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2003-2004 Annual ReportCITY OF LIVONIA ANNUAL REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2003 - 2004 OFFICE OF THE MAYOR JACK ENGEBRETSON ,�� 33000 CIVIC CENTER DRIVE �/ DVONIA, MICHIGAN 481543897 MAYOR (/34)4882281 LAX: V34)421A870 C December 22, 2004 Honorable Members of the City Council City of Livonia, Michigan Dear Council Members: The Annual Report for fiscal year 2003-2004 reflects activities of the Livonia City Departments, Commissions and Boards. The following reflects a sampling of the information contained in various reports and some personal observations. Department of Assessment The Assessing Department received the 2004 Disfinguished Assessment Jurisdiction Award. This award is given to a state, county or local assessment agency that has instituted a technical, procedural or administrative program that is an improvement over prior progmms. It is generally recognized as a component of a model assessment system and a contributing factor to equity in property taxation. A video was developed and produced by City Channel 8, and was used in the presentation of the program. Civil Service Department In June of 2004, the Civil Service Department received the regional award from the International Personnel Management Association (IPMA) for the City Emergency Response Program and the Policy Against Workplace Violence Response Program. District Court The Court upgraded their computer system, replacing a 5 -year old main console with the new I -Series IBM AS400 at notable and substantial cost savings. The State of Michigan mandated Judicial Network Project was successfully completed in three months, and all systems were brought up successfully 30 days prior to the project deadline. Office of Emeraencv Preparedness This office succeeded in attaining funds for reimbursement of the costs of the August 2003 blackout. A $5,000 federal grant for Homeland Security was successfully secured. An emergency and informational AM radio station was established to better inform the public on items of importance as well as emergency information when necessary. Finance Department The Finance Department coordinated an extensive review of all user fees charged by the City and made recommendations to the City Council to adjust the fees to make them more comparable to other communities and appropriate for the cost of the service provided. The majority of the recommendations were adopted, and this action helped to balance the 2004 budget. Livonia Fire and Rescue Our Fire Department was once again successful in winning a FEMA Fire Act Grant award totaling more than $98,000 in FY 2004. This grant award allows the department to purchase three additional Thermal Image Cameras, a new wireless freground accountability system, five (5) RIT emergency air bags and a new SCBA integrated firefighter egress system. Division of Police The Strategic Traffic Accident Reduction (S.T.A.R.) program that began in June, 2003 continues to be successful. In December, 2003 its focus was expanded from specific intersections to include pre -intersection and special enforcement details. Summary From the very beginning of this fiscal year, we knew that our financial challenges would be substantial. Due to dwindling revenues, those challenges have become even greater than expected. In spite of our financial woes, however, the City was still able to achieve many accomplishments and operate within a balanced budget in FY 2003-2004 -- thanks to the cooperation and conlnbufions of the City Council, the Leadership Staff and our great team of City Employees. Together, as we face potentially greater economic challenges, I trust we can weather the stone. With your support, I believe that Livonia's greatest days lie ahead. Sincerely, Jack Engebretson MAYOR CITY OF LIVONIA, MICHIGAN ANNUAL REPORT 34 Fiscal Year 2003-2004 38 TABLE OF CONTENTS 39 Information Systems ................................................... Page No Assessing Department............................................................. 1 Review, Board of ......................................................... 2 CityClerk........................................................................... 3 Civil Service Department......................................................... 8 Trustees, Board of ........................................................ 17 Community Resources Department .............................................. 21 Aging Commission........................................................ 24 Arts Commission.......................................................... 25 Cable Commission........................................................ 27 Historic Preservation...................................................... 28 Historical Commission.................................................... 29 Human Relations Commission ............................................ 31 Youth Commission........................................................ 32 District Court ....................................................................... 34 Emergency Preparedness......................................................... 38 Finance Departmm............................................................... 39 Information Systems ................................................... 42 Fire Department.t................................................................... 44 Housing Commission............................................................... 55 Inspection Department.t............................................................ 59 Building Code Board of Appeals ......................................... 61 LawDepartmem.................................................................... 62 Library Department & Commission ............................................... 66 Parks and Recreation Department & Commission .............................. 70 Planning Department & Commission ............................................. 78 Police Department.................................................................. 85 Public Works Department ......................................................... 93 Engineering Division....................................................... 93 Public Service Division .................................................... 95 Traffic Commission................................................................. 107 Treasurer............................................................................ 109 Zoning Board of Appeals........................................................... 113 The 2004 state equalized valuation of the city real and personal property was $5,642,338,420 which relates to the following statistics: CLASS PARCEL COUNT VALUATION Residential 37,702 3,661,282,030 Commercial 1,375 794,488,830 Industrial 863 615,067,560 Personal 4,791 571,500,000 Total $5,642,338,420 In addition, vahomon under the Industrial Facilities Act 198 provided total valuation of $173,775,230 as follows: LET Real $30,907,030 LET Personal 142,868,200 Total $173,775,230 All property appeared on the assessment roll at 50.00% of true cash value as mandated by State Law. Annual sales studies are conducted in order to determine market growth by neighborhood. The results of these studies are utilized to adjust area values to the required 50% of We cash value. The appraisal and maintenance of all residential field data is the responsibility of this department. Records for 185 new homes were created and revisions to approximately 831 existing property field sheets were made. Commercial and Industrial new buildings, alterations and additions numbered 172 and were reviewed for value for the 2004 assessment roll. The citywide canvass continues this year with the focus on entering the data gathered in the last 3 years. This will further the goals of the city regarding computerization of the assessing office. It also brings the assessing office in closer compliance with the requirements of the State Commission with regard to assessing procedures. Homesteads, Transfers, Rescissions and Uncapping Affidavits are being interpreted and processed on a daily basis. In 2004 this generated approximately 4,250 forms. Lots splits and combinations are processed by this department. This office reviews petitioner's applications and departmental correspondence for compliance to city ordinances and procedures. If a split is non -conforming Council action will be required. Approximately 51 splits and combinations were completed in 2004. Of these, 13 required Council action. Prior years Michigan Tax Tribunal appeals were finalized, 28 full tribunals and 13 small claims for the years 1996 — 2003. Over 4,700 personal property statements were processed for the 2004 assessment roll. A continual inspection of properties in the city is being done to verify the fixed assets in the business as of tax day of each year. Our audit program of the personal property accounts in the city is ongoing. Our staff has visited approximately 75 businesses this year. Additionally, we were approved by the State of Michigan for a personal property audit grant. This resulted in an additional 253 audits being done by Tax Management Associates for this program. These audits generated additional city tax dollars in the amount of $147,550. Total tax revenue generated for all taxing entities was $665,458. Finally, The City of Livonia was recognized by the Michigan Assessors Association for the outstanding video developed and produced by City Channel 8 and the Assessing Department We received the 2004 Distinguished Assessment Jurisdiction Award. This award is given to a state, county or local assessment agency that has instituted a technical, procedural or administrative program which is, for the affected jurisdiction, an improvement over prior programs, and which is generally recognized as a component of model assessment system and a contributing factor to equity in property taxation. Public information programs are included in the eligibility criteria. The December Board of Review meeting was held on Tuesday, December 15, 2003 in accordance with Section 211.53b of the General Property Tax Law of Michigan to correct all mutual mistakes of fact and clerical errors. The Livonia City Council, on January 14, 2004 (CR#08-04), set the place and dales for the 2004 March Board of Review meetings as scheduled by the Assessor and notice was given and published in the local newspapers. The Board of Review meetings convened Tuesday, March 2, 2004 for a five (5) day session of public hearings, which included one evening and one Saturday. Members Mark Thomas, Jolheta Coleman and R- Lee Morrow were in attendance. The Board heard 105 taxpayer appeals and acted on 402 mail -in petitions. Determination notices were mailed on April 6, 2004. The regular session of the 1985 83rd State of Michigan Legislature has amended Section 53b of Public Act 206 to include a July Board of Review meeting to correct clerical errors and mutual mistakes of fact. This meeting was held on Tuesday, July 20, 2004. CITY CLERK This office is administered by the City Clerk, elected for a four-year term at an odd year election conducted by the City of Livonia. The powers and duties of the City Clerk are set forth in the City Charter and statutes of the State of Michigan. The Clerk is assisted by an Assistant City Clerk and a staff of seven who are trained specialists in delivering a variety of services to the citizens of Livonia and the several departments of the City administration, i.e.: (a) `The Clerk shall be clerk of the Council and shall attend all meetings of the Council and keep a permanent record of its meetings ..." This responsibility involves receiving all correspondence and communications filed with the Clerk for transmission to the Council; preparing official agendas for both Council Regular and Study Meetings; taking and transcribing complex minutes of all Council proceedings for the official journal as well as for all Public Hearings conducted by the Council as required by law; notification and publication of Notices and Public Hearings and Coma proceedings in the official newspaper as designated by the City Council; preparation and forwarding of true copies of Council actions to the parties affected; maintaining the official record of all Ordinances enacted by legislative actions. City ccn nril 2003 2004 Study Meetings 24 24 Regular Meetings 24 24 Special Meetings 0 0 Council Resolutions Recorded 650 620 Ordinances Adopted 36 60 Public Hearings Conducted 47 43 (b) `The Clerk shall perform such other duties as are required of that office by State or Federal law, the City Charter, the Council or Ordinances of the City., Required by State Statute to record and file a record of all deaths and births occurring within the City for subsequent transmittal to the State and County Department of Health and make available for certification copies of such records, as can be legally released. 2003 2004 Births Recorded 1425 1233 Deaths Recorded 1412 1185 FEES COLLECTED $61,500.00 $107,290.00 (c) "The City Clerk shall issue and sign all licenses granted and shall register same. LICENSING During the fiscal year this office of the City Clerk accepted and processed, etc., under Title 4 of the Livonia Code of Ordinances the following licenses: TYPE 2003 2004 Gas Stations, Dry Cleaners, Amusement Places, Taxi, Trailer Rental, Solicitors, Vending Machines, Restaurants, Caterers, etc. 1200 1400 FEES COLLECTED $47,700.00 $50,700.00 Garage, Basement, Rummage Sales 2168 2421 FEES COLLECTED $2,168.00 $12,105.00 Pet Licenses 2972 3304 FEES COLLECTED $19,318.00 $26,432.00 Bicycle Licenses 4 6 PEES COLLECTED $4.00 $18.00 (d) "The City Clerk shall receive for filing: zoning petitions, subdivision plats, security bonds, etc. Comprehensive files covering all phases of development of new subdivisions from the Public Hearings of the City 4 Planning Commission in proposed plats, to the filing of all bonds and payment of financial assurances established in the City Council's Master Bond Resolutions to the final signatures of the City Cleric after the final plat approval is given by the Council." NUMBER AND TYPE OF PETITIONS FILED 2003 2004 Zoning 19 15 Vacating 1 1 Miscellaneous (Waivers) 23 34 New Plats Authorized (Preliminary) 0 0 Final Plats 0 0 Extensions 0 0 BONDS Landscaping- Performance Bonds $83,130.00 $116,200.00 (e) Publication and Legal Notices The City Clerk is responsible for the publication of the City Council's proceedings in the official newspaper of the City and the insertion of Public Notices required by law of Public Hearings and all Ordinances duly adopted. In addition, Ordinances are printed, collated and distributed to all departments and interesRd parties. A complete file in excess of 2674 separate Ordinances is maintained, and the Livonia Code of Ordinances is continually updated, as amended, and on file in the City Clerk's office. (f) Duplicating and Mailing Figmes The City Clerk's office produces copies of the following materials for meetings of the City Council. 2003' 2004' Council Regular Agendas 3652 3720 Council Study Agendas 3284 3465 Special Regular Agendas 0 0 Special Regular Minutes 0 0 Council Regular Minutes 1946 1820 Council Study Minutes 552 500 Attorney Notes for Council Regular Meetings 1296 1080 Synopsis of Regular Council Minutes 2064 2090 Council Public Hearing Notices 0 0 Public Hearing Minutes 624 806 'Tables indicate number of sets required per year for distribution for each activity; number of pages varies by event and is not included in total. All City Departments' outgoing mail is handled through mailing equipment in the City Clerk's office and the required postage in 2004 totaled $113,046.00. All incoming mail is handled daily by the Clerk's office and is distributed to the various departments of the City. (g) Election Commission of Livonia (Authority - State Statute) The City Clerk presides as Chairperson of the tlmee-member Election Commission consisting of the Clerk, Mayor and City Attorney, charged with the responsibility of conducting all elections within the City. The compensation of election personnel shall be determined in advance by the Election Commission. In my case where Election procedure is in doubt the Election Commission shall prescribe the procedure w be followed. N WNIkiI WVPal p<V 1I cem 0311: I kv au34111 COC 6 2003 2004 Elections Held in City 1 Primary 1 Primary 1 General 1 General 1 School 1 School 2003 2004 New Registrations 5,101 8,137 Total Registered Voters 69,048 72,567 Change of Name — 434 Change of Address — 1,452 Re-Instalement & Address Combined — -- Cancellations 4,404 4,805 Registrations by Mail 206 730 Number of Absentee Ballots Issued 10,604 20,604 AV. Applications Issued 10,604 20,604 6 Notices of Election Inspectors 700 854 Notice of Cancellation of Registration — -- Sale of Voter Registrations Lists $2,561.57 $2,473.25 (h) Other Duties and Responsibilities of the Cleric The Clerk shall have power to administer all oaths required by State Law, the Charter and Ordinances of the City. The Clerk shall be custodian of the City Seal and shall affix it to all documents and instruments requiring the Seal, and shall attest the same. The Clerk shall be custodian of all papers, documents and records pertaining to the City of Livonia, the custody of which is not otherwise provided for by the Charter. As custodian of records, the office of the City Clerk, in 1985 instituted a program of microfilming the birth and death records of the City. The Clerk shall give the proper officials of the City ample notices of expiration or termination of any official bonds, franchises, contracts or agreements. The Clerk shall examine and audit all accounts and claims against the City. In 2004 the Clerk examined, pre -audited and signed approximately 17,870 vouchers issued by the Department of Finance for transmittal to the City Treasurer. The Clerk shall possess and exercise the powers of a Township Clerk so far as the same are required to be performed within the City. The Clerk shall certify by signature all Ordinances and Resolutions enacted or passed by the City Council. The Clerk, as custodian of the cemeteries under City jurisdiction, is in charge of all burial procedures and in 2004 authorized one (1) opening and closing at Center Cemetery and two (2) openings and closings at Clarenceville Cemetery. The fee collected for the services of the Clerk's office was $75.00. The Civil Service Commission held twelve (12) regular meetings and three (3) special meetings during Fiscal Year 2003-04. LABOR RELATIONS: During the 2003-04 fiscal year, the City of Livonia completed negotiations with the Livonia Lieutenants and Sergeants Association (LLSA) for renewal of their contract for the period December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006. Secondly, negotiations continued with the Livonia Police Officers Association (LPDA) for renewal of their contract for the period December 1, 2003 through November 30, 2006. Also, negotiations commenced with AFSCME Union Local 192 and AFSCME Supervisory Union Local 1917 for renewal of their contracts for the period December 1, 2004 through November 30, 2007 respectively. In addition, ongoing Labor -Management Committee meetings have been scheduled to informally resolve employee grievances or concerns filed by members of the AFSCME Union Local 192, the Livonia Police Officers Association, the Livonia Police Lieutenants and Sergeants Association and the Livonia Fire Fighters Union. These Committees consist of representatives of the Union and the City. In the event the employee grievance cannot be resolved through informal measures, the formal procedure permits appeal to the Civil Service Commission and, if not resolved, through mediation and/or formal arbitration. I U a -14,10) 1111 a a RELVAI ANOF9184k IIIN@a0 The Personnel Review Committee, comprised of the Human Resources Director and the Director of Finance, met sixteen (16) times during the current fiscal year and reviewed and made forty-nine (49) recommendations to the Mayor on all new hires, replacement personnel and promotions. Currently, a freeze on new permanent hires is in place based upon reduced state revenue sharing, lower interest earnings and related economic concerns. Beginning December 1, 1994, newly hired general employees subscribing to hospitalization/medical insurance were required to co -pay a portion of their premium costs at 530.00 for single coverage, $35.00 for two person coverage and $40.00 for family coverage per month. During the month of February, 2004, a new Blue Cross/Blue Shield (BC/BS) plan was introduced for general employees hired after December 1, 1996. All other employees were afforded the opportunity to transfer into the new Blue Choice Point of Service (POS) plan. This plan is a self-funded hybrid of the BC/BS Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) and the Blue Cue Network (BCN) Health Maintenance Organization (HMO). Subscriber's benefit from the fully paid managed care service, like BCN, with a larger group of medical service providers, like the BC/BS PPO plan. The annual Health and Wellness Fair was held on three (3) separate afRmoons during February, 2004 at various City locations, including the Police Headquarters Training Room, the Department of Public Works Administrative Conference Room and the City Hall Fifth Floor Gallery. Employees and retirees, along with their immediate family members, were encouraged to attend and participate in various health screening activities, including blood pressure, cholesterol and body fat content measurements, as well as receive handouts concerning wellness information. Representatives of the City's occupational health services providers, including St. Joseph Mercy Business Health and Providence -Corporate Health, conducted the medical screening. In addition, representatives from each hospitalization/medical insurance plan sponsored by the City, including Blue Cross/Blue Shield (BCBS), Blue Care Network (BCH and Health Alliance Plan (HAP) were present to permit employees to review and compare the various plan descriptions and obtain assistance with health care questions or problems. Also, staff from the Department of Parks and Recreation were present to provide information concerning their fitness programs in collaboration with the Civil Service wellness program initiatives for employees. Approximately 120 individuals attended these activities in preparation for the annual hospitalization/medical insurance March open enrollment period when employees and retirees are permitted to change plans. At the end of the fiscal year, the employee and retiree hospitalization/medical insurance enrollments were as follows: HEALTH ALLIANCE PLAN: 148 Employee subscribers (HAP) 52 Retiree subscribers 16 Retiree subscribers on Medicare 1 COBRA BLUE CARE NETWORK: 132 Employee subscribers (BCN) 31 Retiree subscribers 12 Retiree subscribers on Medicare 4 COBRA BLUE CROSS/BLUE SHIELD 203 Employee subscribes BC/BS Preferred Plan 300 Retiree subscribers 124 Retirees on Medicare 2 COBRA BLUE CROSS/BLUE SHIELD 94 Employee subscribes Point of Service 2 Retiree subscribers - Retirees on Medicare 1 COBRA A total of 55 full-time employees "opted out" of insurance coverage during the February 2004 open enroHment period and received $1,000.00 in lien of hospitalization/medical insurance coverage. LIFE INSURANCE AND ACCIDENTAL DEATH AND DISMEMBERMENT PLAN: The City of Livonia currently contracts for group life insurance with Reliastar Life Insurance Company at the rate of $.205 per $1,000 per month volume. Accidental Death and Dismemberment (AD&D) group insurance coverage is also provided by Reliastar Life Insurance Company at a rate of $.02 per $1,000 volume per month. Currently, a total of 656 employees have life insurance coverage in the aggregate amount of $32,446,000. In addition, 31 retirees have a $3,000 death benefit coverage humfing $93,000; 134 retirees have a $3,500 death benefit coverage totaling $469,000 and 92 retirees have a $5,000 death benefit totaling $460,000 for a total retiree group of 257 having aggregate life insurance in the amount of $1,022,000. During the fiscal year, a total of $83,660.31 life insurance premium and a total of $8,104.73 AD&D premium were paid to Rehastar. During the fiscal year, a total of $14,000.00 in basic life benefits was paid for two (2) retiree and one (1) employee death claims. WEEKLY DISABHdrY INCOME PLAN: The City of Livonia is self-insured for the weekly disability income coverage. Effective December 1, 2003 through November 30, 2006, the disability claims are administered by the Accident Fond Insurance Company of America for a monthly charge of $1.00 per eligible employee. This benefit provides $200/wk to totally disabled general full-time employees and $100.00 to totally disabled part-time employees for up to 45 weeks; $125/wk for totally disabled Police Dispatcher civilian full-time employees for 45 weeks; and $42/wk for the first 12 weeks and $100/wk for the 40 week balance of 52 weeks for totally disabled police and fire employees. During the Fiscal Year 2003-04, there were a total of twenty-six (26) weekly disability income claims for employees. A total dollar volume of $13,138.27 was paid by this self- insured program 10 OPTICAL PLAN: The City continued to offer a self-administered group optical benefit program with three (3) providers: Suburban Eye Care (a private Livonia optometric practice), and retail providers, Coop Optical and Detroit Optometric Centers (DOC) who have multiple area locations. Employee usage and costs incurred during the fiscal year at these centers or through the reimbursement option were as follows: Direct Reimbursement 38 $ 3,566.80 Detroit Optometric Center 116 8,770.00 Co -Op Optical 28 2,233.90 Suburban Eye Care (From August) 161 13,150.00 Total 343 $27,720.70 DENTAL PROGRAM: All employees have negotiated a reimbursement or direct payment program to the Dentist as the expenses are incurred. Billings for services rendered during the fiscal year mus[ be submitted within 30 days of the November 30th fiscal year end for consideration. A summary of the employee reimbursements and hardship advances during the fiscal year to date are summarized as follows: Reimbursement/Drect Payment 1296 $306,765.50 Employees are eligible for 50% of the fees for orthodontic services for a lifetime maximum of $1000 per family limited to the employee, their spouse and dependents until the end of the year they reach age 19. The summary of the orthodontic service claims received this fiscal year is as follows: Number of Claims Total Amount Paid Police/Fire 12 $ 8,773.03 General 2 1,500.00 Total 14 $ 10,273.03 11 The City of Livonia contracts their self-insured worker's disability compensation program with the third party administrator, The Accident Fund Insurance Company of America. The contract for these services is effective December 1, 2003 through November 30, 2006. The net total incurred loss on open claims from December 1, 2003, through November 19, 2004, is $100,427.25, which includes payment for weekly wage loss indemnity benefits, medical services, related legal, vocational rehabilitation and other miscellaneous expenses for approximately 106 employee claims. Employees may choose to receive treatment for work-related injuries or illnesses at one of four (4) Livonia occupational medicine treatment facilities including Concentra Occupational Health Centers (2), Providence Corporate Health Services and St Joseph Mercy Business Health Services. The City of Livonia participates in the Michigan Municipal League Unemployment Compensation Group Account The firm of TALX UC Express is the service agent of this group account. The Civil Service Department responded to approximately twenty- two (22) former employee claims for unemployment benefits filed with the Michigan Employment Security Administration (MESA). To date, a total of $40,364.43 benefit charges have been received for this fiscal year. CITY PHYSICIAN AND MEDICAL CLMCS: Pre-employment, return -to -work and occupational injury/illness medical examinations and treatment continued to be provided by the authorized City Physician, Providence Hospital Corporate Health. In addition, Concentra, Providence and St Joseph Mercy provided occupational medical services, along with the St Mary Hospital Emergency Room under the City Worker's Compensation Program. To date our records indicate that 6 permanent employee pre-employment (full-time and part-time) examinations, 76 pre- employment physicals for temporary employees, 89 physicals for return to work, and 1 public safety pre-employment psychological evaluation by Dr. Harley Stock, the City's Consulting Psychologist, have been conducted. In addition, there were medical consultations with regard to employee health and occupational safety matters as it related to infectious diseases and worker's compensation claims, including continuation of pre- employment auditory, TB and pulmonary function examinations for fire fighter and police officer new hires in compliance with MIOSHA requirements. Commercial Driver's License (CDL) alcohol and drug testing for designated employees assigned to drive specific types of Department of Public Works vehicles are being coordinated in compliance with federal regulations. Lastly, employee psychological "fitness for duty' evaluations are being coordinated with Dr. Stock. 