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2004-2005 Annual ReportCITY OF LIVONIA ANNUAL REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2004-2005 OFFICE OF THE MAYOR JACK ENGEBRETSON MDDD CIVIC CENTER DRIVE w YOR LIVONIA, MICHIGAN 481543097 j V34)40G22D1 J FAX: (/34)42148]1) r C �GttN December 19, 2005 Honorable Members of the City Council City of Livonia, Michigan Dear Council Members: The Annual Report for fiscal year 2004-2005 refiects activities of the Livonia City Departments, Commissions and Boards. The following refiects a sampling of the information contained in various reports and some personal observations. Civil Service Department In October, 2005, the Civil Service Department along with Blue Cross/Blue Shield implemented a new Internet data collection system. The new system greatly improved information transfer compared to previous progmms. The Health Alliance Plan (HAP) website also provided for online information transfers. The utilization of these systems resulted in an improved 24-hourtumaround time on contract changes. Department of Community Resources This Department continued its participation and coordination of volunteers for the Rouge Rescue/River Day in 2005. Administrative responsibilifies for subsidized transportation for Livonia seniors and handicapped residents, the contract for SMART, as well as applicable grants confinued this year. The Livonia Community Transit System provided over 26,300 one-way rides within the City totaling over 13,800 work hours and covered over 192,000 miles. Office of Emergency Preparedness This Department was intergmded into the Police Department this year with a Police Lieutenant being appointed as Director. During this year, the City's Emergency Operations Plan was reviewed and updated. City Department Heads and Emergency Operations Center personnel were trained in unified incident command. Other emergency planning activites were completed this year. Information Svstems Department The Information Systems Department successfully continued its responsibility for the computer hardware and software used by the City including in-house training for City employees and management of the City Website, which continues to find new uses and grow in usage. Library Department and Commission Increased electronic services and numerous library programs have attracted a greater number of patrons than the previous year. Among them are over 1,300 organized Internet links that can be accessed through the Library's website, the SAM Internet Management System making their Internet stations more self -serve, the Children's, Teen and Adult Summer Reading programs, and the 24-hour Read-A-Thon event. Treasurer Applications for electronic fund debit for tax payments were included in the 2005 summer real lax bills to property owners directly responsible for payment of their taxes. This resulted in a considerable increase in the number of taxpayers utilizing electronic fund transfer for payment of their lax bills. This year the summer and winter tax bills were printed in-house resulting h a prinfing cost savings of $4,600 per tax season. It also allowed for greater control and efficiency of mailing and distributing the lax bills in a fimelyfashion. Summary Once again, we knew that our financial challenges would be substantial due to issues mostly beyond our control. Due to dwindling revenues and increasing costs (particularly health care), those challenges have become even greater than expected. In spite of our financial woes, however, the City was still able to achieve many accomplishments and operate within a balanced budget in fY 2004-2005 — thanks to the cooperation and contributions of the City Council, the Leadership Staff and our great team of City Employees. Together, as we face potentially greater economic challenges, I trust we can weather the storm. With your support, I still believe that Livonia's brightest days lie ahead. Sincerely, Jack Engebrelson MAYOR CITY OF L I V O N I A, MICHIGAN ANNUAL REPORT Fiscal Year 20042005 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. City Clerk 2 Civil Service Department 7 Trustees, Board of 17 Community Resources Deparment 21 Aging Commission 24 Arts Commission 25 Cable TeleNislon Commission. 27 Historic Preservation Commission. 27 Histerical Commission. 29 Human Relations Commission 31 Youth Commission- 32 District Court 34 Emergency Preparedness 39 Finance Deparlmmt 40 Information S3s...............................................................43 Housing Commission- 53 Inspection Dcparhnent 56 Building Code Board of Appeals 58 Library Department & Commission 62 Parks and Recreation Department & Commission 68 Plemmons; Depammm&Commission. 77 Public Works Department 90 F^gineering Division 90 Public Service Division 92 Traffic Commission 104 Treasurer 106 Zoning Board of Appeals 110 The 2005 state equalized valuation of the city real and personal property was $5,821,543,880 which relates to the following statistics: CLASS PARCEL COUNT VALUATION Residential 37,874 3,805,924,080 Commercial 1,376 803,119,880 Industrial 866 630,138,660 Personal 4,721 582,361,260 $ 5,821,543,880 In addition, valuation under the Industrial Facilities Act 198 Provided total valuation of $162,582,650 as follows: IFT Real $ 34,795,190 IFT Personal 127,787,460 $162,582,650 All property appeared on the assessment roll A 50.00% of We cash value as mandated by State Law. Annual sales studies are conducted in order to determine market growth by neighborhood The results of these studies are utilized to adjust area values to the required 50% of true cash value. The appraisal and maintenance of all residential field data is the responsibility of this department Records for 165 new homes were created and revisions to approximately 1,200 existing property field sheets were made. Commercial and Industrial new buildings, alterations and additions numbered 196 and were reviewed for value for the 2005 assessmentroll. The citywide carcass continues this year with the entering of the data gthered in the last 4 years and continuation of the field review of property record cards. This is an ongoing Project with the goal of bringing the assessing office in closer compliance with the requirements of the State Tax Commission with regard to assessing procedures. Homesteads, Transfers, Recission and Uncapping Affidavits are being interpreted and processed on a daily basis. In 2005 this generated approximately 4,056 forms. Lots splits and combinations are processed by this depadment This office reviews petitioner's application and deparmental correspondence for compliance to city ordinances and procedures. If a split is non -conforming, Council action will be required Approximately 45 splits and combinations were completed m 2005. Of these, 11 required Council action. Prior years Michigan Tax Tribunal appeals were fnalisd, 22 hill tribnals and 12 small claims for the years 1996 — 2004. Over 5,200 personal property statements were processed for the 2005 assessment ro0. A continual inspection of properties in the city is being done to verify the fixed assets in the business as of tax day of each year. Our audit program of the personal property accounts in the city is ongoing Our staff has visited approxmntely 80 businesses this year. Additionally, we were approved by the State of Michigan for a personal property audit grant This resulted in an additional 63 audits being done by Tax Management Associates for this program. These audits generated additional city tax dollars in the around of $75,000. Total tax revenue generated for all taxing entities was $338,971. BOARD OF REVIEW The December Board of Review meeting was held on Tuesday, December 21, 2004 in accordance with Section 211.536 of the General Property Tax Law of Michigm to con'ect all mutual mistakes of fact and clerical errors. The Livonia City Council, on December 20, 2004 (CRN574-04), set the place and darts for the 2005 March Board of Review meetings as scheduled by the Assessor and notice was given and published in the local newspapers. The Board of Review meetings convened Tuesday, March 8, 2005 for a five (5) day session of public hearings, which included an evening session. Members Madr Thomas, Jollietta Coleman and Conrad Gniewek were in attendance. The Board heard 120 taxpayer appeals and acted m 472 mail -m petitions. Detemtinatim notices were mailed on April 8, 2005. The regular session of the 1985 83rd State of Michigm Legislature has amended Section 53b of Public Act 206 to include a July Board of Review meeting to correct clerical errors and mutual mistakes offact This meeting was held on Tuesday, July 12, 2005. CITY CLERK This office is admimstimed by the City Clerk, elected for a four-year term at an odd year election conducted by the City of Lw ma. The powers and duties of the City Clerk are set forth in the City Charter and statutes of the State of Mchigam The Clerk is assisted by an Assistant City Clerk and a staff of seven who are trained specialists in delivering a variety of services to the citizens of Livonia and the several departments of the City administration, i.e.: (a) `The Clerk shall be clerk of the Council and shall attend all meetings of the Council and keep a permanent record of its meetings .. Y This responsibility involves receiving all correspondence and rmmmmiratione filed w@h the Clerk for transinssion to the Council; preparing official agendas for both Council Regular and Study Meetings; taking and transcribing complex ranulas of all Couual proceedings for the official journal as well as for all Public Hearings conducted by the Council as required by law; notification and publication of Notices and Public Hearings and Council proceedings in the official newspaper as designated by the City Council; preparation and forwarding of true copies of Conrad actions to the parties affected; maintaining the official record of all Ordinances enacted by legislative actions. City Council 2004 2005 Study Meetings 24 24 Regular Meetings 24 24 Special Meetings 0 1 Council Resolutions Recorded 620 602 Ordinances Adopted 60 35 Public Hearings Conducted 43 46 (b) `The Clerk shall perform such other duties as are required of that office by State or Federal law, the City Charts, the Council or Ordinances of the City., DEPARTMENT OF VITAL STATISTICS Required by State Stag to record and file a record of all deaths and births occurring within the City for subsequent transmittal to the State and County Departnent of Health and make available for certification copies of such records, as can be legally released. 2004 2005 Births Recorded 1233 1259 Deaths Recorded 1185 1282 FEES COLLECTED $107,290.00 $138,787.50 (c) `1be City Clerk shall issue and sign all licenses granted and shall register same. LICENSING During the fiscal year this office of the City Clerk accepted and processed, etc., under Title 4 of the Livonia Code of Ordinances the following ficenses: TYPE 2004 2005 Gas Stations, Dry Cleaners, Amusement Places, Taw, Trader Rental, Solicitors, Vending Machines, Restaurants, Caterers, etc. 1400 1495 FEES COLLECTED $50,700.00 $58,700.00 Garage, Basement, Rummage Sales 2421 2500 FEESCOLLECTED $12,105.00 $12,500.00 Pet Licenses 3304 3500 FEES COLLECTED $26,432.00 $28,000.00 Bicycle Licenses 6 20 FEES COLLECTED $18.00 $60.00 (d) "The City Clerk shall receive for filing: zmmng petitions, subdivision plats, security bonds, etc. Comprehensive files covering all phases of development of new subdivisions from the Public Hearings of the City Planning Commission in proposed plats, to the fling of all bonds and payment of financial assurances established in the City Council's Master Bond Resolutions z the final signatures of the City Clerk after the final plat approval is given by the Council." 2004 2005 Zomng 15 15 Vacating 1 3 Misrzllaveons (Waivers) 34 19 4 New Plats Authonzed (Prehmmary) 0 0 Final Plats 0 1 Extensions 0 3 BONDS Landscaping- Performance Bonds $116,200.00 $119,700.00 (e) Publication and Legal Notices The City Clerk is responsible for Poe publication of the City Council's proceedings in Poe official newspaper of Poe City and the insertion of Public Notices required by law of Public Hearings and all Ordinances duly adopted. In addition, Ordinances are printed, collated and distributed to all departments and interested parties. A complete file in excess of 2720 separate Ordinances is maintained, and the Livonia Code of Ordinances is continually updated, as amended, and on file in the City Clerk's office. (f) Duplicating and Mailing Figures The City Clerk's office produces copies of the following maRrials far meetings of the City Counchl All City Departments' outgoing mail is handled thro ugl mailing equipment in the City Clerk's office and Poe required postage in 2005 5 2004' 2005' Council Regular Agendas 3720 5808 Council Stady Agendas 3465 5568 Special Regular Agendas 0 232 Special Regular Minutes; 0 242 Council Regular Mumps; 1820 1680 Council Study Minims 500 580 Attorney Notes for Council Regular Meetings 1080 1392 Synopsis of Regular Council Minims 2090 2328 Council Public Hearing Notices 0 0 Public Hearing Minims 806 1196 'Tables indicate number of sets required per year for distribution for earb activity; mrnber of pages varies by event and is na included in hand. (Agenda totals for 2005 inchhde copies for the public.) All City Departments' outgoing mail is handled thro ugl mailing equipment in the City Clerk's office and Poe required postage in 2005 5 totaled $108,114.00. All incoming mail is handled daily by the Clerk's office and is distributed to the various departraouts of the City. (g) Election Commissi0n of Livonia (Au0tority - State Statute) The City Clerk presides as Chairperson of the three-member Election Commission consisting of the Clerk Mayor and City Attorney, charged with the responsibility of conducting all elections within the City. The compensation of election personnel shall be deter pined in advance by the Election Commission In any case where Election procedure is in doubt the Election Commission shall prescribe the procedure to be followed YIr<Y I Rio I CRI 9$ WN I Wra DIM I: I kv I I)CCN 10110 2004 2005 Elections Held in City 1 Primary - 1 Primary I General 1 General 1 School 2 School Notice of Cancellation of Registration Sale of Voter Registrations Lists $2,473.25 $1,707.58 (h) Other Duties and Responsibilities of the Clerk The Clerk shall have power to administer all oaths required by State Law, the Charter and Ordinances of the City. 2004 2005 New Registrations 8,137 4,847 Total RegisNed Voters 72,567 72,445 Change of Name 434 491 Change of Address 1,452 1,334 Cancellations 4,805 4,697 Registrations by Mail 730 229 Number of Absentee Ballots Issued 20,604 11,543 AV. Applications Issued 20,604 11,543 Notices of Election Inspectors 854 942 Notice of Cancellation of Registration Sale of Voter Registrations Lists $2,473.25 $1,707.58 (h) Other Duties and Responsibilities of the Clerk The Clerk shall have power to administer all oaths required by State Law, the Charter and Ordinances of the City. The Clerk shall be custodian of the City Seal and shall affix it to all documents and instruments requiring the Seal, and shall attest the same. The Clerk shall be custodian of all papers, documents and records pertaining to the City of Livonia, the custody of which is not otherwise provided for by the Charter. As castodian of records, the office of the City Clerk, in 1985 instituted a program of microfilming the bulb and death records of the City. The Clerk shall give the proper officials of the City ample notices of expiration or termination of any official bonds, franchises, contracts or agreements. The Clerk shall examme and audit all arcoums and claims against the City In 2005 the Clerk examined, pre -audited and signed approximately 17,968 vouchers issued by the Department of Finance for transmitm to the City Treasurer. The Clerk shall possess and exercise the powers of a Township Clerk so far as the same are required to be performed within the City. The Clerk shall catdy by signature all Ordinances and Resolutions enacted or passed by the City Council. The Clerk, as custudian of the cemeteries under City jurisdiction, is in charge of all trial procedures and in 2005 authorized three (3) openings and closings at Livoma Center CemetNy. The fee collected for the services of the Clerk's office was $75.00. The Civil Service Commission held tredve (12) regular meetings and two (2) special meetings during Fiscal Year 2004-05. 7 Dining the 2004-05 fiscal year, the City of Livonia commenced negotiations with the Livonia Fine Fights Union (LFFU) for renewal of them contract for the period December 1, 2005 to November 30, 2008. Secondly, negotiations continued with the Lw ma Police Officers Associative HTOA) for renewal of their contract for the period December 1, 2003 through November 30, 2006; and AFSCME Union Local 192 and AFSCME Supervisory Union Local 1917 for renewal of their contacts for the period December 1, 2004 through November 30, 2007 respectively. Currently, the City is in Act 312 Arbitration with the Livonia Police Officers Association (LPDA) and Mediation with AFSCME Union Local 192. In addition, ongoing Labor -Management Committee meetings have been scheduled to infomrally resolve employee grievances m concerns fled by members of the AFSCME Union Local 192, the Livonia Police Officers Associabom the Livonia Police Lieutenants and Sergeants Association and the Livonia Fire Fighters Union Ihese Committees consist of representatives of the Union and the City. In the event the employee grievance cannot be resolved throngh informal measures, the formal procedure peanuts appeal to the Civil Service Commission and, if not resolved, through mediation and/or formal arbitration The Personnel Review Commuttee, comprised of the Human Resources Director and the Director of Finance, met nineteen (19) times during the current fiscal year and reviewed and made fifty-one (51) recommendations to the Mayor on all new Lines, replacement personnel and promotions. Currently, a freeze on new permanent hives is in place based upon reduced state revenue sharing, lower interest earnings and related economic concerns. Since December 1, 1994, newly hived general employees who subscribe to hospitalization/medical insurance are required to co -pay a portion of them premium costs A $30.00 for single coverage, $35.00 for two -person coverage and $40.00 for family coverage per month. The annual Health and Wellness Fav was held on three (3) separate afternoons during February 2005 at various City locations, including the Police Headquarters Training Rory the Department of Public Works Administrative Conference Room and the City Hall Fifth Floor Gallery. Employees and retirees, along with their immediate family members, were encouraged to attend and participate in various health screening activities, including blood pressure, cholesterol and body fat content measurements, as well as receive handouts concerning wellness information Representatives of the City's occupational health services providers, including St Joseph Mercy Business Health and Providence -Corporate Health, conducted the medical screening In addition, representatives firm each hospitals lion/medical insurance plan sponsored by the City, including Blue Cross/Blue Shield (BCBS), Blue Care Network (BCI), and Health Alliance Plan (HAP) were present to permit employees w review and compare the various plan descriptions and obtain assistance with health care questions or problems. Also, staff fiom the Department of Parks and Recreation were present w provide information concerning their fitness programs in collaboration with the Civil Service wellness program initiatives for employees. Approximately one hundred (100) individuals attended these activities in preparation for the cocoa] hospitalization/medical insurance March open enrollment period when employees and retirees are permitted to change plans. At the end of the fiscal year, the employee and retiree hospitahzetion/medical insurance enrollments were as follows: HEALTH ALLIANCE PLAN: 136 Employee subscribers (HAP) 42 Retiree subscribers 17 Retirees on Medicare 6 COBRA BLUE CARE NETWORK: 120 Employee subscribers (BCN) 31 Retiree subscribers 4 Retirees on Medicare 6 COBRA BLUE CROSS/BLUE SHIELD 198 Employee subscribers BC/BS Preferred Plan 301 Retiree subscribers 132 Retirees on Medicare 3 COBRA BLUE CROSS/BLUE SHIELD 97 Employee subscribers Point of Service 2 Retiree subscribers 0 Retirees on Medicare 0 COBRA A total of fifty-seven (57) full-time employees "opted our" of insumme coverage dnring the February 2005 open enrollment period and received $1,000.00 in lieu of hospitalimuon/medical insurance coverage. The City of Livonia currently contracts for group life insurance with the Hartford hrsmance Company at the rale of $.18 per $1,000 per moms volume. Accidental Death and Dismemberment (AD&D) group insurance coverage is also provided by the Hartford hrsmance Company at a rate of $.02 per $1,000 volume per month. Currently, a total of six hundred thirty-eight (638) employees have life insurance coverage in the aggregate comm[ of $31,936,000. In addition, thirty (30) retirees have a $3,000 death benefit coverage totaling 590,000; one hundred burry -seven (137) retirees have a $3,500 death benefit coverage totaling 5479,500 and one hundred four (104) retirees have a 55,000 death benefit totaling 5520,000 for a total retiree group of two hundred seventy-one (271) having aggregate life insurance in the ammnt of $1,089,500. During the fiscal year, a total of $71,408.62 life insurance premium and a total of $7,688.72 AD&D premium were paid to the Hartford Insurance Company. The City of Livonia is wIf-ins red for the weekly disability income coverage. Effective December 1, 2003 through November 30, 2006, the disability clams are administered by the Accident Fund Insurance Company of America for a monthly charge of $1.00 per etigble employee. This benefit provides $200/wk to totally disabled general fidl-time employees and $100.00 to totally disabled part-time employees f r up to 45 weeks; S125/wk for totally disabled Police Dispatcher civilian full-time employees for 45 weeks; and S42/wk for the first 12 weeks and S 100/wk for the 40 week balance of 52 weeks for totally disabled police and fire employees. The total premium paid to Accident Fund was $7,688.72 for this fiscal year. During the Fiscal Year 2004-05, there were a total of twenty-one (21) weekly disability income claims for employees. A total dollar volume of $20,260.55 was paid by this self- insured program. The Civil Service Department staff adrumaxrs the general employee =an tition reimbursement programs. A total of twenty-eiglut (28) members of AFSCME Union Local 192 expended $2,669.80 out of the maximum allocation of $10,000.00 during the fiscal year. One member has requested the $475.00 maxntrum allowed for the three year contact period for the AFSCME Supervisor Technical Chapter of Union Local 1917. OPITCAL PLAN The City contimued to offer a self-administered group optical benefit program with three (3) providers: Suburban Eye Care (a private Livonia optometric practice), and retail providers, Co-op Optical and Detroit Optometric Centers (DOC) who have multiple area locations. Employee usage and costs incurred during the fiscal year at these centers or through the reimbursement option were as follows: 10 Direct Reimbursement 25 $ 2,337.00 Detroit Optometric Center 102 6,859.50 Co -Op Optical 12 793.90 Suburban Eye Care (From 67 5,375.00 August) 206 $15,364.50 Total DENTAL PROGRAM All employees have negobated a reimbursement or direct payment program to the DerNst as the expenses are inured. Billings for services rendered during the fiscal year must be submitted within 30 days of the November 30e fiscal year end for consideration A summary of the employee reimbursements and hardship advances during the fiscal year to date are sum,narized as follows: RemiIwrsemmvDirect Payment 1154 $279,565.51 Employees are eligible for 50% of the fres for orthodontic services for a lifetime maxnmra of $1000 per family funded to the employee, then spouse and depeadevts until the end of the year they reach age 19. The summary of the orthodontic service claims received this fiscal year is as follows: Number of Claim Total Amount Paid Pchcedtire 8 $ 7,151.18 General 7 4,920.00 Total 15 $ 12,071.18 The City of Livonia enamels their self-insured worker's disability compensation program wiPo the third party administrator, The Accident Fund Insurance Company of America The contract for these services is effective December 1, 2003 through November 30, 2006. The net total incurred loss an open claims from December 1, 2004, through Nwember 30, 2005, is $112,705.88, which includes payment for weekly wage loss indemnity benefits, medical services, related legal, vocational rehabilitation and other miscellaneous expenses for approximately one hundred five (105) employee claims. Employees may choose to receive treatment for work-related injuries or illnesses at ane of four (4) Livonia occupational medicine treatment facilities including Concentra Occupational Health Cenlers (2), Providence Corporate Health Services and St Joseph Mercy Business Hea1Po Services. 11 The City of Livoma participates m the Michigan Municipal League Unemployment Compensation Grasp Account The frim of TALK UC Express is the service agent of this group account The Civil Service Department responded to approximately thirtptwo (32) former employee claims for unemployment benefits filed with the Michigan Employment Security Administration (MESA). To date, a total of $54,439.07 benefit charges have been received for this fiscal year. CITY PHYSICIAN AND MEDICAL CLINICS Pre-employment, reum-to-work and occupational mjury/illness radical examivatioas and treatnent continued to be provided by the authorized City Physician, St John Providence Health. In addition, Concentm, Providence and St Joseph Mercy provided occupational medical services, along with the St Mary Hospital Emergency Room under the City Worker's Compensation Program. Our records indicate that nine (9) permanent employee pre-employment (fill -time and part-time) examinations, seventy (70) pre- employment physicals for temporary employees, ninety-five (95) physicals fa rearm to work, twenty-two (22) public safety pre-employment psychological evaluations by Dr. Harley Stock the City's Consulting Psychologist and dree (3) Fitness for Duty medical evaluations through Providence, the City Physician, have been conducted Dr. Stock also conducted Fitness for Duty examinations related to job performance and discipline issues. In addition, there were medical consultations with regard to employee health and occupational safety matters as it related to infectious diseases and worker's compensation claims, including continuation of pre-employment auditory, IB and pulmonary function examinations for fire fighter and police officer new hives m compliance with MIOSHA requirements. Commercial Shiver's License (CDL) alcohol and drug testing for designated employees assigned to drive specific types of Department of Public Works vehicles are being coordinatedn compliance with federal regulations. Two members of the Civil Service Department staff attended the National Incident Management Systems (NIMS) Training sponsored by the Police Department. This training is designed w ensure that P responders and then support system understand the Unified Incident Command System if the to Responders ever have to respond to a terrorist's attack or natural disaster. Training was held July 20 — July 21, 2005 in the Police Department Training Room. A representative of the Accident Fund Loss Prevention Division, the thud party administrator of the City's self-insured Worker's Compensation Program, conducted dree (3) loss prevention facility tours and ave (1) ergonomic assessment with Civil Service and Public Works staff during the fiscal year. The facilities reviewed were the Police Administration Building and Recreation Center, and the Department of Public Works Adrmnistramn Building, yard and adjoin^ ng buildings and the Parks and Recreation outdoor pools and Recreation Center. 12 In June, annual OSHA updated safety training concerning bloodhome pathogens and infectious disease was provided by the Ferguson supervisor in charge of the pools who is certified by Red Crass to teach the class to Life Guards and Pool Manages. In October the Accident Fund Representative provided Bloodborne Pathogens Training to Custodian employees. Hepatitis B inoculations were Provided for individuals at Providence Corporate Health Service's Newburgh Facility at the conclusion of the fainng prograons for newly hired employees covered by these programs.. Employee accident reports were kept by all City Departments and reviewed by the Accident Review CommitRe consisting of nine (9) representatives from Fire, Police, Public Works, Engineering Library, Parks & Recreafoq AFSCME Union Local 192, and Civil Service. The Accident Review Committee met three (3) times during the year and reviewed one hundred forty-six (146) accident reports. Accident statistics are compiled into an annual MIOSHA City-wide report SERVICE RECOGNITION PROGRAM One hundred forty -vine (149) employees received service recognition awards in FY 2004-05. Service Awards Level of Service Presented Five Years 29 Ten Years 30 Fifteen Years 29 Twenty Years 27 Twxnty-Five Years 18 Thirty Years 11 Thirty -Five Years 2 Forty Years 2 Forty -Five Years 1 Total 149 The Civil Service Department bas continued an affvmative recruito�ent program through newspaper advertisements in the ObservenFcceutric, the Michigan Chronicle, the Detroit News/Detroit Free Press, and notices to various colleges, training schools, MESA, handicapper rehabilitation services, and minority conmmnity based organizations. The total number of advertisements published during Fiscal Year 2004-05 were: the Detroit News — 12; Livonia Observer — 12; Michigan Chronicle — 11; The Employment Guide — 1; several professional association publications, the Internet r"irrent service Monstatrskcmn and the City of Livonia Spring and Fall News. 13 In accordance with the Affirmative Action policy adopted by the Civil Service Commission, the Civil Service staff continued its efforts to make examinations and position descriptions as job-related as possible. Proposed qualifications for each new examination were reviewed by the respective Department subject matter experts, staff and the Civil Service Commission in order to establish prerequisites which were appropriate to the positions being filled In addition, the Civil Service staff completed several state and federal equal employment opportunity reports and prepared a monthly summary report to the Civil Service Commission concerning the race and gender characteristics of all applicants for open-competitive examinations, the resukmg eligible lists, and all permanent employee hires and terminations. EXAMINATION PROGRAM The Civil Service staff continued to prepare and administer open-competitive and promotional examinations as requested by City Department Heads. During Fiscal Year 2004-05, a total of 9 open-competitive and 17 promotional examinations were announced The Civil Service Department received 324 applications for open, competitive examinations and 80 for promotional examinations during the fiscal year. In addition the Department received 684 applications for temporary employment opportunities in various Parks and Recreation positions; 180 applications for Seasonal Laborer, 31 applications for Seasonal Clerk; 86 applications for Student Page; 80 applications for Library Page; 6 applications for Substitute Librarian' 48 applications for Temporary Clerical; 8 applications for School Crossing Guard: 48 applications for Police Reserve Officer; and 1 application for Planning Technician. TRAINING During FY 2004-05, the Civil Service Deparhnem sponsored several employee-trammg activities. These are summarized as follows: Between December 2004 and November 2005, Civil Service Staff coordinated multiple educational presentations sponsored by financial representatives from the Deferred Compensation 457 Plan providers including Nationwide Retirement Solutions, ICMA Retirement Corporation and Commomiw Choice Credit Union. Over 90 employees scheduled individual appointments with the Defer-d Compensation 457 Plan on-site representatives. Effective May 1, 2005, Great West Retirement Services introduced Matt Wallace, Account Representative, as a new contact for the City of Livonia's Defined Contribution Retirement Plan Account Mr. Wallace has held seven (7) sessions at various City locations conducting one-ov-ooe inRrviews with employees. 14 A subconmuttee comprised of a police/fire main representative, a general employee union representative, the Youth Assistance Program Supervisor, two (2) behavioral heafth service EAP providers and the Human Resources Director continue to oversee the Emergency Behavioral Health Service Referral Network For the FY 2004-05, a total of 12 employees, 3 employee family members and 3 residents received crisis interatimv individual counseling sessions at the limit of 5 sessions totaling $400 per individual. In addition, EAP providers have been called upon to assist Department and Divisions with group conflict resolution exercises. All services totaled approximately $7,465.00. The Cor m rnity Development Block Grant (CDBG) program has mirrored their behavioral healtltcounseling program and uses many of the same referral network of providers. A total of $6,940.00 in CDBG funds has been expended during FY 2004-05 provided to 19 low-income residents. SPECIAL PROJECTS 1. The Civil Service staff coordinated one (1) Employee Blood Drive in 2005 and assisted in the coordination of two (2) additional drives at the Community Recreation Center. A total of eighty-eight (88) pints of blood were donated by City employees during the drives, conducted in March, May and in September. 2. The Civil Service staff coordinated the 2005 United Way Campaign in all City Departnem s and Divisions. A preliminary total of $3,770.00 has been donated by City employees to this year's Drive with continuing contributions in progress. This represents 30/D contributions from employees contributing to the United Way to date. Six (6) departments have submitted donation cards at this time. Results are pending from the other thirteen (13) departments. 3. Blue Cross/Blue Shield and Blue Care Network implemented a new mtemet data collection system in October 2005. The new system is a windows based product which greatly improves information transfer compared to the previous Membership Collections System (MCS). The Health Alliance Plan (HAP) website also provides for online informmion transfer. All employee hospitalization and medical insurance reporting and enrolhnent changes are processed directly by the Civil Service Department utilizing these systems. This results in an unpurved 24-hour tum around time on contact changes. 4. Computer reporting projects continued during FY 2004-05 include: maintenance of the automated Life Insurance Employee Emollmerd Report to enable the clerical staff member to make monthly additions and deletions and achieve instantaneous Life Insurance totals and costs; maintenance of an employee Pension estimate program in an EXCEL spreadsheet format; continuing preparation of department mgammaxnal chms with annual updates using ORGCHART Software; and implementation of each employee classification and wage/salary history on the ACCESS database to facilitate processing annual payroll Master Transfers. In coordination with the Information 15 Systems Manager, the Civil Service Department has developed an appliravUexammation database m ACCESS to improve the maintenance of applicant data for open-competitive and promotional examinations. This database enables staff to track the information necessary for EEOC record keeping and reporting. The staff maintains a website, which provides an overview of department responsibilities and activities, along with continuously updated job announcements and application guidelines. Civil Service Department staff has maintained a database for benefit tracking in ACCESS to facilitate self-admnnimmicat of the employee dental reimbursement program. Staff continues to electronically track employee spouse and dependent utilization ofthe City's self-administered optical plan. 5. The Critical Incident Team comprised of members from Police, Fre, Law, Public Service, the Mayor's Office, the Council Office, the Director of Emergency Preparedness and Civil Service continued its mission during the past year. The team contimres to evaluate potential violence problems and rwommmends assessment or intervention plans. The members of the CIRT Teams responded to one possible workplace violence situation this year. 6. On July 21, 2005, Compensation Statements illustrating total compensation, taxable earnings and the City's cos[ of various benefits were mailed to all permanent full-time and part-time employees. Also included at the Statement for the first time were the actual value of paid time off used las[ year and the sick leave balance as of December 2004. 7. DSS Corporation scanned, documented and created CD ROMs of the Civil Service Commission Minutes; Collective Bargammg Agreements; Legal Opinions; and Personnel Record Cards. The documents are now available on "Iaserfiche". This allows staff to gmckly access information saving time and energy. In the Chore, the CD ROMs will be updated as necessary w add concern information 8. Or. Kenneth Wolf communes to work with the Police Department on their Critical Incident Stress Debriefing Program. 9. The Civil Service staff continued the on-site "Flu Shof' program in cooperation with Providence Hospital Corporate Health Services. One hundred twenty-five (125) employees and their immediate Cannily members received inoculations for a no®nal fee A several City worksite locations. 16 Following is a report nn the activities and accomplishments of the Board of Trustees of the Livonia Employees Retirenierat System for the period December 1, 2004 through November 30, 2005: 1. DEFINED BENEFIT PLAN a) The Board of Trustees held twelve (12) Regular Meetings and one (1) Special Meetings during this period b) As of November 30, 2005, the retirement system Defined Benefit Plan had five hundred twenty-four (524) retirees or surviving spouses plus seven (7) Digible Domestic Relations Orden: (EDRO's) (Divorced Prior to Retaement) and four (4) Alternate Payees (Divorced aft Retirement) for a blah of five hundred thuty-five (535) receiving pension checks. Twelve (12) City retirees died during fiscal year 2004-2005. The total pension payroll fiscal year to dab is $11,047,222 through November 2005. c) The team of David Sowerby and Kenneth Johnson, Loo®s-Sayles and Company, advises the Board nn investmeNs for the Defined Benefit Plan and uses discretionary power regarding imeshneNs subject to confirmation by the Board The Board approved mveshnent transactions by Lomas- Sayles and Company at regular me ags. The Defined Benefit find had a value of $185,369,028 as of October 31, 2005. d) In June 2005, the Board reviewed the fifty-second (52nd) annual actuarial valuation as of November 30, 2004, for the Livonia Employees Retirement System, prepared by the Board's Actuary, Rodwan Consulting Company. The Plan covered five hundred thirty-eight (538) retirees, iltirty-three (33) deferred and two hundred eighty-ane (281) employees for a bbl of eight hundred fifty-two (852). The Actuary reported that the accmed actuarial condition of the Retirement System is very good e) The handed ratio of actuarial value of assets to actuarial accrued liability for the Retirement System Defined Benefit Plan is 121.4%. t) Manll-Lynch cormmes to provide quarterly performance appraisal of the Defined Benefit Plan g) The 2004-05 annual soft dollar expense for the Merrill Lynch Performance Measurement Report was $57,000. 17 Id Effective July 5, 2000, the Board entered into a Securities Lending Agreement with Comerica Bank. Total earnings from December 1, 2004 through October 31, 2005 were $25,074.78. i) to June 2001, the Board approved a $5 million investment with MumNlae Midland LLC, in the Midland Multifamily Equity Real Estate hrvermew Trust (REFI) offering, In April 2002, the Board approved an additional $5 million inveshnent for a total of S10 iniirn invested in the Midland Multifamily Equity REIT. Total imerest earnings from December 1, 2004 through November 30, 2005 were $999,311. j) In March 2002, the Board approved a $5 million inveshnevt with Cohea & Steers Capital Management Inc., in a Real Estate Investment Trust (REFI), separately managed account The account marlret value reported as of October 31, 2004 was $8,229,630. Note. On February 9, 2005, the Board of Trustees approved to take the profits earned be0ceen March 2002, the date of inception and February 2005 tapproxonately $3.5 mfllwn), rebalance the fm+estment down to $5 million, and transfer one-half of the total profits into the Loomis Sayles Bond Account one and ane -half into the Loomis Sayles Large Cap Growth Account. The account market value reported as of October 31, 2005 was $5,788,637. k) DSS Corporation scorned, documented and seated CD ROMs of the Board of Trustees Minutes for the Defined Benefit Plan. The Ninnies for the period January 1954 through February 2005 are now available on 'Imerfiche". This allows staff to quickly access information saving time and energy. In the future, at the end of each year, the paper copy of the minutes for that year will be forwarded to DSS Corporation to add to the om1)CD Rom- 1) On October 19, 2005, the Actuary presented a GaincLoss Analysis Report covering the period November 30, 2003 through November 30, 2004. No changes were recommended at this time. and Currently there is me participant in the Defined Benefit Plan nulilary buy - in program. One (1) employee completed military Fury -m paymevls during lhis fiscal year. n) Approximately one hundred (100) requests for retirement estimates under the Defined Benefit Plan were processed by the Civil Service Department Staff using a computented format that has been infernally developed by staff to expedite the calculation of estimated pension benefits. 18 o) The City made hely employer comnlamions on a monthly basis firunghout the year. p) The Board of Trustees continues to distribute monthly pension checks directly to members of the Defined Benefit Plan with these checks being processed by the staff of the Civil Service Department q) Members of the Board attended the Michigm Association of Public Employees Remenumt System (MAPERS) Conferences A Soaring Eagle Resort, Mt Pleasant Michigan, from May 15 to May 17, 2005 and at the Grand Tmverse 2. DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLAN a) The Board of Trustees held twelve (12) Regular Meetings during this period. b) The Defined Communion Plan Administrator continues to be Great West Retirement Services. c) The Defined Communion bund had a total account ending balance of $41,218,376 as of September 30, 2005, for three hundred seventy-nme (379) Active Participarm, fifty-six (56) Active/Per®nated Participants and two (2) Inactive Pmfimpaim. d) As of November 30, 2005, a total of fifty-seven (57) employees have retired under the Defined Contribution Retirement Plan. e) DSS Corporation scanned, documented and created CD ROMs of the Board of Trustees Minutes for the Defined Contribution Plan. The Minutes for the period December 2003 through February 2005 are now available on 'I msedmche". This allows staff m quickly access tfrmamon saving time and energy. In the future, at the end of each year, the paper copy of the mutes for that year will be fouvarded to DSS Corporation to add to the CD Rom. t) The Board continues to schedule separate monthly meeting agendas for all Defined Contribution Plan related business. 3. LIVONIA RETIREE HEALTH AND DISABILITY BENEFITS PLAN (VERA) a) The Board conducted twelve (12) separate Regular Meetings for the City of Livorno Retiree Health and Disability Benefits Plan (VERA). b) Mr. Sowerby and Mr. Johnson advised the Board on iweshnems for the City of Livonia Retiree Health and Disability Benefits Plan VERA 19 (Voluntary Employees Beneficiary Association). The VERA had a value of $37,384,406 as of October3l, 2005. Note: The Voluntary Employees Beneficiary Association (VERA) was established at the recommendation of the fanner Actuary to the Board of Trustees, Gabriel, Roeder, Smith and Co., for purposes of placing in a tax Gee trust hospitalization -medical insurance benefit funds for members of the Defined Benefit (DB) and the Defined Contribution (DC) Plans, as well as to pemuit separate funding for DC Plan member disability retirements. c) In June 2005, the Board reviewed the seventh (7u) annual actuarial valuation as of November 30, 2004, for the City of Livonia Retiree Health and Disability Benefits Plan, as prepared by the Board's new Actuary, Rodwan Consulting Company. In sunmazy, the Actuary reported that the amortization periods adopted by the Board of Trustees far the funding purposes of this Plan are 30 years for disability benefits and 50 years for health insurance benefits. The 50 year amortization period produces a contribution that is less than the Annual Required Contribution (ARC), and hence world result in a contribution deficiency in the Plan's financial report. Consideration will be given to decreasing the amortization period for funding purposes for post-retirement health insurance benefits to 30 years, which will result in an increase in the computed contribution requnement. d) DSS Corporation scanned, documented and created CD ROMs of the Board of Trustees Minutes for the VERA. The Ninnies for the period December 2002 through February 2005 are now available on "Laserfiche". This allows staff to quickly access information saving late and energy. In the future, at the end of each year, the paper copy of the minutes for that year will be forwarded to DSS Corporation to add to the CD Rom e) The Board continues to schedule separate monthly meeting agendas for all VERA related business. 20 PUBLICATIONS • City Newsletter — four (4) issues published and mailed to over 43,000 residences and businesses. • Brochures, newsletter and flyers were prepared for specific programs. Information & Complaint Center — 4 volunteers bandled 1,268 calls including =/IDD assistance. There were no formal complaints processed City Hall Toms — 2 tours were conducted for 50 students from Roosevelt Elementary school Rouge Rescue / River Day — The activities at Rotary Pads were coordinated by Public Service & Community Resouroe staff and over 160 volunteers representing the following groups: Anter Construction Company, Costco Wholesale, Livonia Rotary Club, Shrvenson High School, Churchill High School, Ladywood High School, Divine Child FBgh School, Schoolorzft College & U of M Biology Honor Sociely, American Legion Auxiliary Juniors Unit 4 32, Boy Scout Troop 4875, Cub Scout Pack 4 1382 — Den 4, Pink 4 287 firm Botsford & Grandview Elementary and Pack 4 852 from Washington Elememazy School. Together they filled 6 garbage bags of plastic/glass debris, planted 150 seedlings of white pine -hack berry & white spire birch, removed 8 garbage bags of garlic mustard seed, opened 3 log jams/blockages and verked/painted an estimated 1 mules of mime trails In addition, 5 groups of 58 volunteers worked a combined total of 16 hours and stenciled 125 storm drains. We acknowledge and extend a big `Thank You" to the Golden Lantern, Stan's Market & Costco Wholesale for thein generous donations of refreshments & smacks RESIDENT ASSISTANCE • Emergency Cerlificates— assisted 30 families with $ 980.00 in Former Jack certificates, donated by the Mvvimis Early Risers Club and Gtildnm & Youth Commission • Utility Assistance (CDBG) — assisted 20 low-inmme households wilh utility shut-offbills mailings 8,860.11 • Holiday/Referral Assistance — assisted 93 ]ow -income families with food and gift donations provided by 21 local sponsors • Commodity Food (TEFAP) — dishibuted 2571 food bags, with the aid of 24 volurn ers, to 2141ow-income households 21 • Foous:HOPF — distributed 1,042 food boxes, with the aid of 12 volumeers, to 87 low-income seniorhouseholds Clmcal, technical, and budgetary assistance were also provided to the Aging, Arts, I istuical, Histone Preservatiou Human Relations, and Youth Commissions. Commonalty Resources has adrm mmurve responsibilities for subsidized transportation for Livonia senior citizens and handicapped residents. Contract for SMART, as well as applicable grants are administered and monitored by Community Resources staff. The Livonia Commonalty Transit system has a fleet often (10) vehicles (vans and small buses). The vehicles are driven by 25 CDL licensed part-time bus drivers. Five (5) part- time employees coordinate the drivers and then schedules. The system provided over 26,300 one-way rides within the City of Livonia These rides totaled over 13,800 work hours and covered over 192,000 miles. CIVIC PARK SENIOR CENTER Participation in activities during 2005 totaled approximately 113,000 seniors. 16,800 congregate meals were served Activities included: health screening, educational classes, support groups, fitness classes, cards and games, art & crafts, senior sports, Medicare counseling etc. Volunteers logged 17,000 hours. SUPPORT SERVICES, GIFTS, GRANTS, AND TRANSPORTATION Senior Cent Staffing Gran; Livonia Community Foundation Gm4, and Michigan Office of Services to the Aging Grant and C.DB.G. funds totaled 5209,493. $14,400 in donations was received. SCAN donated $49,500 to purchase a wheelchair equipped van for the senior transportation program Federal and State grants and donations provided: • 1097 hours of personal care service to 13 seniors. • 1239 hours of homemaker services to 18 seniors • 443 hours of respite services to 4 seniors • Home maintenance service to 34 homes • 16,950 one-way rides through the smim transportation program • 39,784 meals were delivered by volumeers to home bound senior • 3000+ seniors received referral service 22 REFERRAL SOURCES: 2005 Referrals: 60 New Cases — (30 males and 30 females) Carry Over Cases from 2004: 76 — (41 males and 35 females) Total Cases served in 2005: 136 2005 Cases represent the fo8owing referral agencies: Livonia Police Department 33 Third Cirmit Court- Juvenile Division 15 Surrounding Police Departments 09 Schools 01 Fire 02 30 parents completed our Alternative Parenting Skills group. Program youth performed 617 hours of Community Work Service. 46 youth completed `Project Impact' (social living skills) group (12 horns each). 29 males participated in the JAG (Juvenile Awareness Program) A Milan Federal Prison 8 males and 16 females tcared the Wayne Comly Jail. 790 youth used the services of the Youth Employment Fracture Center that listed over 1123 job openings. Youth Assistance staff participated on the EAP Committee and attended various Educational Seminars. Wayne Comfy grant Child Care Fund - $ 4,300 1110ue Mill Fund -$13,000 Coarmrmly Resources has adnnnummve responsibility for the Cable Television franchise and mrmicipal programming. The report pertaining to these activities cart be hand under the Cable Television Commission. Commonly Resmuces has administrative responsibility for the Historical and Flistann Preservation Coumnssions. The reports pertaining to these activities can be found under the Historical Commission and Historic Preservation Commission 23 In addition, the Community Resources staff at Greearmead: • conducted day to day operation of Greermead • maintained Historical Commission records including minutes, voluuher hours, caretaker reports, contracts, and budgets • coordinated weekday tams, Sunday tams, Gift Shop operations, Newburg School usage, Newburg Church, Alexander Blue House, Meeting House rentals, and property usage including neetmgs, luncheons, private parties and a class reunion held at Greermead • implemented Historical Commission resolutions • assisted with the development, pla ^ ng and implementation of 20 special events, fundraisers and community projects sponsored by the Historical Comnussion, Friends of Greemnead, Livonia Historical Society Arts Commission, St Andrew's Society of Detroit Festival of Cultures Program, AMC. Car Club, Mustang Car Show and Garden Club. • assisted with the over site of construction of handicap ramp and porch restoration at Newberg Church and copper gutter installation and handrail installation at the Alexander Blue House. • waked with DP.S. to define and prioritize maintenance work and Building Inspection to coordinate Career Center Project. • coordinated Greenmead's volunteer program, published issues of the Volunteer Voice Newsletter and scheduled volumsem for tars and special events • provided work site and supervision for community service probationers and corporate community service projects. • hosted several professional and volunteer gatherings such as a Volunteer Reception, Friends of Greenmead and Quester Luncheons, Historical Society, and Police Reserves Picnic • provided a project site for Master Gardener Program and support far volunteer gardeners program • provided a site and support for five Eagle Scout Projects and a Carl Scout Project. As of June 2005, the "Heritage" the Commission's newsletter is part of the City News. It is distributed to all horns in the City of Livonia - In May and September, the Commission sponsored a Mature Driving Workshop for Livonia seniors. Commission funds were used for this project. 24 In June, the Commission co-sponsored the annual Senior Citizens Picnic held at Bride Edgar Ice Arena. The Commission paid for entertainment and a portion of the food. The Commussion was in charge of bingo and a 50150 raffle. In October the Commission helped with Senior Celebration Day. In November the Commission decided unanimously to use the balance of their promotion printing and postage accounts to help pay the additional assessmerd to The Senior Alliance. At its November 2005 meeting pursuant to its by-laws, the Commission held its normal election. The following officers were unanimously elected to one-year terms commencing December 1, 2005 Chairperson: Clam Kar la Vice Chairperson: Joan O'Brien 2°a Vice Chairperson Bernard Szehga Treasurer: Joseph Echols Secretary: Robert Cams The Livonia Arts Commission meetings were held on the 4th Tuesday of every month in the Mayors Conference Room of City Hall, with the exception of the July meeting, which was held A an offsite location. The 2004 officers were: Chairperson: Bob Perisb, Vice Chairperson: Andrea Taylor/Audrey Coronado, Secretary: Donna Eno, Treasurer: Virginia Bosak These positions remained in place for the 2005 calendar year. During the year, resignation letters were received from Andrea Taylor, Stan Weber, (had Swales and Lois Mize. We are deeply saddened, as longtime Art Commissioner and friend, Clayton Evende a passed away this summer. Active Commission members include Virginia Bosak, Audrey Coronado, Do®a Eno, Mary Fisher, Conrad Gniewek, Theresa Mastela, Robert Perrish, Frank Petersmark, Came Spurting Dan Spoiling and om newest member, Crzce Kamzewski. At this time the Commission has four open positions. Budgeted Free -Admission Activities were: Noontime Concerts held at the Civic Center Library at a cost of $2,000. 