12 SAFETY: The City Emergency Response Team (CERT) continued to lead our employee response to extraordinary events that occurred in our workplace. On May 21, 2004, CERT assisted employees in vacating the premises during a City Hall and surrounding area power outage. In both instances prior training gave our CERT the ability to assist employees to remain calm and orderly during the evacuation and take shelter situations. On June 17, 2004, CERT members met to review our response to the earlier mentioned threatening situations and to receive training on how to use an Automatic External Defibrillator (AED). In June 2004, the Civil Service Department received the regional award from the International Personnel Management Association (SPMA) for the City Emergency Response Program and the Policy Against Workplace Violence response program. A representative of the Accident Fund Loss Prevention division, the third party administrator of the City's self-insured Worker's Compensation Program conducted five (5) loss prevention facility tours and twelve (12) ergonomic assessments with Civil Service and Public Works staff during the fiscal year. The facilities reviewed were Greenmead Farm and Historical Village; the Police Administration Building and Recreation Center; and the Department of Public Works Administration Building, yard and adjoining buildings. In June, annual OSHA updated safety training concerning bloodbome pathogens and infectious disease was provided by medical representatives from Providence Corporate Health Service to Custodians, Life Guards and Pool Managers. Hepatitis B inoculations were provided on-site at the conclusion of the mining program for newly hired employees covered by this program. Employee accident reports were kept by all City Departments and reviewed by the Accident Review Commitee consisting of nine (9) representatives from Fire, Police, Public Works, Engineering, Library, Parks & Recreation, AFSCME Union Local 192, and Civil Service. The Accident Review Committee met two (2) times during the year and reviewed 125 accident reports. Accident statistics are compiled into an annual MIOSHA City-wide report. The Employee Service Recognition Program was revised in June 2003 to offer the option of `9ifestyle" gifts as an alternative, in addition to traditional pinkharm jewelry. The Civil Service Department staff selected and evaluated four vendors who offered service recognition jewelry, as well as a variety of "lifestyle" gifts. The evaluation was based upon pricing, selection and value. The vendor selected was the Michael C. Fina Company. Under the new program, employees at the initial or first five year level of service recognition receive the traditional City of Livonia pin or charm. Employees with 13 ten or more years of service may select a gift from the Michael C. Fina Gift Catalog or the traditional service pin or charm- One harm One hundred fifty-one (15 1) employees received service recognition awards in FY 2003- 04. APPLICANT RECRUITMENT: The Civil Service Department has continued an affirmative recruitment program through newspaper advertisements in the ObservedEccentric, the Michigan Chronicle, the Detroit News/Detroit Free Press, and notices to various colleges, training schools, MESA, handicapper rehabilitation services, and minority community based organizations. The total number of advertisements published during Fiscal Year 2003-04 were: the Detroit News — 8; Livonia Observer — 8; Michigan Chronicle — 7; and several professional association publications and Internet recruitment services including: the State of Michigan Labeling Mailers for licensed Firefighter Paramedics - 1; Society for Human Resources Management- 1; Monstertrak.com; and the Michigan Municipal League. In accordance with the Affirmative Action policy adopted by the Civil Service Commission, the Civil Service staff continued its efforts to make examinations and position descriptions as job-related as possible. Proposed qualifications for each new examination were reviewed by the respective Department subject matter experts, staff and the Civil Service Commission in order to establish prerequisites which were appropriate to the positions being filled. In addition, the Civil Service staff completed several state and federal equal employment opportunity reports and prepared a monthly summary report to the Civil Service Commission concerning the race and gender characteristics of all applicants for open -competitive examinations, the resulting eligible lists, and all permanent employee hires and terminations. 14 Service Awards Level of Service Presented Five Years 44 Ten Years 29 Fifteen Years 39 Twenty Years 9 Twenty -Five Years 18 Thirty Years 8 Thirty -Five Years 2 Forty Years 2 Total 151 APPLICANT RECRUITMENT: The Civil Service Department has continued an affirmative recruitment program through newspaper advertisements in the ObservedEccentric, the Michigan Chronicle, the Detroit News/Detroit Free Press, and notices to various colleges, training schools, MESA, handicapper rehabilitation services, and minority community based organizations. The total number of advertisements published during Fiscal Year 2003-04 were: the Detroit News — 8; Livonia Observer — 8; Michigan Chronicle — 7; and several professional association publications and Internet recruitment services including: the State of Michigan Labeling Mailers for licensed Firefighter Paramedics - 1; Society for Human Resources Management- 1; Monstertrak.com; and the Michigan Municipal League. In accordance with the Affirmative Action policy adopted by the Civil Service Commission, the Civil Service staff continued its efforts to make examinations and position descriptions as job-related as possible. Proposed qualifications for each new examination were reviewed by the respective Department subject matter experts, staff and the Civil Service Commission in order to establish prerequisites which were appropriate to the positions being filled. In addition, the Civil Service staff completed several state and federal equal employment opportunity reports and prepared a monthly summary report to the Civil Service Commission concerning the race and gender characteristics of all applicants for open -competitive examinations, the resulting eligible lists, and all permanent employee hires and terminations. 14 The Civil Service staff continued to prepare and administer open -competitive and promotional examinations as requested by City Department Heads. During Fiscal Year 2003-04, a total of 6 open -competitive and 20 promotional examinations were amoanced. The Civil Service Department received 298 applications for open - competitive examinations and 83 for promotional examinations during the fiscal year. In addition the Department received 209 applications for temporary employment opportmities in various Parks and Recreation positions; 233 applications for Seasonal Laborer; 42 applications for Seasonal Clerk; 95 apphcatiovs for Student Page; 117 applications for Library Page; 7 applications for Substitute Librarian; 49 applications for VIP Substitute Clerical: 6 applications for School Crossing Guard; 38 applications for Police Reserve Officer: 26 applications for Police Vehicle Maintenance Coordinator; and 19 applications for Planning Technician. TRAP7A7G During FY 2003-04, the Civil Service Department sponsored several employee -training activities. These are summarized as follows: Between December 2003 and November 2004, Civil Service Staff coordinated multiple educational presentations sponsored by financial representatives from the Deferred Compensation 457 Plan providers including Nationwide Retirement Solutions, ICMA Retirement Corporation and Community Choice Credit Union. Over 95 employees scheduled individual appointments with the Deferred Compensation 457 Plan on-site representatives. The Civil Service Department staff has also administered the general employee union tuition reimbursement programs. A total of thirty-two (32) members of AFSCME Union Local 192 expended $2,945.17 out of the maximum allocation of $10,000.00 during the fiscal year. No members have requested the 5475.00 maximum allowed for the three year contract period for AFSCME Supervisory Technical Chapter of Union Local 1917. On June 29, July 28 and August 25, 2004, Vanessa Coakley of Great West Retirement Services provided one -mi -one computer training sessions to City employees on how to access their retirement accounts. In June 2004 the Civil Service Department was pleased to offer a panel discussion titled "Mutual Fund Scandals: Myth vs. Reality'. Representatives from the following companies participated on the panel: Vanessa Coakley and John Bambara of Great West Retirement Services; Guy Thomas of Hartford Institutional Solutions Group; Wendi Landreth of Prefrrred Financial Services; Bill Jordan of ICMA Retirement Corporation; and Cart Morrow and Emanuel Mahaud of Nationwide Retirement Solutions. In October 2004, the Civil Service Department offered training on Public Sector Law for Managers and Supervisors, in cooperation with the Council on Education in 15 Management The training was presented by Drive M. Soubly, Esq, of the law firm of Vercmysse Murray and Calzone, P.C., and was held at the Alexander Blue House in Greemaead Historical Village. Forty-two (42) department heads, managers and supervisors attended. A subcommittee comprised of a police/fire union representative, a general employee union representative, the Youth Assistance Program Supervisor, two (2) behavioral health service EAP providers and the Human Resources Director continue to oversee the Emergency Behavioral Health Service Referral Network. A provider group follow-up session was held during the year to review program implementation results. Since the FY 1998-99 to date, a total of 137 employees, 7 employee family members and 94 residents received crisis intervention individual counseling sessions at the limit of 5 sessions totaling $400 per individual. In addition, EAP providers have been called upon to assist Deparhnent and Divisions with group conflict resolution exercises. The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program has mirrored Weir behavioral health counseling program and uses many of the same referral network of providers. A total of $6,880.00 in CDBG funds has been expended during FY 2003-04 provided to 19 low-income residents. The combined total expended of EAP and CDBG behavioral health service provided from inception to date is approximately $92,269.00. Confidential client satisfaction surveys report very positive feedback on the program's effectiveness. 1. The Civil Service staff coordinated ore (1) Employee Blood Drive in 2004 and assisted in the coordination of two (2) additional drives at the Community Recreation Center. A total of ninety-two (92) pints of blood were donated by City employees during the drives, conducted in March, May and in September. 2. The Civil Service staff coordinated the 2004 United Way Campaign in all City Deparhnents and Divisions. A preliminary total of $5,877.00 has been donated by City employees to this year's Drive with continuing contributions in progress. This represents sixty-one (61) contributions from employees contributing to the United Way to date. 3. The Civil Service staff continues to utilize an online computer hookup with the Blue Cross/Blue Shield (BC/BS) and Blue Care Network (BCI) mainframe for their Membership Collection System (MCS). The Health Alliance Plan (HAP) website also provides online member services. All employee hospitalization and medical insurance reporting and enrollment changes are processed directly by the Civil Service Department utilizing these systems. This results in an improved 24-hour turn around time on contract changes. 16 Computer reporting projects continued during FY 2003-04 include: maintenance of the automated Life Insurance Employee Enrollment Report to enable the clerical staff member to make monthly additions and deletions and achieve instantaneous Life Insurance totals and costs; maintenance of an employee Pension estimate program in an EXCEL spreadsheet format continuing preparation of department organizational charts with annual updates using ORGCHART Software; and implementation of each employee classification and wage/salary history on the ACCESS database to facilitate processing annual payroll Master Transfers. In coordination with the Information Systems Manager, the Civil Service Department has developed an applicant/examination database in ACCESS to improve the maintenance of applicant data for open -competitive and promotional examinations. This database enables staff to track the information necessary for EEOC record keeping and reporting. The staff maintains a website, which provides an overview of department responsibilities and activities, along with continuously updated job announcements and application guidelines. Civil Service Department staff has maintained a database for benefit tracking in ACCESS to facilitate self -administration of the employee dental reimbursement program. Recently, a database has been implemented to track employee spouse and dependent utilization of the City's self-administered optical Plan. 5. A Critical Incident Response Team comprised of members from Police, Fire, Law, Public Service, the Mayor's Office, the Council Office, the Director of Emergency Preparedness and Civil Service conduced several meetings during the pas[ year on the topic of Violence in the Workplace. The team continues to evaluate potential violence problems and recommends assessment or intervention plans. The members of the CIRT Team attended 5 emergency response exercises conduced by Dr. Kenneth Wolf and his associate Marilyn Knight with Livonia Public School Administrators. 6. In cooperation with the Police Department, the Civil Service Department retained the services of Dr. Kenneth Wolf to implement a Critical Incident Stress Debriefing Program. Dr. Wolf sanded in the development of the departmental policy and conduced executive, supervisory and police officer training on the critical incident debriefing protocol. BOARD OF TRUSTEES Following is a report on the activities and accomplishments of the Board of Trustees of the Livonia Employees Retirement System for the period December 1, 2003 through November 30, 2004: 17 1. DEFINED BENEFIT PLAN a) The Board of Trcstees held twelve (12) Regular Meetings and one (1) Special Meetings during this period. b) As of October 31, 2004, the retirement system (Defined Benefit Plan) had five hundred twenty (520) retirees or surviving spouses plus seven (7) Eligible Domestic Relations Orders (EDRO's) (Divorced Prior to Refrement) and four (4) Alternate Payees (Divorced after Refrement) for a total of five hundred thirty one (531) receiving pension checks. Sixteen (16) City retirees died during fiscal year 2003-2004. The total pension payroll fiscal year to date is $9,643,400 through October 2004. c) The team of David Sowerby and Kemeth Johnson, Loomis -Sayles and Company, advises the Board on investments for the Defined Benefit Plan and uses discretionary power regarding investments subject to confirmation by the Board. The Board approved investment transactions by Loomis - Sayles and Company at regular meetings. The Defined Benefit Fred had a value of $178,108,947 as of October 31, 2004. d) In June 2004, the Board reviewed the fifty-first (51') annual actuarial valuation as of November 30, 2003, for the Livonia Employees Retirement System, prepared by the Board's new Actuary, Rodwan Consulting Company. The Plan covered 524 retirees, 32 deferred and 304 employees for a total of 860. The Actuary reported that the accrued actuarial condition of the Retirement System is very good. e) The funded ratio of actuarial value of assets to actuarial accrued liability for the Retirement System Defined Benefit Plan is 127.3%. f) Merrill -Lynch continues to provide quarterly performance appraisal of the Defined Benefit Plan. g) The 2003-04 annual soft dollar expense for the Merrill Lynch Performance Measurement Report was $66,000. h) Effective July 5, 2000, the Board entered into a Securities Lending Agreement with Comerica Bank Total earnings from December 1, 2003 through October 31, 2004 were $21,661.04. i) In June 2001, the Board approved a $5 million investment with MuniMae Midland LLC, in the Midland Multifamily Equity Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT) offering, In April 2002, the Board approved an additional $5 million investment for a total of $10 million invested in the Midland 18 Multifamily Equity REIT. Total interest earnings from December 1, 2003 through October 31, 2004 were $972,760.50 j) In March 2002, the Board approved a $5 million investment with Cohen & Steers Capital Management Inc., in a Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT), separately managed account The account market value reported as of October 31, 2004 was $8,229,630. k) Currently there is one participant in the Defined Benefit Plan military buy - in program. One (1) employee completed military buy -in payments during this fiscal year. 1) Approximately one hundred (100) requests for retirement estimates under the Defined Benefit Plan were processed by the Civil Service Department Staff using a computerized format that has been internally developed by staff to expedite the calculation of estimated pension benefits. m) The City made timely employer contributions on a monthly basis throughout the year. n) The Board of Trustaes continues to distribute monthly pension checks directly to members of the Defined Benefit Plan with these checks being processed by the staff of the Civil Service Department. o) Members of the Board attended the Michigan Association of Public Employees Retirement System (MAPERS) Conferences A Soaring Eagle Hotel and Casino, Mt Pleasant Michigan, from May 23 to May 25, 2004 and A the Amway Grand Plaza Hotel, Grand Rapids, Michigan, from October 9 to October 12, 2004. 2. DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLAN a) The Board of Tmswes held twelve (12) Regular Meetings during this period. b) The Defined Contribution Plan Adamustmtor continues to be Great West Life and Annuity Insurance Company. c) The Defined Contribution Fund had a total account ending balance of $35,749,919 43 as of September 30, 2004, for three hundred seventy-two (372) Active Participants and sixty-one (61) Active/Terminated Participants and tan (10) Inactive Participants. d) As of November 30, 2004, a total of forty-eight (48) employees have retired under the Defined Contribution Retirement Plan. 19 e) The Board continues to schedule separate monthly meeting agendas for all Defined Contribution Plan related business. 3. LIVONIA RETIREE HEALTH AND DISABILITY BENEFITS PLAN (VERA) a) The Board conducted twelve (12) separate Regular Meetings for the City of Livonia Retire Health and Disability Benefits Plan (VERA). b) Mr. Sowerby and Mr. Johnson advised the Board on investments for the City of Livonia Retiree Health and Disability Benefits Plan VERA (Voluntary Employees Beneficiary Association). The VERA had a value of $29,322,678 as of October 31, 2004. Note: The Voluntary Employees Beneficiary Association (VERA) was established at the recommendation of the former Actuary to the Board of Trustees, Gabriel, Roeder, Smith and Co., for purposes of placing in a tax free trust hospitalization -medical insurance benefit funds for members of the Defined Benefit (DB) and the Defined Contribution (DC) Plans, as well as to permit separate funding for DC Plan member disability refrements. c) In June 2004, the Board reviewed the sixth (6th) annual actuarial valuation as of November 30, 2003, for the City of Livonia Retiree Health and Disability Benefits Plan, as prepared by the Board's new Actuary, Rodwan Consulting Company. In summary, the Actuary reported that the amortization periods adopted by the Board of Trustees for the funding purposes of this Plan are 30 years for disability benefits and 50 years for health insurance benefits. The 50 year amortization period produces a contribution that is less than the Annual Required Contribution (ARC), and hence would result in a contribution deficiency in the Plan's financial report. Consideration will be given to decreasing the amortization period for funding purposes for post-retirement health insurance benefits to 30 years, which will result in an increase in the compuRd contribution requirement d) The Board continues to schedule separate monthly meeting agendas for all VERA related business. 20 PUBLICATIONS • City Newsletter — four (4) issues published and mailed to over 43,000 residences and businesses. • Brochures, newsletter and flyers were prepared for specific programs. Information & Complaint Center — 8 volunteers handled 1,263 calls including TTY/TDD assistance. Two (2) formal complaints were processed City Hall Tours — 5 toms were conducted for 52 visitors from local public & private schools, senior housing residences and Boy & Girl Scout Troops Rouge Rescue / River Day — Activities at Bluegrass, Greenwood & Rotary Parks were coordinated with over 83 volunteers representing the following groups: Livonia Rotary Club, Stevenson High School, Churchill High School, Grid Scouts from Ladywood High School, Friends of the Rouge & staff from Senator Laum Toys' office. Together they filled 6 garbage bags of debris, planted 300 dogwood twigs, removed invasive species from an estimated % to 1 mile and filled 1 cubic foot with a variety of wood planks. In addition, 5 groups of 26 volunteers worked a combined 25 hours and stenciled 95 storm drains. Thank You's go out to the Golden Lantern, Stan's Market, IGispy Kreme, Bmeggers & McDonalds for their generous donations. RESIDENT ASSISTANCE • Emergency certificates — assisted 27 families with $1,310 in Farmer Sack certificates donated by the Yiwanis Early Risers Club and Children & Youth Commission • Utility Assistance (CDBG) — assisted 14 low-income households with utility shut -offs totaling $4,218.65 • Hohday/Goodfellows Assistance — linked 87 low-income families with 23 sponsors for food and gift donations • Commodity Food (PEFAP) — distributed 2,621 food bags, with the aid of 23 volunteers, to 219 low-income households • Focus HOPE — distributad 954 food boxes, with the aid of 12 volunteers, to 79 low-income senior households 21 Clerical, technical, and budgetary assistance was also provided to the Aging, Arts, Historical, Historic preservation, Human Relations, and Youth Commissions. Community Resources has administrative responsibilities for subsidized transportation for Livonia senior citizens and handicapped residents. The contract for SMART, as well as applicable pants are administered and monitored by Community Resources staff. The Livonia Community Transit system has a fleet of seven (7) vehicles (vans and small buses). The vehicles are driven by 21 CDL licensed part-time bus drivers. Five (5) part- time employees coordinate the drivers and their schedules. The system provided over 27,100 one-way rides within the City of Livonia. These rides totaled over 14,000 work hours and covered over 200,000 miles. CIVIC PARK SENIOR CENTER participation in activities during 2004 totaled approximately 100,420 seniors. 17,200 congregate meals were served. Activities included: health screening educational classes, support groups, fitness classes, cards and games, and art & crafts, senior sports etc. Volunteers logged 18,800 hours. SUPPORT SERVICES, GOTS, GRANTS, AND TRANSPORTATION Senior Center Staffing Grant, Livonia Community Foundation Grant, and Michigan Office of Services to the Aging Grant and C.D.B.G. funds totaled $20555. $11,247 in donations was received. SCAN donated $25,000 to help with the purchase of 2 buses for the senior transportation program Federal and State grants and donations provided: 1075 hours of personal care service to 11 seniors 1150 hours of homemaker services to 24 seniors • 515 hours of respite services to 6 seniors Home maintenance service to 48 homes • 17,775 one-way rides through the senior transportation program 39,050 meals were delivered by volunteers to home bound seniors • 2,860 seniors received referral service 22 REFERRAL SOURCES: 2004 Referrals: 71 New Cases -(37 males and 34 females) Carry Over Cases from 2003: 80 - (50 males and 30 females) Total Cases served in 2004: 151 2004 Cases represent the following referral agencies: Livonia Police Department 27 Third Circuit Court- Juvenile Division 32 Surrounding Police Departments 7 Schools 1 Voluntary 4 • 29 parents completed our Alternative Parenting Skills group. • Program youth performed 612 hours of Community Work Service. • 45 youth completed `Project Impact' (social living skills) group (12 hours each). • 23 males participated in the JAG (Juvenile Awareness Program) at Milan Federal Prison. • 11 males and 13 females toured the Wayne County Jail. 953 youth used the services of the Youth Employment Resource Center that listed over 410 companies with over 1,377 job openings. • Youth Assistance staff participated on the EAP Committee and attended various Educational Seminars. • Wayne County grant Child Care Fund - $ 5,000 1110P Mill Fund -$15,000 • Target grant: - $ 3,900 CABLE TELEVISION Community Resources has administrative responsibility for the Cable Television franchise and municipal programming. The report pertaining to these activities can be found under the Cable Television Commission. Community Resources has administrative responsibility for the Historical and Historic Preservation Commissions. The reports pertaining to these activities can be found under the Historical Commission and Historic Preservation Commission. 23 In addition, the Community Resources staff at Greenmead: • conducted day to day operation of Greeram ad • maintained Historical Commission records including minutes, volunteer hours, caretaker reports, contracts, grant reports and budgets • coordinated weekday tours, Sunday tours, Gift Shop operations, Newburg School usage, Newburg Church, Alexander Blue House, Meeting House rentals, and property usage including meetings, luncheons, and family reunions held at Greenmead • implemented Historical Commission resolutions • assisRd with the development, planning and implementation of 21 special events, fundraisers and community projects sponsored by the Historical Commission, Friends of Greeram ad, Livonia Historical Society, Arts Commission, Parks and Recreation, St. Andrew's Society of Detroit, Festival of Cultures Program, A.M.C. Car Club, and Garden Club • assisted with the over site of construction contract and painting of the Alexander Blue House • worked with D.P.S. to define and prioritize maintenance work. • coordinated Greenmead's volunteer program, published issues of the Volunteer Voice Newsletter and scheduled volunteers for tours and special events • provided work site and supervision for community service probationers • hos ed several professional and volunteer gatherings such as a Volunteer Reception, Friends of Greenmead and Quester Luncheons, Historical Society, and Police Reserves Picnic • provided a project site for Master Gardener Program • provided a site and support for two Eagle Scout Projects and Girl Scout Day Camps. • coordinated the Country Market project at Greemnead. The "Heritage," a newsletter for seniors, continued to be published under the auspices of the Commission on Aging. Three issues were distributed to 13,500 seniors over the age of 60 in 2004. In May, the Commission sponsored a Mature Driving Workshop for Livonia seniors. Commission funds were used for this project. 24 In June, the Commission co-sponsored the annual Senior Citizens Picnic held at Eddie Edgar Ice Arena. The Commission paid for entertainment and a portion of the food. The Commission was in charge of bingo and a 50150 raffle. In September the Commission gave out promotional pens for the Senior Center at Senior Celebration Day. In November, the Commission decided unanimously to use the balance of their promotion, printing and postage accounts to help pay the additional assessment to The Senior Alliance. At its November 2004 meeting pursuant to its by-laws, the Commission held its annual election. The following officers were unanimously elec ed to one-year terms commencing December 1, 2004: Chairperson: Clara Karr 1'� Vice Chairperson: Berard Szeliga 2nd Vice Chairperson: Joan O'Brien Treasurer: Joseph Echols Secretary: RobertCams The Livonia Arts Commission meetings were held on the 4th Tuesday of every month in the Mayor's Conference Room of City Hall, with the exception of the July meeting, which was held at an offsite location. The 2004 officers were: Chairperson: Bob Perish, Vice Chairperson: Andrea Taylor, Secretary: Donna Eno, Treasurer: Virginia Bosak. These positions will remain in place for the 2005 calendar year. During the year resignation letters were received from Federico Acer and Cometta Boje. We are deeply saddened, as longtime Art Commissioner and friend, Clayton Evenden passed away this summer. Other members include Conrad Gniewek, Lois Mize, Carrie Spurting, Dan Spurting Carol Swales, Stan Weber, and our newest member, Frank Petersmark. At this time, the Commission has four open positions. Budgeted Free -Admission Activities were: Noontime Concerts held at the Civic Center Library at a cost of $2,000. 25 Music Under the Stars held at the Community Recreation Center, Greenmead, Civic Center Park, and the Wilson Barn at $9,180. Commission Sponsored Community Activities were: a $500 grant to Jack-in-the-Box Theater group, a 5600 grant to VAAL; one of Livonia's art clubs, a 5600 contribution to Greenmead's Fall Festival, and a $500 grant to the Livonia Civic Ballet. Scholarships are scheduled to be awarded this year in the amount of $6,000 to students. Commission Donations: To the Livonia Symphony, $5,000. To the Historical Commission, $1,590. To Greenmead's Garden and Christmas Walks, $loo. Donation to the Commission from the Theater Guild of Livonia -Redford, $11,860. The Commission held its 7th Annual Fine Arts Exhibition in September. The artwork was on display in the 2nd floor Art Gallery of the Civic Center Library. Out of 250 submissions (an increase of over 70%) 76 entries were chosen. Prize money totaled $2,750. Income from the show, including sponsorship contributions, totaled $4,150. Expenses totaled $4,411. With a minimal loss of $261, it has improved over las[ year. The Commission will be striving to increase sponsor involvement next year, in order to make this prestigious event a moneymaker. Artwork from regional artists was displayed monthly in the Civic Center Galley, The City Hall Atrium, and small art collections were displayed in the Library cases. Art clubs in Livonia also exhibited in the City Hall Atrium. Commission -Sponsored Receptions: the Fine Arts Exhibit in September; individual artist receptions were held monthly in the Civic Center Library Gallery. The 281h Annual Arts in the Village Festival 2004 was extremely successful, considering the bad weather. Profits generated were $20,169.00, a 25% increase from last year. The dollars generated from the Festival allow for the continued art and cultural experiences Livonia that the Commission works for each year. The Commission has formulated its mission statement: "To preserve, promote, sponsor and develop the Arts in Livonia To continue community access to art experiences, opportunities and improving community awareness." The Commission has developed a new Arts Commission logo and is developing a new brochure about the Commission to be printed in 2005. Also implemented this year was the marketing of bottled water with the Arts Commission logo to sell at Commission sponsored events. The Commission is presently developing its own web page, which will be an extension of the City's site. It will include more timely information and will have a more direct roue of contacting commissioners concerning different events, plus forms and information, which can be downloaded. 26 Wayne County Commissioner Lyn Bankes began working with our Commission to develop and fteflitate an art/sculpture competition, which will result in a public an installation to celebrate the "Underground Railroad" history at Newburgh lake. Produced 211 programs (3,027 production hours) for City Channel 8, including the live coverage of City public meetings: Council Study and Regular and Planning Commission. Utilized 228.5 hours of volunteer assistance from certified residents in the production of City Channel 8 programs. Logged 122 complaints/inquiries re: rates, reception, programming choices and the desire for competition for cable television and Internet access using cable modems. Cable staff received training from manufacturer to produce the content and maintain the new Livonia Alert and Information Radio Station, WPZY — 431, 1670 AM. Cable staff trained and assisted other City personnel responsible for non -office hours Alert and Emergency radio messages. Logged 77.25 hours of training and programming devoted to WPZY. Replaced a significant portion of the television production equipment used on the 5"' floor of City Hall. Camera technology of the 1980's was removed, allowing for the installation of up-to-date digital camera equipment, providing much -improved image quality and a necessary, future -friendly digital signal system. An upgraded lighting system was also added to the Gallery, providing flexible, energy-efficient illumination for productions Awards: 2004 Hometown Video Festival for At Your Service: Leaf Pick-up Program and the 2004 Distinguished Assessment Jurisdiction Award to City of Livonia Assessor's and Channel 8 staffs for At Your Service: Assessor's Office. 27 RESOURCES: JOSHUA MORRELL SIMMONS HOUSE (FRUIT HILL FARM) Worked with new owner, Dr. Keith Pierce, on an addition to the historic structure. • hdtially provided guidelines for appropriate addition to an historic building, including style, building materials, windows, colors etc. • Approved the final plans for the office addition and provided guidelines for the siding, windows, roof and paint colors. • Recommended that the roofline on the addition be lowered to match the roofline on the historic structure, if the change was structurally possible. This change was later made and approved. • Provided information and sample drawings to the architect and developer on verge boarding, cresting and appropriate paint colon. Later approved foal paint colors, roof shingles (to match those on the historic house) and metal roof for the connector between the historic house and the addition. ALEXANDER BLUE HOUSE A proposal for additional vents in the gables of the original section of Alexander Blue House was approved. The building is being rented and used by the city for a variety of events. UNION CEMETERY • The issue of the sale of Union Church and Cemetery was referred to the Committee of the Whole for father discussion in 2003. • The Committee is scheduled to meet November 23, 2004 to discuss the Law Department recommendation (dated December 1, 2003) to deed the Union Church to the Trinity Theater Group and for the City to retain ownership of the Union Cemetery. • A letter in support of the Law Department recommendation was sent to City Council. GREENMEAD Cider MR! The Committee of the Whole held a study session regarding the issue of whether or not to allow Parmenter Cider Mill of Northville to operate a cider mill at Greenmead was held. Recommended that a Master Plan (Cultural ral Resource Management Plan) be developed before any decision is made. • Agreed to the compromise of developing the master plan in tandem with exploring the feasibility of the project. • Master Plan is in the process of being developed. 28 Quicken Parking The parking of Quicken employees in the parking lot near the office and in the lot across from the church puking has been very disruptive to the day-to-day operation of Greemnead. Building a paved parking lot in the area called "overflow panting" was proposed as a solution to the problem. The HPC proposed an alternative location for the parking lot along Pembroke. City Council accepted the former solution. TAX CREDIT LEGISLATION Michigan PA 534 (Single Business Tax Credit) and Michigan PA 535 (Income Tax Credit) were signed into law in January 1999. These laws make it possible for homeowners and businesses to apply for a 25 % tax credit if they live in a home or operate a business in a building that it on a local register of historic places. The passage of a local ordinance that is in compliance with the revised enabling legislation (PA 96) is important to the approval of tax credit applications. COMMISSIONERS Donald Knapp (Councilman Knapp's father) was newly appointed as commissioner. Kathleen Johnson -B artshe was reappointed. James Kline received his 25 -year pin in December 2003. OFFICER ELECTION Election of officers was held in December and are: Chairperson: Kathy Johnson-Bartshe Vice Chairperson: Don Knapp Secretary: Jim Kline Treasurer: Ralph Bakewell Operations Committee participated in the decorating for Christmas. Marian Lynch and Pauline Schweiger decorated the Suuroom at the Hill House and the Mer lands have decorated the A. J. Store in the village. Several Quester groups have decorated Hill House. Kingsley House was decorated by the 17th Michigan Women's Civilian's group. Shaw House has been decorated by the Mill Race Questers. The Newburg School was decorated with decorations made by students from Cass Elementary School. The Merriman's decorated the bungalow. Maureen Casey and family decorated the church. 29 Eighteen accessions of donations and purchased artifacts were added to the collections of the Museum and village buildings. Many requests for information, photographs of Livonia and genealogy were answered. Members of the Briggs & Ryder family have visited Greenness] with information to share and to research their families. Gardens — Thirty active volunteer Gardeners and members of the Livonia Garden Club have spent hundreds of hours maintaining the Hill House and church gardens. Livonia Garden Club has done landscaping around the Alexander Blue House. Restoration of the Alexander Blue House has continued and should be completed soon. Maintenance has included: Carnage house boiler replacement, carnage house siding and window repair. Quicken Loans has replaced Joshua Simmons Drive asphalt between Victor Drive and the gravel parking lot. They have also constructed an asphalt puking lot in the meadow and installed lighting. Volunteers have conducted tours, maintained the Hill House Gardens, two village gardens and worked the food booth for eleven activities. A volunteer training was held in the spring and a thank you was held in December. Eagle Projects have included rebuilding the bullpen east of the north ban and the painting of porches. Conferences — Linda Wimek and Sue Daniel attended the spring Midwest Museum Conference at Comer Prairie, Fishers, IN. Over 41,000 people have attended activities at Greenmead this year Activities held at Greenmead included: Christmas Walk held by Friends of Greenmead Twas the Night Before Christmas Candlelight Tom of the Historical Village Victorian Tea Peter Rabbit Festival of Cultures - Green Meadows Productions Arts and Crofts Festival — Livonia Arts Commission Garden Walk held by the Friends of Greem<ead Grid Scout Day Camp Art Camp — July Mid Summer Tea Highland Games — St Andrews Society Music Under the Stars AMC Car Show AMC Car Club and LHC Flea Market Livonia Historical Society in September & LHC held in June Livonia Garden Club Flower Show Fall Harvest Festival Greenmead & Parks & Recreation Department 30 Hannah's Autumn Tea Mother Goose Halloween Walk LHC and the Kappa Students from Churchill High School There were 35 weddings in the Newburg Church. Blue House has been rented 25 times. Uses have included graduation, birthday partes, wedding receptions, quilt class, seminars, and other business meetings. The Commission has used Blue House for the volunteer reception, Christmas and presidential teas, Friends of Greenmead thank you luncheon, dinner for the Historical Society, tour guide and gardeners meetings, Reservation and Historical Commission meetings. Our 2004 goals, as discussed at our December 2003 meeting, were to continue and improve the Marlin Luther King Jr. Celebration, Honor Roll Awards and the children's program at the Livonia Spree. We also planned to sponsor our first Fair Housing Forum. We also set a goal to continue to support out library by donations for books and materials relating to diversity. January The HRC again co-sponsored the annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Program that was held at the Clarenceville High School auditorium on Monday, January 19, 2004. Keynote speaker was Noel Saleh, ACLU Attorney. February Our annual Honor Roll Award was presented this year to Ed and Jeannette Katz, Livonia residents who began a group called Livonia Citizens for Better Human Relations. This group eventually became the Livonia Human Relations Commission. March Laura Callow suggested donating funds to the library to purchase books honoring Women's History Month. Michelle Scot and Maureen Farquhar suggested conducting a children's program at the Livonia Spree, which was very successful. April Our commission held its first Fair Housing Foram along with the Livonia Housing Commission. The mayor welcomed guests and dignitaries and experts from the legal, housing real estate and banking fields. Our first forum was successful, and the future ones promise to be even better. Our goal is to improve the forum and encourage participation from more groups and individuals. 31 May City Librarian Debra Jacubiec sent her thanks for the HRC donation for Women's History Month. She purchased America's Women -400 Years of Dolls, Drudges Helpmeets and Heroines and Enterprising Women -- 250 Years of American Business. The books were labeled as donated by the Human Relations Commission. Jme The Human Relations Commission held the Livonia Spree children's program to encourage the children of Livonia to live and believe in diversity. The coloring contest included giving books to children concerning diversity. We also had Mayor Engebrdson and Livonia Police Department's Captain Cramb as our guests for the meeting. We discussed numerous items including the Martin Luther King, Jr. program, fair housing, crime and City of Livonia recruiting practices. September We discussed suggestions for the speaker A the Martin Luther King, Jr. program to be given to PLAID for their consideration. Future projects proposed and approved were a children's program craft night conducted at the library, holding an open form¢ in a local high school and guest, Barbara Breslin, explained President Bush's Executive Order to Strengthen Emergency Preparedness With Respect to Individuals With Disabilities. October PLAID representative discussed the theme of the 2005 Martin Luther King Jr. program titled, "Peacing it All Together" scheduled for January 17, 2004 at Franklin High School. Michelle Scott and Maureen Farquhar discussed their children's craft activity to be held at the Civic Center Library. 111 woo GyQILi 161 tom [O[[O2[M I I I A I] It dCld� 111'[1] IY Y 11 In 2004, the Youth Commission continued the administration of the scholarship program sponsored by the Livonia Anniversary Committee. The Commission distributed brochures advertising the scholarships to the local high schools and libraries. Information about the scholarships was presenRd in the Winter News, on City Channel 8, the city's website and also in the Department of Community Resources. Commission members David O'Neil, Richard Sheffield, Jerry Krause and Dan Spurting took part in the selection process of the three winners of the scholarships. The Arbor Day Project, with the cooperation of the Livonia Public Schools and the Clarenceville Public Schools, was repeand again. Seedlings were packaged and distributed to all fourth grade classes in the two school systems. Global Retest and the 32 Youth Commission shared the cost of the trees. One thousand dollars ($1,000.00) was donated to Global Releaf for this project Commissioner Kenneth Balcoff charred the committee this year. The Youth Commission again supported "All Night Senior Graduation Parties' A the high schools that requested help. Donations of two hundred fifty dollars ($250.00) were made to each of the following high schools; Stevenson, Franklin, Churchill and Clamnceville. Honor Certificates were presented to all graduating seniors who had achieved a 3.0 honor point average or higher from all five high schools in Livonia. Commissioner Richard Sheffield handled this project Emergency stickers, which are to be placed on the bedroom windows of children, senior citizens or handicapped individuals, continue to be available at City Hall and also from the Livonia Fire Department. Information on obtaining the stickers is shown on City Chane] 8. The Commission again funded and staffed "The Treasure Hunt" at the Fall Harvest Festival. A two hundred dollar ($200.00) donation was made to fund this project. The Commission held a Memorial Ceremony for deceased Commissioner Elaine Schultz who originated the Seedling program and served on the Commission for more than 20 years. A plaque was placed as well as a tree outside the City Amex in her honor. Using the Livonia Community Recreation Center on Saturday nights, the Youth Commission hosted three lock-ins. Two were for senior high students in March and October, and one was for current 6"', 7th and 8th grade students in June. Any appropriate aged student was invited for a nominal fee to enjoy the safe and entertaining environment along with plenty of food. Generous area businesses; Meijer, Kroger's, Busch's Market, Valentino's, Stan's Market, Edy's Ice Cream, Bright House Networks, Mama Vera's Pizza, Primu's Pizzeria, Plastomer Corporation, Dean Koulouras, Esq., Merribowl, Guido's Pizza assisted with the funding and donations of food. The Commission budgeted approximately one thousand six hundred fifty dollars ($1650.00) for these three events. The balance was paid for through donations and entry fees. Commission officers for 2003-2004 were: Kay Sibert, Chairperson; Richard Sheffield, Vice-Chairperson; Paul Pyrkosz, Secretary and Phyllis Beck, Treasurer. Kay Sibert resigned during the year and Richard Sheffield took her place. 2004-2005 Commissioners were elected at the Commission's October meeting. Paul Pyrkosz will serve as Chairperson; Dan Spurting as Vice Chairperson; and Jil Cramb as Secretary. 33 le JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT NEW CASES FD.ED . :41p. 1. Felony (FY) 340 2 Ordinance Misd®ezmr(OM) 1219 3. Sta eMiAm® r(SM) 420 Sta eParking(SE) 24 TRAFFIC 4. Felony DsunklMv (FD) 24 5. Felony Tmffc(FT) 18 6. Ordinancelhndr IDlving(OD) 260 Z Ord a Civil 1nfiacfions(01) 32126 8. Ordinance Traffic Mime (OT) 2230 9. Statcfel Driving (SD) 50 10_ St a Civil lnfrmfions(SI) 2715 11. Stnlme Tmff Mi &memor(ST) 2]] M15CELLANEOUS 12_ CriminaVTra clmies Selected 7 13. CriminaVra c Cases PerfdM b Appeal 3 Total Felony Tnfw 42 (#4+#5=) Tata)Dr Dmmg 310 (#6+#9=) Taal CivD mtnmons MMI (#8+#11=) NONTRAFFICCND. A'FRA ONS &PAREA'G 14_ Ordinance Parki%(OE) 1175 15. Ordinance Noo-Trffc(ON) 23 16_ Sta eParking(SE) 24 Tata)Par g 1199 (#14+#16=) 19_ Sta eNon-Trt c(SN) 11 Tata)Non -Traffic 34 (# l5+# t] _) CND. DN ION LAWSUITS 34 l8_ General avil(GC) 1994 19_ General avil Miscellaceoos(GZ) 13 20. Landlord T®ant(LT) 385 21. Land Contract Surtmry Proceedings(SP) 4 22. Small Claims(SC) 947 23. Civil levision Junes Selected 5 24. Marriages 25 25. Mofiow 1161 26. ITscevery/Debtor Euros 163 2]. Gamishm®ts 2932 28. Orders to Srin/Orders oflevictm 271 PROBATION SUMMARY PROBATION Number ofPlacan®ts m Probation 1571 Pres®t®ce Investigation Reports 1407 Violation ofProbanon Warrants Issued 1069 Slew Cause Surmmns Issued 1750 Probation Cases Closed 1825 NumberofOpen Probation Cases 1404 Toll NumberDays o VdumtaryWo&rk Progrso (w Gime lieuofjfjaB) 5947 Felony Guilty Plea(reducedchsge) 7 Beach Verdict 0 Bircbver to 3a Circuit Court(adler Examination held or waived) 347 ITsmissed by Party 7 ITsmissed by Court 12 In tsfiw Status (Warrant)* 130 Local Aversion 3 Case Type Charge 0 Total 506 Misdemeanors (Ordinance and Statute) Jury Verdict 0 BercL Verdict 16 Guilty Plea 1216 35 ITsmissed by Party 643 ITsmissed by Court 108 Irswfiw Status (warrant)* 488 Local lywrsim 351 Case Type Change 1 Total 2821 Felony, Misdemeanor and Civil Infraction Jury Verdict 2 BercL Verdict 5454 Guilty PIe Adrmssion 24524 Bindowr to 3m Circuit Court (after Frcamnaron held or waived) 54 ITsmissed by Party 627 ITsmissed by Court 2029 Default Judgrreuts 7726 ]uachve Staz (Warrant)* 862 Local Diversion 7 Case Tyne Change 0 Total 41285 •Nof WarraotB®ch warranHOn Appe eodiagForemic locimnahon Non Traffic, Civil Infraction and Parkin Verdict at Dearing 87 AdmissiorMaivers 742 ITsmissed by Party 7 ITsnissedbv Court 39 Default Judgments 417 Case Type Change 0 Total 1292 C1 DEPARTMENT Civil, Landlordfrenant and Small Claims JuryVerdict 3 Bench Verdict 245 Dmocreste efaults Senl®eN 2032 Transferred 58 ITsmissed by Party 794 ITsmissed by Court 518 36 Inactive Stares** 77 Other Disposition 5 Case Type Change 0 **Note_ Bankruptcy Stay Total 37M FINANCrer Due to City of Liv®ia General Foal $3,692,49660 Escrow Accounts Bolls $105920470 Retribution $ 45622.16 Work Program $ 18812300 Miscellaneous* $ 1810009 • vH,da%arrvaM1mml Pal*^mo, nww rnS mfm& ftc Doe to State of Mcldgan $1,654,225 0 Doe to County Library $ 11635080 Other Miscellaueoos Payrrente $ 6375700 Cook Build'inglmprwern®t Full $ 24273300 UNAUDITED YEAR'S REVENUE TOTAL (erclading interest income) $7,070,81333 2003-2004 Projects 1. Upgraded Courtcomputer system, replaced five-year-old main console with new I Series IBM AS400 — at notable and substantial cost savings. 2. Actively participated in Michigan Supreme Court — State Court Administrative Office [mining of Court personnel to plan and design a meaningful Caseflow Management Plan to comply with Michigan Supreme Court directives. Plan was drafted, presented, reviewed and submitted by the required deadline. Approval was received from the Supreme Court December 6, 2004 — implementation set for January 1, 2005. 3. Worked with City of Livonia — Information Systems Deparhnent personnel to design, test and implement a computer program to report indigent counsel 37 statistics to the Michigan Supreme Court to comply with new Michigan Court Rule. 4. The courthouse building was rewired with cat 5 wire to accommodate the Judicial Network Project at a cost of $10,412.00 — paid for by the State of Michigan. 5. A total of thirty-eight (38) new personal computers were installed in a State of Mich mandated Judicial Network Pmject Thirty-two (32) personal computers and related switches, routers and phone lines were installed at a cost of $48,736.00 — paid for by the State of Michigan. 6. The Judicial Network Project was successfully completed in three mouths (Jane — August). All systems were brought up successfully thirty (30) days prior to the projects deadline. 7. The Court worked with the City of Livonia's Information Systems Director and staff to utilize City network mitures and eliminate/reduce duplicate costs. It should be voted that this Court has maintained its computer operation for nearly twenty (20) years without a designated information systems analyst. 8. The Court implemented a new schedule of fives to comply with Michigan Legislation of October 2003. The Court commenced a Court Building Fund upon notification of a City of Livonia Council Resolution for the purpose of planning for much needed facility improvements. 9. The Senior Court Officer participated in two court security training sessions to further enhance security measures. 10. The Court completed a project to rewrite the Probation Department Community Services Computer Module into Microsoft word — which bas made the system more user friendly and eliminated a troublesome software interface. The responsibility of this office is to continually review the navy hazards and risks that face a municipality as large and diversified as Livonia By recognizing the hazards and the impact they may have on the citizens and its economy, an outlive is established to provide planning for emergencies. From this process, an all hazard emergency plan is developed. This plan provides for coordination of emergency forces, establishes emergency response, identifies resoumes and identifies any further specific planning that 38 may be necessary to properly handle emergencies. Effort is continually put forth to efiminate or reduce the impact of future emergencies on this community and its citizens. The following items were some of the highlights of the Emergency Management Program for2004: • Successful completion of attaining federal funds for reimbursement of the costs of the August, 2003 blackout • Completion of the Pre -Disaster Mitigation Plan for Livonia partiallyfunded by Grant funds. • Participated in the Livonia Emergency Planning Committee throughout the year. • Prepared and successfully secured a $5,000 Federal Grant for Homeland Security. • Participated in Homeland Security Training Conference in Grand Rapids, Michigan. • Reviewed reports and Emergency Response Plans for companies with extremely hazardous materials. • Assisted with liason work with the Public Schools, citizen groups and civic associations. • Established an emergency and information AM radio station for Livonia to better inform the public on everyday items of importance as well as emergency information when necessary. The Department of Finance consists of Accounting, Management Information Systems, Water and Sewer Usage Billing, and the Division of Budget and Purchasing with a total staff of twenty-five people. The Director of Finance serves as administrative assistant to the Mayor in financial matters and is under the direct supervision of the Mayor. The function of the Department of Finance includes: Supervision over the administration of the financial affairs of the City. Keeping of accounts and financial records of the City and all departments, commissions and agencies of the City government 39 Maintenance of payroll records for all City employees. Preparation of checks for all financial obligations of the City. Billing and collection of over 150,000 water and sewer bills. Responsibility for all computerized reporting and budget analysis for City Departments. Responsibility for evaluating and recommending computer hardware and software systems City-wide. Preparation of the annual budget for the Mayor. Taking ofbids for all major purchases made by the City. Responding to City Council questions and providing additional reports and information as requested by Councrl. The Finance Director serves on a three-person Personnel Review Committee, which is responsible for review and evaluation of the hiring, placement and replacement of all employees for the City. Performs Treasurer function for the Plymouth Road Development Authority. Membership on the Community Development Block Grant Committee. Responsible for risk management of casualty and liability, worker's compensation and medical insurance for the City and is the City's representative to the Michigan Municipal Risk Management Authority (MMRMA). Representation stover 50 meetings of the City Council. Preparation of all debt issued by City. Responsible for investment of City funds in interest earning accounts in accordance with State law. Management of City -owned properties leased to third partes. The Budget -Purchasing office is under the supervision and direction of the Director of Finance who also acts as Purchasing Agent for the City. 40 The Budget-Purrhasing activity processed a total of 12,193 requisitions for the purchase of goods and services for the City of Livonia. A total of 2,083 supply orders and printing requests were also filled for City Departments. ACCOUNTING The volume of the Accounting Division activity is listed by comparative figures for the past two years: FISCAL YEAR ENDED NOVEMBER 30 2003 2004 General Fund and Other Fund Payables Checks 16,960 17,870 Payroll Checks 25,994 32,590 Journal Entries 14,622 13,291 Retirement Checks (Payroll and Payables) 6,689 7,103 Accounts Receivable Invoices: False Alarms 2,500 2,600 Rescue Runs 3,700 3,970 Other 1,600 1,870 Water Bills Mailed 154,836 153,911 Temporarily idle funds were invested in Certificates of Deposit and daily savings deposits, resulting in a total interest earned of $1,134,086 or 2.22% of City General Fund Revenue. 1. The City was required to implement the Governmental Accounting Standards Board Statement No. 34 (GASB 34) for fiscal year 2003. This statement requires extensive revisions to the accounting methodology used in the annual audited financial statements. The City's independent auditors conducted their examination of our compliance with GASB 34 early in 2004, and issued an opinion indicating that we have met the new standards. 2. The Finance Department coordinated an extensive review of all user fees charged by the City and made recommendations to City Council to adjust user fres to make them more comparable to other communities and appropriate for the cos[ of the service provided. Council adopted most of the recommendations. This action helped to balance the 2004 budget. 41 3. The water billing section implemented a new water bill design. The new letter -sized bill replaces the old postcard bills. These new bills have the advantage of being less susceptible to loss and capable of including more useful information for our customers. 4. Insurance renewals for Life, Property and Casualty coverages were completed this year. We were able to negotiate very reasonable renewal rates. 5. The Finance Department continued to work with City Council and the Mayor's Office to maintain the City's excellent bond ratings, which currently are rated AA3 A Moody's and AA at Standard and Poor's. Because of these excellent bond ratings, more people will invest in City of Livonia bonds resulting in more competitive bidding from brokerage houses. Savings will continue into the future for the City due to these ratings. 6. The City of Livonia audit was completed and, once again, the City's auditors found no significant audit adjustments. 