25 Music Under the Stals held at the Community Recreation Center, Greermead, Civic Center Park, and the Wilson Barn at $8,117. Commission Sponsored Community Activities are: a 5500 grant to VAAL (Visual Arts Association of Livonia), me of Livovia's art clubs; and 5100 fox the Livonia Art Club. A $600 contribution to Greermhead's Fall Festival, and a $500 grant was awarded to Livonia resident Kyle Grant for Shakespeare classes at Churchill High School. Scholarships were awarded this fear in the arrant of $6,000 to shrdeNs majoring in an art -related field at a post high school learning institution. Commission Donations: Livonia Symphony, $5,000; Greevmead's Garden and Christmas Walks, $100. The Arts Commission received a donation from the Theater Guild of Livonia -Redford, $11,860; which disbanded. The Commission held its 8th Annual Fine Arts Exhibition in September. The artwak was displayed in the 2nd floor Art Gallery of the Civic Cent Library. Out of 195 submissions 82 entries were chosen for exhibition. Prize money totaled $2,750. Corporate sponsorship donations totaling $500 were received from Bill Broom Ford, Inc., Eastern Michigan University — Livonia, Cole, Newton and Duran, and Perkos Shoes. Expenses totaled $3,126. A painting was purchased by the Commission at a cost of $700 to add to its collection and will be displayed in the lobby of City Half The Commission will strive to increase sponsor involvement next year, in order to make this prestigious event a moneymaker. Artwork from regional artists was displayed monthly in the Civic Center Gallery and in the City Hall Atrium Small craft and an collections were shown in the Library as well as City Hall display cases throughout the year. In November, City of Livonia employees held thein third annual show in the lobby of City Hall. Commission -Sponsored Receptions: The Fine Arts Exhibit in September, Individual artist receptions were held monthly in the Civic Cent Libm y Gallery. The 29th Annual Arts in the Village Festival 2005 was mildly successful, considering the bad weather. Profits generated were $12,973.36, a 30% decrease fiom last year. The dollars generated form the Festival allow for the comar med art and cultural experiences that the Commission works for each year. Next year, the festival will be called "Art From the Heart" of Livonia and will change its location to the grounds around City Hall to centralize the event, and attract more pinions, and in time, increase revenues. The Commission has formulated its mission statement: 'To preserve, promote, sponsor and develop the Arts in Livonia To continue commumity access to an experiences, opportunities and i nparving community awareness." The Commission created a new color Livonia Arts Commission brochure 26 The Commission has developed its own web page, which is an extension of the City's site. It includes more timely infomanon and has a mom detect route of contacting commissioners concerning different events, plus forms and information, which can be downloaded Produced 190 programs (2,844.85 production hours) for City Channel 8, including the live coverage of City public meetings: Council Shindy and Regular meetings and Planning Commission meetings. Utilized 410.5 hours of volumteer assistance from certified residents in the production of City Channel 8 programs. Logged 93 complants/ivquires re: ohs, reception, programming choices and the desire for competition for cable Television and Internet access using cable modems. Maintained radio station WPZY, 1670 AM, providing up to date nfamation regarding road closures, snow emergencies and other vital information relating to the public safety and well being within om community. Updated the 5me Floor Edit Suite with a new Avid Computer -Based editor. This new equipment wi l benefit the entire Cable amps efficiency in editing taped material. Honors: 2005 Hometown Video Festival la Place Award, Educational Profile category for: So You Waone Be a Chef and the 2005 Philo T. Farnsworth Video Festival I'm Place Award for the Promotional Video: Hmbem Gft Shop. HISTORIC DISIRICI RESOURCES: A website is being developed to highlight the historic districts in Livonia on the City Website. Leiters of ntroduction to Historic Preservation Commission and a copy of the local ordnance were sent to the new owners at the Ebenezer Smith House on Wayne Road and the Thomas Bemmett House on Stale Road 27 Plans were approved to plan a Historic District owners meeting and newsletter in 2006. The list of historic districts in Livonia was updated for the State Historic Preservation Office. JOSHUA MORRELL SIMMONS HOUSE (FRUIT OR,L FARM) New owner, Dr. Keith Pierce, was awarded a recognition plaque commending him on his restoration / renovation of the historic property at the March Such of the City Address. KATOR—SHAYHOUSE Exterior changes to the house dais past year were not reviewed by HPC per the local ordinance. The owner was sent a letter and a copy of the local ordinance to remind them that all exterior changes to the historic district need to be approved by the Historic Preservation Commission. The owners were also asked b attend a meeting to discuss the issues. ASA B. SMITH HOUSE AND SITE HPC is working with the current owner to provide restoration and tax credit information and sources for contractors. The owner was sent a letter and a copy of the local ordinance to remind them that all extenor changes to the historic district need to be approved by the Historic Preservation Commission atter an inquiry had been made concerning the site. UNION CEMETERY City Council approved a quitclaim deed to the Trinity Theater Group and the theater group agreed to mow the grass in the adjacent cemetery. hifomiation on historic designation and requirements in relation to arty changes, mowing the grass around the headstones, and repairing doors and windows was sent to the theater group. CLARENCEVBLLE CEMETERY The entrance pillar and fence were repaired after another traffic accident along Eight Mile road GREENMEAD Cider Mill hmnediate plans to incorporate the cider mill into Greenmead were dropped when the present cider mill land was not sold Rerummended that a Master Plan (Cultural Resource Management Plan) be developed before any future decision is made. Newburg Church Plans to add a handicap enhance and coup to the church were approved. Mesunder Blue House Renovations to the second floor of the house were discussed. 28 TAX CREDIT LEGISLATION A Commissioner attended a full day has credit workshop offered by Michigan Historic Preservation Network to familiarize the commission with the tax legislation. Michigan PA 534 (Single Business Tax Credit) and Michigan PA 535 (Income Tax Credit) were signed into law in January 1999. These laws make A possible for homeowners and businesses to apply for a 25 % tax credit if they live in a home or operate a business in a building that it on a local register of historic places. The passage of our local ordinance in compliance with the revised enabling legislation (PA 96) will enable Livonia homeowners and businesses to apply for the tax credit COMMISSIONERS Ralph Bakewell and James Kline were reappointed to the commission. Election of officers held in November, results as follows: Chairperson — Kathleen Johnson Badshe Vice Chairperson —James Klem Secretary — Ralph Bakewell Treasurer — Gilbert Toth Operations Committee participated in the decorating for Cbrishnas. The theme for Hill House was Twos the Aught Before Chrlsbnas and was decorated by several Questers groups. The 17th Michigan Women's Civilian's group decorated Kingsley Horse. Shaw Horse has been decorated by Jenna Stacey. The A. J. Geer store was decorated by the Sand Hill Questers. The bungalow was decorated by Mary Cambridge. The church was decorated by Maureen Casey and her family. The Newburg School was decorated with decorations made by students from Cass Elementary School. The Meeting House and Alexander Blue House were decorated by Louise Scanlan. Boy Scout troop 782 hung the greens. Louise Scanlan decorated for the Peter Rabbit and the Mother Goose Halloween activities. Seventeen accessions of donations and purchased artifacts were added to the collections of the Museum and village buildings. Many requests for information, phowgmphs of Livonia and genealogy were answered Members of the Simmons, Kingsley and Shaw families have visited Greemuead this year. 29 Photographs from the commission collection were used in the Livonia book by David MacGregor. Photographs were also made available to O Charley's res[aurard on Seven Mile. Book signings were held for the book Livonia by David MacGregor published by Arcadia and the book Shadow Towns by Gene Scott Shadow Towns was fimded by a Michigan laminates Council grant Gardens — Thirty active volunteer Gardeners and members of the Livonia Garden Club have spent hundreds of horns triamosming the Hill House and church gardens. Lw ma Garden Club has done landscaping around the Alexander Blue House Parking — Lights were installed in the east parking lot The asphalt at the west end of Joshua Sermons Drive was replaced Quicken Loans has developed a lighted blacktop parking lot in the meadow. Restoration of the Alexander Blue House has cautioned The students from the Livonia Career Center have installed insulation on the second than. Other work has included electrical and two furnaces. Phone and computer lines have also been installed. A ramp is being constructed for the Newburg Church. Maintenance has included: Volunteers have conducted tars, maintained the Hill House Gardens, two village gardens and worked the food booth for 6 activities. A volunteer touring was held in the spring and a thank you reception was beld in December. Handrails were added to the front and south porches of the Alexander Blue House by a volunteer. Eagle Projects have included painting the Alexander Blue Office, garage, chicken coop, trellis and the painting of porches. Conferences — Linda Wiacek Sue Daniel and Kathy Glynn attended the spring Midwest Museum Conference in Dian and Linda & Site the fall conference in Motors. Over 41,000 people have attended activities at Greenmead this year Activities held at Greernesd (19) Cbristrnas Walk held by Friends of Greernesd Christmas Tea Tomas the Night Before Chris amas Candlelight Tau of the Historical Village Presidential Tea Victorian Tea Peter Rabbit Festival of Cultures - Green Meadows Productions Arts and Crafts Festival —Livonia Arts Co®issim 30 Garden Walk held by the Friends of Greenmead Mid Summer Tea Highland Games — St Andrew's Society Music Under the Stars Mustang Car Show AMC Car Show Flea Marlket Livnnia Historical Society in Septmber & LHC held in June Hannah's Auhmm Tea Mother Goose Halloween Walls - LHC and the Kappa Students Gam Churchill High School There were 36 waddings in the Newburg Church Blue House has been rented 37 times. Uses have included showers, wedding receptions, anniversary, graduation & birthday parties. The commission has used Blue House for the volunteer reception, Cbristmas, Presidential and Highland teas, Friends of Greemnead thank you luncheon, tour guide and gardeners meetings, preservation and historical conmtissinn meetings. Greermread has hosted two meetings of the Rouge Stewardship Committee of the Motor Cities National Heritage Area. A farm bell was installed to the south of the Alexander Blue House in gory of Floyd McAand. LIVONIA HUMAN RELAJTONS COMMISSION Jamairy - Featured our co-sponsorship of the Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration with PLAID. (People of Livonia Addressing Issues of Diversity) at Franklin High School with featured speaker Kris Nedham, chairperson of Kids 4 Afghan Kids. Kris explained her program where students and supporters raise funds for the children of Afghanistan and build schools, churches, water filtration plants and numerous other needs of life Volunteers conducted a diversity workshop for children at the Library. February - We held our annual Hnnor Roll celebration. This year's awardees were Kris Needham, Kids 4 Afghan Kids; former Livonia Mayor Jack Krksey, and the Franklin High School Foreign Language Department April - The Comrrtissinn conducted the armual Fav Housing Farman. discussing various methods that have been used in racial profiling in real estate purchasing, and the laws pertaining to such activities. 31 May - Kris Nedham, Honor Roll awardee, made a presentation to the Commission with a detailed, informative background of her group, its formation and how they aid children in June — The Commission determined that there was a need to review and create a fist of responsibilities that we would perform and those that PLAID would perform, as co- sponsors of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration, along with a timeline for tasks. The list was approved by both groups and put om place for 2006. Humman Relations Concussion volunteers also sponsored and worked at a booth at the Livonia Spree Festival, promoting the concept of diversity to children by holding a coloring contest and providing books to children on the subject September - WRh the approved responsibilities fist in place, we met with Ronaele Bowman of PLAID. They announced that the 2006 -year speaker would be Huel Perkins of Fox 2 News. The Commission endorsed the choice and the plans for announcements, and duties in preparation for the celebration were begun. October - The Coronission discussed the racist remarks made by attendees at a bourn held by Schostak Bros., owners of Wonderland Mall. The Commission supports Mayor Enge"cus position on this situation and also wrote a position statement regarding the issue that was printed in the Livonia Observer Newspaper. We agreed to monitor the situation, specific to the racial remarks and not to take a stand pro or against the remodeling of Wonderland November - featured Human Relations Commission phoning events for 2006 such as the Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration, Honor Roll, and Fair Housing fomnm. The Commission also conducted its election of Officers for 2006. Mayor Engebretsou reappointed Vince Mocen as Chairperson, and officers elected were George Saba as First Vice Chairperson, Dormer Anagnosmu as Second Vice Chairperson, and Ronald Amen as Secretary. LIVONIA COMMISSION ON CHILDREN AND YOUTH In 2005, the Youth Commission continued the administration of the scholarship program sponsored by the Livonia Anniversary Committee. The Commission distributed brochures advertising the scholarships to the local high schools and libraries. Information about the scholarships was presented in the Winter News, on City Channel 8, the city's website and also through the Department of Community Resources. Commission members David O'Neil, Richard Sheffield, Jerry Krause and Dan Spurting took part in the selection process of the for winners of the scholarships. Over thirty applications were submitted far the four $2500 awards. 32 The Arbor Day Project, with the cooperation of the Livonia Public Schools and the Clarenceville Public Schools, was repeated again Seedlings were packaged and distributed to all fourth grade classes in the two school systems. Global Releaf and the Youth Commission shared the cost of the trees. Commissioner Kenneth Balcoff chained the committee this year. The Youth Commission again supported "All Night Senior Graduation Parties" at the high schools that requested help. Donations of two hundred filly dollars ($250.00) were made to high schools in the city. Boom Certificates were presented to all graduating seniors who had achieved a 3.0 honor point average or higher fiom all fie nigh schools in Livonia. Commissioners Richard Sheffield and Paul Pyrkosz handled this project. Emergency stickers, which are to be placed on the bedroom windows of children, senior citizens or handicapped individuals, continue to be available at City Hall and also from the Livonia Fine Department. Information on obtaining the stickers is shown on City Channel 8. Using the Livonia Community Recreation Center on Saturday nights, the Youth Commission hosted two themed activity nights. 'Toga Topia' for senior high students and Hula Hootenanny for current 6uh, 71h and 8th grade students. Any appropriate aged student was invited for a nominal fee to enjoy the safe and entertaming environment along with plenty of food Generous area businesses; Meijer, Kroger's, Busch's Market, ValmNno's, Stan's Market, Edy's Ice Cream, Mama Vera's Pizza, Primu's Pizzeria, Membowl, and the Livonia Anniversary Committee assisted with the finding and donations of food Both events were the result of the entire Commission's efforts as well as support from the Livonia Youth Council. Members of the Livonia Youth Council were outfitted in spirited t -shins, which they designed, through a donation from the Youth Commission. These youth were insMmental in offering a younger voice to the commission when planning events for teens. In an effort to reach out to the needy youth of Livonia, the Commission hosted a Holiday Parry for families who registered with Goodfellows for holiday baskets on two weekends; November 12 and November 19th. While Goodfellows representatives interviewed the parents, the children were invited to enjoy snacks, crafts, gifts, and a visit with Santa at the Senior Center. While mzvy items were donated, the Commission ensured that every student left with a gift bag. Cmmmussioners Dan Spoiling and Paul Pyrkosz initiated this project and were assisted by the entire commission The Commission supported Family Day at the Spree by donating $650 in prizes, passed out to the youth who participated throughout the day. 33 At the Livonia Police Department's request, the Commission funded the purchase of children's safety coloring books and crayons to be passed out to young visitors of our Police and Fre Stations, as well as the kits for the young explorer police in training program Commissioners Jilim Cramb and Jessica Sanding are currently investigating updating and reprinting of an emergency resource brochure entitled, "Who You Gonna Call," a project that was originally coordinated by the Maym''s Task Force, no longer active. The project should yield a list of helpful phone numbers and website addresses that could be distributed to troubled teens or available to com emed parents. The Commission identified a need for a mission statement, along with a Logo that embodies the purpose of the Commission as well as updating the Commissioner shhd. Commission officers for 2004-2005 were: Paul Pyrkosz Chairperson; Dan Spurting Vice Chairperson, Jilim Cramb Secretary and Jessica Spurting, Treasures. In November 2005-2006 officer: were elected Jeff Nork will serve as Chairperson, Dan Spurting as Vic Clmirperson, and Jilim Cramb as Secretary. 10 JODICIAL DISTRICT' CODRT NEW CASES FILED 1. Felony 01f) 352 2. Ordinance Misdemeanor (OM) 12W 3. Statute Misdemeanor (SM) 427 TRAFFIC 4. Felony Thunk Drivng(FD) 24 5. Felony Traffic (FT) 16 Total Felony Traffic 40 (#4+#5=) 6. Ordinance Thunk Dmmg(OD) 300 7. Ordinance Civil Infiactions (01) 29292 8. Ordinance Traffic Misdemeamr (OT) 2326 9. Statute Thunk Dmmg (SD) 32 Total Drunk Driving 332 (# 6+# 9=) 10. Statute Civil Infiaclions (SI) 31M Total CSvillnfracttons 32401 (#7+#10=) 34 11. Statute Traffic Misdemeanor (ST) 340 Total Trafc Mtsd. 2666 (# 8+# 11=) MISCELLANEOUS 12 CrimioalTraffsc Juries Selected 13 13. Criminanraffic Cases Perfected to Appeal 3 NONTRAFFICCIVIL INFRACITONS & PARKING 14. Ordinance Parking (OK) 1642 15. Ordinance Non -Traffic (ON) 12 16. Statute Parking (SK) 0 Total Parking 1642 (# 14+# 16=) 17. Statute Non -Traffic (SN) 2 Total Non -Tragic 14 (# 15+# 17=) 18. General Civil (GC) 2131 19. General Civil Miscellaneous (GZ) 14 20. Landlord Tevant (LT) 419 21. Land Contract Summary Proceedings (SP) 6 n Small Cla®s (SC) 636 MISCELLANEOUS 23. Civil Division Juries Selected 5 24. Marriages 30 25. Motions 1138 26. Discovery/Deblor Exams 186 27. Cranrisbments 3333 2& Orders to Seize/Orders of Eviction 242 PROBATION 1. Number of Placements on Probation 1689 35 Ptes®1®ce Investigation Report. 1311 Violation of Probation Warrants Issued 1059 Show Cause Summons Issued 1945 Probation Cases Closed 1771 Number of Open Probation Cases 1401 Total Number of Days Worked on the Volurmry Wmk Progmn(mheuofjail) 5020 Felony Guilty Plea (reduced charge) 8 Bench Verdict 0 BindoverIn3mCircuit Court (after lemounatlon held or waived) 318 Dismissedby Parly 6 Dismissedby Court 9 Inactive Status (Warrant)' 43 Local Diversion 2 Case Type Change 0 Total 386 Misdemeanors (Ordinance and Statute) Jury Verdict 5 Bench Verdict 16 Guilty Plea 11% Dismissed by Party 274 Dismissedby Court 95 Inactive Status (Warrant)' 265 Local Diversion 318 Case Type Change 0 Total 2123 Felony, Misdemeanor and Ch it Infraction JuryVerdict 1 Bench Verdict 3958 36 Guilty Plea/Admissim 22118 Bindover to 3m Circuit Coud(aderloommatimheldorvaiv4 38 Dismissedby Party 724 Dismissedby Court 1643 Default Judgment 7838 Inactive Status (Warranty 744 Local Divenim 10 Case Type Change 3 Total 37077 *Note : Warrmt/Bench WarrmMOn Appeal/Pending Forensic Examination Non-Trafc, Civil Infraction and Parldng Verdictal Hearing 109 Admission/Waivers 1054 Dismissed by Party 4 Dismissed by Court 56 Default Judgment 456 Case Type Change 0 Total 1679 CIVIL DEPARTMENT Civil, Landlond(Temnt and Small Claims JuryVerdict 2 Bench Verdict 192 Uncmtested/Defaults/Setilement 1695 Transferred 53 Dismissed by Party 679 Dismissed by Court 502 inactive Status" 74 Other Dispositim 6 Case Type Change 0 "Note: Banlmnpicy Stay Total 3203 37 FINANCIAL Due to City ofLivoma General Fund $3,617,280.61 EscrowAccounts Bonds $ 979,580.75 Restikrtion $ 49,647.15 Work Program $ 171,585.00 Misrellmeous* $ 23 453.63 • includes garnishment payments, escrow rent, refunds, etc. Due to State of Michigan $1,585,163.92 Due m County Library $ 121,888.04 Other Miscellaneous Payments $ 62,684.42 Cavi Buildmgbnprovemern Fund $ 295,573.75 Drag Cant Fund (set-aside effective 10/01/05) $ 2,545. UNAUDITED YEAR'S REVENUE TOTAL (excluding interest income) $6909,402.27 20042005 Projects 1. The Court initiated the process to establishing a `Dug Court' within the District Court operation. A team of professionals was called together to assist and oversee this effort Currently the Court is awaiting Federal and State approval of its application 38 2. The Court commenced contract negotiations with two MERC anPoonzed labor unions. 3. The Court installed successfully the spring update release to its case processing system in traffic/cminnal, civil and cash collections with related training to staff. 4. The Cart purchased and installed the Michigan Supreme Court — State Court Administrative Office — Collections Module. Special mailers were printed, staff haired and in the fust 3 months of operation this effort brought in over $100,000.00 from delinquent accounts. 5. The Cart purchased two new system printers which replaced equipment 6+ years old- 6. ld6. Courthouse security was improved with a new walk-thm metal detector and a hand-held metal detection wed. These items were obtained at no cost to the Court—via a Wayne Canty District Cart Homeland Security grant 7. The three full-time District Cart Officers for each common received Naming in taser technology and use. The Court received assistance from the Chief of Police and the Departrnent personnel in purchasing and training. During the carne of 2005 the Department of Emergency Preparedness was im rgraded into the Police DeparmerR Effective October 1, 2005, the Mayor appointed a police lieuumart the Director of Emergency Preparedness. Emergency Preparedness is respomsmle for the planting, preparation, management and recovery from both rotund disasters and man-made or terrorist incidents. City plans and procedures are continually reviewed and updated to develop an all -hazards response. During 2005, accomplishments of Emergency Preparedness include: Completion of a citywide tabletop exercise involving city detainment heads, emergency operations staff, public and private industry. Funding for this initiative was obtained from a Federal Homeland Security Grunt Participated with the Livonia Public Schools in their terrorism response exercises. Pc ewed and updated the City's Emergency Operations Plan. 39 • Planned and obtained equipment pursuant to the 2004 State Homeland Security Cmmt Program Equipment purchased included: a closed curmt television recording system to protect the critical infrastructure housed at the Police Department; a vehicle capable of special response to chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or explosive incidents: an unimenuptible power supply back-up for critical infiastmclure housed at the Police Department; and personal protective equipment for police and fire first responders. • Trained all police employees on terrorism awareness for first responders. • framed all police employees m the National Incident Response Play. • Hosted "Steam" training and qualified nine (9) city employees on the Stale system- • Trained City department heads and Emergency Operations Center personnel in unified incident command • Participated m emergency plantings; wih public and pervade partners m the community including SchoolcraR Co0ege, St Mary's Hospital, the Civil Air Patrol and Amateur Radio Operators. The Department of Finance consists of Accoonting Management Information Systems, Water and Sewer Usage Billing, and the Division of Budget and Purchasing with a total staff of menty-five people. The Director of Finance serves as administrative assistant to the Mayor in financial matters and is under the direct supervision of the Mayor. The function of the Department of Finance includes: Supervu mm over the administration of the financial affairs of the City. Keeping of accounts and financial records of the City and all departments, commissions and agencies of the City goverment. Maintenance of payroll records for all City employees. Preparation of checks for all financial obligations of the City. Billing and collection of over 150,000 water and sewer bills. 40 Responsibility for all computerized reporting and budget analysis for City Departments. Responsibility for evaluating and recommending computer hardware and software systems City-wide. Preparation of the annual budget for the Mayor. Taking of bids for all major purchases made by the City. Responding to City Council questions and providing additional reports and information as requested by Council. The Finance Director serves on a three-person Personnel Review Committee, which is responsible for review and evaluation of the hnmg placement and replacement of all employees for the City. Performs Treasurer function for the Plymouth Road Development Auffionly Membership on the Community Development Block Caavt Co®ttee. Responsible for risk management of casualty and liability, worlafs compensation and medical insurance for the City and is the City's representative to the Michigan Municipal Risk Managemend Authority (MMRMA). Representation at river 50 meetings of the City Cantil. Preparation of all debt issued by City. Responsible fa mveshnen[ of City fiords in interest earning accents in accordance with State law. Management of Citpowned properties leased to third parties. The Budget -Purchasing office is under the supervision and direction of the Director of Finance who also acts as Purchasing Agent for the City. The Budget -Purchasing activity processed a total of 13,053 requisitions fa the purchase of goods and services for the City of Livonia A total of 2,181 supply orders and printing requests were also filled for City Departments. 41 ACCOUNTING The volume of the Accounting Divisim activity is listed by comparative figures for the past two years: FISCAL YEAR ENDED NOVEMBER 30 2004 2005 General Fund and Other Fund Payables Checks 17,870 17,914 Payroll Cbecks 32,590 37,426 Journal Entries 13,291 15,218 Retirement Checks (Payroll and Payables) 7,103 7,213 Accounts Receivable Iwoices: False Alarms 2,600 1,567 Rescue Runs 3,970 4,087 Other 1,870 1,300 Water Bills Mailed 153,911 154,351 Water Bills Paid by EFT Not Available 12,534 Tempormily idle fiords were invested in Certificates of Deposit and daily savings deposits, resulting in a total interest earned of $1,251,324 or 2.49% of City General Fund Revenue. SPECIAL PROJECTS 1. The City spent a significant amount of true in 2005 analyzing and reviewing options to address the financial challenges of continuing to provide acceptable services with inadequawravenues. The Finance Deparhnent played a major role in this process. Coarmmicatim of the issues was provided via City newsletters, cable presentations, a town hall meeting, citizen surveys, the Mayor's Budget Task Force and meetings of the Council's Finance, Insurance and Budget Committee. As a result of the feedback received, the City Council and Mayor decided to put a "SMART opt -a8' issue on the November ballot 2. The Finance Deparhnent refinanced $3,730,000 of outstanding debt, resulting in a reduced future debt service cost of $180,853. 3. The Finance Department received training and participated in a new mePood of collective bargaining called Interest Based Bargaining (IBB). 4. The Finance Deparhn®1 continued to work with City Council and the Mayor's Office to mairrtain the City's excellent bond ratings, which currently are rated AA3 A 42 Moody's and AA at Standard and Poor's. Because of these excellent bond ratings, more people will invest in City of Livonia bonds resulting in more competitive bidding boat brokerage houses. Savings will continue roto the future for the City due to these ratings. 5. The City of Livonia audit was completed and, Once again, the City's auditors farad no sign kart audt adjustments. 6. The Finance Department participated in several cooperative bids with sunuunding communities that resulted in more competitive bids and reduced costs to the City. The Information Systems Department is responsible for the computer hardware and software used by the City. The IS Deputment assists other City Departments in evaluating, selecting and implementing computer systems. It also sets the standards for City computer systems. The Inf nuct on Systems Director reports duectly to the Finance Director. The staff of the Information Systems Department consists of five (5) employees. The IS Department maintains the following hardware: 2001- 2002- 2003- 2004 2002 2003 2004 2005 IBM AS/400 Midrange Computer 1 1 1 1 Windows 2000/2003 Server 9 11 10 10 Perswal Computers 273 317 319 293 The IS Deparhmemt assisted with moving the Fire Department computers and users over to the Public Safety network This has slightly reduced the number of computers and users supported The IS Department provides in-house training for City employees on how to use computers and software. All of the courses were updated this year to be based upon Windows XP and Office 2003. A breakdovm on training offered is: 1999- 2000- 2001- 2002- 2003- 2004 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Number of Classes 89 66 72 60 26 26 Conducted Number of Employees 333 208 210 140 77 59 Trained 43 The Infomation Systems Department also manages the City Website (http://w .ei.fivoiiaznLu , which continues to find new uses and grow in usage. This year we did add extensive information on the site for the Ans Commission and the Traffic Commission. We have also added some new e -Newsletters including a Snow Vert, City Council Agendas and City Council Committee Agendas. 2003-2004 20042005 Number of Page Views 950,967 1,042,874 The Deparmund also provides e-mail and Interad access to City Employees. 2003- 2004 2004 2005 Number of E-mail accounts 259 239 Dining the fiscal year 2005, Livonia Fire & Rescue responded to 8,431 incidents, 82% involved emergency medical services, while fire related responses accounted for 18% The following statistical breakdowns reflect the departmental activity for the current fiscal year. hicidents Emergency Medical 6,904 Fire 335 Fire(other) 1,192 Total 8,431 For the Fire Incidents (other) category, carbon monoxide alarms accounted for 80 of the responses, 562 were false fire alarm calls and 214 for doomed wire incidents. 44 Monetary Fire Loss Residential $1,408,275 Vehicle $542,930 Commercial $309,350 PducationaVlnxlihIIiond $235,300 Total $2,495,855 Of the total dollars lost, residential fires accounted for 560/y commercial foes 12%, educational / assembly occupancy 9%, and vehicle losses 22 Incidents by day of week Sunday 1,071 12.7% Monday 1,226 14.5% Tuesday 1,203 14.3% Wednesday 1,240 14.7% Thursday 1,272 15.1% Friday 1,273 15.1% Saturday 1,146 13.6% The busiest time of day u 11:00 am through I2:00p.m. Through" the year, in addition to the related activities listed below, this Division is responsible for updating technical knowledge, maina^^g job efficiency and staff certification for the departnerR's Fre Inspectors. This is accomplished by attending numerous seminars, job related schools and other continuing education programs. Iliese schools would include but are not bunted to: Schoolcraft College, the National Fire Academy, Michigan State Police Arson School, Michigan Fire Inspectors Conferences, Metro Detroit Fire Inspectors Society and the various (I -A -AS.) International Association ojArson Investigators arson schools and seminars. Inspections Although not all encompassing, the following categories reflect the majority of inspections conducted by the Fine Precession Division: Advice 87 Inbiior Alterations 112 Harm 41 Liquor License 8 Complaint 11 Liquid Propane Cas 5 Chemical Surveys 132 Life Safety Inspections 18 City License 121 New Construction 25 45 Carnival/Spree 6 Site Plan/Prelimmary Plan 39 False Alarms (Billable) 281 Re -occupancy 85 Fire Lanes 13 Revision 11 Fast Tenant 11 System ReportDeficiency 77 Fireworks 8 Suppression 47 Hydrant/Flow 29 Temporary Structure 14 History File 137 Exterior Nterntions/Conshnction 9 Total 1327 Pfau Reviews Alarm 37 Cousmuchim 139 Hood & Duct / Spray Booth 31 Site 39 Fire Suppression 101 Total 347 The Fire Marshal and the Senior Fire Inspector in the Fire Prevention division continue to be Certtied Slate of MFmhigan Fire Inspectors and Certified by the National Fire Protection Association to the level of Fire Inspector L In addition to the above ce tifications the two senior investigators in Fire Prevention have attended both the National Fire Academy Arson Imissaganon course and the Michigan Slate Police Arson Imestigation course. The Inspectors have completed Fire Officer I and IL The Jumor Inspector completed the Michigan Slate Police Arson Imesdgamin course this Fall - Them were 43 fires investigated by the Fire Prevention Divisive of these 19 were accidental, l l were arson and 13 were of m rmdetermined origin The above plan review totals reflect the number of projects received / assigned in the Fire Preventive Office and do not include the actual number of inspections made. Multiple site visits are required when inspecting various fire alarm, suppression or structural systems to insure compliance with the adopted codes and standard installation practices. A conservative estimate of site visits needed to complete a project would be four inspections. More complex jobs would iequre additional inspections, in some instances 20-30 site visit. Construction and re -occupancy of buildings have significantly increased. Our plans review is talang an extraordmary amoum of time from the division's day. The required number of site visits has correspondingly increased 46 The focus of the morning office for fiscal year 2005 was to continue to assure compliance far the ongoing education (CEU) requirements for both EMT and Paramedic within the department The number of overall CEU's for Paramedics is higher than that d an EMT and thus requires a more diligent training program in order to ensure that the department's personnel are always compliant with licensing requrerments. The mining office continues to improve its record management system related to trumang activities, which in turn ensures compliance with OSHA, ISO and nationally accepted standards on training and documenrrion The morning division continues to provide morning commensurate with the mission of our department Although EMS training takes up large amaods of resources and time, flus office still facilitates training in fire suppression, specialized rescue, hazardous materials, utility emergencies and risk reduction. Ofluer ongoing initiatives undertaken by flue turning office include the administration and oversight of the department Omnis. The department was once again successful in winning a FEMA Fire Act Grant award totaling than $171,000.00 in FY 2005. This grant award will allow the department develop and deploy an electronic Patient Care Record System (ePCR) reducing redundancy in the currem county Paper reports, unpror'ng QNQI processes, increase HEPAA security on PER and allow the department to interface electronically with the city's third party EMS Filing company. This new program will also enhance Poe department's ability to analytically view EMS trends and usage from a demographic perspective, as well as provide a tool for syndromic surveilance within the rumm�aunity. The department, with the approval of the law department, has entered into a contract with Medtronics Cooperation (LifeNet Software) and hopes to begin the configuration phase in early 2006. The tanning office continues to be forward thinking in regards to capturing available grant funding and alternative ways to finznce departmental capital needs both in training programs and equipment Enhancing relationships with both local businesses and community educational institutions has also been a priority in hopes that a mutual sharing of resources increases overall operational effectiveness. Grants through State Famy MMRMA, and Belmur construction have allowed the department to move ahead with programs that have been left unfunded due to budgetary constraints over the last three years. Fire Officer t'+^^g commensurate with the CBA continues to be a top priority as it pertains to off-site miming and in preparing our Company level officers for each new position. The Training office is hopeful in completing the remaining needed Fire Officer classes by the first quarter of 2006. This office continues to look at ways to improve our overall service and maintain the highest level of pre-hospital care to the citizens of Livonia The department's EMS Quality Assurance (QA) program continues to strive to comply with stringent county and state requirements regarding QEQA The manning office contimues to administrate and 47 facilitate the Medical Priority Dispatch system that is used in dispatching EMS calls city- wide. The system has proven to be extremely effective m risk reduction for responders, as well as the public, by assigning a priority to the medical call Because of the increasing EMS ran call volume each year, the MPD system allows the prioritizing of all EMS related calls to ensure that the most life threatening emergencies receive assistance above those of a lesser degree. The Training Coordinamr and Engineer Jon Unruh continue to provide the needed contmned education units (CEU) required for recertification of dispatchers every two years. This office was also responsible for tracking and fulfilling the MPD Quality Assurance requvements as outlined in county Medical Control protocols. Since the MPD program came on line in May of 2001, the training office meets and discusses QI related issues quarterly, as to ensure compliance within county and slate guidelines. This fiscal year has also brought added responsibility in regards to the facilitation of grant money awarded under the 2004 Homeland Security Grant Ibis office has been tasked wrth the overaght of seven grant projects approved under this grant program that primarily focuses on operational readiness and personal protective equipment as A applies W WMD/CBRNE events. The goal m each of the projects was to take an "all hazards" approach in deign of the projects, while still complying with the strict DHS grant guidelines an expenditures for approved equipment The munmg office has worked closely with the LPD Homeland Sectaity Officer m meeting the city's purchasing guidelines, securing quotes, seeking City Council approval where needed, and ordering all associated equipment for the seven grant projects. The completion of these grant projects is stated for early 2006. The focus of the training office in 2006 will be to establish updated company level drills, revise and implement a new Shiver/Operakr program and begin development On a new in-house Company Officer training program. With contracted changes in the state's Fire Offices pingrarns, new records and additional tram s; will be required m order to fulfill the CBA and meet the new state requvements. The Livonia Fire & Rescue Maintenance Division is comprised of one Fire Apparatus Supervisor and one Senior Fire Equipment Mechanic who are responsible for specification wrong, ordering rare, maid ance and repatr of all mechanized and related fire, rescue and paramedic egwpmem The diNision provides firefighters, Livonia citizens, and vistas of Livonia with safe and reliable ambulance, rescue and fire fightng vehicles and related equipment Thu year the resgonsibihnes ofthe Mairdenmce Divuion included the jo[[owmg: Completed 362 work orders. M Inspected pumpers, rescue vebicles, aerial ewer, administrative cars, and all equipment on each vehicle on a semi-annual and annual basis. Centrifugal pumps received their annual testing, along with MIOSHA fire inspections. Two inspection trips wire made w NorAr Carolina, inspection of major warranty repair on Engine 3 and Engine 5 Worked with Medic Master on warranties of vehicle chassis and box All four Medic Mases Ambuilances were shuttled to and from Indianapolis for complete repairrt under warranty. The 1976 Smlphm Arial Tower was dnv to Springfield Ohio for repairs and driven back after completion of repairs. Made ready and disposed of equipment removed from service. In coordination with the Training Division, instructed Firefighter and EALTD.'s on the operational requirements of vehicles. Also aided in training exercises when necessary. Responded w major fires w assist the department in set up of equipment, filling of SCBA bottles, repair and refueling of vehicles. provided assistance, as needed, to neighboring fire departments and members of Western Wayne Mutual olid Association. Provided assistance to thejollownig Project Managers • SCBA Officer - ordering parts, repairing SCBA air packs. • Hose Officer - specification writing, ordering and mounting of mszles, adapts, and hose. • Building Maintenance Officer- repay of vehicle electrical drop lines. • EMT Officer- installation of AIS equipment. • Comvumications Officer — vaunting Land held prep radio vehicle chargers and instillation of new radio systems for ALS and relocation of some radios in pumpers, and repair of same. • Apparatus Officer - ordering and mounting of new equipmmVhamd tools and moats. • Public Relations Committee - equipment 49 Radio Technician - the mshallation and removal of cormmmications systems for vehicles going iMo and coming out of service along wRh inshallations of ALS radio equipmerR This Dzvcaon provides maintenance on all oflhe fallowing items Vehicles 1 - 1976 Sulphm Aural Tower, 1250 GPM Pump 1 - 1988 C-30 Chevrolet/Investigative Unit 2 - 1988 Pierce Arrow 1250 GPM Pumpers 1 - 1988 Pierce Dash Heavy Duly Rescue 1 - 1994 Ford Horton Waw Rescue Unit 1 - 1994 Smeal/Spartan 1250 GPM Pumper 1 - 1995 Ford Horton Reserve Alpha Unit 3- 1995 Chevrolet Sedans 1- 1996 S-10 Chevrolet Pick -Up 1 - 1996 GMC 3/4 -Ton Pick -Up 1 - 1997 Clievrolet Limtina 1 - 1997IrrtemationaVHorton Reserve Alpha Unit 1 - 1997 InternationaVHorton Alpha Unit 1 - 1998 Clievrolet Lumina 1 - 1999 Chevrolet Tahoe 2 —2000 FreigWiva/Medic Mases Alpha Units 2 —2001 FreigWina/Medic Mases Alpha Units 1 —2001 Ford Croom Vic Sedan 1 —2002 American LaFrance 2000GPM 75FT. Aerial 3 - 2003 Amerism LaPrance Eagle Pumpers 1 - 2003 Ford 450 Maintenance Truck 1 —2003 Mercury Marine Inflatable Rescue Boat, Motor and Trailer 5 —2003 Ford Crown Vic Sedans (3 retired Police can; to replace the 1995 Caprices) 1 —2003 Club Car Ambulance and Hauling LS Enclosed Trailer 35 — Total Vehicles Eamnment on Vehicles Thousands of feet of fire hose Fire hose nozzles Axes and adapters Foam equipment, hand and vehicle mounted Deluge equipment 110 V electrical lighting Tools (baud and fire fighting) 9 - auxiliary, gmeretors 50 39 - ISI Viking Ar Pack 4 — ISI Magnant Ar Pack 74 - Ar Bottles 89 — ISI Viking Masks 4 — Magraim Masks 1- Bann Air Compressor Cascade System 1 - 4 - 6000 Air Bottle Cascade System 1 —K-950 Saw 2 - K-12 Saw 7 - (Lain saws 2 - Amkms Power Tools 2 - TNT Power Tools 7 - Life Jack PPV fans 1 - Hose reprair tool and parts Medical equipment on Alpha Vehicles Various hazardous material and confined space rescue equipm®t Garage Equipment 1 — Hose test Pump 2 - In -ground grange hoist bydro-e sting 1 - Garage tool replacements 1 - Pumper pamrp test tool as needed to comply with NFPA 1911. The 2005 fiscal year was one that saw new challenges for educating our citizens through the Fire Safety Education Program within Livonia Fire & Rescue. While remaining committed to providing quality fire safety education programs throughout the comity, public fire safety education has had to reevaluate the number and types of programs we deliver. Each yea Livonia Fire & Rescue responds to numerous requests from the public for Fire Safety Educatim programs. These requests are fmvarded to either the on -duty Battalion Chief m to the Fire Safety Education Committee, teased on the needs of the requesting persm or group. If the caller is requesting to visit a fire station or have a fire apparatus visit them as part of the educational effort, the on -dirty Battalion Chief handles the requesL If the group requests an individual to speak at a prearranged time and locatim that does not require firefighting apparatus, the Fine Safety Education Committee is contacted Currently, most requests ire handled by on -duty =vs at the fire stations, while remaining in-service to respond to emergency calls in our area- Face rea Fire Prevention records indicate that we responded to approximately 200 requests during this fiscal yea, reaching thousands of our citizens. These requests are handled routinely by the Battalion ChiePs office and are conducted by the on -duty crews. 51 In June of 2005, we put together our "School's Out, Safety's In" Open House, with help boon State Senator Laura Toy and Rock Financial. At this event, we recognized a young citizen who took appropriate action at his burning house. In October of 2005, Livonia Five & Rescue held its "Twelfth Annual Five Prevention Week Open House." The Open House has proven to be a highly anticipated event by our covmurtity, reaching a crowd estimated at 3,600. While in attendance, visitors received information on fire and Iffe safety and are given an opporhauty to practice life safety skills. In addition, the Department continued the cooking fire demonstration, fire safety behavior practice arra and gave attendees a look at our newest fire engine, Engine 1. A new addition to our Open House included a Halloween Safety table. Livwia firefighters participated in a September event held at Laurel Park Place Mall called the `Passport to Safety." This project, spearheaded by SgL Teeter of LPD, was a huge success- crowds were estimated in the thousands who attended the event After being involved m the second -year annual event, more effort is being directed into this area. The large number of children that attend the indoor event are encouraging. Our dedicated efforts to educate our citizens are among the best anywhere. Our ideas were shared with the fire service coonummity m one article that appeared m "Five Engineering" magazine, (August issue), the nations pramere fire training magazine. Other ideas were seen A the website for Fire Engineering magazine, that has weekly featured articles. This is the first year we took on the project of creating a Fire Safety insert that was carried along with the Livonia Observer newspaper. The eight -page insert was designed for elemenrgy age students and families, and went out with the 21,000 copies of the Observer on October 9, and they were handed out to our Open House attendees on October 15. We were also able to distribute our fire and life safety nssages to the citizens of Livonia through the use of the following sauces: Livonia Public Schools City Channel 8 Time Warner Cable Livonia Observer 52 The Livonia Housing Coum assam submits the following information on its activities and accomphshm®ts for Silver Village, Corramity Development Block Grant Program, Newburgh Village, McNamara Towers 41 and 42, Section 8 Rent Subsidy Program and Brashear Tower. SILVER VILLAGE - 33780 LYNDON Silver Village occupancy was A 100% A all times. The waiting lis[ consists of 91 "Livonia residents" and 55 "par®ls of Livonia residents." Activities and AccomplishmeNs Silver Village turnover was 14 units in 2005. The flooring in the community even was replaced wrth ceramic tile. Carpeting was replaced in 25 one and two bedroom apahraerls. Water heaters were replaced in 90 apartments. All aparhneats were inspected for safety and maintenance purposes. The Community Development Office administered the following programs during the 2004-05 fiscal year, through the Community Development Block Guard Program Total CDBG expenditures fir the year were $974,070.00. Community Development Block Grant Program (The following information on accomplishments is based on the CDBG program year which began on 8/1/14 and ended on 7/31/05): Major Home Rehabilitation Loan Program 12 Households Served Emergency Home Rehabilitation Loan Program 12 Households Served Minor Home Repair Program 76 Households Served Emergency Utility Shut -Off Assistance 8 Households Served Senior Van Transportation Program 247 Persops Served Mental Health Counseling Program 25 Persons Served First Step (Western Wayne County Proj ect an Domestic Assault) 182 Persons Served Fav Housinglnitiative Not Applicable Scattered Site Rental Homes 15 Households Help Source 43 Households Total Served: 620 Households/Persons 53 Additionally, during the previous year, 12 city -owned scattered -site homes received major rehabilitation work in areas of heating, electrical, siding, pamimg and landscaping. NEWBURGH VB,LAGE - 11999 NEWBURGH ROAD During 2005, 120 apartments were inspected and necessary repairs were made, in order to ensure decent, safe and sanitary housing, whereby maintaining resident satisfaction. Activities and AccomptishmeNs Original carpeting was replaced in 24 occupied apartments and 11 rmoccupied apartments. Twelve unoccupied apartments were painted and re -furbished. All 120 aparmerts had their air conditioner condensers replaced and two aur conditioner condensers were replaced in the commarly building. Electronic fiord transfer for rental payment was offered to all residents. Currently, there are 65 resident apartneuts enrolled in this program. There were 12 turnovers from January 1, 2005 through November 30, 2005. Occupancy ramous A 100% There are approximately 60 names on the Newburgh Village `teudent waiting list' and 27 names on the "parents of residents waiting list" McNAMARA TOWERS #1 & #2 - 19300 PURLINGBROOK McNamara Towers Building #1 All apartments were inspected and repairs made according to HUD Uniform Physical Conditions Standards. New wood entry doors were installed on all apartments. New steel entry doors were installed in all common areas (hallways, stairways and commmvity room). Mailboxes were replaced with new larger -sized boxes. New carpet was installed in all hallways. Automatic door openers were installed on the doors in the laundry room and hallways. New aur conditioners were installed in 15 aparnamd . McNamara Towers Building #2 1. All apartments were inspected and repairs made according to HUD Uniform Phvsical Conditions Standards. 2. Automatic door openers were installed on the doors in the laundry room and one hallway exit door. 54 3. New an conditioners were installed in 10 apartments. The McNamaa Towers had a total of 19 vacancies during 2005. Scattered Site Housing The scattered sit homes underwent extensive modenmortion which included plumbing, heating, electrical, structural, concrc4 replacement and landscaping upgrades. SECTION 8 EXISTING HOUSING PROGRAM The Livonia Housing Commission Section 8 Rat Subsidy Program currently administers a Housing Choice Voucher Program consisting of 803 families. The Applicants on the Waiting List were updated for 2005, and there are currently 1,343 remaining on this lid. All current landlords participate in the Direct Deposit Program. Fiscal Year 2004 SEMAP, Section 8 Management Assessment, scored as a High Performer. An audit was conducted on the Section 8 program and no findings were noted. The current Section 8 Voucher Leasing rale is 98 WILLIAM W. BRASHEAR TOWER B - 17841 N. LAUREL PARK DRIVE The waiting lis[ consists of approximately 48 applicant as of November, 2005. Activities and Accomplislmmats 1. Installed new circuit breaker boxes in 12 units. 2. Installed new kitchen floor file in 10 routs. 3. Installed new carpeting in 23 unit. 4. Repainted 30 units for new move -ins. 5. Installed bathroom vanities in 21 routs. 6. Installed new window verticals in 36 routs. 7. Installed kitchen lamp fixtures in 15 units. S. Completed wall and paint repairs in 7 occupied units. 9. Installed carpeting in freight elevator. 10. A handicap power door system was installed in the north entry. Funding was provided by the Livonia Housing Commission. An annual inspection of 196 apartments and building common areas was performed by the Livonia Housing Commission in September 2005. 55 INSPECTION DEPARTMENT is responsible for all construction operations an private property. Included in it jurisdiction is building inspection, plan review, sanitation and ordinance enforcement Areas of involvement include Zoning Board of Appeals, Building Code Board of Appeals and various civic groups. Coordination with State government agencies involving building construction is handled by this department. Plan Review for new buildings, alterations and additions, pools, demolitions, zoning compliance and signs is an integral par[ of the department's fraction, as well as the issuance of permit, sanitation and enforcing the City's Code of Ordinances designated as Inspection's responsibility. Inspections were made and permit issued for Bre rehabilitation of homes for the Community Development Block Program Additionally the Inspection Department reviews lot splits for the Department of Assessment and reviews site plans and waiver use petitions for the Planning Department and provides support to all other departments as needed. BUILDING INSPECTION issued approximately 9,732 permits in 2004/05 for buildings, signs and mechanical installations, including new construction, additions, renovations and alterations. 