7. The Finance Department participated in several cooperative bids with surrounding communities that resulted in more competitive bids and reduced costs to the City. 2003-2004 ANN -UAL REPORT The Information Systems Department is responsible for the computer hardware and software used by the City. The IS Department assists other City Departments in evaluating selecting and implementing computer systems. It also sets the standards for City computer systems. The Information Systems Director reports directly to the Finance Director. The staff of the Information Systems Department consists of five (5) employees. The IS Department maintains the following hardware: 1999- 2000- 2001- 2002- 2003- 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 IBM AS/400 Midrange Computer 1 1 1 1 1 Windows NT Servers 4 2 1 0 0 Windows 20002003 Server 1 3 9 11 10 Novell Servers 4 4 0 0 0 Personal Computers 217 244 273 317 319 42 The IS Department was able to replace 5 old servers this year with 4 new ones. These servers support our Intranet Website (Inside Livonia), our GIS Server, our ISA (internal Internet Cache Server) and the Server that supports our Internet Maps, Video Streaming and the City Council Packets. The IS Department has been busy with the implementation of the new Car eGraph computer system at the Department of Public Service. This project is in production use now and the last pieces of the project are being completed. The IS Department provides in-house training for City employees on how to use computers and software. The need for training this year was reduced due to reduced staffing in the user departments and the hiring freeze. A breakdown on training offered is: 1998- 1999- 2000- 2001- 2002- 2003- 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Classes 78 89 66 72 60 26 Conducted Number of Employees 232 333 208 210 140 77 Trained The Information Systems Department also manages the City Website (http:/hvww.ci.livonia.mi.us), which continues to find new uses and grow in usage. The Internet based Property Tax and Assessing Inquiry System continues to reduce the workload for the Assessing and Treasurer's Offices. The IS Department has also enhanced the website by adding additional interactive Geographic Information Systems (GIS) maps that show Parks and Recreation, Roads, Schools, Trash Pickup Days, Voter Precincts and Zip Codes. The IS Department has worked with several departments in creating Electronic Newsletters. These E -Newsletters have allowed departments to communicate with our Public for no cost. In some cases, these have replaced a traditional printed piece resulting in a savings to the City. The IS Department also worked with the Parks and Recreation Department this year to establish the ability for members to pay on-line for classes. 1998- 1999- 2000- 2001- 2002- 2003- 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of User 83,368 136,926 183,999 278,642 350,230 327,708 Sessions 43 The Department also provides e-mail and Internet access to City Employees. 1999- 2000-2001 2001- 2002- 2003- 2000 2002 2003 2004 Number of E-mail 202 232 237 269 259 accounts The Information Systems Department stopped 3,683 Computer Viruses from attacking our Computer Systems this year. LIVONIA EIRE & RESCUE During the fiscal year 2004, Livonia Fire & Rescue responded to 7,930 incidents, 81.5% involved emergency medical services, while fire related responses accounted for 18.5%. The following statistical breakdowns reflect the departmental activity for the current fiscal year. Incidents Emergency Medical 6,464 Fire 326 Fire(other) 1,140 Total 7,930 For the Fire Incidents (other) category, carbon monoxide alarms accounted for 65 of the responses, 521 were false fire alarm calls and 232 for downed wire incidents. Carbon monoxide alarm runs have increased 64% from las[ year, due in large part to the advertising, availability and falling purchase prices of carbon monoxide detectors. False alarm responses have increased slightly up 1.3% over las[ year and will continue to rise in the future due to increased requirements of the adopted codes, availability, advertising and falling costs of such systems. Fire Prevention Inspector/Investigamrs conducted 57 fire investigations throughout the year. Of these 57 investigations, 45.6% were accidental (26 incidents), 35% were undetermined (27 incidents) and 19.2% were incendiary/arson (11 incidents). 44 Arson / incendiary fires continued to rise during this past year. At two separate locations, independent of each other, multiple incidents of arson have occurred. Both incidents are still under investigation by both the fire and police department Monetary Fire Loss Loss of Content $1,352,430 Educational/Institutional $1,026,000 Residential $899,167 Vehicle $394,790 Commercial $257,525 Total $3,929,912 Of the total dollars lost, residential fires accounted for 230/y commercial fires 7%, educational / assembly occupancy 260/y vehicle losses 10% and personal property 34%. Incidents by day of week Sunday 932 11.7% Monday 1,165 14.7% Tuesday 1,183 14.9% Wednesday 1,161 14.6% Thursday 1,113 14.0% Friday 1,256 15.8% Saturday 1,120 14.3% The busiest ame of day is II:00 am. through 12:00 p.m Livonia Fire & Rescue has a formal mutual aid pact with twenty-one other area fire departments. This pact provides an assistance agreement when dealing with large-scale incidents. However there is an increasing frequency of Livonia requesting assistance from neighboring communities for both emergency medical services and firefighting when dealing with temporary manpower shortages or station closings. We are not alone in this respect; other surrounding communities have used our services when dealing with the same issues facing them Fire Lijurh% During the year 24 firefighters sustained on -the job injuries and unfortunately two civilian injuries were fatal, one a suicide and the other alcohol and a medical condition played a role. 45 Throughout the year, in addition to the related activities listed below, this Division is responsible for updating technical knowledge, maintaining job efficiency and state certification for the department's Fire Inspectors. This is accomplished by attending numerous seminars, job related schools and other continuing education programs. These schools would include but are not limited to: Schoolcraft College, the National Fire Academy, bfmhigan State Police Arson School, bfmhigan Fire Inspectors Winter Conference, Metro Detroit Fire Inspectors Society and the various (IAAI) International Association of Arson Investigators arson schools and seminars. The Fire Marshal and the two Inspectors assigned to the Fre prevention division continue to be State of Mchigan CertifiedFire Impectors and National Fire Protection Association Certdied Fire Inspector L The two senior members of the Fire prevention Bureau have completed the Fire Officer 47 program. In addition to the above certifications all three investigators in Fire Prevention have attended both the National Fire Academy Arson Imestigation course and the Mwhigan State Police Arson hyestigation course. Inspections Although not all encompassing, the following categories reflect the major inspections conducted by the Fire Prevention Division: Advice 6 Interior Alterations 105 Alarm 13 Liquor License 15 Complaint 15 Liquid Propane Gas 1 Chemical Surveys 22 Life Safety Inspections 3 City License 115 New Construction 32 Carnival/Spree 4 Site Plan/Preliminary Plan 1 False Alarms 1 Re -occupancy 69 Fire Lanes 3 Revision 1 First Tenant 3 System Report Deficiency 29 Fireworks 12 Suppression 37 Hydrant/Flow 1 Temporary Structure 6 History File 88 Exterior Alterations/Constmcrion 21 Total 603 Play Reviews Alarm 35 Construction 100 Hood & Duct / Spray Booth 19 46 Site 54 Fire Suppression 51 Total 259 The above plan review totals reflect the number of projects received / assigned in the Fre Prevention Office and do not include the actual number of inspections made. Several site visits are required when inspecting various fire alarm, suppression or structural systems to insure compliance with the adopted codes and standard installation practices. A conservative estimate of site visits needed to complete a project would be 4-6 inspections. More complex jobs would require additional inspections, in some instances 20-30 site visits. The focus of the training office for fiscal year 2004 was to continue to assure compliance for the ongoing education (CEO) requirements for both EMT and Paramedic within the department. The number of overall CEU's for Paramedics is higher than that of an EMT and thus requires a more diligent training program in order to ensure that the department's personnel are always compliant with licensing requirements. The training office continues to improve its record management system related to training activities, which in tum ensures compliance with OSHA, ISO and nationally accepted standards on Mniv; and documentation. The mining division continues to provide training commensurate with the mission of our department. Although EMS training takes up large amounts of resources and time, this office still facilitates training in fire suppression, specialized rescue, hazardous materials, utility emergencies and risk reduction. Other ongoing initiatives undertaken by the training office include the administration and oversight of the department grants. The department was once again successful in winning a FEMA Fire Act Grant award totaling more than $98,000 in FY 2004. This grant award allows the department to purchase three additional Thermal Image Cameras (TICS), a new wireless fireground accountability system, five (5) RIT emergency air bags and a new SCBA integrated firefighter egress system. The committee also undertook the writing of a fourth FEMA Grant for FY 2004/2005 and is confident that our department's proposal will make a serious bid for a fourdi consecutive grant award. Fire Officer training commensurate with the CBA continues to be a top priority as it pertmas to off-site [mining and m preparing our Company level officers for each new position. The Training office is hopeful in completing the remaining needed Fire Officer classes by the fust quarter of 2005. This office continues to look at ways to improve our overall service and maintain the highest level of pre -hospital care to the citizens of Livonia. The deparhnent's EMS Quality Assurance (QA) program continues to strive to comply with stringent county and 47 state requirements regarding QEQA. The training office continues to administrate and facilitate the Medical Priority Dispatch system that is used in dispatching EMS calls citywide. The system has proven to be extremely effective in risk reduction for responders, as well as the public, by assigning a priority to the medical call. Because of the increasing EMS nm call volume each year, the MPD system allows the prioritizing of all EMS related calls to ensure that the most life threatening emergencies receive assistance above those of a lesser degree. The Training Coordinator and Engineer Jon Unruh continue to provide the needed continued education units (CEU) required for re- certification of dispatchers every two years. This office was also responsible for tracking and fulfilling the MPD Quality Assurance requirements as outlined in county Medical Control protocols. Since the MPD program came on line in May of 2001, the training office meets and discusses QI related issues quarterly, as to ensure compliance within county and state guidelines. The following reflects the framing acovdies generated or facilitated by this office during fuca/year 2004. Jain / Training on Heavy Rescue and Peripheral Equipment Inventory / New Engine 41 in-service training / Facilitate the Respirator Fit Testing program for all personnel (MIOSHA) / Injury Prevention (EMS CEU's) / EMS Operations (EMS CEU's) / Bloodbome Pathogens/Infectious Disease training / Department wide CPR recertification / Three personnel HURT Team Members) attended monthly W WHIRT HazMat training / Tactical Medic Training—SWAT / Facilitate the testing of all personnel for HBV)TB (MIOSHA) / RespiratoryEmergencies (EMS CEU's) / Attended monthly HEMS meeting February / Delivered QEDocumentation Training to department on ALS operations / Continued New Engine 41 in-service training / SCBARespirmor Fit-Testingmake-ups(MIOSHA) / Delivered mandatory QEQA review for HEMS (Amapolis Hospital) / Ice Rescue Training / Environmental Emergencies (EMS CEU's) / Rapid Intervention Team training / Basic Airway (EMS CEU's) / Oxygen Basic (EMS CEU's) / Three personnel (HIRT Team Members) attended monthly W WHIRT HazMat training / Tactical Medic Training—SWAT M / Began the bid process for the FEMA Grant Award project / Attended monthly HEMS meeting March / Advanced Airways (EMS CEU's) / County Medical Protocol (update on new revisions) / Participated in Multi -Jurisdictional Inter -Operability Communication tests / Delivered training to LPD (PORTS) on Hazardous Materials / Bum Care (EMS CEU's) / State EMS Vehicle and Agency inspections / Hazardous Materials Refresher / Soft Tissue Imunes(EMS CEU's) / Department's Exposure Control Plan update / Thee personnel (HIRT Team Members) attended monthly W WHIRT HazMat training / Tactical Medic Training—SWAT / Respiratory Fit -Test makeup's(MIOSHA) / Attended monthly HEMS meeting April / SCBA Emergencies / Attended Terrorism conference sponsored by MSP in Lansing / Delivered training to LPD (PORTS) on Hazardous Materials / Patient Packaging (EMS CEU's) / Beriatric Care (EMS CEU's) / Hazardous Materials Operations Level Refresher / ACLS Review (EMS CEU's) / Three personnel (HRT Team Members) attended monthly W WHIRT HazMat training / Tactical Medic Training—SWAT / Four personnel attended Incident Safety Officer Course (ISO) / Ford Transmission Plant — Station walk-thrus / Attended monthly HEMS meeting May / Hazardous Materials Operations Level Refresher / Hose Testing department wide / Delivered HazMat Training to LPD personnel (PORTS) / Delivered Trauma Class to LPD -Intelligence Bureau / Department wide ACLS re -certification class / Attended monthly HEMS meeting / Tactical Medic Training—SWAT 49 / Department participated in LEPC sanctioned HazMat Drill (Old GM site) / Thee personnel (HIRT Team Members) attended monthly W WHIRT HazMat training June / Water Rescue Protocol review / Water Rescue: Surface Operations at Newburgh Lake (Zodiac Operations) / Engine Nl Quint Operations / Foam Operations class / Deconn Operations: Emergency/Mass / Pump Operations class / GM Powertrain Site Training/Emergency Planning / Three personnel (HIRT Team Members) attended monthly W WHIRT HazMat training / Tactical Medic Training—SWAT / Attended monthly HEMS meeting July / Continued ACLS testing and re -certifications / Civil Service Training — Department wide / New Communications (Jaguar prep radios) inn -service training / Three personnel (HIRT Team Members) attended monthly W WHIRT HazMat training / Attended monthly HEMS meeting / New Helmet -Communication inn -service training / Touring Coordinator attended new T -t -T NIMS/OIC class / Tactical Medic Training —SWAT / Homeland Security Update / Attended monthly HEMS meeting August / Continued ACLS Mega Code testing and re -certifications / Trained LPD -Intelligence Bureau in Basic Trauma Care (LPD Range) / Training Coordinator attended CBRNE Defensive Ops T -t -T class / Extrication Training: Vehicle Stabilization / Forcible Entry Evolutions at Wonderland Mall / Three personnel (HIRT Team Members) attended monthly W WHIRT HazMat training / Implementation of Tactical Medic Team (TEMS) 50 September / Continued Forcible Entry training at Wonderland Mall / Cutting operations: New K-950 Heavy Rescue / Thee personnel HURT Team Members) attended monthly W WHIRT HAZMAT training / Trained DPW personnel in Confined Space Operations / New Training Site Development meetings: Glendale Site / Attended monthly HEMS meeting 1 Tactical Medic Training—SWAT October / New Southeast Michigan Protocol review for all suppression personnel / Three personnel HURT Team Members) attended monthly W WHIRT HAZMAT training / Tactical Medic Training—SWAT / Career Talks at Livonia High Schools / Development meetings for EMS electronic reporting / FEMA Grant Award— Project Committee meetings / Wayne County Emergency Management Grant Prep / Attended monthly HEMS meeting November / Continued development of"Fire Equipment Operator's Handbook" / Internal review of MIOSHA Compliance programs / Delivered mandatory QEQA to HEMS Board / Continued development meetings for EMS electronic reporting 1 Developmental meetings with LPD Hometown Secur dy/EM Re: Citywide exercises and WMD training / Training Coordinator involved m several DHS Grant meetings with LPD - Emergency Management to develop project guidelines The Livonia Fire & Rescue Maintenance Division is comprised of one Fire Apparatus Supervisor and one Senior Fire Equipment Mechanic who are responsible for specification writing ordering, care, maintenance and repair of all mechanized and related fire, rescue and paramedic equipment The division provides firefighters, Livonia citizens, and visitors of Livonia with safe and reliable ambulance, rescue and fire fighting vehicles and related equipment 51 This year the respominlines oflhe Llaudenance Division included the following Completed 485 work orders. Inspected pumpers, rescue vehicles, aerial tower, administrative cars, and all equipment on each vehicle on a semi-annual and annual basis. Centrifugal pumps received their annual testing along with MIOSHA fire inspections. Thee inspection trips were made to South Carolina, one conducted before the delivery of the new demo American LaFrance 75' aerial and two for inspection of major warranty repair on Engine 3. Worked with Medic Master on warranties of vehicle chassis and box. Made ready and disposed of equipment removed from service. In coordination with the Training Division, instructed Firefighter and E.M.T.D.'s on the operational requirements of vehicles. Also aided in training exercises when necessary. Responded to major fires to assist the department in set up of equipment, repair and refueling of vehicles. Provided assistance, as needed, to neighboring fire departments and members of Western Wayne Mutual Aid Association. Provided assistance to thefollowing Project Mamgers: / SCBA Officer - ordering parts, hydro testing of SCBA tanks. / Hose Officer - specification writing ordering and mounting of nozzles, adapters, and hose. / Building Maintenance Officer- repair of vehicle electrical drop lines. / EMT Officer - installation of ALS equipment / Communications Officer — mounting hand held prep radio vehicle cLargers and installation of new radio systems for ALS and relocation of some radios in pumpers, and repair of same. / Apparatus Officer - ordering and mounting of new equipment/hand tools and mounts. / Public Relations Commitee- equipment 52 1 Radio Technician - the installation and removal of communications systems for vehicles going into and coming out of service along with installations of ALS radio equipment This Division provides maintenance on all ofthefollowmg items Vehicles 1 - 1976 Sutphen Aerial Tower, 1250 GPM Pump 1 - 1988 C-30 Chevrolet/Investigative Unit 2 - 1988 Pierce Arrow 1250 GPM Pumpers 1 - 1988 Pierce Dash Heavy Duty Rescue 1 - 1994 Ford Horton Water Rescue Unit 1 - 1994 SmeaUSpmisai 1250 GPM Pumper 1 - 1995 Ford Horton Reserve Alpha Unit 3- 1995 Chevrolet Sedaus 1 - 1996 S-10 Chevrolet Pick -Up 1 - 1996 GMC 3/4 -Ton Pick -Up 1 - 1997 Chevrolet Lumina 1 - 1997 International/Horton Reserve Alpha Unit 1 - 1997 Imemational/Horton Alpha Unit 1 - 1998 Chevrolet Lumina 1 - 1999 Chevrolet Tahoe 2 - 2000 Freightliner/Medic Master Alpha Units 2 - 2001 Freightliner/Medic Master Alpha Units 1 - 2001 Ford Crown Vic Sedan 1 - 2002 American LaFrance 2000GPM 75' Aerial 3 - 2003 American LaFmnce Eagle Pumpers 1 - 2003 Ford 450 Maintenance Truck 1 - 2003 Mercury Marine Inflatable Rescue Boat, Motor & Trailer 2 - 2003 Ford Crown Vic Sedans 1 - 2003 Club Car Ambulance and Hauling LS Enclosed Trailer 32 - Total Vehicles Equipment on Vehicles Thousands of feet of fire hose Fire hose nozzles Axes and adapters Foam equipment, hand and vehicle mounted Deluge equipment 110 V electrical lighting Tools (hand and fire fighting) 53 9 - Auxiliary Generators 39 - ISI Viking Air Pack 4 - ISI Magnum Air Pack 74 - Air Bottles 89 - ISI Viking Masks 4 - Magnum Masks 1 - Bauer Air Compressor Cascade System 1 - 4 - 6000 Air Bottle Cascade System 1 - K-950 Saw 2 - K-12 Saw 7- Chain Saws 2 - Amkus Power Tools 2 - TNT Power Tools 7 - Life Jack PPV Fans 1 - Hose repair tool and parts Medical equipment on Alpha Vehicles Garage Equipment 1 - Hose test Pump 2 - In -ground garage hoist hydro -testing 1 - Garage tool replacements 1 - New Pumper pump test tool as needed to comply with NFPA 1911 Various new hazardous material and confined space rescue equipment The 2004 fiscal year was one that saw new challenges for educating our citizens tbmugb the Fire Safety Education Program within Livonia Fire & Rescue. While remaining committed to providing quality fire safety education programs throughout the community, public fire safety education has had to reevaluate the number and types of programs we deliver. Each year Livonia Fire & Rescue responds to numerous requests from the public for Fire Safety Education programs. These requests are forwarded to either the on -duty Battalion Chief or to the Fire Safety Education Committee, based on the needs of the requesting person or group. If the caller is requesting to visit a fire station or have a fire apparatus visit them as part of the educational effort, the on -duty Battalion Chief handles the request. If the group requests an individual to speak at a prearranged time and location that does not require firefighting apparatus, the Fire Safety Education Committee is contacted. Currently, on -duty crews at the fne stations handle most requests, while remaining in-service to respond to emergency calls in our area. 54 Fire Prevention records indicate that we responded to approximately 200 requests during this fiscal year, reaching thousands of our citizens. These requests are handled routinely by the Battalion Chiefs office and are conducted by the on -duty crews. In October of 2004, Livonia Fire & Rescue held its "Eleventh Annual Fire Prevention Week Open House". The Open House has proven to be a highly anticipated event by our community, reaching a crowd estimated at 3,600. While in attendance, visitors received inforrmation on fire and life safety and are given an opportunity to practice life safety skills. In addition, the Department continued the cooking fire demonstration, fire safety behavior practice area, and gave attendees a look at our newest fire engine, Engine 1. Livonia firefighters participated in a September event held at Laurel Park Place Mall called the "Passport to Safety'. This project, spearheaded by Sgt Teeter of LPD, was a huge success - crowds were estimated in the thousands who attended the event. After being involved in the first annual event, more effort is being directed into this area The large numbers of children that attend the indoor event are encouraging. Our dedicated efforts to educate our citizens are among the best anywhere. Our ideas were shared with the fire service community in one article that appeared in "Fire Engineering" magazine, the nations premiere fire training magazine. Other ideas were seen in the pages of "Fire T.I.E.S." from the Michigan State Police -Fire Marshal Division, and the Michigan Professional Fire Fighter. Our efforts were sought after when the Michigan Arson Prevention Committee sought us out to conduct a seminar on educating children in the community at their annual conference. 150 fire service professionals throughout the state attended this event We were also able to distribute our fire and life safety messages to the cincens ofLivoma through the we of the following sources: / Livonia Public Schools / City Channel8 / Time Wama Cable / Livonia Observer The Livonia Housing Commission submits the following information on its activities and accomplishments for Silver Village, Community Development Block Grant Program, 55 Newburgh Village, McNamara Towers #1 and 42, Section 8 Rent Subsidy Program, and Brashear Tower. SILVER VILLAGE -33780 LYNDON Relative to Silver Village, the Livonia Housing Commission experienced a good year with occupancy at 100% A all times. The waiting lis[ consists of 101 "Livonia residents' and 51 "parents of Livonia residents". Activities and Accomplishments Silver Village had a turnover of 9 units in 2004. The flooring in the community room back hall and library was replaced with ceramic tile. Carpeting was replaced in 26 one and two bedroom apartments. All apartments were inspected for safety and maintenance purposes. The Community Development Office administered the following programs during the 2003-2004 fiscal year: 1. Community Development Block Grant Program. 2. Michigan State Housing Development Grant'Loan Programs: Housing Resources Fund - Home Rehabilitation Loan Program - Homebuyer Assistance Program Below please find the accomplishments produced by each of these programs: Community Development Block Grant Program (The following information on accomplishments is based on the CDBG program year which began on 8/1/03 and ended on 7/31/04) Major Home Rehabilitation Loan Program Emergency Home Rehabilitation Loan Program Minor Home Repair Program Emergency Utihty Shut -Off Assistance Senior Van Transportation Program Mental Health Counseling Program First Step (Western Wayne County Project on Domestic Assault) Fav Housing Initiative Scattered Site Rental Homes (Mngt/Maint.) 56 15 Households Served 5 Households Served 107 Households Served 25 Households Served 253 Persons Served 19 Persons Served 78 Persons Served Not Applicable 15 Households Total Served: 517 Households/Persons Michieaa State Housme Development fMSHDAI Grant/Loan Proerams Housing Resources Fond: The Livonia Housing Commission -Community Development Office was awarded $277,200 in funds through MSHDA's HRT grant program to provide 0% and 5% interest rate, deferred repayment home rehabilitation loans. The grant term extends from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2004. During this reporting period, August 1, 2003 — July 31, 2004, 7 homes were improved; 4 others are in process of major home improvements. The Housing Commission -Community Development Office received mother grant award in the amount of $300,000 through MSHDA to provide Homebuyer Assistance to low/moderate income households. To date, seven households have already closed on the purchase of a new home and have completed rehabilitation activities. It is anticipated that another family will benefit from this assistance before the grant term expires November 30, 2004. Capital Improvement Projects — Housing Commission During the previous year the following public facility renovations were completed: McNamara Towers 41 and 42 - installation of 59 energy-efficient ceiling fans and 235 smoke detectors McNamara Towers 41 — installation of new elevators, to be completed in fall of 2004 Newburgh Village — installation of new generator and carpet replacement in 25 units NEWBURGH VILLAGE- 11999 NEWBURGH ROAD During 2004, 120 apartments were inspecRd and necessary repairs were made, in order to ensure decent, safe and sanitary housing whereby maintaining resident satisfaction. Activities and Accomplishments Original carpeting was replaced in 25 occupied apartments. Eighteen unoccupied apartments were painted and 11 unoccupied apartments had carpeting replaced. Five apartments had new skylights installed; one apartment had a skylight repaired; and five apartments had ceilings repaired due to skylight leaks. Four buildings had extensive roof repairs. An emergency generator was purchased and installed for am residents' safety and convenience in case of a power failure. 57 There have been 20 turnovers from January 1, 2004 through November 30, 2004. Occupancy remains at 100%. There are approximately 50 names on the Newburgh Village "resident waiting list' (the majority of which are for a two-bedroom apartment) and 23 names on the "parents of residents waiting fist'. McNAMARA TOWERS #1 & #2 -19300 PURLINGBROOK McNamara Towers Building #1 1. All apartments were inspected and repairs made according to Housing Quality Standards (HQS). 2. Both elevators were replaced at a cost of $339,950. 3. New ceiling fans were installed in each apartment 4. New AC/DC smoke detectors were in stalled in all apartments and common areas of the building. McNamara Towers Building #2 1. All apartments were inspected and repairs made according to Housing Quality Standards (HQS). 2. Original carpeting was replaced in 6 apartments. 3. New AC/DC smoke detectors were installed in all apartments and common areas of the building. Scattered Site Housing 1. Installed new floor coverings, closet doors, lighting fixtures, updated electrical and some landscaping at 3 of the homes. General Property Improvements 1. Several plumbing and heating repairs/upgrades were completed in buildings #1 & #2. 2. 22 window air conditioners were installed in resident apartments. 3. 4 large trees were removed 2 of which were ash trees. 4. Several small landscaping projects were completed. McNamara Towers had 19 new residents move in, 6 in building 41, 13 in building 42 and 3 new families moved into our scattered site homes. SECTION 8 EXISTING HOUSING PROGRAM The Livonia Housing Commission Section 8 Rent Subsidy program currently administers a Housing Choice Voucher program consisting of 803 families. 58 We received notice in October 2004 that we will be receiving 21 Program Opt -Outs for Swan Harbor II. On January 1, 2004, all Landlords are now participating in the Direct Deposit Program. Fiscal Year 2003 SEMAP, Section 8 Management Assessment scored as a High Performer. An audit was conducted on the Section 8 program and no findings were found. The current Section 8 Voucher Leasing rate is 98 WILLIAM W. BRASHEAR TOWER -17&41 N. LAUREL PARK DRIVE The waiting list consists of approximately 52 applicants as of November 15, 2004. Occupancy remains at 100%. Activities and Accomplishments 1. Replaced 14 unit refrigerators. 2. Replaced 2 unit stoves. 3. Installed new circuit breaker boxes in 17 units. 4. Installed new kitchen floor file in 8 units. 5. Installed new carpeting in 13 units. 6. Repainted 19 units for new move -ins. 7. Completed drywall and painting repairs in 11 units. 8. Installed new kitchen sinks in 3 units. 9. Installed bathroom vanities in 14 units. 10. Installed new garbage disposals in 6 units. INSPECTION DEPARTMENT is responsible for all construction operations on private property. Included in its jurisdiction is building inspection, plan review, sanitation and ordinance enforcement. Areas of involvement include Zoning Board of Appeals, Building Code Board of Appeals and various civic groups. Coordination with State government agencies involving building construction is handled by this department Plan Review for new buildings, alterations and additions, pools, demolitions, zoning compliance and signs is an integral part of the deparanent's function, as well as the issuance of permits, sanitation and enforcing the City's Code of Ordinances designated as 59 Inspection's responsibility. Inspections were made and permits issued for the rehabilitation of homes for the Community Development Block Program. Additionally the Inspection Department reviews lot splits for the Department of Assessment and reviews site plans and waiver use petitions for the Planning Department and provides support to all other departments as needed. BUILDING INSPECTION issued approximately 10,339 permits in 2003/04 for buildings, signs and mechanical installations, including new construction, additions, renovations and alterations. 69 permits were issued for new residential homes and 17 permits were issued for new commercial/industrial s[mclures. In other activity, 137 single-family condominium units were constructed or are currently under construction. No permits for apartment buildings were issued this year. Mechanical permits (plumbing, electrical, heating and refrigeration) numbered approximately 5847 for the year. Residential additions/alterations, garages, decks/patios, fire repairs, pools, signs, zoning compliance, commemial/industrial additions, demolitions and moving permits comprised the remainder of permits issued. 72 demolition permits were issued during the year, 13 of which were residential structures. Permits for Christmas tree sales lots, pennant and banner displays, awnings, underground storage tanks and various special inspections were issued as required. Certificates of Occupancy are issued for all new residences, commercial and industrial buildings upon completion. State building, mechanical, plumbing, electrical and sign contractor licenses are registered yearly in this office. Additionally, official records are kept on fence contractors, excavators and demolition contractors. The systematic annual inspection of existing buildings for compliance with B.O.C.A. Property Maintenance Code continued through 2004. In connection with this program, 1181 inspections were made, violations issued when necessary and compliance obtained. This program is designed to maintain health and safety standards in the city. In addition to the annual inspection program the Inspection Department now requires that all one, two and multiple family rental dwelling units be licensed and inspected on m annual basis. This year 911 rental units were inspected by the City. Additionally, 355 formal complaints were received and responded to throughout the year as they reland to property code violations. There were approximately 453 rental and 866 annual inspection violations were issued for various code infractions during 2003/04. The valuation of new building activities for 2003/04 is $97,677,746. The revenue collected from all building activities was approximately $2,518,310. SANITATION AND ORDINANCE ENFORCEMENT is responsible for compliance with the City Zoning Ordinance 4543 and also the Code of Ordinances 41688 as it pertains to the majority of all nuisance and non -criminal violations. These responsibilities include those things that affect the health, safety and welfare of the residents of the City, such as pollution, hazardous waste, trash and debris, vacant buildings, weed catling basic property maintenance and supervision of the collection of 60 municipal refuse. The enforcement of special conditions of approval made by the Zoning Board of Appeals, City Council and the Planning Commission relative to site plans, variances, and waiver uses are the responsibility of Ordinance Enforcement STATISTICS 2003-04 Total General Inspections Made 24,893 Building Maintenance and Repair 993 Parking Lot Repairs 211 Trash and Debris 3243 Junk Vehicles 2558 Noxious Weeds* 4401 Noise/Air/Odor 164 Nuisances 2525 Illegal Signs on Commercial Property 943 Illegal Signs Removed from Public Property 3524 Illegally Parked Recreational Vehicles 1103 Illegally Parked Commercial Vehicles 1533 Misc. Illegally Parked Vehicles 1810 Right of Way encroachments 593 Vacant Buildings (Re-inspected/Posted) 496 Snow on Sidewalks 796 Sanitation activities included 1,955 citizen complaints regarding the collection of municipal refuse and the delivery of 289 recycling bins. Enfomement of the Noxious Weed Ordinance included the investigation of citizen complaints and the abatement of violations through the mowing of weeds and removal of debris from 687 properties by the City Weed Mowing Contractor. BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS The Building Code Board of Appeals provides my person the right to appeal a decision of the code official refusing to grant a modification of the building code covering the manner of construction or materials to be used in the erection, alteration or repair of a building or structure. An application for appeal shall be based on a claim that the true 61 intent of the code or the riles legally adopted there under have been incorrectly interpreted, the provisions of this code do not fully apply, or an equivalent form of construction can be used. A summary of the activities of the Building Code Board of Appeals for the fiscal year 2003-04 is as follows: Meetings Scheduled 1 Appeals Filed 2 Hearings Held 2 Re -hearings 0 Appeals Granted 2 Appeals Denied 0 Appeals Dropped 0 Appeals Tabled 0 All records are on file in the offices of the Inspection Department DEPARTMENT OF LAW IIIYCH<YYCOQI There are eight (8) cases pending in the Circuit Court for the County of Wayne, where the City of Livonia, and/or City officials, are involved either as plaintiffs or as defendants. Eight (8) other cases were resolved in 2003-2004 either pursuant to a stipulation or by final judgment of the Wayne County Circuit Court. There is one (1) civil case pending in the 16th District Court. Two (2) civil cases were resolved in the 16th District Conn. One of these cases had a money judgment granted by the Court which remains unpaid. Four (4) cases are pending in the Michigan Court of Appeals and three (3) other cases were resolved. Four (4) cases are pending in the United States District Court. 62 Seventy-four (74) cases are pending before the Michigan Tax Tribunal. Fifty (50) other cases were disposed of. (NOTE: Settlement agreements may have been reached in some of the cases reported as pending It is the practice of the Law Depanneent to keep a case open until the Tax Tribunal has entered a final order, the Tribunal often takes several weeks to enter final orders after receipt of the stipulation of the parties.) The Law Department has filed claims to preserve and protect the City's interest in the Bankruptcy Court relative to two (2) cases. The foregoing does not include any appeals taken in ordinance violation cases from the District Court to the Circuit Court, and/or the Court of Appeals, and/or the Supreme Court. 111 ki YP CN R6OU:i11 From December 2003 through November 2004, the following number of cases were disposed of in the Livonia District Court criminal Traffic Jury Trials Ordinance Misdemeanor 1219 2230 0 Ordinance 260 Druck Driving There are two (2) cases which were appealed from the 16th District Court to a higher court which are pending, one in the Wayne County Circuit Court and one in the Michigan Court of Appeals. In addition, four (4) other cases which were appealed from the 16th District Court to a higher court have been resolved. OPINIONS No formal opinions were issued by the Department of Law during 2003-04. Upon request, the Department issued a substantial number of recommendations in correspondence to the various City Departments, Boards and Commissions and the City Council by members of the legal staff upon various subjects and matters. This office represents the City and its officials from time to time in formal appeals and grievance proceedings before the Civil Service Commission. We also appear in matters 63 involving the City before various State agencies, including the Michigan Public Service Commission, the Michigan Employment Relations Commission and the Michigan Liquor Control Commission. ARBITRATION At present there are no arbitration cases pending in which this office is involved. One (1) other case was resolved. No civil rights complaints are pending before the Michigan Civil Rights Commission or EEOC. One (1) civil rights/EEOC complaint was resolved. ORDINANCES The following =her of ordinances, prepared by the Department of Law, were submitted m the City Council and were adopted by the Council during the year 2003-04: 7 amendments to the Zoning Ordinance and Zoning Map; 34 amendments to the substance of the Zoning Ordinance; 4 vacating ordinances; and 27 amendments to the Livonia Code of Ordinances. In addition, five (5) proposed ordinance amendments have been prepared and submitted to the City Council and the same are now awaiting Council action. Tax foreclosed property located at 14801 Farmington Road Property located at 14801 Farmington Road was purchased from Wayne County in 2003. Pursuant to Council Resolution 146-04, this property was sold back to Vincent and Christine Lee for the amount of the back taxes ($2,250.41) plus a $1,000.00 administration fee. This transaction was completed on April 20, 2004. 64 2. Property located at Bai Lynn Park Pursuant to Council Resolution 211-04, a Grant of Easement was given by the City to SBC for the consideration of $8,500.00. This transaction was completed on June 4, 2004. 3. Tax foreclosed property located at 14917 Country Club Pursuant to Council Resolution 390-04, property located at 14917 Country Club was purchased from Wayne County for $6,637.15. This transaction was completed on October 27, 2004. NOTE: Not included in this report are the numerous transactions involving the acquisition of easements without monetary consideration. 1. Preparation and drafting of proposed resolutions in connection with City Council meetings. 2. Providing a representative at meetings of the Zoning Board of Appeals, and, upon request, at meetings of the City Planning Commission, the Board of Trustees of the Employees Retirement System and other City commissions and agencies. 3. Preparation and review of all contracts entered into between the City and other persons, as well as approving "as to form" all legal documents that are processed in the City. 4. Approval, typing and transmission to the District Court warrant requests (541) as submitted by the Police Division and the Inspection Department 5. Provide assistance to other departments in the collection of delinquent fees, charges and taxes by taking whatever steps may be necessary, including the institution of litigation. 6. Refer to the Michigan Municipal Risk Management Authority for disposition all lawsuits and claims of action against the City which would be covered through the City's agreement with the Authority. 65 Provide legal assistance to various City department heads and supervisors with respect to labor maters, including review of proposed disciplinary actions. Citizens' disputes and problems requiring the advice and counsel of this office are increasing and require more time than ever before. DIRECT SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC The Library has experienced a gradual shift over the last few years, as is the common trend throughout all libraries, toward a far greater patron demand for and use of various electronic services. Library staff has begun to quantify these services by gathering statistics on intrmet and website use, as is reflected in the "statistical review" A the end of this report The various electronic services offered to citizens by the Library include free intrmet access at all 3 of its full-service locations, as well as providing both in - library and convenient at-home access via the Library website, to their library records, the ability to look A the card catalog and place requests for books, search for magazine articles, and link to over 800 informational websites selected and organized by the Library's professional information specialists. The free in -library computer services offered by the Library are especially crucial during these troubled economic times, due to the greater need to serve job hunters, the unemployed and other citizens who do not have computer access at home. The Library's E -newsletter now has almost 400 subscribers and not only highlights Library programs and services, but also features lists of interesting new reference books that have arrived at the Library along with the other interesting facts and trivia that are sent out each month Public meeting rooms provided at Civic Center, Noble and Sandburg Branches are constantly in demand as a foram for informational meetings and a venue for performances and are a vital partof the public services that Livonia has to offer. The Library was once again fortunate in the wonderful news coverage that it received. The Livonia Observer ran various articles throughout the year covering everything from the completion of the updated Teen Scene area at Civic Center Branch (courtesy of the Friends of the Library) to news items covering a wide range of Children's and Teen programming including: Pied Piper music class, the Library's Book Fair held at Bames & Noble featuring our mascot Dewey the Bear, and publishing the list of excellent Summer Reading program participants. The Detroit Free Press covered an Adult program on the presidents. The Detroit News gave the Library a great deal of coverage on specific programs offered at the different Library branches including several articles on the Teen 66 and Children's Summer Reading programs and highlighting events such as Clifford the Big Red Dog, Gemini (musical performance for children), Ya-Yo Man, Teen Music Workshop, Dr. Seuss' Centennial celebration. City Channel 8 taped several of the Noontime Concerts for local broadcast, as well as basic and intermediate interact classes. Videotapes hosted by library staff on basic intemet and card catalog use are also available for checkout The Library hosted monthly art exhibits provided by the Livonia Arts Commission, as well as coordinating a number of other displays including rock and mineral displays, W WB and D-Day memorabilia, a prehistoric mastadon bone found by a local resident, seasonal displays, and collections of antique needlework and depression glass. The Library continued to provide numerous popular and successful programs for the community. The Summer Reading program is always a major event. There were 2008 participants, consisting mainly of Children and Teens, but a pilot Adult Summer Reading program was also launched this year. Webster Elementary managed to take home the trophies for greatest participation, as well as greatest improved participation in the Summer Reading program. Noble, Sandburg and Civic Center branches all offer an ongoing series of story times including day and evening lap sit, drop-iv, preschool and toddler programs. Internet classes are offered for both adults and children, with special intermediate classes for adults on travel planning, security, online shopping, and e-mail. Other programs and services included: use of the library's genealogy computer, exam proctoring babysitting workshops, obituary searches, clowns, reptiles, family movies, teen mystery night, pet shows, skateboard demonstrations, Spoon Man, magic shows, teem anime nights, puppet shows, young authors workshop, teen music workshop, Yu- Gi-Oh tournaments, crafts programs, the Dr. Seuss Centennial celebration including an appearance by special celebrity guest reader Mayor Jack Engebretsom hand shadow demonstrations, student financial aid programs, guest authors, library tours and classroom visits. Parnering relationships between the Library and a variety of other state and local organizations continued this year. The Livonia Public Library participated in the Library of Michigan's "Michigan Reads!" project that encouraged families to read together and bond through reading. The Children's hbrarians co-sponsored ELVS (Early Literacy Volunteers) with Livonia Public Schools, which involved a total of 316 students and Whirs this year and mentored student storytellers from Madonna University as well. The Noontime Concert Series continues to be co-sponsored by the Livonia Arts Commission and other programs were also co-sponsored with the Rising Stars Youtheatre and the Detroit Story League, encouraging creativity and the important oral tradition of storytelling. FACTL=S Much of the activity regarding the Library's physical facilities revolved around our migration to the new Sim computer system as part of our membership in The Library Network's shared automation system. A great deal of time was dedicated to staff training, preparation of records, and upgrading or replacement of software and equipment 67 for the move to the new computer system 4 new servers were installed this year along with a number of upgraded workstations and increased security has been added through the use of Deep Freeze anti-virus software. Several new magazine and audiovisual storage units were added to the branches, as well as a dropbox on wheels at the Sandbmg Branch, courtesy of the generous donations of the Friends of the Livonia Public Library. The Library also received a free "Easy Cassette Book Machine" from the Library of Michigan for use by patrons with disabilities. Library service hours were maintained at the same slightly reduced level as last year, despite the loss of additional staff. Hours were staggered between branches to offer as much open time to citizens as possible with our reduced staff. Deliveries between branches continue despite the lack of a dedicated City vehicle for this purpose. The Library is grateful for the generous loan of the City Clerk's van for evening delivery. We continue to borrow a vehicle from the DPW pool for other deliveries, but due to the needs and demands of various City departments, there is not always a vehicle available for inter -library deliveries. The Library welcomed new Commissioner Audefte Palmer to fill the vacancy and serve out the remainder of the term brought about by the tragic death of Talo Am gmstou. Taki was a passionate and dedicated advocate for library services to our community and will be greatly missed. Anna Weidner and Harriet Larson were both re -appointed to serve mother term on the Commission beginning in October. The ongoing hiring freeze led to several internal promotions. Karen fisher was permanently promoted to the position of Library Aide II. 4 Library Pages were promoted to the position of temporary Clerical VIPs to help cover the loss of several permanent Clerk and Clerk -Typist positions resulting from resignations and the tragic death of Clerk -Typist Joyce Bobrowda. VIPs and hiring to maintain the current lower staffing level of Substitute Librarians and Library and Student Pages has allowed the Library to continue to function during the current staff shortage. There were 2 retirements this year. Librarian I Alicia Lesko and Library Aide I Michele Stmss were both valued employees and will be missed. We are hoping to fill the Aide vacancy via internal promotion, but the Librarian position remains unfilled under the current conditions of the hiring freeze. Staff communing in temporary promotional positions include: City Librarian Kathleen Momoe, Assistant Branch Librarian Becky Huang, Librarian II Carol Guerriero and part-time Librarian I Jack Visnaw. A total of 13 % FTE or 22 positions have been lost since the beginning of the hiring freeze, not including those permanent positions currently being covered by temporary VIPs. The millage continues to be the major source of revenue for the Library. In fiscal year 2003-2004 the millage accounted for 81.2 % of the budget and millage revenue for the 2004-2005 budget year is currently expected to remain at approximately 81.2 %. The portion of the Library's budget support that comes from the millage has shifted in recent 68 years, due to reductions in the contribution from the City's General Fund. Direct State Aid to Libraries is expected to be the same as last year, but is not a stable or guaranteed source of annual revenue. General Fund and State Library Aid monies are both threatened by the ongoing State budget crisis. Any additional reductions in funds from those sources could produce a potentially devastating effect on Library service to our community. The Library continues to seek outside funds to help supplement services to the community. The Library began participating in the "Campbell's Labels for Education" program. Labels that are collected count towards redemption points resulting in additional educational equipment and supplies for the Library. The Livonia Arts Commission approved a $2,000 grant towards the support of the popular Noontime Concert Series. The Library held a Book Fair at Barnes & Noble bookstore, where a percentage of the sales from library patrons who came in with a special coupon on a given day would be donated back to the Library. Library patrons spent over $2,000 that day, which resulted in a 20% donation from the sales. Various small grants included funding of Children's programming sponsored by private organizations like Target Corporation and government agencies like the Michigan DNR. The Library received a Reed/Gates grant for over $13,000 to be used towards replacing outdated computer equipment, which will directly benefit patrons that use our catalog and internet computers (especially job hunters and the unemployed). The Library extends their heartfelt thanks to all of the private individuals, as well as a number of Library employees and their relatives and friends, who have been donating money to the Library in honor ofweddings and retirements, as well as monies in memory of their loved ones. The Unique Management collection agency still continues to collect fines and recover thousands of dollars worth of library books and other items, even though complications with the Library's new automated system caused this service to be suspended for several months. The Friends of Livonia Public Library awarded a Page Scholarship in the amount of $1500 to mother worthy staff member this year to help fund their college education. The Friends held three used book sales, which generated an average of $29,500 per sale (up from last year's average of $29,000). The Library is especially appreciative of the Friends' dedicated hard work and generous donations during these hard economic times. Statistics generated from the The Library Network shared computer system (ie: Circulation Statistics) are not totally accurate for this year, due to the migration to the new Sirsi computer system. There were periods of time when statistics were either not collected or were not completely gathered by the new system October2003 October 2004 Library Program Attendance 29,496 25,077 Meeting Room Attendance 52,966 53,359 69 Registered Borrowers 43,504 47,183 Items in the Collection 291,125 295,885 Circulation 715,108 658,550 Library Website Usages N/A 113,268 (11 months)* Internet Workstation Usages N/A 38,654(10 months)* *These are new statistics that the Library began gathering this year, which relate to the increasing use of technology-based services at the Library. PARKS AND RECREATION The Parks and Recreation Department offers programs and services that enhance the quality of life and general well being of its users and their families. Our parks, facilities and programs are opportunities where leisure time can become wholesome, fun and relaxing to the residents of Livonia. The Department also maintains communication with and delivers services to other City Departments, citizen organizations, community businesses and the Livonia and Clarenceville Public Schools. The Department is responsible for the administration of the following: Archery Range Ice Arenas (2) Athletics Leisure Services Capital Improvements Park Facilities Community Recreation Center Public Relations Golf Courses (3) Swimming Pools The Department is the contract administrator for the golf coarses, ice arenas and Shelden Park pool. Parks and Recreation continues to offer many benefits to our residents as well as non- residents, our programs have provided excellent opportunities for individuals and families to enhance their quality of life. We recognize this importance just by evaluating the number of contact hours our participants are exposed to activities associated with the Department of Parks and Recreation. These contact hours would be much greater if we counted the parents, siblings, officials, volunteer workers or spectators. We have listed those contact hours throughout our report 70 ARCHERYRANGE The Department of Parks and Recreation opened its outdoor Archery Range this year on April 1. The range has seven targets at various distances with an additional broad -head range. The range hosted several instructional workshops throughout the summer. Several area Boy Scout and Girl Scout groups utilized the range for badge certifications. The range is open April through October on weekends from 10:00 a.m. — 4:00 p.m. and on Tuesdays and Thursdays in September through October from 4:00 p.m until dusk. This year, the Parks and Recreation Department increased daily usage fees for the Archery Range. Along with these fees, the department also instituted a seasonal pass. Approximately 437 people attended the range through general admission and season passes and the revenue for the range is $2,855. We attribute this to the exposure that the Archery Range has received as well as to the newfound popularity of the sport of archery. ATHLETICS Athletics had mother successful year. We offered over 30 different activities for team sports, had over 6,000 participants and played over 2,000 games. We offered the following team sports for participants ranging in age from four years to over 65 years old. We had over 140,000 contact hours in our athletic programs. PROGRAMS AGES Winter AVG. GAMS Men's Basketball 18 & older UAL Basketball 14 & under Summer Holum* UAL Baseball 16 & under Collegiate Baseball 20 & under Men's Softball 18 & over Men's Modified 18 & over Women's Softball 18 & over Cocd Softball 18 & over Senior Softball 55 & over T -Ball 5-6 yr olds Coach Pitch 7-8 yr olds Girl's Slowpitch 12,400 # of # of # of AVG. GAMS c NTAc TEAMS GAMES PLAYERS TIME Holum* 22 154 264 1 to 4,620 83 415 1,215 1.25 his 15,562 85 500 1,275 2.5 his 50,000 8 124 160 2.5 his 12,400 72 504 1,2% 1.25 his 25$00 11 77 198 125 has 3,850 13 91 234 1.25 has 4,550 16 112 288 1.25 has 5,600 7 70 105 1.25 has 4;200 31 121 558 1.25 has 6$00 38 152 684 1.25 has 7,600 Pigtail 10 & under 7 28 126 1.25 his 1,400 Powderpuff 12 & under 8 32 LM 1.25 his 1,600 *Contact Hours: 1. Baseball and softball equals number of games x 40 (2 teams ® 20/team) x length of game. 2. Basketball equals number of games x 30 (2 teams ® 15/team) x length of game. 3. Does mtimlude practice time or number of spectators at games. 