44 permit were issued for new residential homes and 12 permits were issued for new commercial/industrial structures. In other activity, 149 single-family condominium units were constructed or are currently under construction. No permits for apartment buildings were issued this year. Mechanical pemtits (plumbing, electrical, heating and refrigeration) numbered approximately 5545 for the year. Residential additions/alterations, garages, decks/patios, fire repairs, pools, signs, zoning compliance, cmunercialmdustrial additions, demolitions and moving permits comprised the remainder of permits issued. 71 demolition permit were issued during the year, 15 of which were residential structures. Permits fir Clmiiums; free sales lots, pennant and banner displays, awnings, underground storage looks and various special inspections were issued as required. Certificates of Occupancy are issued for all new residences, cmmmnereial and industrial buildings upon completi®. State budding, mechanical, plumbing, electrical and sign contractor licenses are registered yearly in this office. Additionally, official records are kept on fence contractors, excavators and demolition contractors. The systematic annual inspection of existing buildings for compliance with B.O.CA. Property Maintenance Code continued through 2005. In connection with this program, 556 inspections were made, violations issued when necessary and compliance obtained. This program is designed in maintain health and safety standards in the city. In addition in the annual inspection program the Inspection Department now requires that all one, two and multiple family rental dwelling units be licensed and inspected on an annual basis. This year 883 rental units were inspected by the City. Additionally, 380 formal complaints were received and responded to throughout the year as they related to property code violations. There were approximately 486 rental 56 inspection violations and 373 annual inspection violations that were issued for various code infractions during 2004/05. The valuation of new budding activities for 2004/05 is $94,893,049. The revenue collected from all building activities was approximahTy $2,559,022. SANITATION AND ORDINANCE ENFORCEMENT is responsible for compliance with the City Zoning Ordinance 4543 and also the Code of Ordinances 41688 as it pertains to the majority of all nuisance and non -criminal violations These responsibilities include those things that affect the health, safety and welfare of the residents of the City, such as pollution, harvrdous waste, trash and debris, vacant buildings, weed cutting, basic property maintenance and supervision of the collection of municipal refuse. The enforcement of special conditions of approval made Ly the Zoning Board of Appeals, City Council and the Planning Commission relative to site plans, variances, and waiver uses are the responsibility of Ordinance Enforcement STATISTICS 2004-05 Total General Inspections Made 23,237 Building Maintenance and Repair 1037 Parking Lot Repairs 203 Tmsh and Debris 2546 Junk Vehicles 2042 Noxious Weeds* 4725 Noise/Air/Odor 160 Nuisances 2571 Illegal Signs on Commercial Property 785 Illegal Signs Removed from Public Property 2335 Illegally Parked Recreational Vehicles 1237 Illegally Parked Commercial Vehicles 1327 Misc.IDegally Parked Vehicles 1962 Right ofWay encroachments 374 Vacant Buildings(Re-inspecRd/Posted) 928 Snow on Sidewalks 776 License Violations 229 Sanitation activities included 1,592 citizen complaints regarding the collection of municipal refuse and the delivery of 299 recycling bins. * Enforcement of the Noxious Weed Ordinance included the investigation of city m complaints and the abatement of violations through the mowing of weeds and removal of debris from 704 properties by the City Weed Mowing Contractor. 57 BUDAAIG CODE BOARD OF APPEALS The Building Code Board of Appeals provides any person the right to appeal a decision of the code official refusing to grant a modification of the building code covering the manner of coashuction or materials to be used in the erection, alteration or repair of a building or structure. An application for appeal shall be based on a claim that the true intent of the code or the ales legally adopted there under have been incorrectly wtapretA the provisions of this code do not fiilly apply, or an equivalent form of coastructiw can be used. A summary of the activities of the Building Code Board of Appeals for the fiscal year 2004-05 is as follows: Meetings Scheduled 3 Appeals Filed 3 Hearings Held 3 Re -hearings 0 Appeals Granted 3 Appeals Denied 0 Appeals Dropped 0 Appeals Tabled 0 All records are on file in the offices of the Inspection Deparhnent LTITGATIOtN There is one (1) case pending in the Circuit Court for the Canty of Wayne, where the City of Livonia, and/or City officials, are involved either as plamtids or as defendants. Eleven (11) other cases were resolved in 2004-2005 either pursuant to a stipulation or by final judgment of the Wayne County Circuit Court. There are two (2) civil cases pending in the 16th District Court Eight (8) civil cases were resolved in the 16th District Court 58 Three (3) of these cases had money judgments granted by the Cam which remain unpaid Three (3) cases are pending in the Nhchigan Court of Appeals and two (2) other cases were resolved One (1) case is pending in the Michigan Supreme Court Three (3) cases are pending in the United States District Court and one (1) other case was resolved. Seventy-four (74) cases are pending before the Michigan Tax Tribunal- Thirty-nine (39) other cases were disposed of. (NOTE: Settlement agreements may have been reached in some of the cases reported as pending. It is the practice of the Law Department to keep a case open until the Tax Tribunal has entered a final order, the Tribunal often takes several weeks to enter foal orders after receipt of the stipulation of the parties.) The Law Department has tiled claims to preserve and protect the City's interest in the Bankruptcy Court relative to fmm (4) cases, and in the Oakland County Probate Court relative to one (1) case. The foregoing does not include any appeals taken in ordinance violation cases from the District Court to the Current Cort and/or the Court of Appeals, and/or the Supreme Court 111 ki I:i CM rHI1111:41 From December 2004 through November 2005, the following number of cases were disposed of in the Livonia District Court Criminal Trak Jury Trials Ordinance Misdemeanor 1297 2326 3 Ordinance Drunk Dnvmg 300 1 There are three (3) cases which were appealed from the 16th District Cart to a higher court which are pending, two in the Wayne County Circuit Court and one in the Michigan Court of Appeals. In additive, three (3) other cases which were appealed from the 16th District Court to a higher court have been resolved OPINIONS No formal opinions were issued by the Department of Law during 2004-05. Upon request the Department issued a substantial number of recommendations in correspondence to the various City Departments, Boards and Commissions and the City Comcil by members of the legal MIT upon various subjects and mats. 59 This office represents the City and its officials from tune to time an formal appeals and grievance proceedings before the Civil Service Commission We also appear in matters mvohW Poe City before various State agencies, including the Michigm Public Service Conrnission, the Michigan Employment Relations Commission and the Michigan Liquor Control Commission. ARBITRATION At [resent there are no arbitration cases pending in which this office is involved CIVD. RIGHTS COMPLAINTS No civil rights complamis are pending before the Michigan Civil Rights Commission or EEOC. ORDINANCES The following number of ordinances, prepared by the Department of Law, were submi d to the City Council and were adopted by the Cantil during the year 2004-05: 16 amendments to the Zo mg Ordinance and Zonmg Map; 1 amendment to the substance of the Zo mg Ordinance; 3 vacating ordinances, and 12 amendments to the Livonia Code of Ordinances. In addition, four (4) proposed ordinance amendments have been prepared and submitted to the City Council and the same are now awaiting Council action City- owned properNlocated A 15388 Harrison Pursuant to Council Resolnion 543-04, property located at 15388 Hanson (140.0 feet) was sold to Mr. Henry Kozyn This transaction was completed on December 21, 2004. 60 2. City -owned property located at 15388 Harrison Punmad to Council Resolution 544-04, property located A 15388 Hanson (31.42 feet) was sold to Mr. Thomas Come. This transaction was completed on Mach 4,2005. 3. Tax foreclosed property located at 38900 Six Mile Road Pursuant to Council Resolution 466-02, property located A 38900 Six Mile Road was purchased from Wayne County in 2002. Pursuant to Council Resolution 584- 04, this property was sold back to Trinity House Theatre for the amount of back taxes ($580.40) plus accrued taxes paid by the City for years 2002 to present ($232.64) and a $1,000.00 administrative fee (total of $1,813.04). This transaction was completed on March 22, 2005. 4. City -owned property (Newburgh Village espasi®property) Pursuant to CmIDcil Resolution 341-05, permanent and temporary easements were given to Consumers Power for lie consideration of $30,000.00, with an additional $170,000.00 to be paid before January 31, 2006. This transaction was completed on July 29, 2005. 5. Right-ofway located A 35099 Am Arbor Trail Punciam to Council Resolution 440-05, right-of-way located at 35099 Am Arbor Trail was purchased from Mr. Randy Kline for the consideration of $15,155.06. NOTE: Not included in this report are the numerous transactions involving the acquisition of easements without monetary consideration. 1. Preparation and drafting of proposed resolutions m connection with City Council meeimgs. 2. Providing a representative at meetings of the Zoning Board of Appeals, and, upon request A meetings of the City Planing Commission, the Board of Treat s of the Employees Retirement Sys[an and other City commissions and agencies. 3. Preparation and review of all contracts ended into between the City and other persons, as well as approving "as to form" all legal documents that are processed in the City. 4. Approval, typing and transmission to the District Court wanam requests (541) as submitted by the Police Division and the Inspection Department 61 5. Provide assistance to other departments in the collection of delinquent fes, charges and taxa by taking whatever steps may be necessary, including the instidffion of litigation. 6. Refer to the Michigan Municipal Risk Management Authority for disposition all lawsuits and claims of action against the City which would be covered throrgb the City's agreement with the Authority. 7. Provide legal assistance to various City department heads and supervisors with respect to labor matters, including review of proposed disciplinary actions. 8. Citizens' disputes and problems requiring the advice and counsel of this office are increasing and require more time than ever before. DIRECT SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC Many aspects of Library service are busier and more popular than ever. The ever- increasing public demand fin electronic services is clearly indicated in the statistical review at the end of this report More and more citizens are tinning to the Library's website for its many useful and well -organized links, which are researched and selected by our professional staff of trained research librarians. This greatly simplifies searching the Internet and leads users to authoritative, hand -selected sites. The another of carefully organized links has increased from over 800 last year to over 1300 at the present time. Ibis is due principally to the addition of links to the homepages of 500 top companies. Patrons can also access the catalog, as well as their Library records and search for magaane articles hon our in-house workstations or from the comfort and convenience of their own hurries. Public Internet statiome at all 3 fid] -service locations are available Gee of charge and were used even more heavily in 2005 than in the previous year. A number of card catalog sbtiome at each branch were converted to either regular use or "express" internet stations to help meet the increasing demand. Ibis service has proven to be even more valuable to the community, in recent times, given the slate of our economy. Library Internet stations not only benefit business people on thein lunch hours and students doing research, but also aid job hunters and the unemployed The Library has recently installed the SAM internet management system to make the mend stations more self -serve in nature and to help Gee up the decreased number of professional librarian staff to devote more tie to helping citizens with research questions. A wireless network is also in the process of being installed and will greatly enhance the Library's Internet services to the 62 community in the near fu re. News of upcoming event, new reference books and seasonal fact and trivia has proven popular with the many recipient of the Library's mxMhly E -newsletter, which now has over 450 subscribers (up from approximately 400 a year ago). Another technological change at the Library this year is the amounted telephone call service to notify patrons that a reserved book has arrived for them. This notifies users more quickly and is more cost-efficient than sending out paper notices. Patrons also still have the option to receive e-mail notices. Public meeting rooms provided at Civic Center, Noble and Soothing branches continue to be in high demand as a venue for performances and a form for community event and informational meetings, as well as the many library -sponsored programs that are offered. Many small citizens groups, clubs, and associations as well as other City deparhnent look to this significant public resource as a vital and valuable public service. Civic Center branch in particular is always in high demand with the public, but is in need of major updates and repairs to the auditorium's lighting and sound systems in order to provide the basic requirement for groups using our facilities. The Library was in the news a nurmber of times again this yea, enjoying continued positive coverage from The Detroit News and the Livonia Observer with articles on many event including: the Fall reading program wlth a circus theme that was co-sponsored by Rmglmg Brothers Circus through the provision of free ticket as incentives to young readers, a staff member accepted into the Michigan Library Association Leadership Academy, Banned books week the Summer Reading program with Children who read over 500 hours and Teens who read over 100 hours having their names fisted in the Livonia Observer, trophy presented to Tyler Elementary School for outstanding student participation in the Summer Reading Program, The Music Lady performances, Library pet contest, Teen music programs, Rainbow Feathers bird program, and the Pied Aper Children's program. City Channel 8 taped some of the Noontime Concerts at Civic Center Branch again this year, broadcasting free musical evtertairmarmuo the community. Exhibit of all sons graced the display areas at all of the Library branches in 2005. The Livonia Arts Commission booked manddy exhibit in the Civic Center gallery and other library displays throughout the public library system, showcasing Raggedy Am dolls and memorabilia, boxes "wood to Wedgewood", Questor's President's Day display, bell collection, handmade dolt, crystals, rocks and fossils, lacemaking and Depression glass just to more a few. Library programs, just like electronic services, are an area that is attracting an even greater number of citizens than last year. The Summer Reading Program is always the high spot of the Library's programming year. The Chddrev's, Teen and Adult Summer Reading Programs were all amazingly successful this year with participation up noticeably from last year (1,708 children, 268 teens). Ibis vital program encourages children and teens to enjoy the Library and embrace reading as a lifelong skill. The many on-going Library programs offered at all branches include something for all ages and stages of development and are an mmportant supplemem to other educational services in the community. Library programs are especially important in reachmg and preparing 63 young chibbev before they enter Kindergarten. Typical programs include story times, lap sit, drop -m, preschool and toddler programs. Mayor Jack Engebretson was a celebrity reader for us again, but this year as pmt of our 24 hour Read -A -Thor event. Clifford the Big Red Dog and Franklin the Turtle also made an appearance. The First Lady and the Govemm both responded to our mock election to vote for you favorite Childrern's book (The Polar Express and Because of Worm Dixie proved to be the most popular titles with children in Livonia Other programs and services included: firmly movie oughts, per shows, magic shows, comeds, obituary searches, book discussion groups, use of the genealogy computer, exam proctoring, Library mous, teen arame nights, babysitting workshops, classroom visits, beg'mning and specialized classes for Adults and Children on intemet use, guest authors, college applications and student financial aid, Microsoft Office classes, astronomy, teen writing and the "Young Authors" event, children's plays, travel programs, balloon animals, crafts, health and beauty, gardening, comic books, puppets, summation, pumpkin decorating, and Harry Potter. The Livonia Public Library continues to be frdmame in its many partnering relationships wiPo various organizations. The Library provided entertainment and craft programs in conjunction with the City's Tree Lighting Ceremony and in cooperation with Pinks and Recreation Department and the Livonia Rotary Club. In honor of Minton Luther King Day, the Library worked in cooperation wth the Livonia Human Relations Commission in presenting a related storytelling program and craft activities for cbddren. The Livonia Observer cooperated with us again this year by graciously making room in Poen pages to list the names of the top readers in the Library's Summer Reading Program (me of our most powerful incentives to inspire children and teens to read). Barnes and Noble and the Livonia Pubfic Library cooperated and moss -promoted their respective summer reading activities and Clowns Around Redford cooperated with Summer Reading events as well. The Children's Department held a mock electim for favorite Children's book and was pleased to have the participation of the First Lady and the Governor through thein own personal submissions and votes. A number of programs tbroughont the year were co-sponsored by the Rising Stars Youtheatra and the Detroit Story League, encouraging performance and storytelling as an mnportant part of the educational process. The Library partners with the Livonia Pubhc Schools on a number of projects including ELVS (Early Literacy Volunteers — a volunteer tutoring program), the `ParmilvdIe" fah (sharing early learning intonation with parents), the "Yong Authof' program and the "Author in Amman" outreach program which benefits local school children The Library also receives generous cooperation and support from many local businesses that provide incentives for the Summer Reading Program The Library was fotname in having the Livonia Arts Commission co-sponsor the popular Noontime Concert Series again this year. The Library also assists City employees and other City departments by providing meeting room facilities for various meetings and ever s. FACILUIES New servers were installed at all 3 &U -service branches this year to replace the previous outdated ones. This upgrade was necessary in order to handle the demands of the new Sari shared automation system that was introduced by our library cooperative this year. 64 A amber of old pubfic workslations were also replaced as a result of the Reeds/Gates Grant that was bestowed the previous year. Some of our card catalog stations were converted to Internet stations to help meet the greater demand for that service. As the Sirsi software has been refined, the Library has had to install multiple updates. Several shared pubfic color printers were replaced this year. Microsoft Office software (word processing, etc.) is now available an a number of the public computer stations. Another new installation is the SAM internet management software, which makes the internet stations more self -serve and helps give citizens more fair and equal access to the service, while Geeing up our diminished professional staff to spend more time aiding pahons with research questions and other Library services. A wireless Internet service is also in the process of being installed at Civic Center Branch and soon patrons will be able to access the Internet at the Library an their own laptop devices. A new firewall is also being installed for greater security and to limit the bandwidth consumed by arty individual user. The Civic Center Branch experienced major air conditioning problems with the system being out of order during a good portion of the hottest part of the s amer. Repeated maintenance was performed, but the problem proved difficult to resolve. Extreme beat h our sealed budding would build up after several consentive days of little or no air conditioning necessitating the early closure of the branch an several occasions in the interest of staff and pubhc health and safety. Civic Center staff relocated to our other branches, keeping them open beyond their regular hours in an effort to offer the mummint service to citizens even in these emergency conditions. The problem recurred over the summer, but seems to have been resolved now. There was also a problem with a large number of fights at all locations tuning out and not being replaced This caused difficulties for the staff and generated numerous complaints from citizens, but this also seems to have finally been resolved New equipment this year included additional AN display/storage units at several locations and an "Edge Disc Cleaning & Repair System" to repair CDs and DVDs, thus saving money by extending the Ire of many damaged 'items by repairing them rather than having to replace them The purchase of the items mentioned above was made possible by the generosity of the Livonia Friends of the Library. A "Leap Pad" system and related educational games is being offered at the Sandbag Branch as a new service. A local citizen damned a "Video Eye" magnifying device to Noble Branch (Civic Center branch also odes a similar "Optilec Viewer' device for public use). One of the most popular features at Civic Center Branch has always been the Children's Department fish tank. After experiencing a number of problems with the previous mak the Friends group replaced it with a new larger 72 -gallon tank that is now maintained by the Fish Doctor service. Livonia children were thrilled with the new tank and the new fish and it garners a lot of positive comments from families visiting the Library. Haus of Library service were mandromed at the same slightly reduced level as the past 2 years, despite the loss of additional staff. Hours are staggered between the branches in order to offer the maximum amount of open time to cuums wth our limited stiff. 65 We are grateful for the continued generosity of the City Cleric's Office in sharing then delivery van with us to make our daily mer -library deliveries. Making deliveries has become increasingly difficult, however, since there is no longer a vehicle in the general City pool to cover the times when the City Clerk van is not available. Deliveries are, therefore, sometimes done with a personal vebicle of the staff or skipped altogether. Ibis has caused woridlow problems for staff and slows down service to our citizens. MANAGEMENT AND STAFF Library commissioners Betty Newton and Trudy Pinto were both re -appointed to serve another term an the Commission beginning in October. The m -going Laing fieeze has led to several internal promotions. Staff that had been serving in an actmg/temporary capacity, but have now been promoted to a permanent status, include: City Librarian Kathleen Monroe, Assistant Branch Librarian — Adult Services Becky Huang, Librarian II Carol Guerriem, and Part -Time Librarian Jack Vismw. Library Page Theresa Robinson was promoted to Temporary Clerk to fill a vwmcy left by a Clerk that transferred to the City Clerk's Office. Part -tine Librarian I Lisa Hausman resigned this year to take advantage of a firlltime opportunity in another comrarmity, and camnt be replaced due to the hiving freeze. We are trying to cover this additional loss of a professional Librarian, as we have previous ones, with the use of Substitute Librarians, but their use and availability is limited. Library Aide II Karen Tisher retired this year and we are cummly in the process of trying to fill this vacancy, by internal promotion. This will create a domain effect that will still leave us with fewer permanent staff than we need Temporary Clerks, Pages and Substitute Librarians are helping cover staff shortages as much as possible, but budget cuts and the City's ongoing hiring freeze has affected the Library's ability to provide the level of service that our community deserves. Our reduced and over-worked staff continues to do thein best to maintain a high level of service to our citizens with fewer employees and reduced funding. FUNDING At 82.2 % the millage continues to be the majm source of revenue for the Library going into the 2005-2006 budget year (in fiscal year 20042005 the millage accounted for 812 % of the Library budget). The portion of the Library's budget that comes from the millage has shifted in recent vem, due to reductions in the contribution from the City's General Fund. State Aid to Libraries has been under threat for the last several years and in the new budget year we will see a reduction of 10 % in that sauce of revenue. The Library Department is already `Suming lean" and any additional loss of finding could devastate Library service to our cormarmy The Library continues to seek outside funds to help supplement services to the commirly. The Library has contained to participate in the "Campbell's Labels for Education" program., eaming points towards educational equipment and supplies. The Livonia Arts Commission approved another $2000 grant to help underwrite the Library's popular Noontime Conten Series. Needed automation updates were completed this year as the result of the Reeds/Gats grant that was bestowed previously. The Target 66 Corporation donated funds towards the purchase of books that were distributed to children participating in or 24 Hour Read -A -Tion Michigm Humanities Council grants were secured by several staff members to fiord the Terrific Tuesdays programs in the Children's Deparmum, as well as the appearance of upcoming young musician Jeremy Kittie who performed at a program armed at Teens, but enjoyed by all ages. The Library extends thein heartfelt thanks to the many private citizens who continue to donate money to the Library in honor or in memory of their loved ones. Services of the Unique Management collection agency were interrupted for a few months during the transition to our new automated system, but a backlog of notices was eventually generated and debts of $50 or more are once again being pursued on an active and on-going basis. Recovering these funds allows the Library to replace lost and damaged items. The Friends of the Livonia Public Library awarded three (3) $1500 scholarships to worthy staff members pursuing thein college educations this year. The Friends of the Library continue to work tirelessly to organize and cavy out thein quarterly Book Sale events. The Library is especially appreciative of thein dedicated hard work and generous donations as we move through a period of continuing economic hard times. We are grateful for the fiords that the Friends donate to us every year, but the labor and revenue attached to this wonderfully supportive vohmfeer group camon be guaranteed or planned on as part of the budget planning process of Liberty as a City Departrnent This is our fust bill year of statistics generated by The Library Network's new Saar shared computer sysLmn as well as the fink full year that the Library has collected and reported Website and Intemet Workstation Usage. These and other statistics follow: Half of the population of the City of Livonia are active Library users and cardholders at Livonia Public Library. ** Out -dated and damaged materials are weeded from the collection periodically. 67 October 2004 October 2005 Library Program Attendance 25,077 28,541 Meeting Room Attendance 53,359 53,132 Registered Borrowers 47,183 50,716* Items in the Collection 295,885 294,195** Circulation 658,550 651,477 Library Website Usages 113,268 (11 mantis) 150,004 Intemet Workstations 38,645(10 months) 49,778 Half of the population of the City of Livonia are active Library users and cardholders at Livonia Public Library. ** Out -dated and damaged materials are weeded from the collection periodically. 67 A strong co m ilmem to Parks and Recreation services is a key component to the success of our community. Our facilities, programs and services help create a sense of place and belonging: and enhance the quality of Iffe and general well being of its users and their families. We also provide opportunities where ones leisure time can become wholesome, fico and relaxing to the residents of Livonia. Our Department recognizes the critical role we play in the fives of so many we serve. This year we began working on; or master park plan, a strategic plan, surveying our participants and dividing or department into six divisions. Each division listed below strives to offer quality recreational facilities and opportunities to its participauls/visitom. We offer the following: Aquatics: Swim lessons, pool rentals, lifeguard classes, waw fitness, swim team, lap swim., open swim, indoor and outdoor pools, diving & leisure pool Athletics: League play men's/ladies softball, men's basketball, youth (basketball, t -ball, coach pitch, softball, baseball, ice skating program, roller skating, soccer, archery, termis & bowling Community Center. Ah program activities held in the Center except for those fisted under aquatics Gulf: Leagues, Jr. program, lessons & outings Leisure Services/Special Events: Daddy/DagWrdance,Mother/Sondmee,hohday activities, summer playground program, youth fitness meet, tree lighting, Cardboard boat races, Elk's soccer sboot and hoop shoot, Winter Fest, pitch, hit & mr. etc. Parks & Facilities: Park rentals, neighborhood parks, ball fields, soccer fields, terms courts, nature trails, walking paths, in-line courts, playgrounds, volleyball courts & Wilson Bam The Departnumt also maintains communication with and delivers services to other City DeparhneNs, citizen organizations, community businesses and the Leonia and Clarmeaville Public Schools. The most mpormm communication tool of all is word-of-mouth by satisfied castomers/participants. Through staff training we emphasize the importance in serving our caminters/guests. On a daily basis we continue to ®prove our means of communication through the City's web site, Commonly Center monument marquee, plasma screens, message boards, kiosk, display board, press releases, cable releases, event flyers, guest appearances on Rec Check on Charnel 8 and at civic organiemonbusiness meetings. Distribution of comment cards fr: aquatics, facilities, Community Center, golf comes and programs continue to provide important feedback on oar performance. 68 Our "L" Magazine, which varies in size from 56 to 72 pages, has been received well and is a great source to distribIIing information coda, our resident informing them of the benefit and opportunities available to them AQUATICS The Aquatics division is comprised of the indoor pools at the Community Recreation Center and the two outdoor pools. We provide safe, educational, and enjoyable aquatic services to the citizens. Community Center In 2005 we continued our tradition of high quality programming at the LCRC pools. This year we offered swimming and diving lessons, a wide array of water exercise classes, synchronized swimming, and some aquatic special event. We were the host of swim practices for four swim teams, and are considered the home pool for three of those Rams. We are also the home of the Catholic High School League Swimming and Diving championships. Over the last year the classes and programs we offered have over 3750 participant, not including the swim Rams. Attendance in the aquatic cater is taken daily and we had approximately 151,500 swimmers. The Lap pool was shut doom for aiaint®once to March, and the Leisure pool was shut down to August Also to August we installed a UV system on our Leisure pool and spa, m order to limiter increase our water and air quality. Outdoor Pools This year Botsford opened on June 11 and Clement Circle an lime 17. Botsford closed August 28 and Clements Closed September 5. We had 13,422 people enjoy the pools this year (6296 at Botsford 7196 at Clement Circle) including day and season passes. Our swim lesson program saw 610 student at the two pools, and we had 473 season pass holders. Five different swim Rams used our outdoor pools for summer practice, totaling 263 hours of swim time. This year we held our second annual Super Youth Triathlon, which had 61 participant. Family fico night was also conducted weekly at each pool We had over 8,667 contact hours in our outdoor programs this year (5,606 in Swim Lessons 3,061 in rentals). M ATHLETICS League Play Athletics had another successful year. We offered over 30 different activities for team sports, had over 6,000 participants and played over 2,000 games. We offered the following team sports for participants ranging m age from four years to over 65 years old We had over 148,822 contact hours in our athletic programs. 70 4 o Nof Nof AVG. GAME WITtACf PROGRAMS AGES TEAMS GAMES PEAY TIME HOIB6' Winter Men's Basketball 18 & older 16 112 192 1 hr 3,360 Ui Basketball 14 & under 83 415 1,245 1.25 brs 15,562 Summer Ui Baseball & Softball 16 & under 100 590 1,500 2.5 bis 59,000 Collegiate Baseball 20 & under 8 124 160 2.5 bis 12400 Men's Softball 18 & over 74 518 1,332 1.25 bis 25,900 Men's Modified 18 & over 9 63 162 1.25 bis 3,150 Women's Softball 18 & over 14 98 252 1.25 bis 4,900 Co-ed Softball 18 & over 17 119 306 1.25 bis 5,950 Senior Softball 55 & over 7 70 105 1.25 bis 4,200 T -Ball 5-6 yr olds 25 im 450 1.25 bis 5,000 Coach Pitch 7-8 yr olds 38 152 684 1.25 bis 7,600 Girl's Slovpitch 10 & under 8 32 144 1.25 bis 1,W0 13 & under 6 24 144 1.25 bis 1,200 'Contact Homs: 1. Baseball and softball equals number of games x 40 (2 teams @ 20keam) x length ofgmxe. 70 2. Basketball equals number of games x 30 (2 teams @ 15Ream) x length of game. 3. Does not include practice time or number of spectators at games. Archery Range The Deparhnent of Parks and Recreation opened its outdoor Archery Range this year on Saturday, April 2. The range has seven targets at various distances with an additional broad -head range. The range hosted several inshuctional workshops throughout the summer as well as a Shoot to Score Competition. Several area Boy Scout and Girl Scout groups utilized the range for badge certifications. The range is open April through October on weekends from 10:00 am — 4:00 pm and on Tuesdays and Thursdays in September through October from 4:00 pm until dusk. This year, the Parks and Recreation Department instituted a special fee of $25.00 plus general admission if groups would like to utilize the skills of an inshuctor. Approximately 845 people attended the range through general admission and season passes and the revenue for the range is $2,951. We attribute this to the exposure that the Archery Range has received as well as to the newfomd popularity of the sport of archery. Ice Skating The City of Livonia owns two ice arenas, Eddie Edger and Devon Aire. Both rinks (three sheets of ice) are under contract and managed by the Livonia Hockey Association (LHA). The figure skating program is administered by the Parks and Recreation Deparhn®t The program consists of learn to skate lessons (1,109 enrollments), competition practice (569 enrollments) and three synchronized teams (135 enrollments). The program year finished with or urvatationni ISI figure skating competition Over 300 skaters competed from around southeast Michigan Seven hundred fifty tun different skaters participated during the year. A total of 16,434 annual passes were purchased, with 94% sold to Livonia residents. Ibis continues to be the number one choice of utilizing the facility. Following is a breakdown of each classification: Adult 1,452 Couple 1,187 Fa®ly 11,304 Senior 682 Yong Adult 315 Yonth4'een 262 Matinee 66 Business 331 Corporate 67 Sunnaer 805 71 This past year, day passes were popular for those who used the facility on a trial or short- term basis. Day pass purchases average 185 per day during summer and 156 per day during winter. Our peak hours of operation seem to be from 5:00 pm. to 8:00 p.m. Day pass usage is as follows: Residemts Non -Residents Youth 19,305 6,930 Teens 14,354 3,590 Adults 10,047 4,622 Semors 942 431 TOTAL 44,648 15,573 The Commcmity Center plays hos[ to a variety of groups. The Livonia Public Schools gymnastics program has over 697 students utilizing the Community Center facility throughout the year. The Livonia Swim Club has 80 members, Ladywood Gnls Swim Team has 35 swimmers and Livonia Junior Athletic League basketball has 1,100+ participants. The Community Center had its second maintenance shut down the week before Labor Day. Mary items were talon care of including, refinishing the gym, painting and major cleaving. This yearly event takes place to protect the investment made by the comrandy The storage building was completed in July. Programming has blossomed at the Center, meeting community needs that are diverse. Below is a breakdown of enrollments in the programs that we offer: Aerobics0ance 4,723 Aquatics 785 Cluabmg Wall 351 Fitness Center 177 Classes 4,509 Special Events 264 Swim lessons 2,937 WaterExemise 1,278 Leisure/Sports Throughout this past year, the LCRC Spats and Leisure Programs have groom in leaps and bounds. In our Adult Basketball and CoEd Volleyball Leagues we've served over 660 participants throughout the year. We've also added a number of Leisure programs such as Ball Roan Dance, Ifni .ng Crochet and Needlepoint to name a few. Our youth programs ages 6 — 17 have enrolled over 2, 981 participants. Our youth spats programs in basketball, gir'l's volleyball, and youth soccer have proven to be consistently strong wvdh up and coming spats such as Cheer -Port on the rise. Our Leisure Programs such as 72 Kande, Tae Kwon Do, Jazz, Ballet, and Creative Drawing have also grown. The Pre - School programs are lady a growing population in leisure and sports programming. In our 0-5 years of age population we've had over 1, 250 enollmenis over the past year. The Tons-In-T'+^^g Music with Joy, Ballet and Martial Arts programs continue to grow. We also have new programs on the rise such as our 2's on the Move program to come out Winter 2006. The LCRC began our Parent Break Night youth program January of 2005. This one time a month special event is averaging over 30 kids per night We also hosted or T° Annual New Year's Rock'n Eve Party, which has brought in over 300 guests. Finally, our new Camp Swoosh program was the highlight of the year in our summer leisure programs. In it's fust year, Buis 9 -week day camp program averaged over 23 kids per week CONTACT PROGRAMS AGES PARTICIPANTS HOURS Leisure & Sports, Leagues All 6, 399 individuals 268,758 Kid -Quarters 12 & under 7,119 visits 14,238 Camp Swoosh 6-11 118 53, loo Battle of the Bands All 215 860 i7_^IsSF We continue to play host to birthday parties, Bar Mitzvah, reunions and business meetings with revenue of $193,224.00. We continue to offer a variety of special events such as: City Wide Grange Sale Tramoanma (2) Irish Dance Competition Battle of the Bands (2) Fit Kids Free Day Gyamatics Exhibition Music Under the Stars (2) Blood Drive (2) Fimess[Welmess Fitness and Wellness programming m the LCRC continues to expand. Members can take advantage of a number of services offered by the LCRC. Fitness and Wellness offerings include: climbing wall, fitness hub, personal mtimng, hammonal comselivg group exercise (aerobics) and health/welmess seminars. 73 The climbing wall continues to be a popular feature of the recreation center. The wall has 13 races ranging in degree of difficulty in order to challenge the novice through elite climber. We offer a range of youth and adult climbing classes throughout the week. The fitness hub has remained a very busy area of the LCRC. Free equipment orientations are offered on an hourly basis. A new service that is being offered is the Polar BodyAge assessment system The assessment measures fitness levels of an individual. For the youth, we offer two types of youth orientations: Teens in Tmmmg Part I and Teens in Training Part IL The Fit Hub has 80 cardio machines, 17 selectorized weight -[raining machines, 2 cabled functional trainers, 2 sets of 516-10016 dumbbells and 1 set of 2016- 11016 fixed curl bars. Also available for member use is an assortment of plate -loaded machines such as a smith machine, squat rack leg press, calf raise and chest press benches. Another feature of the fit hub is the Enercise Cardio Theater function fond an most of or cardio equipment The Enercise unit enables the member to lune into a tv. program while getting then cardio wmko t im Personal Training contimes to be utilized on a rmsishnt basis. Members can use personal training as an individual, couple or even in a group setting. Personal trainers help members become successful with their fitness goals. The LCRC currently has a staff of 12 certified personal matters. Nutritional counseling is a new service that the LCRC is offering begging in late fall of this year. Mary Lonergan has over 27 years of nutrition and wellness coaching experience in instrommal and fitness settings. Members meet with Mary an an individual basis. Group exeroise (land aerobics) continues to expand and grow. The LCRC currently offers 62 classes- seven days a week Women an weights, yoga, cycle, step and pilafs are a few of our most popular classes. The LCRC currently has a staff of 26 certified aerobics instructors. Health and Wellness senators are a new service that the LCRC is offismg begming in early winter. These seminars range in class content from a number of nutritional workshops, to exercise workshops to a structured class centered an the BodyAge assessment system. #OF #OF AVERAGE CONTACF PROGRAM ACES DAYS PARTICIPANTS TBIE HOURS Aerobic Classes 18 & up 7 4,773 1 IN 33,411 Cbmbmg Wall 6 & up 1 421 2 hr 842 Teens in Training 13-15 1 171 2 hr 342 Personal Training sessions from Nov. 04 -Nov. 05 = 1,500 sessions (each session= 1 hr) 74 GOLF COURSES The City's three Golf Courses, Idyl Wyld, Fox Creek and Whispering Willows had a successful season considering the unseasonable weather in the spring and summer. In the third week of April, golfers were surprised by a substantial snowfall and in June/July, golfers avoided afternoon golf due to temperatures in the low to mid 90's. Unfortunately, the weather was not the only obstacle that effected revenue. The City of Livonia allowed for two construction projects to take place during the golf season at Fox Greek and Idyl Wyld Golf Courses. These projects limited the availability of golf and caused many golfers, leagues and outings to find a different course w play for the 2005 season. As contracts are being signed for the 2006 season many league customers are asking if there will be any more disruptions to the corse moving fanvard. Rounds Played (as of 11-30-05) Whispering Willows 40,288 Idyl Wyld 32,542 Fox Creek 39,058 TOTAL 111,888 Capital expenditures included phase one of the Fox Creek tree restoration. All other approved capital expenditures are being held over w the 2006 season due w the Golf Fridge project at Fox Creek and No. Creek project at Idyl Wyld. Expenditures that will be held over include completing phase one of the Fox Creek tree restoration, the replac®eot of culvert bridges at Idyl Wyld, the renovation of the driving range A Whispering Willows and parking lot surfacing at the Fox Creek maintenance building. Programs for the year included Senior Citizens Golf Leagues and Championships. Women's 9 and 18 hole Golf Leagues and Championships. Youth Golf Program and murnanieruts were successful. Youth and Senior Golf Clinics were held for free at all three carnes. Program participation increased for both the paid and non -paid programs. Hearts of Livonia outing was a great success. Observer-Eccenhlc Golf Toumaurcrat came down to an exciting playoff. The Livonia Seniors continued thein plant a tree hand and donated more mmey fa the planting of new trees at Idyl Wyld. Overall it was a good season It was predicted that the courses may be down in revenue close to $250,000 due to the construction projects and at the end of October, the manes were only down $119,353. With no scheduled disruptions for the 2006 season, TJW Inc. anticipates an increase in green fees in the 2006 season. 75 LEISURE SERVICES The Department places great emphasis on special everds and programs. Programs are sponsored and staffed by the Department, while special events are offered on a limited basis by local businesses and civic organizations that provide professional maul volunteers; and/or financial assistance. It is oro great to play an mtegral role m developing compromity spirit a sense of family, and individual pride, by offering these opporNmties; thereby, making a difference for our residents. Over 6,000 individuals have benefited firma participating in oro leisure service activities. We had over 86,000 haus in special events and programs EVENT PROGRAMS Wima/Sormu/Fau Roue & Inline Skating Youth lbwling League #of #of CONTACT Co-SPONSORID AGES DAYS' TIME PEOPLE HOURS BY 5&up 24w1a l t&under 26w1a 2 Summa 2,77 RivrsideM®a Playgrorrd Program 5-10 26 Tennis Lessons 618 10 Employee Fitness Adult 89 Introto Archery loop l Triathlon 612 l Total Baseball 7-17 3 Mad Sd®ce Camps 5-12 4 Nature Camp 5-12 4 VENTS 684 Parks &Recreation W'mer Winter 128 Parks &Recreation Santa's Workshop Calling K-2 l 2 Cracks 170 Santa Bowling 3b t Santa Mailbox 7 -under t Essay Contest 5-12 l Tree Lightro Cer®ony All 1 Lunch w/Santa 12undert 218 Elk' s Hoop Shoot Contest 8-13 l MRPA Hoop Shoot Contest 7-14 l Da"Maughter Dance 416 l Mother/Son Dance 49 1 Civic Chorus Concert All 2 Syriae 120 Livonia Civic Chorus Take Pride in Livonia All 1 Memorial Day Ca®ouy All t Easter Egg Hum 12undert Civic Chorus Concert 18&up 2 Easter Burry Lunch 12undert Pitch,Hit,Run 7-24 l 5 t t 4 3 4 3 2 115 2,77 RivrsideM®a 796 41,392 Mood Bowl. Clovaianes, Community Resources Wonderland& Woodland 189 24,570 Parks &Recreation 74 740 Parks &Recreation 19 1,691 Parks &Recreation 27 108 Parks &Recreation 61 183 Wamrart 15 180 Parks &Recreation 57 684 Parks &Recreation 16 128 Parks &Recreation 5 84 42 Livonia Eiwanis& Community Resources 15 1w 240 Mori -Bowl 5 220 110 Livonia Riwaras t 148 148 FriendsofThe Bam 2 20M 40M Rotary,Libranes,Civic Chorus & Youth Choir 2 104 208 Jaycees &Kiwanis 25 43 1075 Livonia Elks lodge 2 85 170 MRPA 2 325 650 Parks &Recreation 2 109 218 Parks &Recreation 2 30 120 Civic Chorus 3 218 654 Rotary Club, Scouts& School Groups 4 115 460 Veteran's Alliance 3 9504 2,850E Livonia Rotary& Jaycees 2 30 120 Livonia Civic Chorus 2 85 170 Jaycees &Kiwanis 25 20 50 Parks &Recreation 76 Summa 12 -under l 2 a 96 Music Under Stam All 8 15 3501 4200 Arts Commission Rdayfor life All l 25 25 625 City Deparmr®ts Youth Fitness Meet 714 l 4 182 728 Parks & Recreation Shoot to Score All l 4 11 44 Parks & Recreation Fan LuuchwiOGoblins 12 -under l 2 a 96 Livonia Jaycees& Riwmis Elks Soccer Shoot 13under l 35 49 19150 Livonia Elk's lodge Haurted Stroll 12underl 4 25 1.0 3501 FriendsofneBam Craft Homs tunneler l 4 N 84 FriendsofneBam Hurter Safety 11&up 2 14 52 14% Parks&Recreation,DN Not. Pass &lack launder 1 15 M 30 1.1 L The City's park system issued approximately 425 permits for picnics at Rotary, John Stymelski Veteran's, Bicentennial, Clements Circle, Mies and Shelden Pads. Our revenue for the pavilion rentals was $29, 319 for the season. 5 picnic packs were rerRed The packs were also the sites of numerous special events and activities. Cross-country ski hails were set at Rotary Park, Whispering Willows and Idyl Wyld Golf Course and had limited use. The Rotary Club continues to assist us in park improvements such as providing a walking path at the park. PLANNING COMMISSION Activities and projects handled by the Planning Commission and the Planning Department for the year 2005 included the following: Subdivision Plata Considered Meetings Held Preliminary Plats 0 Public Hearings Final Plats 2 RegularMeetings Extensions 0 Study Meetings Special Regular Meetings 10 19 19 1 Petitions Processed Amendments Rezoning 17 Master Plan Amendments 1 Waiver of Use 25 Language Amendmevts(Ord. 543) 2 Vacating 3 Site Plans 22 Site Condominiums 4 Sign permits 9 Greenbelt & Landscape 2 Satellite Disb 1 77 The most sign cant planning issue to confirm the City this past year was the redevelopment of the Wonderland Mall property. Approved by the City Council on November 30u, the plan demohsbes the now defunct mall in its entirety and replaces it wilh three (3) big -box retail stores, including a 204,000 square foot Wal-Mart store, a 127,000 square foot Target store, and six (6) individual retail buildings along Plymouth Road that total approximately 98,000 square feet Controversial from the beginning, many residents and neigbborhood groups that felt the project would create too many adverse impacts on the surrounding area were opposed to the plan The plan that was ultimately approved commons several conditions on the operational aspects of the big -box stores (i.e., limiting the hours of operation boom 6 am to 12 midnight) in an attempt to mitigate these impacts to the extent possible. Tlvaughout the past year, the Planning Department was closely involved in a number of other new developments, as well as several expansion and redevelopment projects, including 1) Approval of a new Fifth Third Bank located at the southwest coma of Newburgh Road and Seven Mile Road (currently under construction); 2) Approval of a new dental office at 15552 Newburgh Road between Five Mile Road and Ladywood Avenue (currently under construction); 3) Expansion and remodeling of the Abbey Flooring and Design cents (formerly Danny's Supermarket) located at the northeast comer of Farrington Road and Six Mile Road); 4) Approval of Finishline Power Sports located on the north side of Seven Mile Road between Middlebelt Road and Parkville Avenue (crrently under construction); 5) Expansion and remodeling of Steve's Family Dining (fomerly Emmetls Restaurant) located on the east side of Middlebelt Road between Five Mile Road and Sumydale Avenue (currently under conshuction); 6) Approval of a new Cheebrger- Cbeebrger reshmunt at College Park; 7) Approval of a new Franklin Bank at College Park 8) Approval of three (3) new office buildings, including TCF regional headquarters, at the campus of College Park; 9) Facade renovations to Livonia Chrysler Plymouth dealership located on the south side of Plymouth Road between Merriman Road and Minium Avenue; 10)Demolition of two (2) vacaut and blighted buildings A the soulheast comer of Six Mile Road and Middlebelt Road and the approval of a new retail shopping cent (cuaautly under construction); ll)Approval of m addition to the Bright House Networks facility A the northwest comer ofFanxangton Road and Lyndon Street; 12)Approval of four (4) new residential condominium project, including: 1) Sarah Estates an Eight Mile between Gill Road and Ellen Drive, 2) Livoma Manor an Seven Mile Road between Merriman Road and Auburndale Avenue; 3) CB Club Condominiums at the northeast comer of Lyndon Avenue and Branson Avenue; 78 and 4) St. Martins Condominiums on the north side of St Martins Avenue between Middlebelt Road and Melvin Avenue; 2005 Land Use Inventory Report 2005 Land Use Quitter Section Colored Maps 2005 Lot Splits Reports - 34 2006-2011 Capital Improvement Plan The Planning Deparhneut oversees and coordinates the activities and functions of the office of Economic Development The Depaz mt provides oversight, guidance and assistance to the Economic Development Dnector. The new and expanded program is to lead assistance to business and industrial firms in the City by maintaining a list of available properties and buildings, provide guidance though the permit process and by adrmnisteang to the Economic Development Corporation Special emphasis of the new program is to assist in promoting, retan^g and attracting local industrial, commercial and retail entalmses within the City thereby strengthening and protecting the local economy, and tax base. Below is a summary of the major activities tbat the City's Economic Development Office has been involved with wa the past year: • Retention Calls and/or Prospect Meetings Negotiations Lunch Meetings: 126, including 45 joint calls with MFDC. (]his number does not include phone contact work with businesses.) • City Representative (2` Networlong events: charity, chamber, breakfasts & after hones events etc. 25 • Customer Service and/or Conflict Resolution 12 issues resolved • Tax Incentive Progrmn: 1. Created 4 new Industrial Development Districts 2. Completed 5Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificates • Conducted 8 Council Public Hearings and/or Study Presentations • ResearcLeNAat4d 9 Memos and/or Lets for Mayor and/or Council 79 3 Public Speaking Engagemads: 1. Livonia Chamber Breakfast 2. Valassis Dadication Ceremony 3. Livonia Public Schools Reading Week SeminarsMemberships Committees: • Michigan Econ. Dew. Association (MEDA) • International Council of shopping CentersGCSC) • MEDA Econ. Development Urban Task Force (Lansing 3, hosted 1) • MEDA`Beyoul our Borders" Attraction Seminar • ICSC Michigan Idea Exchange • ULI Redevelopment Seminar & Tan @ Detroit Misc. • Chaired 5 Mayor's Economic Development Task Face, meetings & participated in 8 additional sub-commultee meetings. • C®pleted new Strategic Plan w/input from Mayor's ED. Task Force • 8 Building Search/Attraction packets, prospect taus and/or cold calls • 7 Media interviews (Detroit Dews, Free Press & Observer) • Testified at one MEGA Hearing C Lansing for Quicken Loans 2005 New Business& Expansion Highlights fists are"new jobs" NYK, $15 million expansion, 150 jobs Quicken Loans, 35,000 