71 The Livonia Community Recreation Center celebrated its first anniversary on April 14, 2004. The center has experienced an outstanding response from the community. The 230 employees have worked very hard to serve the multiple needs of such a diverse group of users. We celebrated our one-year anniversary by holding an hourly raffle to the pass holders and daily users. There were prize giveaways such as t -shirts, coffee mugs, and gift certificates donated to the event by local businesses. Those that entered in our hourly drawings were automatically entered to win our various Grand Prizes, which included: golf, two Costco gift baskets, and a Joes Produce gift basket Cookies, coffee and lemonade were also available to our 1,168 participating guests. A total of 16,434 annual passes were purchased, with 94% sold to Livonia residents. This continues to be the number one choice of utilizing the facility. Following is a breakdown of each classification: Adult 1,197 Couple 1,187 Family 12,414 Senior 684 Young Adult 295 Youth/Peen 284 Matinee 38 Business 271 Corporate 64 This past year, day passes were popular for those who used the facility on atrial or sbort- term basis. Day pass purchases average 185 per day during summer and 156 per day during winter. Or peak hours of operation seem to be from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Day pass usage is as follows: Residents Nov -Residents Youth 20,446 7,518 Teens 12,752 2,669 Adults 9,828 4,766 Seniors 1,535 331 TOTAL 44,561 15,284 The Community Center houses the Livonia Public Schools gymnastics program. The schools have over 500 students utilizing the Community Center facility throughout the year. The Community Center had its first maintenance shut down the week before Labor Day. Many items were taken care of including, refinishing the gym and aerobics floors, painting and major cleaning. This yearly event takes place to protect the investment made by the community. We broke ground for a storage building in November. In addition to the storage, rest arms are included for convenience to the outdoor features of the skate park, in-line rink and volleyball court 72 Leisure/Sports Throughout the past year, the CommunityCenter has provided additional opportunities to am members and guests by expanding am adult league play and enrichment classes. The Livonia Junior Athletic League basketball program played over 340 games here. We've also grown in leaps and bounds in am youth sports leagues & clinics, summer camps, and leisure programs. The Community Center also offered special holiday events such as a Christmas Holiday Social and Candy Cane Hunt, a New Years Eve Celebration, and a Halloween Spooky Monster Magic Show. The Community Center's Kid Quarters, 2 -hour Short Term Care Facility, is proud to say we've provided care for over 1,300 families. Ori PROGRAMS AGES PARTICIPANTS HOURS Leisure & Sports, Leagues All 2,350 individuals 108,100 Kid -Quarters 12 & under 10,344 visits 20,688 Battle of the Bands All 232 attended 1,160 Rentals We continue to play host to birthday partes, Bar Mitzvah, reunions and business meetings with revenue of $193,224.00. A variety of special events such as were offered: City Wide Garage Sale Trainomar a (2) Irish Dance Competition Battle of the Bands (2) Fit Kids Free Day Gymnastics Exhibition Music Under the Stars (2) Blood Drive (2) Fitness/Wellness The Fitness Hub has generated a lot of buzz. The Community Center is continuing its policy of offering free equipment orientations to my one that is interested. The personal [mining staff has remained very busy with personal training sessions, teens in training classes and other aerobic classes. The Fit Hub added nine new cardio pieces to reduce wait time to run on treadmills or use the cross trainers. The Fit Hub has 59 cardio machines, 16 selectorized weight -[mining machines, 2 cabled functional trainers, 2 sets of 5lb-10016 dumbbells and 1 set of 2016-11016 curl bars. The 73 Fit Hub also has a good selection of plate -loaded machines ranging from flat benches; incline benches, a smith machine and a squat rack. Another amenity that members are able to take advantage of is the enemise Cardin Theater that is a function found on most of our cardio equipment. The enemise unit enables the exerciser to tune into there favorite TV show while getting their workout in. Fitness and Wellness programming is going well. We have a variety of classes that the whole family can participate in. The climbing wall is a featured attraction. We offer a range of youth and adult climbing classes throughout the week. The land aerobic classes have become very popular with our membership. The Community Center is currently offering 59 classes. Yoga, kickboxing and women on weights are our most popular classes. Personal Training Sessions from Nov. 03 -Nov. 04 = 1,740 sessions (each session= 1 hr) Aquatics The first full year of aquatic programs in the new Livonia Community Recreation Center went well. We offered many different aquatic activities ranging from youth and adult swim lessons to diving, synchronized swimming and water exercise classes. We also had three different swim teams using our facility for practice and meets. During the past year of classes/programs we had over 4,211 participants. The attendance in the aquatic area was taken daily. From November 2003 to October 2004 we had over 154,320 swimmers, give or take 100. The Lap Pool was shut down for annual maintenance in April and the Leisure Pool was shut down for annual maintenance in August. In our indoor swimming pool activities, we had 60,840 contact hours 4 O 4 O AVERAGE CONTACT PROGRAM AGES DAYS PARTICIPANTS TIME HOURS Aerobic Classes 18 & up 7 4,277 1 hr 29,939 Climbing Wall 6 & up 1 485 2 hr 970 Teens in Training 13-15 1 156 1 hr 156 Personal Training Sessions from Nov. 03 -Nov. 04 = 1,740 sessions (each session= 1 hr) Aquatics The first full year of aquatic programs in the new Livonia Community Recreation Center went well. We offered many different aquatic activities ranging from youth and adult swim lessons to diving, synchronized swimming and water exercise classes. We also had three different swim teams using our facility for practice and meets. During the past year of classes/programs we had over 4,211 participants. The attendance in the aquatic area was taken daily. From November 2003 to October 2004 we had over 154,320 swimmers, give or take 100. The Lap Pool was shut down for annual maintenance in April and the Leisure Pool was shut down for annual maintenance in August. In our indoor swimming pool activities, we had 60,840 contact hours *Average 74 #of #of AVG CONTACT EVENT AGES DAYS PARTICIPANTS TIME HOURS Swim Lessons All 7 2,505 .75 hrs 13,151 Water Exercise Adults 6.5 1,706 1 h 11,089 Swim Team Rentals 18 & under 300 45s 2 hrs 27,000 Swim Meets 18 &under 12 200 4 hrs 9,600 *Average 74 GOLF COURSES The City's three Golf Courses, Idyl Wyld, Fox Creek and Whispering Willows had a successful season considering the unfavorable weather conditions at the beginning of the season including an abnormally wet month of May with over 9" of rain. Rounds Played (as of 10-31-04) Whispering Willows 41,573 Idyl Wyld 35,926 Fox Creek 44,456 TOTAL 122,135 Capital expenditures continued to be placed on hold, although T.J.W., Inc. managed to take down an additional 120 dead Ash trees. DPS has been overseeing a project at Idyl Wyld that concentrates on the north creek and its ability to retain and slow down water flowing east into the neighboring subdivisions. Every effort to complete the project in 2004 has been made; however, the completion will not be until spring of 2005. Additional programs of the year were: 1. Senior Citizens Golf Leagues and Championships. 2. Women's 9 and 18 hole Golf Leagues and Championships. 3. Livonia Youth Golf Program and Tournaments were a success. All three coarses were utilized for junior golf. 4. Youth golf clinics at all three golf coarses. Both free and paid programs were available. Programpartcipation has continued to increase. 5. Hearts of Livonia and Livonia Symphony golf outings were a success. 6. Observer-Eccemac Golf Tournament continues to be popular. 7. Livonia businesses hosted more events at the City courses than in years past, including the Livonia Chamber of Commerce for the second year in a row. 8. Leagues A Fox Creek and Idyl Wyld continued to be a success. 9. Evening leagues were added at Whispering Willows for the first time. 10. The Livonia Seniors donated (ands to plant trees in an effort to replace dead Ash trees. 11. Capital projects were approved for the 2005 season. Mos[ notable is phase one of the Ash tree restoration at Fox Creek. ICE ARENA The City of Livonia owns two ice arenas, Eddie Edgar and Devon Aire. Both rinks (three sheets of ice) are under contract and managed by the Livonia Hockey Association (LEA). The figure skating program is administered by the Parks and Recreation Department The program consists of learn to skate lessons, competition practice and four synchronized trams. 75 The program year finished with am spectacular "From Here to Eternity" ice show. The show is made possible by the 183 skaters, skating staff and countless hours of parent volunteer time. PARK FACILITIES The City's park system issued approximately 432 permits for picnics at Rotary, John Stymelski Veteran's, Bicentennial, Clements Circle, Mies and Shelden Park. Our revenue for the pavilion rentals was $23,735 for the season. Over 5 picnic parks were rented. The parks were also the sites of numerous special events and activities. Crossconntry ski trails were set at Rotary Park Whispering Willows and Idyl Wyld Golf Course and had limited use. The Rotary Club continues to assist us in park improvements such as providing a walkway from the fountain plaza to the play structures. Plans are underway for a walking path in the park. The Department places great emphasis on special events and programs. Programs are sponsored and staffed by the Department, while special events are offered on a limited basis by local businesses and civic organizations that provide professional input, volunteers and/or financial assistance. It is am iment to play an integral role in developing community spirit, a sense of family and individual pride, by offering these opportunities; thereby, making a difference for am residents. Over 18,000 individuals have benefited from participating in our leisure service activities. We had over 137,500 hours in special events and programs 76 #of #of CONTACT C SPONSORED EVENT AGES DAYS' TIME PEOPLE HOLES BY PROGRAMS WiuR /Spnup/Fall Rolla&lahne Skating 5&up 24wks t 110 2,640 Rivenede Arena Youth Bowling League 18mda 26 wks 2 754 39208 Mari -Bowl, Clovalmes, wo a1 d&W00JhsxI Summer Plnyg mdl Program 5-10 26 5 255 33,150 Packs&Recreation Terris Lessons 6-18 8 l 74 592 Packs&Recreation Employee Races Adult 89 l 56 4,984 Pwks&Recreation Into to Archery l0 -w 3 4 30 360 Pwia & Recreation TriadIm 6-12 l 3 41 361 Walmart Total Baseball 7-17 3 4 26 312 Pwia&Recreation Marl Science Camps 5-12 l8 16 76 21,888 Packs&Recreation NatoreCamp 5-12 4 2 16 128 Pam&Recreation SPEcfAL E4'ENTS Winter Saom's Wodkslo Calling K-2 l 5 37 74 Livonia Kvmucs& 76 The most important communication tool of all is wordof-mouth by satisfied customers/participants. Through staff training we emphasize the importance in serving our customers/guests. On a daily basis we continue to improve our means of communication through the City's web site, Community Center monument marquee, plasma screens, message boards, kiosk, display board, press releases, cable releases, event flyers, guest appearances on Rec Check on channel 8 and at civic organization/business meetings. Distribution of comment cards for: aquatics, facilities, Community Center, golf courses and programs continue to provide important feedback on our performance. 77 (o�a Cn�n tnts.R somees Sana Bowling 3-6 l L5 119 1,785 Man -Bowl Sana Mailbox 7 -under l 5 230 115 Livonia Kiwauis Essay Contest 5-12 l l 53 53 FnerAs of The Barn Tree LightingC nonony AD l 2 350+ 700+ Rotary,Libranes,Cvic clwms&YONh Chas Lunch w/Saoa 12underl 2 103 206 Jaycees & Kiwanis Elks Hoop Shot Contest &13 l 25 54 135 Livonia Elks Lodge MRPA Hoop Shot Contest 7 14 l 2 124 248 MRPA Daddy/Daughter Dance 4-16 l 2 480 960 Parks&Recreation Mother/Son Dance 49 l 2 197 394 Parks &Recreation Civic Chorus Corvert All t l 300 300 Civic Chorus Winferfit All 24 15 4,000 6,000 &Various Croups Spring Take Pride in Livonia AD l 5 230 1,750 Rotary Qub, Scouts& School Croups M®oval Day Ceremo� All l 4 100 480 Veteran's Alliance Pasta Egg Hour 12 under l 3 900 2,700 Liwca Rotary&Jayvees Civic Chorus Corvert 18&op 2 2 300 12M Livonia Chic Chome EasterBurry Lunch 12underl 2 60 120 Jaycees &Kiwa s Atc15 Hit, Rom 7-24 l 25 83 20750 Pants &Recreation Summer Music Under Says All 10 8 650 13,000 Arts Commission itelzyfirLife All l 25 200 200 Ciy Departerauts Youth Fitness Meet 7-14 l 4 125 500 Par1a;&Recreahm Shot to Score All l 4 23 88 Pam&Recreation Fail Lunch with Goblins 12 -under 1 2 80 160 t,vma tayeea&wwa s FaLLHarvest Fest All l 4 low 4,000 Co®unity Resources Livonia Holiday Parade All l 2 3,000 6,000 PRDA Elks Soccer Shot 13underl 35 l8 63 Livorno Elks Lodge Haunted Stroll 12underl 25 1,888 471 FrieMs of The Barn Craft Homs 12 under l 5 75 375 Friends of The Barn Hunfer Safety H&op 2 14 52 1,456 Parke&Re¢eatiaa; DNR Pont, Pass &Kick 15Undert l5 l8 27 LJAL The most important communication tool of all is wordof-mouth by satisfied customers/participants. Through staff training we emphasize the importance in serving our customers/guests. On a daily basis we continue to improve our means of communication through the City's web site, Community Center monument marquee, plasma screens, message boards, kiosk, display board, press releases, cable releases, event flyers, guest appearances on Rec Check on channel 8 and at civic organization/business meetings. Distribution of comment cards for: aquatics, facilities, Community Center, golf courses and programs continue to provide important feedback on our performance. 77 Our "L" Magazine, which varies in size from 56 to 72 pages, has been received well and is a great source in distributing information onto our residents informing them of the benefits and opportunities available to them. SWAvAvBNG POOLS Botsford Pool opened June 5 and Clements Circle Pool opened on June 11. Botsford closed August 29 and Clements Circle closed September 6. Over 16,686 participants enjoyed the pools this year (10,048 at Clements Circle and 6,638 at Botsford) during open swim, including both day and season passes. This summer we completed some necessary repairs to both pools prior to opening. Both facilities have new filter media and Clements Circle has a new pool heater. This summer we lengthened our swim lessons to 50 minutes and 644 children participated in our learn to swim program. 144 season swim packages were sold this season, giving us a total of 494 individual pass holders. Family fun night was offered at both pools weekly. The inaugural Super Youth Triathlon was held at Clements Circle Pool with 40 participants enjoying a great day of competition. We had over 8,051 contact hours in our outdoor aquatic programs this year. Activities and projects handled by the Planning Commission and/or the Planning Department for the year 2004 included the following: Subdivision Plats Considered Meetings Held Preliminary Plats 0 Public Hearings 10 Final Plats 0 Regular Meetings 21 78 #of #of AVG CONTACT EVENT AGES DAYS PARTICIPANTS TIME HOURS Swim Lessons 18 & under 8 644 .83 hrs 4,276 Swim Team Rental 18 & under 40 35* 2 hrs 2,800 Private Rentals All 15 25* 1 h 375 Special Events All 12 50* 1 hr 600 *Average Activities and projects handled by the Planning Commission and/or the Planning Department for the year 2004 included the following: Subdivision Plats Considered Meetings Held Preliminary Plats 0 Public Hearings 10 Final Plats 0 Regular Meetings 21 78 Extensions 0 Study Meetings 21 Special Regular Meetings 1 Petitions Processed Amendments Rezoning 15 Master Plan Amendments Waiver of Use 38 Language Amendments (Ord. 543) Vacating 1 Site Plans 28 Site Condominiums 4 Sipe Permits 14 Greenbelt & Landscape 6 Satellite Dish 0 In 2004, construction commenced on two (2) significant development projects. The first is College Park. College Park is a planned business campus being developed on 45 acres at the south end of property owned by Schoolcraft College which is located on the east side of Haggerty Road between Six Mile and Seven Mile Roads. When finished, it will feature approximately 450,000 square fret of office space and a variety of retail conveniences, restaurants, and banking services. Phase 1 will officially open by year's end and will include three (3) signature restaurants — Claddagh Irish Pub, Mitchell's Seafood Market and Bravo — and a 15,000 sq.ft. retail center known as The Marketplace. The second significant project that got underway this year is Golf Ridge Condominiums. Golf Ridge is a planned community of 118 detached cluster homes located on the south side of Eight Mile Road approximately % mile east of Newburgh Road. The site of this major housing development consists of 47 acres of surplus property that was once part of the surrounding Glen Eden Cemetery. The development will feature 2 and 3 bedroom ranch and colonial style homes that will be priced from the mid to high $300,000 range. In 2004, the Planning Department was closely involved in a number of other new developments, as well as several expansion and redevelopment projects, including: 1) Expansion of the Comerica Operations Center at the northeast comer of Six Mile and Haggerty Roads; 2) Approval of a new Social Security Administration building at 34010 Plymouth Road (formerly the Hi-Fi Gas Station); 3) Approval of a new automotive repair facility on the west side of Newburgh Road between Schoolcraft Road and Amrhein Road; 4) Expansion and remodeling of the Kroger grocery store at Livonia Plaza shopping center on Five Mile Road between Merriman and Middlebelt Roads; 5) Demolition and reconstruction of the gas station A the northwest comer of Seven Mile Road and Inkster Road; 6) Approval of three (3) bill service restaurants A College Park; 7) Approval of a new National City Bank at the Pentagon Entertainment center on Haggerty Road between Seven and Eight Mile Roads; 79 8) Redevelopment of the Taco Bell restaurant at 11707 Merriman Road, just north of Plymouth Road; 9) Approval of Pallagia Site Condominiums (7 detached dwelling units) located on Joy Road between Wayne Road and Harvey Avenue; 10) Approval of Maple Woods Site Condominiums (9 detached dwelling units) on the west side of Gill Road between Navin Avenue and Norfolk Avenue; and 11) Expansion of the Learning Tree Child Care Center located at 32955 Plymouth Rd. 2004 Land Use Field Study 2004 Land Use Neighborhood Study 2004 Land Use Inventory Report 2004 Land Use Quarter Section Colored Maps 2004 Lot Splits Reports - 40 The Planning Department oversees and coordinates the activities and functions of the office of Economic Development. The Department provides oversight, guidance and assistance to the Economic Development Director. The new and expanded program is to lend assistance to business and industrial firms in the City by maintaining a list of available properties and buildings, provide guidance through the permit process and by administering to the Economic Development Corporation. Special emphasis of the new program is to assist in promoting, retaining and attracting local industrial, commercial and retail enterprises within the City thereby strengthening and protecting the local economy and tax base. Below is a summary of the major activities that the City's Economic Development Office has been involved with over the past year: • Retention Calls & Lunch Meetings: 109, including 28 joint calls with MEDC. (This number does not include phone contact work with businesses.) • City Representative Id Networking events: charity, chamber, breakfast & after hours events etc. 22 • Customer Service and/or Conflict Resolution: 31 issues • Tax Incentive Program A) Created 5 new Industrial Development Districts B) Completed 6 Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificates ig C) Completed one IFEC transfer and one IFEC amendment • Conducted 13 Council Public Hearings • 3 Public Speaking Engagements: A) Livonia Chamber Breakfast B) Browne Troop C Coolridge LPS C) Plymouth Road Tech Center case study for MEDA Urban Task Force Seminars Memberships Committees • Michigan Econ. Dev. Association (MEDA) • International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC) • National Manufacturing Week C Chicago • Assembly Canada Trade Show C Mississauga • MEDA Economic Development Urban Task Force (ongoing) • MEDA Attraction Seminar • ICSC Michigan Idea Exchange Misc. • Created Economic Development Orientation Notebook for new Council • Organized informal Economic Development Partnership Roundtable • Capital Ave. roadway repair & resurfacing (Engineering) • 13 Building Search/Attraction packets, prospect toms and/or cold calls • 13 Media interviews (Detroit News, Free Press & Observer) • Testified atone MEGA Hearing C Lansing for Infineon 2004 New Business & Expansion Highlights lists are "new jobs" • Infineon from Nordiville $1.1 million, 21,118 s.f. 50jobs • Classic Container from Plymouth 203,100 s.f. 135 jobs 81 • Comerica Bank $9.1 million, 64,000 s.f. expansion 100 newjobs • J.C. Gibbons Manufacturing $1.3 million renovation • Virginia Tile expansion 80,000 s.f expansion to 120K s.f. add 25 jobs • Hamilton Engineering from Westland, 24 jobs • Industrial Valves & Piping, 18 jobs • Golden Refrigerant from Plymouth, 20,000 s.f, 12 jobs • Lloyd Waters Associates from Dearborn Heights, 12 jobs • Delft Gear from Wixom (TIFCO), $1.25 milhon, 40 newjobs • Webasto, $2.39 milhon M&E expansion, 15 newjobs • Roush Industries, $8.1 million, 125,000 s.f. expansion & 100 jobs • Country Fresh, $7.3 million M&E expansion 2004 Job losses • Digitron (moving in Feb. 2005) 350 fidltime 150 part-timejobs • Brown& Williamson Tobacco Corp. 38 jobs • National chain closings impacting Livonia: Chi Chi's & Cooker's The Planning Department continues to provide oversight and clerical support to the Plymouth Road Development Authority (PADA). The full-time Director of the Plymouth Road Development Authority works with the Planning Director and department staff m coordinating and administering the various programs as assigned by the Authority. The Department secretary maintains custody of records, books, documents and other papers of the Authority. Planning Department personnel attend all meetings of the Board and keep a record of its proceedings. Improvements completed by the Plymouth Road Development Authority m 2004 consisted of the frill replacement of all stationary "Welcome Banners' and "Seasonal Banners". The existing banner program had stationary banners occurring only at the major mile road intersections and seasonal banners were placed on the next two light poles from these intersections. The new program implemented this year expanded the 82 program to include both the half mile or collector road intersections and mile road intersections to receive the "Stationary Banners'. The "Seasonal Banners' were Wen placed on every fourth street fight pole from the various intersections. In all a total of 52 "Stationary Banners" are in place and on a seasonal basis 168 banners are on display. Other improvements completed this program year consisted of replacement of damaged or cracked sidewalk sections at various locations an Plymouth Road. In all, thirty-two (32) sections of sidewalks were replaced with new concrete and two utility manhole covers had to be lowered to avoid trip hazards. At the northeast comer of Plymouth Road and Farmington Road a decorative wall was added to the brick plaza with ten new brick piers constructed along Plymouth Road. This construction work was needed to match the wall design and brick piers in place at the other three comers of this intersection. One hundred and fifty (150) replacement trees were platted on the Plymouth Road condor early in the spring of 2004. The Emerald Ash Borer caused the death of one hundred and forty (140) Ash trees, and ten (10) other tree species had died from other causes. A variety of new trees were selected and planted to create a broader diversity of trees to lessen the potential problem of am street trees being lost to a species specific disease. UMVIR The Planning Department has prepared many new maps for City use and has revised others. These maps are used at the various public hearings conducted by the Planning Commission and City Council. The maps are also made available to other City departments and groups. GIS The Planning Department continues to work closely with the Information Systems Department and other City Departments involved in the development and maintenance of the City's desktop Geographic Information System (GIS). The City's GIS is a powerful collection of computer hardware and software designed to visualize, explore, query and analyze data geographically. The Planning Department utilizes the GIS on a daily basis for a variety of planning related tasks including: mapping, obtaining land use statistics and information, generating muting labels for public notification purposes, and much more. As part of its responsibility of providing accurate and current land use information, the Planning Department maintains the following spatial GIS layers and accompanying attribute information: 83 Zoning Liquor Licenses Act 198 Industrial Districts Existing Land Use Wireless Communication Facilities Vicinity Control Areas Future Land Use Truck Routes Building Footprints PLANNING DATABASE The Planning Department continues to expand the use of its computer database, which was designed and developed for the purpose of tracking and storing information about all of the various petitions that the Department is responsible for overseeing. The new database was created with several benefits in mind, including faster and more efficient delivery of information to residents, other City Departments and developers, better record keeping, and expandability and compatibility with other computer software programs including the GIS. The Planning database was developed using Microsoft Access and includes detailed information on each petition including the type of project, the review procedure, the applicant, critical deadlines (i.e., public notification), past history, zoning, etc. Select information can be linked directly with the GIS and viewed in a spatial context. For example, maps can be generated showing the locations of all properties involved in certain types of land use proposals (i.e., restamants), over a given period of time. As of November 2004, the Planning database contains detailed information on approximately 1,288 petitions. Hundreds of hours have been spent supplying other departments with technical help including: Community Resources Assessor's Office Historical Commission Engineering/Inspection Legal Department Library Commission Parks &Rec. Finance Department Historic Preservation Housing Commission SITE PLANS Since the adoption in July of 1972 of the General Site Plan Approval Ordinance, approximately 1,151 site plans for commercial and office developments have been processed. Recommendations are made on site development proposals in order that functional, aesthetically pleasing developments, which are compatible to surrounding developments, are accomplished. Through landscape treatment of sites, the Planning Commission and Department maintain strong emphasis on quality of site developments. 84 LIVONIA DIVISION OF POLICE Smmmort Services The Administration section consists of the Chief of Police, one Deputy Chief, three Captains (one Support Services Division, one Uniform Division, one Investigative Division), one Sergeant, one Police Officer, one Program Supervisor, one Account Cleric and one Clerk -Typist The bureau is responsible for the efficient day-to-day operation of the department Preparing and maintaining the budget, purchasing, training, personnel, labor relations, contact with citizen groups, and investigating citizen complaints are also important functions. During fiscal 2004, the Training Division coordinated the attendance of our officers at 215 off site training classes. Of our officers, 128 attended 40 hours of in-house training through our Police Officer Refresher Training Program. The training division also oversaw the application and receipt of police officer "302" fiords, dispatcher wireless 9-1-1 training funds, the Bullet Proof Vest Program and the Local Law Enforcement Block Grant. Orientation training and evaluation for one newly hired dispatcher was provided. The firearms range provided training to all officers a minimum of two times during the year as well as extensive training by the SWAT team and several outside agencies. The training division also oversaw the administration of the department's Fitness Incentive Program and the popular 13 -week Citizen's Police Academy. Communications This office is staffed by one full time Communications Supervisor. Activities include maintenance of the Ericsson radio system (including over 550 mobiles and prep radios citywide, dispatch room and site equipment) and forty "in -car" video systems. Other duties include the maintenance of U.P.S. machine and its battery bank and the support of Computer Services in the maintenance and programming of forty in -car computer systems. Commuter Section This bureau consists of one Police Sergeant, one Police Officer, one Computer Administrator DD, and one full time Data Processor (one Data Processor below staffing level). Computer Services is responsible for maintaining and improving the department's IT infrastructure. This includes deploying, servicing and supporting new and existing hardware and software (including mobile units), as well as providing statistical information and reporting tools. Computer Services is also a disaster recovery site for CLENHS and a training center as well. 85 It should be noted that a new reporting system has been implemented this past year, and as such, statistical information will be affected see notations at bottom id'chart. Activities Est. Fiscal Fiscal 2003 2004 % Chaoee Total Incidents CAD Runs 41,370 38,679 -6.5 *Reports Written 11,263 7,890 -29.9 "Property Items 11,703 5,942 -49.2 *"Victim/Complainant Witness 28,716 24,904 -13.2 Adult Arrests 3,971 3,862 -2.7 Juvenile Artests 329 322 -2.1 Stolen/Recovered Vehicles 287 252 -12.2 Traffic Tickets 32,741 33,981 3.8 *The number of reports written has been affected by two factors: Warrant arrests and ops arrests no longer require written reports; and multiple incidents can be written on the same report **The number of property items has been affected by the way that it is reported to the state, items are `grouped" together, rather than independently counted. ***Additionally, VCW's does not take into consideration the reduction in "complainants" for warrent arrests. All categorises in the estimated columns are calculated by murrg actual figures up to 10-19-04. Central Records Central Records is staffed by one Sergeant, five Clerk Typists and two Clerk DD's. This bureau receives and files all incident reports and arrest documents, forwarding the proper documentation to Stateand Federal agencies. In addition, they fulfill request information from Freedom of Information, Subpoenas, Discovery Orders and are responsible for the issuance of pistol purchase permits. Central Records personnel also review and enter reports and traffic citations into the database. 86 Activities TOTAL REVENUE: $45,161 $47,922.40 ProoerN/Licensme The Property & Licensing Unit is staffed by a Fiscal Fiscal impounded vehicles, daily maintenance of the Processed: 2003 2004 % Change Accident Reports 1,379 1,026 -26.0 Incident Reports 251 305 21.5 PV License 54 91 68.5 Fingerprints 736 718 -2.4 Fingerprints NIC 42 14 -66.7 FOIA 920 927 .76 LCC 11 18 64.0 Gun Permits 633 480 -24.0 Gun Permits NIC 88 147 67.0 Record clearance 308 370 20.0 Gun Registrations 1,421 1,498 +5.4 Park permits 236 212 -10.0 Solicitors 2 12 500.0 Tapes (VT, AT, CD) FOIA 160 110 -31.0 Photographs — FOIA 328 201 -38.0 Pages copied—FOIA 9,654 5,363 -45.0 TOTAL REVENUE: $45,161 $47,922.40 ProoerN/Licensme The Property & Licensing Unit is staffed by a sergeant and a police officer. Work activities include the processing of property and evidence, control and hacking of impounded vehicles, daily maintenance of the in -car videotapes and DVDs, taxicab licensing and licensing investigations under Ti0e 5 of the Livonia Code of Ordinances. The following are estimaes for fiscal year 2004, shouv next to las[ year's estimates. 2003 2004 % Change Public Vehicle Permit Applications investigate / 60 60 0 processed Taxicab Inspections 22 15 -31.8 Business License Applications investigated 75 60 -20 Impounded Vehicles processed 1,730 1,450 -16.2 Property items received/pmcessed 3,500 4,000 14.3 M Investieative Division Detective Bureau The Detective Bureau is comprised of several units within the Investigative Section. The Detective Bureau includes General Investigations, Youth Crimes, Sex Crimes, the Crime Scene/ldentification Unit, Crime Prevention and Court Services Unit. Six sergeants, thirteen police officers and one clerk typist staff these units. The Executive Lieutenant of the Investigative Section is the officer in charge of the Detective Bureau. School Resource Officer program is staffed by five police officers. One sergeant and six police officers correctly staff the General Investigations Unit This unit investigates the majority of serious crimes reported to the police department, including but not limited to, assaults, robberies, larcenies, home invasions, frauds and car thefts. One police officer and one sergeant are assigned to investigate Youth Crimes. These officers also assist with other investigations and assist the other units within the bureau. Ove officer is the Polygraph Operator. This officer, along with two others and a sergeant, are assigned to Sex Crimes. These officers also investigate domestic, stalking, harassment, and telephone complaints. One sergeant is assigned to Crime Prevention. This officer conducts training seminars for businesses and citizen groups. One sergeant and one police officer are assigned to Court Services/LCC. These officers process all warrants issued by the court and enter the warrants in LEIN. The officers also investigate all applicants for Michigan Liquor Contra] Commission (MLCC) licenses and enforce MLCC laws and rules. This includes on-site inspections, decoy operations, citing violations and submitting reports to the MLCC. The Court Services sergeant is assigned as the officer in charge of mos[ D.B. cases and appears in court in place of the investigator in order to free up the investigators. One police officer and one sergeant staff the Crime Scene/Identification Unit. This unit is responsible for the processing of crime scenes, including the development collection and analysis of my evidence that is collected. The unit classifies and maintains an extensive fingerprint and photograph file. The unit is recognized as an Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) consortium. The officers perform fingerprint work for nine area police departments and periodically for the Michigan State Police and the Drug Enforcement Administration. The figures provided do not include the activities performed for these other agencies. Activities M FY 2003 FY 2004 % Change Total Cases Investigated 8,041 7,357 -9 Felony Warrants Requested 176 253 44 Misdemeanor W= mts Requested 1,373 757 -45 Precious Metal Documents 169 804 376 Crime Scenes Processed 58 62 6 Vehicles Processed 37 40 8 Pieces of Evidence Processed 2,898 1,951 -33 M Latent Prints Identified Reports by Crime Scene Unit AFIS Cases Polygraphs Administered Juvenile Arrests Referrals to Youth Assistance Programs Warrants Processed Warrant Arrest Reports NILCC Reports NILCC Inspections (on-site & dewy) NILCC Violations Reports NILCC Applicants Investigated PatrolBureau FY 2003 FY 2004 % Change 182 175 -4 244 235 -4 391 341 -13 47 68 45 297 310 4 51 27 -47 5,927 6,116 3 1,569 1,650 5 51 34 -33 274 147 -46 15 12 -20 46 31 -33 Four Lieutenants, twelve Sergeants, seventy-five Police Officers and nine Civilian Dispatchers staff the Patrol Bureau. The Patro] Bureau provides protection to the public twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, responding to all reported incidents and requests for service within the City of Livonia. The Patro] Bureau also provides dispatching services for the Livonia Fire Department Activities Dispatched runs (Livonia Police) Dispatched runs (Livonia Fire) Criminal complaints taken Adult arrests Juvenile arrests Uviform Law Citations issued Accident reports taken # of days spent by prisoners lodged in a wuntyjail 2003 2004 % Change Actual Proj, from 2002 41,370 38,953 -5.84 8,101 7,975 -1.56 15,770 7,088 -55.05 3,682 3,108 -15.59 240 264 10.00 16,830 15,161 -9.91 4,397 2,949 -32.26 13,379 11,797 -11.82 NOTE: The large decrease in criminal complaints taken is somewhat of a misnomer. The department no longer generates a separate number for each crime or complaint on a particular incident. This is a result of the new CLEMIS MICR reporting protocols. New in 2004, the Patrol Division began oversight of the department's vehicle maintenance coordinator. The vehicle maintenance coordinator is responsible for general maintenance, repair, and outfitting of department vehicles. 89 Traffic Bureau The Traffic Bureau is currently staffed with two Sergeants and six Police Officers. The Traffic Bureau OIC and the six police officers have specialized training in traffic crash investigation. The Traffic Bureau OIC and the traffic officers routinely investigate all types of traffic crashes and handle all fatal crashes. The officers conduct selective enforcement in specific locations in order m reduce traffic crashes and address traffic concerns as brought to the attention of the Traffic Bureau by other officers or concerned citizens. Traffic Bureau personnel reviewed, completed (if required), and processed 4300 public and private property traffic crash reports and 300 OWI cases during the past fiscal year. Through a new partnership with the Traffic Improvement Association (TIA), the Traffic Bureau now receives crash statistics from TIA and consults with TIA's traffic engineer on traffic safety related issues. Traffic Bureau officers investigated 16 very serious or fatal crashes and issued 4,000 traffic citations during this fiscal year. Commercial Vehicle Enforcement has resulted in the inspection of 259 commercial vehicles with 76 tacks being taken off the road for safety and weight violations. Officers issued over 370 commercial vehicle citations with "scheduled" fines totaling over $409,000. The second sergeant is in charge of the day-to-day operation of the recently formed Strategic Traffic Accident Reduction initiative. The Traffic Bureau has received approval for overtime grant funding to participate in the "Drive Michigan Safely" seatbelt enforcement grant and the "You Drink, You Drive, You Lose" drunk driving enforcement grant. The Traffic Bureau won a $5000 equipment grant that will be used fo update its crash investigation reconstruction equipment in the coming year. The Traffic Bureau O.I.C. represents the Police Department at all Livonia Traffic Commission meetings providing information and recommendations. He sits on the executive board of the Wayne County Traffic Safety Committee and consults with the Livonia Public Schools regarding traffic safety issues. The Strategic Traffic Accident Reduction (S.T.A.R-) program began in June 2003. The focus A that time was on six specific high traffic crash intersections within our City. We realized a significant reduction at these intersections in the first six months — down as much as 33%. Despite the success, overall crashes within our City for this period increased by 6%. In response m this problem beginning in December 2003, the STAR program expanded its' focus from specific intersections m include pre -intersection and special enforcement details. We also instituted a school bus safety program, a school zone enforcement detail, a road rage freeway detail, a work zone speed detail, and a subdivision/special attention detail m address individual citizen complaints. STAR has become a popular program and many citizens have specifically requested these units in their area. This has improved the overall image of our department by allowing us to rapidly respond m the complaints of our citizens regarding traffic problems. It has also increased the number of Officers on the road from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. by four patrol units allowing us m better serve the public. m Ten months after this expansion at the end of September 2004, the number of reported public property crashes showed an overall crash reduction rate of 9% (12/12003 through 9/302004). The STAR program received two awards for outstanding Traffic Safety initiatives from the Office of Highway Safety Planning and the Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police. Budgeted amounts for this fiscal year were; overtime of 5364,000, FICA of $26,000, and revenue of $879,000 — or revenue over expenses of 5489,000. Actual figures as of November 28, is overtime of $287,828, FICA of $20,579, and revenue of $934,670 — or revenue over expenses of $626,263. Our officers have written 16,361 tickets totaling $1.8 million in scheduled fines. We have also made 290 misdemeanor arrests, and 22 felony arrests during the 610 details this year. Special Operations Unit The Special Operations Unit was responsible for saturation duties and other assignments delegated to the unit. The unit monitored crime patterns and responded with the appropriate type of enforcement. The unit was available to assist other bureaus in the department as necessary. Below are the statistics that reflect the activities of the unit for the period ending 08/01/04, when this unit was disbanded. Activities Arrests 2003 2004 Change Activities 2003 2004 Change Total Arrests 266 100 -62% Assist IB/DB 39 16 -59% Felony Arrests 87 20 -77% Misdemeanor Arrests 179 90 -50% K-9 Activity (Nov.2003-Oct.2004) Sarcotic Bldg. 47 63 34% 1 e Narcotic Vehicle 60 33 -45% Drug Related 105 48 -55% Criminal Tracks 22 13 -41% Against Persons 3 2 -33% Public Demo. 11 6 1160 Against Prop/Warr. 135 52 -62% Community Service Bureau One Lieutenant and one Police Officer staff the Community Service Bureau. The unit is responsible for administration of the Police Reserve Program, consisting of 34 Reserve Officers. This Bureau also supervises the Community Event Volunteers and Police Explorer Post 4213. Uniformed personnel worked 7,070 hours at special events throughout the City of Livonia during 2004, including school functions, the Livonia Spree and other community events. The total cost of services for the year is estimated at $143,288.43 with fractional reimbursement at $83,459.80. Discounted and unsubsidized services amount to $59,829.14. 91 Additionally, this bureau continues to be responsible for issues related to "Hometown Security." Personnel assigned to this unit participate with the Anti-Tercorism Task Force along with training and planning issues for the police department. As of 11/01/04, Community Services is handling issues related to Emergency Preparedness including the Michigan State Police Emergency Management Performance Grant State Homeland Security Grants, the Livonia Emergency Planning Committee and Livonia Crisis Management Team. INTELLIGENCE BUREAU The Intelligence Bureau is staffed by one Lieutenant, five Sergeants, six Police Officers and one Clerk Typist The Bureau consists of the following: One Sergeant supervising six Police Officers. These individuals are responsible for investigation of all narcotic crimes affecting the City of Livonia. Officers are also responsible for tacking other criminal activity in the City of Livonia and surrounding communities. Bureau supervisors then prioritize the intelligence and conduct follow up investigations that may include surveillance and search warrant executions. This unit also networks its intelligence with other appropriate law enforcement agencies at the federal, state and local levels. The second Sergeant handles all evidence, court work and forfeiture actions. The third Sergeant is assigned to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and works in conjunction with Federal Agents in criminal prosecutions as well as federal forfeiture of the assets of drug dealers. The fourth Sergeant is assigned to the United States Customs Service Ou0 bound Currency Task Force (OCTF). The OCTF is a multi -agency task force created to ensure compliance with currency reporting requirements and to disrupt the illegal money-laundering activity of criminal organizations. The fifth Sergeant is assigned to the Fugitive Apprehension Service Team. The `TAST" team is responsible for arresting fugitives of the Criminal Justice System. All sergeants report to the Lieutenant The Clerk Typist is responsible for records management and employee time records for this bureau and the Detective Bureau. Narcotics Enforcement Activities 92 2003 2004 % Change Assigned Cases 701 685 -2.28 Search Warrants 60 75 25 Cocaine Purchases 19 14 -26 Marijuana Purchases 49 69 40.8 Herouv Other Purchases 15 15 0 Criminal Surveillance 58 92 The Department of Public Works includes the Public Service Division and the Engineering Division, which operate under the direction of the Director of Public Works. The responsibilities of the two Divisions are as follows: Public Service Division - This Division is responsible for the performance of a wide variety of maintenance functions. These functions range from in-house activities such as building rammenance and vehicle maintenance (except Police and Fire) to the more visible maintenance of public utilities, park sites and roadways. There are 134 full-time and 19 part-time positions in the nine maintenance/service sections of the Division. Fifteen positions are assigned to managerial/administrative functions. Engineering Division - The Engineering Division is under the direction of the City Engineer and is responsible for all construction operations within public rights-of-way and/or public easements. The department has provided engineering services as directed by the Mayor, the City Council, and various Boards and Commissions, as well as for the general public. Suring the past fiscal year, the work was handled by 12 full-time employees. The department consists of three sections: administrative, design, and field. Highlights of this year's accomplishments include Administrative Section This section is under the direction of the City Engineer and an Assistant City Engineer. This section prepares reports for the City Council, subdivision bond establishments and releases, and various other reports; reviews the design of public improvements in connection with the development of residential subdivisions, commercial and industrial site plans: prepares legal descriptions as required by other departments; and provides technical assistance and advice to administmtive and legislative groups within the City as well as State and Comfy governmental units. This section also issues permits for work in the public rights-of-way and/or easements. Attendance at Council, Commission and citizen meetings is also a function of this section. The Administrative Section was involved with the following matters during 2004 in addition to attending meetings with State and Comfy officials, and investigating citizen complaints: • Wayne and Oakland Comfy Resurfacing and Reconstruction Projects - Eight Mile Road —atI-275 Interchange - Seven Mile Road — Middlebelt Road to Inkster Road - Eight Mile Road — Farmington Road to Grand River Avenue • Traffic Signal Improvements 93 • Numerous Reconstruction and Rehabilitation Projects in Conjunction with the Annual Paving Program • Expansion and Renovation of the Alexander Blue House at Greenmead • Asphalt Parking Lot at Greenmead Seventeen sitecondominium projects, four subdivisions, and numerous commercial and industrial projects were also reviewed and/or inspected by the Division. • Cavell Woods Condominiums • Church Place Condominiums • College Park Commercial • Curtis Creek Condominiums • Golf Ridge Properties • Hunters Park Estates Condominiums • Newport Place Condominiums • Queens Place Condominiums • Rambling Acres Subdivision Design Section This section, in conjunction with the Administrative Section, prepares plans, specifica- tions and bidding documents for the City's public improvement projects. It also prepares legal descriptions as needed. In addition, this section provides utility information to the public, assigns addresses and reviews residential site plans. The following projects were designed and/or built in 2004: • 2004 Fremont Avenue Sanitary • 2004 Thin Asphalt Overlay Program • 2004 Sidewalk Program Field Section This section is responsible for providing all field inspection, survey and testing services in convection with contract plans and specifications for projects constructed under the jurisdiction of the Engineering Division, as well as all subdivision and commercial developments involving the installation of public improvements. In addition, the survey crew provides live and grade work for the Public Service Division's road ditching program and other assignments requiring survey work. Numerous public improvement contracts amounting to approximately $1,304,580.91 were handled by the division during the pas[ year. Major projects which were designed, engineered and inspected by the Engineering Division may be summarized as follows: • 2003 Thin Asphalt Overlay= $11,268.30 94 • 2003 Sidewalk Program=$33,807.05 • 2003 Pavement Joint and Crack Sealing Program= $144,162.49 • 2003 Pavement and Catch Basin Repair = $256,561.83 • 2004 Sidewalk Program =$116,045.22 • 2004 Pavement Joint and Crack Sealing Program= $143,692.27 • 2004 Thin Asphalt Overlay= $447,329.68 • 2004 Fremont Avenue Sanitary =$123,391.61 • 2004 Sidewalk Replacement — Water Main Breaks = $28,322.46 • Provided administrative services for the City telecommunications system. • Prepared annual budget submittal for the Public Service Division. • Worked on adaptation and installation of comprehensive new software program for the Department of Public Works operations. • Conducted employment interviews for various vacant positions within the Department • Administered safety programs within the Department • Maintained an alcohol and controlled substance testing program per requirements of Federal law. • Provided for public relations information for Rouge Sub -Watershed Project • Administered a West Nile Vims — Mosquito Control public information program and a larviciding program for City parks, facilities, and over 12,000 catch basins. Sanitation • Prepared monthly payment submittals for solid waste contract. • Operated Recycling Center and City Office Paper Recycling Program. Collected 131.56 tons of recyclable material. • Administered Curbside Recycling Program. Collected 8,006.44 tons of recyclable material. • Administered Separated Yard Waste Collective Program. Diverted to compost facility 26,768 yards of yard waste material. • Prepared and distributed to all Livonia households a Household Hazard Waste Day postcard announcement • Conducted a Household Hazardous Waste Drop -Off Day at Ford Field on May 1, 2004. A total of 1,506 vehicles utilized the service of which 1,142 were from Livonia. (Northville/Nordiville Township conducted a drop-off event on October 1, 2004, which was utilized by 777 vehicles from Livonia). • Maintained City Type III landfill in compliance with all Federal, State and County requirements. • Prepared and submitted all solid waste reports required by State of Michigan and Wayne County. 95 • Continued community solid waste and recycling educational programs through use of City newsletter. • Prepared and distributed to all Livonia households a Bulk Leaf Pick -Up Program brochure. • Prepared and distributed to all Livonia households a Holiday Refuse Collection Schedule postcard. ROAD MAINTENANCE Snow and Ice Control • Maintained roads on primary salt routes in a "wet pavement or better condition 24/7 throughout the winter. Salted primary routes once in November, 9 times in December, 27 times in January, 7 times in February, and 5 times in March, for a total of 49 times using 3900 tons ofroad salt. • Plowed primary and secondary routes 3 times. • Plowed all roads City-wide (370 miles) in 2 separate snow cycles, once using a combination of contract road graders and City resources, and once using strictly in- house equipment and personnel. • Provided plowing and ice control services on City parking lots. • Filled and maintained salt barrels at key locations throughout the City. • Spot salted 42 water break locations. Sweeping and Grading • Graded parks, alleys and gravel roads 6 times and added gravel as needed • Restructured drainage ditches, culverts and gravel road surface on Pickford at Sunset to improve road surface longevity and improve storm drainage for the area. • Applied calcium chloride to gravel roads for dust control City-wide 3 times. • Applied calcium chloride to parks and alleys 3 times. • Swept City local streets 4 times, major roads 26 times, and industrial roads 26 times. • Performed street sweeping after SPREE (3 times). • Swept all paved City streets after Leaf Pickup Program. Landfill Transfer Station and Recycling Center • Maintained licensed City landfill; composted 46,440 yards of leaves from the Leaf Pickup Program. • Processed 16,410 cubic yards of household refuse from 5,576 users of the Refuse Disposal Transfer Site. M Brush Pickup • Covered entire City every 10 working days, picking up 11,959 yards of brush with 18,208 stops. • Removed and disposed of chips resulting from stump grinding at 126 locations. • Trained new seasonal laborers in operational and safety requirements of brush pickup. • Cleared roads, removed logs and provided additional brush pickup service to areas in the south end of the City hit by a late -Jove storm. Leaf Pickup • Picked up 46,440 yards of bulk leaves at curbside; provided a minimum of two (2) pickups for each residential area. Construction Road Maintenance and Miscellaneous • Integrand Cartegraph information system into daily operations of Roads and Sieg Shop. • Repaired, adjusted or rebuilt 157 catch basins, gate wells, and storm and sanitary manholes. • Replaced 125 feet of edge drain tube. • Repaired or replaced 5 sanitary sewer lives and 13 storm sewer lives. • Convected SPREE trailer to existing sanitary live at ice rink. • Completed 70 concrete slab replacements (17,166 square feet of concrete). • Repaired 2 concrete curbs. • Milled concrete streets to eliminate water ponding problems at 164 locations. • Milled major roads in 8 locations to eliminate pavement heat pops. • Completed 29 asphalt repairs consisting of 634 tons of asphalt • Replaced road base and repaired 12 pavement blowouts when frost was leaving the ground in spring. • Patched potholes on 370 miles of City -maintained roads, as well as trip point locations from the Engineering Division and repair sites from the Water and Sewer Section. • Repaired potholes reported on the Pothole Hotline within 48 hours. • Responded to 1000+ citizen service requests. • Repaired or replaced 10 mailboxes from plow damage, leaf pickup or water activities. • Picked up and cleaved oil spills, large debris or lost loads from trucks on City streets 10 times. • Performed 8 ditching projects in various locations including Sumydale east of Middlebelt, upgraded or added 1500 feet of ditch live. • Changed truck attachments (buckets, blades, boxes, salt spreaders) from construction season/summer mode to leaf pickup mode to plowing/salting configuration. • Cross -trained crew members in tree felling and cuffing, bucket truck safety, chainsaw safety, traffic control signing, plowing and salting operations to increase versatility of workforce and provide greater coverage for call-in events. 97 • Cleaned outfalls and inlets of City storm drains 39 times. • Performed illicit discharge inspections, water tests on approximately 20 storm water outfalls. • Repaired 6 guardrails and barricades. • Assisted LPD with 3 major and 2local road closings. • Placed and removed over 4000 linear feet of snow fence to prevent drifting on City roads. • Repaired lawns resulting from Water Section activities and snowplow damage at 520 locations. • Repaired 50 sprinklers damaged during water main repairs or by snowplows. • Trained employees for commercial drivers license test m allow for upgrades when needed • Delivered and picked up voting supplies for 2 elections. • Assisted the Livonia Goodfellows with thein annual holiday food and toy program. • Assisted the Focus Hope program with food distribution 11 times. Sipe Maintenance • Traffic Signs: Repaired or Removed: 481 Installed or Replaced: 310 • Traffic Posts: Repaired or Removed: 592 Installed or Replaced: 181 • Street Name Signs: Repaired or Removed: 234 Installed or Replaced: 146 • Street Name Posts: Repaired or Removed: 323 Installed or Replaced: 119 • Engraved approximately 305 signs for various City departments. • Installed 1 new park identification sign. • Assisted with the setups, signing, snow fencing, barricading and traffic control devices for SPREE, Arts and Crafts Festival, several Wilson Barn shows, Livonia Heritage Festival, Highland Games, plus an additional 19 events at Greenmead. • Assisted with the setup of the Easter Egg Hunt, Rotary Barbeque, Ford Field Ice Show, Youth Fitness Meet, and the Clarenceville Homecoming Parade. • Handled approximately 156 work orders and 105 complaints. • Applied and repaired vehicle markings on 11 new and 1 content City vehicles. • Striped 41 miscellaneous road locations. • Posted subdivision entrances for the Leaf Pickup Program. • Changed safety posters on County roads 4 times and replaced wooden backings on posts. • Maintained barricades and construction signs for all City departments. • Replaced old wooden signs at Civic Center with romed PVC signage. • Replaced 2 wooden DPW signs with romed PVC signs. • Striped City parking lots where needed (approximately 101,000 feet). M Animal Control • Provided animal control services for residents and businesses which included requests for service as follows: 61 abuse to antmal/cruelty complaints, 107 barking dog complaints, 9 bird problems, 7 cat bites, 114 coyote complaints, 20 dead crow (Wes[ Nile Vims) complaints, 42 dog bites, 6 excessive pet complaints, 136 injured animal reports, 1 kennel complaint, 28 vicious animal complaints, 1 pest control complaint, 2 pet store complaints, 2 pick up contained animal requests, 11 sick wildlife reports, 326 stray animal reports, 65 trapped animal complaints, 10 waste (feces) complaints, 32 wildlife complaints, 1 wildlife bile, and 50 miscellaneous complaints. • Exterminated coyotes in dens located in the Five Mile and Farmington area and the Six Mile and Middlebelt area • Issued animal ordinance violations as required. • Floated and lined all City baseball/softball diamonds, soccer and football fields on a routine schedule. • Mowed, trimmed, edged, weeded, fertilized, applied herbicides and fungicides, trimmed trees and routine maintenance to Ford Field, Bicentennial Diamonds 1-3, Greenmead soccer fields, Civic Center, Sandburg and Noble libraries, Wilson Bam, Greemmead, and all other parks and fields. • Installed banners at Civic Center for Music Under the Stars, SPREE, Arts and Crofts Festival, Christmas, other special events and everyday patriotic banners. • Rolled and aerified baseball diamonds and soccer fields. • Performed safety inspections, repaired or removed damaged playground equipment in all City parks and installed 500 yards of "Softfall" under playground structures. Began adding woodchips under structures that currently have none. This is a result of changing regulations from the Playground Safety Institute. • Added sand to beach volleyball courts A Clements Circle, Rotary and Stymelski Parks. Also, replaced worn and tattered net. • Added material, extended the infield, removed the infield lip, and graded diamonds at Ford Field, Bicentennial, and YJ einert Park ball diamonds. • Assisted in the "Requests for Service' from other City departments. • Monitored trashcans on athletic fields that could not be reached by Waste Management Also, cleaned dog stations and tmshcans in City parks on weekends. • Performed mow removal services for City buildings and right-of-way sidewalks leading to parks on an as -needed basis. This included shoveling plowing and salting sidewalks. • Performed winter maintenance to equipment, which included miscellaneous repairs, painting blade sharpening, preventative maintenance and thorough cleanings. • Sprayed "Roundup" weed killer on right-of-way fences to control growth of weeds. • Applied the biological control "VectoLex" to control mosquito -breeding populations in recreational parks; Two applications were accomphshed this year. Also, helped with the spring application to catch basins in roads. 