square foot expansion, 500 jobs Delta Gear, from Wixom $2 million investment, 15 jobs Valassis, $5.5 million expansion into runner NWA Res. Center, 180 jobs to Livonia from Plymouth, 55 from California Eagle Plastics, attraction from Plymouth 25 jobs Dunkin Donuts, $2.5 million regional bakery, 45 jobs Feblo, 149,818 square feet (attraction to: 3 44 50 Industrial) Binkehman Corp. attraction (Industrial Supply House) 2005 Sob losses • ASC, Inc. (paint booth) 65 jobs to Lincoln Park consolidation • Mervyn (closing 62 stores nationwide) approm 75 full-time egmvalents • GM Acceptance Corp., 31 jobs (GM downsizing non -auto operations) • DEQ consolidationto Warren, 95jobs 80 The Planning Department continues to provide oversight and clerical support to the Plymouth Road Development Authority (PADA} The full-time Director of the Plymouth Road Development Authority works with the Planning Director and department staff an coordinating and administering the various programs as assigned by the Authority. The Department secretary maintains custody of records, books, documents and other papers of the Authority. Pla ung Department personnel attend all meetings of the Board and keep a record of its proceedings. The PRDA Board is happy to report the continued success of the development program along the Plymouth Road comdor in 2005. Phase VI of the street cape improvements were completed. These improvements included the brick piers, decorative fencing and landscaping for the Walgreen site at the northwest comer of Plymouth and Farrington Roads. We placed new street sign poles and signs for the balance of the residential streets on the south side of Plymouth Road between Memmman and Farrington Roads. The balance of the sidewalk replacement program for the area of the corridor between Inkster and Merriman Road was also completed All the street lamp poles were repainted under the terms of our wamarty agreement with the manufacturing company. All of the burned art light bulbs in the street lamp poles fixtures were replaced the full length of the corridor. All the ash trees killed by the Emerald Ash Borer Disease were replaced Nearly half of the ash trees replaced were covered by our warrarty agreement with the landscape company. We prodded design assistance to several business property owners having property fronting on Plymouth Road wanting to voluntary implement the PRDA sbvetscape design elements on their property. MAPS The Pla ^ ng Department has prepared many new maps for City use and has revised others. These maps are used at the various public hearings conducted by the Planning Commission and City Council. The maps are also made available to other City departments and groups. GIS The Planning Department continues to work closely with the Information Systems Department and other City Departments involved in the development and maintenance of the City's desktop Geographic Information System (GIS). The Qty's GIS is a powerful collection of computer hardware and software designed to visualize, explore, query and analyze data geographically. The Planning Department utilizes the GIS on a daily basis for a variety of planning related tasks including: mapping, obtaining land use statistics and information, generating mailing labels for public notification purposes, and much 81 more. As par[ of its responsibility of providing accurate and cement land use information, the Planning Department maintains the following spatial GIS layers and accompanymg attribute information: Zoning Liquor Licenses Act 198 Industrial Districts Existing Land Use Wireless Cbmmmmication Facilities Vicinity Control Areas Future Land Use Truck Routes Budding Footprint PLANNP1 G DATABASE The Planning Deparhnent continues to expand the use of its computer database, which was designed and developed for the purpose of tracking and storing information about all of the various petitions that the Department is responsible for overseeing The new database was created with several benefits in mind, including faster and more efficient delivery of information to residents, other City Deparhnerdts and developers, better record keeping and expandability and compatibility with other computer software programs including the GIS. The Planning database was developed using Microsoft Access and includes detailed information on each petition including the type of pmject, the review procedure, the appficavt critical deadlines (i.e., public notification), pas[ history, Zoning, etc. Select information can be linked directly with the GIS and viewed in a spatial context For example, maps can be generated showing the locations of all properties involved in certain types of land use proposals (i.e., restaurants), over a given period of time. As of November 2005, the Planning database contains detailed information on approximandy 1,403 petitions. Hundreds of hours have been spent supplying other departments with technical help including Cormmdty Resources Assessor's Office Histerical Commission FngivemnlyIvspectiw Legal Deparhnent Library Comrinssion Parks & Rec. FinanceDepartrnent Historic Preservation Housing Commission SITE PLANS Since the adoption in July of 1972 of the General Site Plan Approval Ordinance, approximately 1,177 site plans for cornrnercial and office developments have been processed Recommendations are made m site development proposals in Order that functional, aesthetically pleasing developments, which are compatible to surrrnmdmg developments, are accomplished. Through landscape treatment of sites, the Planning Cournussion and Department maintain strong emphasis on quality of site developutents. 82 Snnoort Services The Admmishation section consists of the Chief of Police, one Deputy Chief, three Captains (one Support Services Division, one Umfni n Division, me Investigative Division), one Sergeant, one Police Officer, one Program Supervisor, me Account Clerk and one Secretary. The bureau is responsible for the efficient day-to-day operation of the department Preparing and maindaming the budget, purchasing, paining, personnel, labor relations, contact with citizen groups, and investigating citizen complaints are also important factions. During Fiscal 2005, the Training Division coordinated the attendance of our officers at 238 off site training classes. Of our officers, 106 attended 40 hours of in-house paining through our Police Officer Refiesher Training Program. The taimvg division also oversaw the application and receipt of police officer "302" fads, dispatcher wireless 9-1-1 training fads, the Bullet Proof Vest Grout Program, and the Justice Assistance Grant The firearms range provided training for all officers a mmumum of two tines during the year as well as extensive training by the SWAT team and several outside agencies. The training tower at the range facility was used to host a rappel -master's school attended by several agencies. Patrol Rifle qualified officers were recertified by in-house instructors and a rented rifle range facility. Eight of our dispatchers were recertified in Emergency Medical Dispatch timing. Officers assigned to the Uniformed Division were trained in Traffic Radar and Laser for speed enforcement and also received update toning in nom -lethal weapons deployment, which included Taser, balm, and personal chemical agents. The defensive tactics `mat room' was made available A the request of the U.S. Amey Reserve for conbatrat readiness training. A new, state -of -the - ant Firearms Training System (FATS) was obtained through a grant award by MMRMA as well as a consortium agreement with other area agencies, and will be delivered shortly. MMRMA grant monies also partially funded the attendance of two department members A the prestigious Northwestern University Staff and Command School. The training division also oversaw the administration of the departrnent's Fitness Incentive Program and developed a training and evaluation program for Police Service elides. commmretiam This office is stated by one full fine Commmicatione Supervisor. Activities include the maintenance of the Ericsson radio system Ibis includes over 550 mobiles and prep radios citywide, dispatch area and site equipment The supervisor also maintains hmy-sue "m-cat'video systems. Other duties include maintenance of the UP.S. machine and its battery bank, and support of Computer Services in the maintenance and progrmmting of forty in -car computer systems. 83 Computer Section This bureau consists of one Police Sergeant, one Police Officer, one Compute Administrator II, and one full time Data Processor (one Data Processor below slaffng level). Computer Services k responsible for mammurmg and mipmvmg the depamnem's IT mfmst mclure. This includes deploymg, servicing and supporting new and existing hardware and software (including mobile units), as well as providing s=stical information and reporting tools. Compute Services is also a disaster recovery site for CLEMIS and a training cent as well. This year, the police and fire deparhuents joined compute netcm ics and now function under the auspices ofthe Compute Services Bureau Activities Est. Fiscal Fiscal Percent 2003-2004 2004-2005 Change Total Incidents CAD Runs 38,359 36,454 -4.97 Reports Written 8,097 8,515 5.16 Property Items 5,049 4,192 -16.97 Adult Arrests 3,880 3,629 -6.47 Juvenile Arrests 263 180 -31.56 Stolen/Recovered Vehicles 289 241 -16.61 Traffic Ticket31,612 28,903 -8.57 2004-2005 numbers are as of 11/15/2005 Tickets as of 1023/2005 Central Records Central Records is staffed by one Sergeant four Clerk Typists, two Clerk H's and one temporary clerk This bureau receives and files all incident reports and arrest documents, forwarding the proper documentation w State and Federal agencies. In addition, they fulfil request information from Freedom of Infrr atun, Subpoenas, and Discovery Orders and are responsible for the issuance of pistol purchase permits. Central Records persormel also review and enter reports and traffic citations mw the database. 84 Activities *Park permits and Solicitors ficense removed payments made at Clerk's office. *Decrease in photo development due to photos produced in Disk four. Property/Licensing A sergeant and a police officer staff the Property and Licensing Unit Work activities include the processing of property and evidence, control and trucking of expounded vehicles, daily aaintevance of the in -car videotapes and DVD's, taxicab licensing and inspection and licensing investigations under Title 5 of the Livonia Code of Ordinances. The following are estimates for fiscal year 2005, shown next to last year's estimates. Activities 2004 2005 % Change Public Vehicle Permit Applications Investigated 60 60 0 Taxicab Inspections 15 16 7 Business License Applications Investigated 60 65 8 Impounded Vehicles Processed 1,450 1,500 3 Property items received and processed 4,000 4,000 0 Investigative Division The Investigative Division is composed of several units. The hrvestigative Division includes the following units: Detective Bureau, Crime Scene Unit, Crime Prevention, Sex 85 Fiscal Fiscal Percent PROCESSED: 2004 2005 mange Accident Reports 1,026 849 -20.85 Incident Reports 305 268 -13.81 Fingerprints - $54 0 21 100.00 Fingerprints - $15 718 855 16.02 Fingerprints N/C 14 44 68.18 FOIA 927 960 3.44 LCC 18 13 -38.46 Purchase Permits 480 405 -18.52 Purchase Permits N/C 147 103 -42.72 Record Clearance 370 250 -48.00 Record Clearrace N/C 600 690 13.04 Gun Registrations N/C 1,498 1,277 -17.31 Tapes (VT, AT, CD) FOIA 110 119 7.56 Photographs — FOIA 201 43 -367.44 Pages Copied—FOIA 5,363 9,446 43.22 PV License 91 51 -78.43 TOTAL REVENUE: $47,922.00 $46,974.00 -2.02 *Park permits and Solicitors ficense removed payments made at Clerk's office. *Decrease in photo development due to photos produced in Disk four. Property/Licensing A sergeant and a police officer staff the Property and Licensing Unit Work activities include the processing of property and evidence, control and trucking of expounded vehicles, daily aaintevance of the in -car videotapes and DVD's, taxicab licensing and inspection and licensing investigations under Title 5 of the Livonia Code of Ordinances. The following are estimates for fiscal year 2005, shown next to last year's estimates. Activities 2004 2005 % Change Public Vehicle Permit Applications Investigated 60 60 0 Taxicab Inspections 15 16 7 Business License Applications Investigated 60 65 8 Impounded Vehicles Processed 1,450 1,500 3 Property items received and processed 4,000 4,000 0 Investigative Division The Investigative Division is composed of several units. The hrvestigative Division includes the following units: Detective Bureau, Crime Scene Unit, Crime Prevention, Sex 85 Crimes/ Polygraph, Court Services/ Liquor Control Eaforcement Internet Gimes Against Chddr and School Resource. The Investigative Division Lieutenant is in charge of six sergeants, seventeen police officers and one clerk typist. Two sergeants, seven police officers and one clerk typist staff the Detective Bureau. Their responsibilities include the investigation of most of the reported crimes. These include assaults, robberies, burglaries, larcenies, frauds and car thefts. One sergeant and me police officer make up the Crime Scene Unit Ibis unit is responsible for processing crime scenes, including the development, collection and analysis of evidence. A sergeant is responsible for Crime Prevention His duties include was of the police facility as well as teaching civic gaups and businesses crime prevention techniques. The Sex Crimes/Polygraph unit is composed of one sergeant and two police officers. This unit investigates reports of domestic violence, sexual assaults, stalling and various telephone complaints. Until recently, me officer was assigned as a polygraph examiner. This officer administered polygraph examinations to suspects in a variety of cases. One sergeant and me police officer are assigned to Court Services/LCC. These officers process warrants and handle the daily court procedures. They also investigate applicants for Mchgan Liquor Control Conmussim hoes and enf nce MI -CC laws and rules. One officer is assigned to the Michigan State Police Internet Gimes Against Children (ICAC) unit The ICAC and investigates individuals who, via 0ne Internet attempt to lure minas to conmut illicit acts. The School Resource unit is comprised of five officers who are assigned to the middle and high schools. They provide a liaism between the police and schools and investigate my crimes that occur in or around their schools. Activities 86 FY 2004 FY 2005 %Change Total Cases Investigated 7,357 5,785 -21 Felony Warrants Requested 253 405 +62 Misdemeanor Warrants Requested 757 604 -20 Precious Metal Documents 804 309 -62 Crime Scenes Processed 62 81 +23 Vehicles Processed 40 38 -5 Pieces of Evidence Processed 1,951 2,325 +16 Latent Prints Identified 175 120 -31 Reports by Crime Scene Unit 235 371 +37 AFIS Cases 341 171 -50 Polygraphs Administered 68 51 -25 Juvenile Arrests 310 178 -43 Referral m Youth Assistance 27 30 +10 Warrants Processed 6,116 6,668 +8 MLCC Reports 34 36 +6 MLCC Inspections (on -sit & decoy) 147 150 +2 MLCC Violations Reports 12 15 +20 MLCC Applicants Investigated 31 30 -2 86 Patrol Bureau Four Lieutmeals, twelve Sergeanls, sevmly-six Police Officers and cane Civilian Dispatchers staff the Patrol Bureau. The Patrol Bureau provides protection to the public twenty-four haus a day, seven days a week, responding to all reported incidents and requests for service NNum the City of Livonia The Patrol Burow includes the Vebicle Maintenance Coordinator (VMC). The VMC is responsible for the general mcantevance, repair and outfitting of department vebicles. The Patrol Bureau also provides dispar1ing services for the Livonia Fire Department Activities Dispatched runs (Livocaa Police) Dispatched runs (Livocaa Fire) Cmunal complamts taken Adult arrests Juvenile arrests Uniform Law Citations issued Accident reports taken 4 of days spent by prisoners lodged in a county jail Traffic Bureau 2004 2005 i Actual Projected Change 38,363 36,553 -4.72 7,366 8,431 14.45 7,402 6,992 -5.54 3,530 4,304 21.93 290 188 -35.17 14,849 13,065 -12.01 2,966 2,904 -2.09 11,760 10,355 -11.95 The Traffic Burow underwent reorganization this year. The duties of the Sergeant in cbarge of the selective emorcem®t unit and the Strategic Traffic Accident Reduction (STAR) program were combined with the Traffic Burow OIC's responsibilities. This resulted to the reduction of a Sergeants position. The bureau is now staffed with we Sergeant and five Police Officers. These officers are responsible for: 1. AS serious traffic crash on -scene investigation and later reconstruction 2. The department's in -station breath test instrument and calibration of the portable preliminary breath test rostrum nds for the road officers. 3. The scheduling and taming of the Livonia Public School's crossing guards. 4. Federally certified child seat safety checks. 5. Planning cormhission research and reports. 6. Zoning board research and reports. 7. Traffic related crepe novesngalmn, arraignments and prosecution 8. Selective enforcement activities tro gbart the city. 9. Motor tamer enforcement activities. 87 We commse to participate in the State funded seat beh and dunk driving campaigns (we received an unprecedented $48,000 this year for this grant). We also received a grant that replaced 12 preliminary breath test instruments, bought 10 laser speed measurement devices for patrol officers, and involved testing a window tint meter for use by road Patrol Officers. The bureau Sergeant represents the city on the Traffic Commission, is on the executive board of the Wayne County Traffic Safety Committee and the Traffic Improvement Association All 2005 statistics are estimates Community Service Bureau One Sergeant and one Police Officer staff the Community Service Bureau. The unit is responsible for adrmustration of the Police Reserve Program, consisting of 36 Reserve Officers. This Bureau also supervises the Community Event Volunteers and Police Fxpkrer Post 4213. Uniformed persomel worked 6,711 hours at special events throughout the City of Livmn durmg 2005 including school functions, the Livonia Spree and other civic events. The total cost of services for the yen is estimated at 5130, 457.14 with fractional reimbursement at $76,255.96. Discounted and unsubsidized services amount to $54,201.18. AddNomnllp, this bureau continues to be substantially responsible for issues related to hometown security efforts. Persomel assigned to this untt participate with the U.S. Assistant Attorney General's Advisory Task Force. This unit also participated in the All Star Gane planing task force and is currently participating in Superbowl XL phoning task face. The Bureau provides personnel and support for emergency events including mow alerts, downed power lines, crowd control, and recently, hurricane Katrina support efforts with the Wayne County Sheriffs Department. 88 2004 2005 % Change Serious Injury Investigation 16 8 -50 Traffic Crashes 4,300 4,276 -.6 Drunk Driving 300 298 -.7 Traffic Related Investigations 63 46 -27 Citations Issued 3,976 3,133 -21 STAR Details 613 520 -15 STAR Citations 16,483 13,000 -21 Scheduled Fines - STAR 1.8 million 1.4 million -22 Motor Carrier Inspections 259 267 3 Motor Carrier Citations 370 361 -2 Scheduled Fines - MC. 409,000 370,000 -10 All 2005 statistics are estimates Community Service Bureau One Sergeant and one Police Officer staff the Community Service Bureau. The unit is responsible for adrmustration of the Police Reserve Program, consisting of 36 Reserve Officers. This Bureau also supervises the Community Event Volunteers and Police Fxpkrer Post 4213. Uniformed persomel worked 6,711 hours at special events throughout the City of Livmn durmg 2005 including school functions, the Livonia Spree and other civic events. The total cost of services for the yen is estimated at 5130, 457.14 with fractional reimbursement at $76,255.96. Discounted and unsubsidized services amount to $54,201.18. AddNomnllp, this bureau continues to be substantially responsible for issues related to hometown security efforts. Persomel assigned to this untt participate with the U.S. Assistant Attorney General's Advisory Task Force. This unit also participated in the All Star Gane planing task force and is currently participating in Superbowl XL phoning task face. The Bureau provides personnel and support for emergency events including mow alerts, downed power lines, crowd control, and recently, hurricane Katrina support efforts with the Wayne County Sheriffs Department. 88 The Intelligence Bureau is staffed by one Lieutenant, five Sergeants, five Police Officers and one Clerk Typist. Responsibilities are as follows: One Sergeant supervises five Police Officers. These individuals are responsible for investigating all narcotic crimes affecting the City of Livonia Officers are also responsible for lacking other criminal activity in the City of Livonia and surrounding rmnmonities. Bureau supervisors prioritize the intelligence and conduct follow up investigations that may include surveillance and search warrant executions. This mat also networks its intelligence with other appropriate law enforcement agencies at the federal, state and local levels. The second Sergeart handles all evidence, court work and forfeiture actions. The third Sergeant is assigned to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and works in conjunction with Federal Agents m criminal prosecutions as well as Federal Forfeihre of the assets of drug dealers. The fourth Sergeant is assigned to the United Stags Customs Service Outbound Currency Task Foxe (OCTF). The OCI'F is a multiagency task force created to ensure compliance with currency reporting reqummums and to disrupt the illegal money-laundering activity of mramal organizations. The filth Sergeant is assigned to the Fugitive Apprehension Service Team. The "FAST' team is responsible for arresting fugitives of the Cruninal Justice System All sergeants report to the Lieutenant. The Clerk Typist is responsible for records management and employee time records for this bureau and the Detective Bureau. Narcotics Enforcement Activities 89 2004 2005 % Change Assigned Cases 710 685 -3.5 Search Warrants 84 105 25 Cocaine Purchases 14 14 0 Marijuana Purchases 69 85 23 Beroin/Otber Purchases 15 18 20 Criminal Survei0ance 58 34 -41 89 The Department of Public Works includes the Public Service Division and the Engineering Division, which operate under the direction of the Director of Public Worcs. The responsibilities of the two Divisions are as follows: Public Service Division - This Division is responsible for the performance of a wide variety of mamirnauce fimctions. These fimcham range tram in-house activities such as building maintenance and vehicle maintenance (except Police and Fire) to the more visible mai manor oa of public utilities, park sites and roadways. Ibere are 135 full-time and 21 part -tune positions in the nine maelservice sections of the Division. Fifteen positions are assigned to mavageriaVadminislmtive fimctions. The Deparhnent currently has 29 vacant positions. Engineering Division - the Engineering Division is under the direction of the City Engineer and is responsible for all construction operations within public tights -of -way, and/or public easements. The deparhnent has provided engineering services as directed by the Mayor, the City Council, and various Boards and Commissions, as well as for the general public. During the past fiscal year, the work was handled by 11 full-time employees. The deparhnrat consists oftluee sections: administrative, design, and field. Highlights of this year's armmplishimicils include Admimstrative Section This section is under the direction of the City Engineer and an Assistant City Engineer. This section prepares reports for the City Caned, subdivision bond establishments and releases, and various other reports; reviews the design of public imFuovemevls in connection with the development of residential subdivisions, corntercial and industrial site plans; prepares legal descriptions as required by other departments; and provides technical assistance and advice to administrative and legislative groups within the City as well as State and Canty governmental units. Ibis section also issues permits for work in the public nghds-of-way and/or easements. Attendance at Cantil, Commission and citizen meetings is also a finction of this section The Administrative Section was involved with the following matters ducting 2005 in addition to attrndivg meetings with State and Canty officials, and investigating citizen complaints: • Wayne Comty ResurfacmgmdReconstmction Projects - Six Mile Road— Middlebelt Road to Inkster Road - Five Mile Road— Famungfon Roadto Merriman Road • Traffic Signal Ia¢vovenains m • Numerous Reconstruction and Rehabilitation Projects in Conjunction with the Annual Paving Program • Recreation Center Storage Building • Aspha@Parking Lot and Lighting at Greenread Twelve site condominium projects, one subdivision, and numerous commercial and industrial projects were also reviewed and/or inspected by the Division. • Brookside Condominiums • CB Estates Condominiums • Cavel Woods Condemnations • Cltvchill Place Coodomnitmis • College Park Condominiums • Fountain Park Condominiums • Golf Ridge Properties • Hunters Park Estates Condon mums • Pastena Villa Condemnations • Rosati Industrial Park Subdivision • Sarah Estates Condoonmnsans • Savile Row Cmdonmans • St Martins Commons Condoonnnms Desien Section This section, in conjunction with the Administrative Section, prepares plans, specifica- tions and bidding doa ends for the City's public improvement projects. It also prepares legal descriptions as needed In addition, this section provides utility information to the public, assigns addresses and reviews residential site plans. The following projects were designed and/or belt in 2005: • 2005 Thin Asphalt Overlay Program • 2005 Sidewalk Program • Carol Drive SAD • 2005 Water Main Replacement Program • 2005 Lane Line Marking Program • 2005 Joint and Crack Sealing Program Field Section This section is responsible for providing all field inspection, survey and testing services in correction with contract plans and specifications for projects constructed under the 91 junsdiction of the Engmeermg Division, as well as all subdivision and commencial developments imolvmg the installation of public improvements. In addition. the survey crew provides line and grade work for the Public Service Division's road ditching program and other assignments requiring survey work Numerous public improvement contracts amounting to approximately $1,587,501.00 were handled by the division during the past year. Major projects which were designed, engmeered and inspected by the Fngraeermg Division may be summarized as follows: • 2005 Thin Asphalt Overlay—$397,681.00 • 2005 Sidewalk Program =$345,096.00 • 2005 Pavement Joint and Crack Sealing Prograa—$127,360.00 • 2005 Pavement and Catch Basin Repair Water Main Breaks =$44,908.00 • 2005 Lane Line Marking Prograrn — $79,767.00 • 2005 Water Main Replacement =$319,342.00 • City Hall Parking Lot Addition =$25,125.00 • Carol Strive SAD—$248,222.00 Administrative Section • Provided administrative services for the City telecommunications systarn. • Prepared anmud budget submitral for the Pubic Service Division. • Worked on adaptation and installation of comprehensive new software program for the Department of Public Works operations. • Conducted employment interviews. • Administered safety programs wiPoin the Department • Maintained an alcohol and controlled substance testing program ler requnements of Federal law. • Provided forpublic relations information for Rouge Sub -Watershed Project. • Administered a West Nile Vims — Mosquito Control public information program and a larviciding program for City parks, facilities, and over 12,000 storm sewer catch basins. Sanitation • Prepared monthly payment submittals for solid waste contract • Operated Recycling Center and City Office Paper Recycling Program. Coueded 119.99 was of recyclable material. • Administered Curbside Recycling Program. Collected 7,339.06 tons of recyclable mala al. • Administered Separated Yard Waste Collection Program. Diverted to compost facility 25,644 yards of yard waste material. • Prepared and distributed to all Livonia households a Household Hazard Waste Day 92 postcard announcement for the rarious City and County even.. • Conducted a Household Hazardous Waste Drop -Off Day A Ford Field on May 7, 2005. A total of 1,589 vehicles utilized the service of which 1,381 were from Livonia. (Northville/Northville Township conducted a drop-off event on October 1, 2005, which was utilized by 371 vehicles from Livonia). • Maintained City Type IB landfill in compliance with all Federal, State and County requvernents. • Prepared and submitted all solid waste reports required by State of Michigan and Wayne County. • Continued commuity solid wase and recycling educational programs through use of City newsletter. • Prepared and distributed to all Livonia households a Bulk Leaf Pick -Up Program brochure. Snow and Ice Control • Maintained roads on primary salt routes m a `met pavement or bell" condition 24/7 d argbout the 2004-2005 snow season. Salted primary routes once in November, 11 times in December, 13 times in January, 11 tines in February, 7 times in March, and once in April fa a total of 44 times using 3900 tons of road salt • Plowed primary and secondary routes 9 threes. • Plowed all roads City-wide (370 miles) in 6 separate snow, cycles, using a combination of contract road graders and City resources, and once using strictly in- house equipment and personnel. • Provided plowing and ice amtrol services on City parking lots. • Filled and mairatuned salt bawls at key locations throughout the City. • Spot salted water break and house fire locations. • Purchased a less corrosive, bio -based salt performance evbancer to try on an experimental basis during the upcoming wives. • Graded parks, alleys and gravel roads 4 times and added gravel as needed. • Restructured drainage ditches, culverts and gravel mad surfaces m improve road surface longevity and improve storm drainage for the area • Applied calcium chloride to gravel roads for dust control City-wide 3 times. • Applied calcium chloride to parks and alleys 3 times. • Swept City local streets 5 times, major roads 19 times, and industrial roads 15 times. • Performed street sweeping atter SPREE (3 times). • Swept all paved City streets after Leaf Pickup Program. 