99 • Added topsoil and grass seed to goal mouths on all soccer fields. Greenmead fields were closed for a short time for sodding in those areas. • Set out and brought in picnic tables and trash barrels for the picnic season. Repaired picnic tables as needed. • Pruned trees and shrubs in parks, City buildings and athletic fields where needed. • Roto -tilled, planted 1600 flats of flowers; 5000 canna tubers, and 1000 various bulbs for seasonal flowerbed color. • Assisted with all SPREE-reland activities, including setup, takedown and daily garbage detail. • Completed 102 `Requests for Service" that related to special activities for other City departments (entailed delivered, setting up, taking down canopies, tents, picnic tables and garbage cans), delivering and setting up the Show ndide, delivering TEFAP commodities for Community Resources, Wilson Barn, and Greenmead activities, and other City activities. • Repaired and maintained irrigation systems at Civic Center, Livonia Community Recreation Center, Ford Field, Bicentennial Park, and Greenmead. Due to the retirement of a Parks Maintenance Worker III, the systems at Noble and Sandberg Library, Wilson Bam, and the Six Mile Road islands where not turned on this year. • Maintained the Livonia Community Recreation and added 60 yards of Cyprus woodchips in the fall. • Removed BMX trails in Nature Preserves at Grandview and Dover Parks. • Cleared deadfall trees and branches off Nature Preserve walkways. • Removed ash trees smaller than 6" in diameter in parks. • Continued testing vacuum breakers as part of Wayne County's DEQ requirements regarding irrigation systems. • Two employees attended the Playground Safety Institute making them certified playground inspectors. • Set up and monitored ice on the City's three outdoor ice rinks. • Oversaw the repair of the Civic Center fountain by the contractor, Gmnwell/Cashero. • Achieved Tree City USA status for the sixth year and received our first "growth award." • Trimmed 110 trees which generated 430 yards of woodchips. • Instituted young tree training program for 200 trees which helps trees with proper form and strong structure as they mature and helps reduce the amount of pruning later in the tree's mature fife. • Forestry personnel removed 436 trees and 595 stumps. Most of these trees were ash trees infested by the Emerald Ash Borer and were smaller than 8". • Supervised removal of 1202 trees and stumps by one contractor. Two separate contracts were performed in 2004 — one in the spring and one in time fall. • Supervised the planting of 850 trees throughout the City by two separate contractors. One contractor finished the 2003 Street Tree Planting Program this spring while the other began the 2004 Street Tree Planting Program in the fall. 100 • Planted 3 tulip trees at Dooley Pads in connection with the Arbor Day Program. Also, 300 seedling White Pine trees were handed out as part of the program to the children at the adjacent school • Removed approximately 750 yards of woodchips as part of DPS brush pickup program. • Removed 48 wasp nests, mainly in August and September. • Completed 63 storm -related tree trimmings. • Received and investigated approximately 2000 requests for service; 1025 are in the new Cas teGraph system of which 795 have been closed. • Performed miscellaneous repairs and blade sharpening on the Section's saws and trimming equipment. • Assisted other departments (Water, Engineering, Ordinance, etc.) with emergency tree removals, sit inspections, and tree inspections. • Performed snow removal operations to City buildings and right-of-way sidewalks including plowing, shoveling and salting. • Assisted in the Rouge River cleanup day held at Greenwood and Blue Skies Parks. • Supervised one contractor who trimmed approximately 5021 trees in four City sections to current International Society of Arboriculture Standards. This contractor also completed over 700 resident call -out trim requests. • Continued assessing 3298 (Davey count) right-of-way ash trees to decide how soon each tree would need to be removed because of infestations of the Emerald Ash Borer. Currently, 1700 trees have been removed with the rest (approximately 1500) coming in subsequent years based on the tree's ability to fight the insect • Tracked gypsy moth populations in Sections 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 15 and 16 as part of the gypsy moth egg mass survey; no spraying was needed in 2004. • Attended the following seminars to increase job knowledge: Michigan Nursery and Landscape Association annual meeting; Michigan Tmfgrass Foundation annual meeting; Michigan Forestry and Parks Association annual meeting: Metro Detroit Landscape Association annual meeting; various seminars on chainsaw safety, tree climbing, hazard assessment and aerial rescue training roping and rigging training and equipment repair training. • Received two grants from the Federal government in association with the Emerald Ash Borer. We received a $20,000 tree planting grant that will be used this fall, and a $84,000 tree removal grant to help offset this year's removal costs. Miscellaneous Repairs and Improvements • Opened, re-lamped, closed, and winterized City out and pool buildings. • Maintained City owned -outside lighting fixtues. • Performed preventative maintenance on equipment. • Replaced all flags semi-amnually. • Continued enhancing custodial checklists. • Stripped and finished floors in buildings as needed. 101 • Spot and cleaned carpeting in buildings as needed. • Replaced two water heaters at Police Headquarters. • Cleaned inside and outside first floor windows on all buildings as needed. • Cleaned exterior windows at City Hall, Library and Community Center. • Relocated and installed outlets/power and lighting as requested. • Monitored building automation climate control systems. • Monitored electronic access systems. • Thawed frozen lines and repaired breaks as needed. • Repaired leaking hydronic lines throughout City Hall. • Answered environmental complaints. • Performed yearly shutdown maintenance and custodial assignments at Community Center. Developed and implemented job assignment checklists for same. • Troubleshot chiller electrical malfimction at Community Center. • Repaired two (2) humidifiers A City Hall. • Replaced east pedestrian door on Water and Sewer building. • Replaced burners on Police boiler and completed CSD -1 certification. • Repaired uncapped dram / vent line in Senior Center addition. • Troubleshot and repaired City Hall generator / UPS power system interface. • Replaced AH -6 supply fav motor at Community Center. • Replaced air compressors at Fire Station 4 4 and Courthouse. • Replaced A/C compressor at Fire Station 4 5. • Replaced blower motor on City Hall AH -1. • Began working live with Cartegmph system. • Tested and treated all process water systems. • Replaced shorelines for tacks at Fire Headquarters. • Begin replacement of toilet paper holders in City building restroom. • Cleaned and rebalanced Detective Bureau VAV boxes. • Installed backup sump pump for City Hall. • Refinished floors in buildings as needed. • Wired in Public Safety Director s City Hall office to generator. • Installed sound deadening in Police Headquarters office. Roof Replacement, Maintenance and Repairs • Worked with contractor and consultant on City Hall Amex, Fire Station 4 4, DPS Administration and Water and Sewer roof replacements. Painting • Repainted City Clerk's Office 102 Health and Safety Continued with Lock Out / Tag Out program Maintained Blood home Pathogen program for employees. Tested fire alarms, sprinklers and suppression systems in City buildings. Maintained Compliance with Wayne County Backflow Certification program as requested. Maintained compliance with State of Michigan boiler and elevator inspections and certifications. Maintained employee State required licensing, certifications and training. Exterminated or removed pests in City buildings as needed. Conducted safety inspections of City Facilities with control specialists as requested. PM and load -bank tested generators. Reset all clocks and equipment for time changes. Cleaned debris and growth from building rooftops, sumps and gutters. Replaced emergency lighting at Courthouse and Equipment Maintenance garage. Re -Tamped and painted over graffiti on Newburgh Bridge. Continued scheduled cycle lamp replacement / lighting repairs in building #'s 5, 7, 12, 13, 31, Eddie Edgar and exterior fighting A Civic Center. Investigated waterless urinal replacement program for City buildings. Greenmead • Assisted with all events held on grounds (Art in the Park, Highland Games, Flea Markets, Car Shows, Fall Harvest). • Installed and removed decorations for Holiday and special events. • Moved, set-up and installed furniture, furnishings and equipment as requested. • Wired in power for computer at Blue house. • Continued maintenance and custodial services at Blue house. • Completed construction of new load centers and redistribution of grounds power sources. • Cleaned out steam traps at Carriage house. • Replaced sill plate and boiler at Carriage house. • Worked with contractor on Blue House repainting project Renovation and New Construction • Continued with Honeywell performance and service contract • Completed installation of buil ding automation system for Senior Citizen addition. • Replaced transformer at City Hall for outside lighting. • Worked with contractor and consultant on City Hall Generator replacement project • Completed Livonia olid building boiler, hydropic and plumbing replacement project 103 Special Projects and Interdepartmental Assistance • Assisted Livonia Goodfellows. • Assisted with Rotary Club BBQ. • Assisted with Spree. • Assisted with City-wide garage sale. • Assisted with various City Hall functions as requested. • Provided set up and tear downs for meetings and events as requested. • Maintained facilities leased from the City. • Moved furniture, computers, work stations and materials and equipment as requested. • Responded to and performed daily maintenance requests on equipment and facilities as requested. • Assisted with Senior Citizen Craft Show and events. • Regularly cleaned out grease trap in Senior Center kitchen. • Jetted and maintained basement drains at Fire Station 41 for newly installed radio system. • Assisted with snow removal as requested, • Assisted Construction crew with repairing Fire Station 4 4 chimney. • Assisted with Water and Sewer restorations (electrical) as requested. • Worked with Water and Sewer to map and dye test inside parking area drains. • Worked with Construction crew to replace parking lot light pole at Civic Center Library. • Rewired upgraded equipment for Channel 8. • Transferred personnel to leaf pickup as needed. This past year has been exciting for the Equipment Maintenance Section. We were able to purchase some new equipment unexpectedly. We also have had tremendous cooperation from the Police Department with used vehicle hand downs, enabling us to update am Motor Pool with newer vehicles. New vehicles purchased this pas[ year are as follows: • Six (6) 4 x 4 pickup trucks • Six (6) mid-size sedans • One (1) cargo van • One(1)eight-passenger transportation van • One (1) Vactor truck • One (1) sewerjet rudder truck • Three (3) six-inch trash pumps • Two (2) two -behind trailers • One (1) backhoe for the Water Section • One (1) flatbed wrecker • One (1) Tenant street sweeper 104 • Received 18 various used can from LPD • Performed over 1200 regular preventative maintenance inspections on Cityoo ned vehicles and equipment. Provided emergency road calls, modification and fabrications where needed for over 800 various pieces of equipment. • Maintained and provided support service for 11 City transit buses. • Maintained and provided support service for 5 SCAN buses. • Provided support service and fabrications for LPD at Gun Range. • Provided support service to LED by making safety tools, floor support, vehicle roll- over supports, and other various equipment. • Provided and maintained generators for intersections throughout the City of Livonia whenever electrical service was out as directed by LPD and Wayne County. • Maintained generator in City Hall basement • Maintained and monitored the City's computerized fuel system. • Provided training to DPS employees and other various communities and parts of Canada on Comp -U -Spread computerized salting systems. • Provided commercial drivers license training for DPS employees. • Monitored and repaired all non -uniformed 2 -way radios. Water Svstems • Inspected 135 water gate wells with valves. • Repaired 35 water gate valves. • Repaired 551 fire hydrants. • Inspected and maintained 348 fire hydrants. • Repaired 112 water main breaks or leaks. • Repaired or replaced 95 water stop boxes. • Staked over 5031 locations for the Miss Dig system • Made 33 service line repairs for various reasons. • Retired 12 water service lines. • Painted 660 hydrants. • Installed 3 new gate valves and 7 new fire hydrants. Meters • Replaced 48 antiquated large commercial water meters. • Repaired 144 large commercial meters • Replaced 1118 water meters for various reasons. • Made 28,875 water -related service calls. • Completed 3704 service slips. • Installed 52 outside read device systems. • Installed 170 water meters for new accounts. • Established 42 new commercial accounts. 105 • Established 138 new residential accounts. • Established 8 new seasonal irrigation accounts. • Installed and removed 267 seasonal irrigation meters • Tested 121 commercial meters. Storm Sewers • Cleaned 11 City sections of catch basins; cleaned storm lines as needed in these sections. • Answered 112 storm sewer complaints. • Retrieved and replaced 20 catch basin covers. Sanitary Sewers • Cleaned 15 City sections of sanitary sewer lines by hydrant flushing, power flushing, bucketing, chemical and power root cutting. • Cleared 5 main sewer backups. • Investigated 150 sanitary sewer complaints. • Televised 2970 fret of sanitary sewer. • Inspected 16 City sections for sanitary lines and structures. Special Projects • Updated computer programs relating to lawn, concrete and asphalt repairs along with new tap list • Updated computer programs relating to Miss Dig (Positive Response System) and CarteGmph on line. • Coordinated hydrant repair requests for the Livonia Fire Department. • Assisted Roads with asphalt, concrete, lawn, catch basin, and pavement restorations. • Assisted Engineering with water main and fire hydrant replacement and proposed projects for 2004 water main and sanitary sewer replacement • Worked on generating the water stop box location MS Access database. • Inspected 132 taps made by Water Section contractor (119 new construction, 7 irrigation, 5 to replace well water, and l lead replacement). • Worked on sewer connection program; inspected 168 OSDS at homes for septic failure. • Helped with flow tests for water model, SCADA system and flow test with Livonia Fire Department. • Updated the Profile min gauges and sanitary sewer monitors. • Provided all section office staff with desktop computers and computer training. • Replaced l remaining known lead water service. • Worked on inventory pricing database for future software changes to take place. • Assisted Engineering with sidewalk driveway approaches and major road replacement. • Replaced pilot valve for 16" PRV #4 at Eight Mile and Newburgh. 106 • Replaced pilot valve for 10" PRV 46 at Seven Mile and east of Newburgh. • Installed 13 multi -readers and 52 MXU radio remote water meter devices, thus reducing monthly reading labor time. • Checked road structures before road improvements and cleaned catch basins.. • Performed Illicit Discharge Elimination Program (IDEP) inspections of storm sewer outfall sampling. • Assisted with water activities for the Livonia SPREE. • Continued the replacement program for antiquated large commercial compound Badger and Rockwell water meters. • Continued the replacement program for antiquated large commercial piston -type Badger and Rockwell water meters. The Traffic Commission is responsible for the planning, coordination, and determination of proposed traffic control devices to improve traffic flow and to provide maximum safety for all drivers, pedestrians, and property. As provided by the City Charter, the Commission meets once a month to discuss and implement traffic control measures which have been brought to their attention by citizens, as well as other City departments. The Commissioners work in conjunction with the Traffic Bureau of the Police Department Requests from concerned citizens and the Livonia Police Department for Stop, Yield, and No Outlet signs were approved for the following areas: Hunters Grove Condominiums Lakeside Estates Norman near Randolph School Lathers Fremont Clarity No Parking signs were approved on Orangelawn and also on Brookfield. Correspondence with the Office of the Wayne County Division of Roads: Left tum signals have been installed at Five Mile/Memman and Six Mile/Memman. 107 Requests from the City Council for reports and recommendations included: Traffic control at the Dunkin Donuts store on Plymouth Road New curb cut at the Red Robin Restaurant on Six Mile Timing of the traffic signals at Five Mile and Merriman The City Engineer requested additional speed limit signs on Hubbard and also on Wayne Road. After a request for increased speed limits in the Victor Parkway area, the Police Department presented an extensive traffic study of the main roads between Seven and Eight Mile. Determinations have not yet been concluded. The Plymouth Road Development Authority requesled assistance from the Traffic Commission because of the large number of obsolete and damaged signs along Plymouth Road. These signs have now been either removed or repaired. An agreement with the Traffic Improvement Association (TIA) was approved by the City Council in December of 2003. After this approval, a representative of the TIA provided a training session for the Traffic Commission and explained the services provided for the community. A six-month report will summarize activities and will include crash data and traffic counting. At a request from the Swenson High School principal, the TIA made several recommendations regarding traffic control at the school. Due to the large traffic problems at Six Mile and Haggerty, a meeting of representatives of the affected communities will be scheduled. The TIA also investigated the timing of the traffic signals at Five Mile and Merriman and determined that they are operating properly. The TIA is surveying the Eckles/Adams intersection due to a request for a stop sign. The Traffic Commission will continue to monitor traffic and parking conditions within the City and will be particularly concerned with monitoring areas of rapid growth. The Commission will also continue to meet with citizens and business owners to jointly address traffic and parking concerns and to act promptly to alleviate dangerous conditions. Ongoing monitoring of traffic concerns by this Commission will insure that Livonia's streets and highways will continue to be safe and well maintained. 108 TREASURER The Treasurer's Department is responsible for collection, disbursement and custody of all revenues belonging to and held in trust by the City. All funds collected by City agencies are transmitted to the Treasurer, verified and recorded through cash receipting deposited and reported daily to the Finance Department. In addition, the Treasurer's Office, on instruction from the Finance Director, transmits instructions for the daily investment of City funds among City banks to maximize the interest on its holdings. This year the Treasurer's Office once again sent letters to real and personal property taxpayers whose faxes for the 2003 tax year had not been paid by February 15, 2004. A total of 4,163 letters were mailed: 2,761 letters to real property owners and 1,402 letters to personal property taxpayers. Letters were also mailed to real & personal property taxpayers after the due date for the summer 2004 tax season. A total of 1,505 letters were mailed to real property taxpayers and 854 letters were mailed to personal property taxpayers. The Treasurer's Office in 2002 initiated the practice of mailing letters to notify Livonia property owners that their property was listed in the Wayne County Treasurer's Office court petition to foreclose on their property for delinquent real property faxes. In 2003 the City of Livonia Treasurer sent out 113 such notices. As a result of this effort, the Wayne County Treasurer sold no Livonia parcels at tax auction in 2004. The Treasurer's Office is responsible for monitoring and maintaining the files on bankruptcy cases. Roof of Claims for personal property taxes are filed with the courts by the City Treasurer. In 2004, 14 businesses with locations in Livonia filed for bankruptcy protection. In 2003, 19 businesses and in 2002, 29 businesses with locations in Livonia filed for bankruptcy protection. The Treasurer's Office filed with the Wayne County Register of Deeds 44 personal property jeopardy tax bills for 2004. In 2003, the Treasurer's Office issued 101 personal property jeopardy tax bills. Applications for electronic fond debit for tax payments were included in the 2004 summer real tax bills to property owners who are directly responsible for payment of their faxes. This resulted in a considerable increase in the number of taxpayers utilizing electronic funds transfer for payment of tax bills. During the summer 2004 tax season 1,891 taxpayers participated in this convenient and no -cost service as compared to 1819 during the summer of 2003, 1,417 during the summer 2002, and 664 taxpayers during the summer 2001 tax season. 109 Tax bills can be paid with a credit card through Official Payments Corporation. There is a convenience fee collected and retained by Official Payments Corporation for this service. There is no cost to the City of Livonia for this service to be offered to the residents. 216 taxpayers utilized this option during 2004. This year the Treasurer's Office printed the summer and winter tax bills in-house, which resulted in a significant printing cost savings of $4,600 per tax season. Printing the tax bills in-house also allowed for greater control and efficiency of mailing and distributing the tax bills in a timely fashion. The Treasurer's Office has strict procedures in place regarding the handling of City funds. All departments issue numbered receipts and timely deliver collected funds to the Treasurer's Office for processing. Large checks are deposited immediately to yield a higher rate of interest There are 43,768 taxpayers in the City 110 2003 2004 Real Property 39,090 39,267 Personal Property 4,527 4,428 IFT 70 73 43,687 43,768 Sixty four percent of the residents are responsible for paying their own property tax bills. Mortgage companies pay 14,162 (36%) of the real property tax bills. The tax levy breakdown is as follows (includes Real, Personal, & IFT for 2003 Winter and 2004 Summer): Real Personal IFT Total City of Livonia 43,445,068 6,449,322 1,219,997 51,114,387 Livonia Public Schools Operating 20,542,740 9,943,984 2,160,375 32,647,099 Debt 9,300,080 1,401,674 245,163 10,946,917 Supplemental Tax 1,619,817 1,619,817 Wayne County Intermediate School District 12,994,505 1,922,577 301,013 15,218,095 Clarenceville Pubhc Schools Operating 1,246,242 238,416 1,484,658 Debt 816,844 50,333 867,177 Supplemental Tax 114,555 114,555 110 Oakland Intermediate School District 727,894 44,851 Tax Year 772,745 State Education Tax 23,798,733 3,409,492 711,160 27,919,385 Schoolcraft Comm. Coll. 7,126,335 1,020,950 156,119 8,303,404 Wayne County 25,251,292 3,848,502 709,087 29,808,881 Wayne County Jail 3,568,412 529,730 100,220 4,198,362 Wayne County Parks 935,227 138,837 26,278 1,100,342 Enron Clinton Metro Auth. 821,867 122,012 23,095 966,974 Wayne Cary. Transit Auth. 2,274,646 337,675 63,879 2,676,200 Special Assessment. 1,801,303 707,193 746,398 1,801,303 Total 156,385,560 29,458,355 5,716,386 191,560,301 The total number of original tax bills mailed for Summer and Winter was 87,487. 6.94% 2003 2004 Original Tax Bills 87,395 87,487 Revised Tax Bills 1,086 1,198 Checks Issued For- 1,185 772 Duplicate Payments, Overpayments & Revised Tax Bills Delinquent Tex Collections Our personal delinquent property taxes collected from 12-1-03 througb 11-30-04 were $719,027. The collections breakdown is as follows: 111 Tax Year Tax Year Tax Year Tax Year 2000 2001 2002 2003 Original Amount Levied 27,757,222 29,229,249 29,935,004 28,050,803 (Personal Property) Original Delinquency 1,785,725 2,028,054 2,062,013 1,689,473 Amount Collected This Year 28,690 71,027 326,857 289,361 DTE& Consumers Energy 716,824 692,348 707,193 746,398 Still Collectible 24,191 81,029 164,873 324,561 %Delinquent 6.43% 6.94% 6.89% 6.02% 111 Invoices for Coma authorized weed cuttings are mailed to taxpayers as well as my special assessments approved during the year. The Treasurer's Office records payment on these assessments and my unpaid amounts are added to the tax bills at year-end. In 2004, the Treasurer's office issued 512 invoices for weed bills, as compared to 406 for 2003. 4 of Parcels $Amount 4 of Parcels $ Amount Billed on Billed on Billed on Billed on 2003 Taxes 2004 Taxes 2004 Taxes 2004 Taxes Special Assessment Districts Sidewalk 152 49,348 64 24,693 Paving 687 213,256 537 160,911 Lighting 13,621 824,960 13,619 802,750 Weeds & Soil Erosion 73 12,662 90 12,734 Delinquent Water 1,063 727,420 1,123 800,214 15,596 1,827,646 15,433 1,801,302 TELLER COLLECTIONS The Treasurer's two tellers processed $235,590,309 in cash, checks, and credit cards for the following items during the course of conducting City business: property taxes, water bills, the greens fees for the City's three municipal golf courses, Livonia Community Recreation Center memberships and fees, park permits, fees for swimming and skating, amusement park ticket sales, registration fres for Parks and Recreation league sports, inspection and engineering permit and bond fees, licenses, the fres for the City's three libraries, Police Department adjudicand, non -adjudicated drug and D.A.R-E. funds, fres for City sponsored special events such as the Highland Games and the Arts & Craft Fair, false alarm charges, accounts receivable items, SMART bus ticket sales, City garage sale, fees for using the City Dump, Police auction, rent payments for Silver Village, Newburgh Village, and city -owned homes, record duplication fres, etc. Of the amounts collected, $46,402.226 was for general deposit items and $189,188,083 was for property taxes. The tellers also receive walk-in water payments from residents. During this fiscal year, 14,808 water payments were processed by the Treasurer's Office. The busiest day was June 7, 2004 with 351 water bills being processed. The average amount of water bills processed was 59 per day. 112 Total Collections 2003 2004 $252,675,460 $235,590,309 DISBURSEMENTS All payroll and payable checks are released through the Treasurer's Office on approval of the Finance Director and the City Cleric (internal auditor). 2003 2004 Payroll Checks 25,994 32,590 Vendor Checks 16,960 17,870 42,954 50,460 ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS The Zoning Board of Appeals is a seven (7) member Board created by State statute and City ordinance. The Board hears appeals from residential and business property owners when they me unable to comply with ordinance requirements and are rejected permits by the Inspection Department The Board meets on Tuesday evenings at 7:30 p.m. The following is a breakdown of the Appeal Cases prepared and heard by the Zoning Board of Appeals during the fiscal year December 1, 2003 through November 30, 2004. Granted with Tabled or Granted Denied Modifications* Postponed Total New Cases 94 24 25 14 157 Rehearings 1 0 0 0 1 Actual Cases Heard 158 Prepared and Scheduled** 19 Total Cases Heard and Prepared 177 113 * Includes Cases which were Guarded in Part/Denied in Part ** Meeting material was prepared more than once, but for various reasons (Petitioner did not appear, asked to be rescheduled, etc.) these cases were not heard at the fust scheduled meeting. *** Meeting material was prepared and Board heard case at meeting and made a decision to table for revised plans, etc. All meeting notices, agendas, etc. were reduce when new meeting date was scheduled. Number of Regular Meetings: 12 (1 meeting cancelled due to lack of quorum) Number of Special Meetings: 26 (1 comprehensive meeting updating ZBA Procedures and Michigan State Statutes) 114