93 Landfill, Transfer Station and Recycling Ceuta Maintained City Landfill; composted 49,042 cubic yards of leaves from the Leaf Pickup Program- Processed rogramProcessed 13,920 cubic yards of household refuse from 4,394 users of Refuse Disposal Transfer Site. Brash Pickup • Covered entire City every 10 working days, picking up 7,898 yards of brush with 15,124 stops. • Removed and disposed of chips resulting from stump grading at approximately 75 locations. • Trained new seasonal laborers in operational and safety requirements of bush pickup. Leaf Pickup • Picked up 49,042 yards of bulk leaves at curbside; provided a minimum of two (2) pickups for each residence. Construction Road Maintenance and Miscellaneous • Repaired, adjusted or rebuilt 111 catch basins, gate wells, and storm and sanitary manboles. • Replaced 125 feet of edge drain tube. • Repaired or replaced 5 sanitary sewer lines and 13 storm sewer lines. • Replaced 21,060 square feet of concrete road, drive and walk • Repaired 4 concrete curbs. • Milled concrete streets to eliminate water ponding problems at 64 locations. • Milled major mads in 8locations to eliminate pavement heat pops. • Completed 22 asphalt repairs consisting of 306 tons of asphalt • Replaced road base and repaired 7 pavement blowouts when frost was leaving the grmmd in spring • Patched potholes an 370 miles of City -maintained roads, as well as trip paint locations from the Engineering Invision and repair sites from the Water and Sewer Section. • Repaired potholes reported on the Pothole Hotline within 48 hours. • Responded to 2350+ homeowner service requests. • Repaired or replaced 61 mailboxes from plow damage, leaf pickup or water activities. • Picked up and cleaned oil spills, large debris or lost loads from trucks on City streets 18 times. • Performed 3 ditching projects in various locations including Suraydale east of Middlebelt Upgraded or added 1750 fret of ditch line. • Changed truck attachments (buckets, blades, boxes, salt spreaders) from runstructiw 94 season/summer mode to leaf pickup mode to plowmg/salting configuration. • Cleaned outfalls and inlets of City storm dmms 23 times. • Performed illicit discharge inspections, water tests on approximately 45 storm water ou falls. • Cleared brush from 75+ storm outfits and inlets m flood plains throughout the City. • Repaired 15 guardrails and barricades. • Cut and cleared brush from City -owned alleyways. • Placed and removed over anWe of snow fence to prevent driffing on City mads. • Repaired lawns or sprmlder repairs resulting from Water Section activities and snowplow damage at 392 locations. • Trained employees for Commercial Drivers License test to allow for upgrades when needed. • Delivered and picked up voting supplies for 2 elections. • Assisted the Livonia Goodfellows with their annual holiday food and toy program. • Assisted the Fire Department in containing spilled asphalt tack coat on I-275 after tanker truck accident • Moved new and outdated election equipment between storage budding and City Hall as requested by the City Clerk • Picked up brush, assisted in removing downed trees and other storm damage from roads. • Assisted Asplundh in setting up a wood recycling yard on Glendale Road Sign Maintea m • Traffic Signs: Repaired or Removed: 379 Installed m Replaced: 174 • Traffic Posts: Repaired or Removed: 442 Installed m Replaced: 123 • Street Name Signs: Repaired orRemoved: 224 Installed m Replaced: 123 • Street Name Posts: Repaired or Removed: 236 Installed or Replaced: 25 • Engraved apprnstmately 369 signs fm various City departments. • Installed 1 new park identification sign. • Assisted with the setups, sig^^& snow fencing barricading and traffic contra] devices fm SPREE, Ar6 and Crafts Festival, several Wilson Ram shows, Livonia Heritage Festival, Highland Games, plus an additional 17 events at Greemmead. • Updated 7 Tree City signs City-wide. • Assisted with the setup of the Easter Egg Hunt, Rotary Barbeque, Police Deparhnent and Fine Department open house events, Youth Fitness Meet, and the Clarmceville and Franklin Homecoming Parades. • Handled approximNely 156 work orders and 194 complaints. • Cut 65 miscellaneous oil board stencils for various City departments. • Applied and repaired vehicle markings on 12 new and 4 current City vehicles. • Applied Eyes and Ears decals to new vehicles. 95 • Installed Rouge River crossing signs. • Striped 28 miscellaneous road locations. • Posted subdivision entrances for the Leaf Pickup Program. • Changed safety posters on County roads once and replaced wooden backings on posts as needed. • Maintained barricades and construction signs for all City deparhneots. • Updated 16 City entranceway signs. • Striped City parking lots where needed (approximately 121,000 fret). Animal Control • Provided animal control services for residents and businesses which included requests for service as follows: 81 abuse to animal/cnelty complaints, 142 barking dog complaints, 4 bird problems, 12 cat bites, 239 coyote sightings/complaints, 12 dead crow (West Nile Virus) complaints, 77 dog bites, 6 excessive pet complaints, 104 injured animal reports, 3 kennel complaints, 41 vicious animal complaints, 2 pest control complaints, 80 pick up contained animal requests, 29 sick wildfife reports, 213 stray animal reports, 30 mapped animal complaints, 14 waste (feces) complaints, 40 wildlife complaints, and 1 wildlife bite. • CorNnued[ ppmgprogr mdefimbm dmrisancecoyo . • Issued animal ordinance violations as required • Floated and lined all City basebalVsoBball diamonds, soccer and football fields on a routine schedule. • Mowed, trimmed, edged, weeded, fertilized, applied herbicides and fungicides, trimmed trees and routine maintenance to Ford Field, Bicentennial Diamonds 1-3, Greenmead soccer fields, Civic Center, Sandburg and Noble libraries, Wilson Bam, Greenmead, and other parks and fields. • Installed banners at Civic Center for Music Under the Stars, SPREE, Arts and Crafts Festival, Christmas, other special events and everyday patriotic banners. • Rolled and aerified baseball diamonds and soccer fields. • Performed safety inspections, repaired or removed damaged playground equipment m all City parks and installed 1000 yards of "Sofffall" under playground structures. Also. Began adding woodchips under structures that currently have none. This is a result of changing regulations firm the Playground Safety Institute. • Added sand to beach volleyball courts at Clements Circle, Rotary, Recreation Center and Stymelski Parks. Also, replaced worn and tattered net. • Added material, extended the infield, removed the infield lip, and graded diamonds at Ford Field, Bicentennial, McCann and Rotary Park ball diamonds. • Monitored tmshcans on athletic fields that could not be reached by Waste Management Also, cleaned dog stations and treshcans in City parks on weekends. • Performed snow removal services for City buildings and ngbt-of-way sidewalks 96 leading to parks on an as-needed basis. This included shoveling, plowing and salting sidewalks. • Performed winter rhmintcnauce to equipment, which included rmscellaneous repairs, painting, blade sharpening, preventative maromm mace and thorough cleanings. • Sprayed `Roundup" weed killer on right-of-way fences to control growth of weeds. • Applied the biological control "Vecld en" to control mosquito-breeding populations in recreational parks. Two applications were accomplished this year. Also, helped with the spring application to catch basins in roads. • Added topsoil and grass seed to goal mouths on all soccer fields. Greenmead and Clement Circle fields were closed for a short time for sodding in those areas. • Set out and brought in picnic tables and Dash barrels for the picnic season • Repaired picnic tables as needed. • Printed trees and shrubs in parks, City buildings and athletic fields where needed • Planted canna tubers in some towerbeds this year. The annual display was severely impacted by fending this year. • Assisted with all SPREE-related activities, including setup, takedown and daily garbage detail. Also repaired damage to diamonds 36 as a result of parked vehicles on the diamonds. • Completed 115 `Requests for Service" that related to special activities for other City departments (entaded delivered, setting up, taking down canopies, its, picnic tables and garbage cans), delivering and setting up the Showmobile, delivering TEFAP commodities for Community Resources, Wilson Bam, and Gweranead activities, and other City activities. • Repaired and maintained ungamon systems at Civic Center, Livonia Community Recreation Center, Ford Field, Bicentennial Park, and Greennead. Due to the retirement of a Parks Maintenance Worker III, the systems at Noble and Sandberg Library, Wilson Ram, Fire Station 45, and the Su Mile Road islands were not fumed on this year. This was the second year Parks was unable to rrintain the systems because of the personnel shortage. • Maintained the Livonia Community Recreation and added 60 yards of N-vinmmch woodchips in the Calf • Removed BMX tails in Nature Preserves A Grandview and Dover Parks. • Cleared deadfall trees and brarches off Nature Preserve walkways. • Removed ash trees smaller than 6" in diameter in parks. • Continued testing vacurmh breakers as pmt of Wayne County's DEQ requirements regarding imgation systems. • Two employees attended the Playground Safety Institute which recertified them as playgmund inspectors. • Set up and monitored ice on the City's tree outdoor ice rinks. It was a good winter for ice. 97 • Achieved Tree City USA status for the seventh year and received om second year "growth award" • City Forestry personnel trimmed 50 trees which generated 200 yards of woodchips. • Instituted young tree training program for 200 trees which helps trees with proper form and strong stmclure as they manna and helps reduce the amamt of perming later in me tree's mance life. • Forestry personnel removed 300 trees and 450 stumps. Most of these trees were ash trees infested by the Emerald Ash Borer and were smaller than 8". Some trees were in the rights-of-way, but many were park trees. • Continued supervising the removal of 1202 trees and stumps by one contractor who was finishing up the removal list from 2004. Thejobwascompletedin August. • Continued supervising and administrating the planting of the 2004 planting contract. Problems with the contractor lave delayed the completion of the project. Paperwork problems have delayed the start of the 2005 project • Planted 3 oak trees at Nash Park / Roosevelt Elementary School in connection with the Arbor Day Program. Also, 500 seedling Space trees were handed out as part of the program to the children at the adjacent school. • Removed approximmtely 750 yards of woodchips as part of DPS brush pickup lmmgnsloe • Treated 20 wasps nests, mainly in August and September, with insecticide to kill the wasps. • Completed 42 stone-related tree trimmings. • Received and investigated approximately 2500 requests for service, Of those, three- quarters have been closed as either serviced or answered • Perfenned miscellaneous repairs and blade sharpening on the Section's saws and manning equipment • Assisted other departments (Water, Engineering, Ordinance, etr.) with emergency tree removals, site inspections, and tree inspections. • Performed snow removal operations to City buildings and right-ofway sidewalks including plowing shoveling and salting. • Assisted in the Rouge River cleanup day held at Rotary Park which was a rousing success. • Supervised ore contractor who trimmed approximately 4576 trees in five City sections. These trees were trimmed to current International Society of Arbukaulnre Standards for street tree elevations. • Supervised the same contractor doing resident call-mut trim requests. The contractor completed over 700 of them • Finished assessing 3298 (Davey court) right-of-way ash trees to decide how soon each tree would need to be removed because of infestations of the Emerald Ash Baer. Currently, 3000 trees have been removed with the rest (approximately 200) coming in next year's removal program to complete right-of-way removal of ash 98 trees. Tracked gypsy moth populations in Sections 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 15 and 16 as part of the gypsy moth egg mass survey; no spraying was needed in 2005. Attended the following seminals to mcrease job knowledge: Michigan Nursery our Landscape Association annual meeting Michigan Turfgrass Foundation annual meeting; Michigan Forestry and Parks Association annual meeting; Metro Detroil Landscape Association annual meeting various seminars on chainsaw safety, tree climbing, hazard assessment and aerial rescue tmmmg, roping and rigging training and equipment repaint tramng Miscellaneous Repairs and Immovemnnts • Opened, re -hanged, closed, and winterized City out and pool buildings. • Started up, serviced and shut down pump systems as needed • Mainamed City owned- a hade hghhng tixnues atvanous locations. • Performed preventative rnlaintnnanne on equipment • Replaced all Bags senti-annually. • Stripped and finished floors in buildings as needed. • Spot and cleaned carpeting in buildings as needed • Cleaned inside and outside fast floor windows on all buildings as needed. • Cleaned exterior windows at City Hall, Library and Cornmumity Cent. • Relocated and mstalled outleta/powxr and lighting as requested. • Monitored building automation chunte control systems. • Monitored electronic access systems. • Answered ewironnrevtal complaints. • Perfnniad yearly shut -down maintenance and custodial assignments A Community Center. • Continued to enhance custodial job assigomnnt checklists Cor all buildings. • Tested and treated all process water systems. • Refinished floors in buildings as needed • Replaced water heaters in Building Maintenance, Fine Station M4, Idyl Wyld Pro Shop, and Fox Creek mzintnnance buildings. • Replaced infrared heaters in Equipment Maintevanrz garage. • Replaced storrn drain through Police evidence room in baserrent • Reworked and padded ceiling in Police roll call room. • Replaced ceiling tiles in Fre Station 45 basement • Replaced domestic water pump at City Hall. • Assisted with all other departmental projects as requested RoofReplacemnnt, Mandenance and Repairs • Replaced roofs at City Hall Annex, Water and Sewer west garage and Fire Station #4 99 • Repaired roods at Senior Citizens Center, DPW Parks garage, and Livonia Aid Center. • Repaired shingled roofs as needed PamLn • Repainted PolicelDgmage. Health and Safety • Continued with Lock Out/Tag Out program. • Maintained Blood bore Pathogen program for employees. • Tested fire alarms, sprinklers and suppression systems in City buildings. • Mandamed compliance with Wayne Carty Backflow Certification program as requested. • Mandamed compliance with State of Michigan boiler and elevator inspections and certifications. • Maintained employee State -required licensing, cert cations and naming. • Exterminated or removed pests in City buildings as needed. • Conducted safety mspections of City facilities with control specialists as requested • PM and load -bank tested genertors. • Reset all clocks, fighting and equipment for time changes. • Cleaned debris and growth from building rooftops, sumps and gutters. • Re- tamped Newburgh Bridge. • PM pump at same lift station. • Continued scheduled cycle ]amp replacement/ fighting repairs in buildings • Completed repan, relamping and taggmg of Civic Center building and Im lighting (except City Hall ramp). • Wired in line voltage for new Police in-house surveillance system • Identified circuits serviced by generator at City Hall • Repaired broken fire suppression line m Armex, replaced damaged ceiling Nes and cleaned carpeting. • Tested panic button m DPW administrative office. • Replaced recalled sprinlder heads at Fire Station 43. • Installed training meter for The Department • Assisted with relocation of Police 911 phone system. • Removed critters from within buildings. • Performed CSD -1 test on required boilers. Gmenmead • Assisted with all events held on grounds (Art m the Park, Highland Games, Flea Markets, Car Shows, Fall Harvest). • Installed and removed decorations for Holiday and special events. • Moved, set-up and installed fiurNne, furnishings and equipment as requested. 100 • Cautioned maintenance and custodial services • Assisted with second floor remodeling project • Installed parking lot lighting for Blue House lot • Installed copper gutters on Blue House porches. • Repaired roofs at Bungalow and Clamb. • Replaced electrical service line to Hinbem Hoose. • Replaced kitchen entrance door an Blue Hoose. • Piuchased materials as needed for Blue House second floor office renovation. Renovation and New Construction • Assisted with new UPS system for City Hall. • Sealed Chy Hall garage. • Replaced generator at City Half Special Protects and Interdepartmental Assistance • Assisted with Rotary Club BBQ. • Assisted with SPREE. • Assisted with City-wide garage sale. • Assisted with various City Hall functions as requested • Provided set up and tear downs for meetings and events as requested. • Maintained facili ies leased from the City. • Moved mandate, computers, work stations and materials and equipment as regoested. • Responded to and performed daily maintenance requests an equipment and facilities as requested • Assisted with Senior Citizen Craft Show and events. • Regularly cleaned ont grease trap in Senior Center kitchen. • Jetted and maintained basement drains at Fare Station 41. • Assisted with snow removal as regoestad, • Assisted Constriction crew with replacement of Police ID garage floor. • Transferred personnel temporarily to leaf pickup as needed • Provided power to Seven Mile and Newburgh pit • Hung wall of Hour plaque A City Hall • Assisted with special facility projects A Community Center. • Rewired, m -piped and replaced pump for chloride system. • Provided service for golfcomse buildings as requested. • Performed over 1200 regular preventative maintenance inspections, emergency repairs, modifications and road calls to over 700 City -owned vehicles and other various pieces of equipment. 101 • The City currently owns 184 motor vehicles ranging from sedans w tandem axle dump trucks. • Maintained and provided support service for 9 City transit buses. • Maintained and provided support service for 6 SCAN buses. • Purchased the following equipment: One (1) sedan for the Inspection Department Two (2) leaf collectors for the Leaf Pickup Program One (1) pickup truck for the Recreation Department One (1) pickup truck for Idyl Wyld Golf Come One (1) pickup truck for Building Maintenance Two (2) 15 -inch brush chippers for Roads Section brush crews Two (2) pickup trucks for the Roads Section One (1) stake track for Roads Section commaction One (1) Sign Maintenance vehicle One (1) tandem axle dump truck for Water and Sewer Sections Two (2) cargo vans for Water Maintenance One (1) backhoe for Water and Sewer Sections Five (5) pickup trucks for Water and Sewer Sections One (1) 6 -inch trash pump for Water and Sewer Sections • Provided and maintained generators at Nations intersections throughout the City during power outages as directed by the LPD and Wayne Coonty. • Maintamed and monitored the City's computerized fuel system for LPD, LFD, golf courses, and other various departments. • Provided assistance w LPD and LFD with fabrication and various repairs throughout the year. • Provided Commercial Drivers License turning for all new DPS employees. • Provided training to DPS employees and various communities on Comp -U -Spread computerized salting system Waw Systems • Inspected, exercised 2,492 waw gate wells with valves and updated inspection hams • Repaired 138 water gate valves • Repaired 181 fire hydrants • Inspected and maratimed 241 fire hydrants completing the 36 city sections • Repaired 142 water main breaks or leaks • Repaired or replaced 119 water stop boxes • Staked over 4,893 locations for Miss Dig system • Made 42 service line repairs for various reasons • Retired 26 water service lives • Painted 538 hydrants • Installed 1 new gate valves and 4 new fire hydrants 102 1\05FOr • Replaced 60 antiquated large commercial water meters • Repaired 122 large commercial meters • Replaced 616 water meters for various reasons • Made 31,430 water related service calls • Completed 3,369 service slips • Installed 45 outside read device systems • Installed 193 waw memrs for new accounts • Established 46 new commercial accormts • Established 145 newresidential accounts • Established 10 new seasonal irrigation accounts • Installed and removed 267 seasonal irrigation meters • Tested 143 commercial meters Storm Sewers • Cleaned 6 City sections of catch basins; cleaned storm lines as needed in these sections • Answered 44 storm sewer complaints • Retrievedandreplaced26catchbasincovers Sanitary Sewers • Cleaned 16 City sections of sanitary sewer lines by hydrant flushing power flushing, bucketing chemical and power root aIlfing • Cleared 4 main sewer backups • Investigated 110 sanitary sewxr complaints • Televised 2,112 feet of sanitary sewer • Inspected 15 City sections for sanitary lines and structures Special Projects • Updated computer programs relating to lawn, concrete and asphalt repairs along with new tap list and CarwGraph associated work orders to other sections for request to repair. • Updated computer programs relating to Miss Dig (Positive response system) and CarleGraph on line. • Coordinated hydrant repay requests for the Fire Department. • Assisted Roads with asphalt, concrete, lawn, catch basin and pavement restorations. • Assisted Engineering with water main and fire hydrant replacements and proposed projects for 2006 water main and sanitary sewer replacements. • Working on updating the water stop box location MS Access database. • Inspected 172 taps made by Water Section contractor (157 new construction, 8 irrigation, 1 to replace well water, 4 upgrade existing and 2 lead replacement). 103 • Worked on sewer cormection program, inspected 162 OSDS at homes for septic failure. • Helped with flow tests for water model, SCADA system and flow test with Fre Department • Updated the software for Profile rain gauges and sanitary sewer as titms. • Provided all section office staff with desktop computers and computer training. • Worked on inventory pricing database for future software changes to take place with CarteGraph upgrade. • Assisted Engineering with sidewalk driveway approaches and major road replacememprojects. • Started a weekly project scheduler with staff to help project manpower and equipment anticipated. • Installed 3 multi readers and 182 NM radio remote water meter devices thus reducing mmriffily reading labor time. • Checked road structures before road improvements and cleaned catch basins. • Continued ➢lilt Discharge Elimination Program (IDE,P.) inspections of storm sewer outfall sampling. • Assisted with water activities for the Livonia SPREE, Race for the Cure and other activities. • Continued the replacement program for antiquated large commercial compound Badger and Rockwell water meters. The Traffic Commission is responsible for the planning, coordination, and determination of proposed traffic control devices to improve traffic flow and to provide mzximmm safety for all drivers, pedestrians, and property. As provided by the City Charter, the Commission consists of seven citizens who are appointed by the Mayor. The Commission meets Once a month to discuss and implement traffic control measures which have been brought to their attention by citizens, as well as other City deparhneNs. The Comntissioners work in conjunction with the Traffic Bureau of the Police Department Requests from concerned cminns and the Livonia Police Department for Stop, Yield, and No Outlet signs were approved for the following areas: Myron at Bobrich Westmore between Industrial and Glendale 104 Chestnut Circle south of Eight Mile Westbound Schoolcraft near Levan Speeding in residential areas continues to be a common concern reported to the Traffic Commission by citizens. As a result of citizen requests, speed studies and requests for increased traffic enforcement were conducted in several residential areas, including: Lyndon between Levan and Golfview Parkdale east of Stark Hubbard south of Five Mile Barkley near Oakley The Commission worked with a number of business owners in the City to discuss or address traffic comems around then business. These include: Quicken Loans (speed limit increase in Vidor Park) AAA Life Insurance (establishment of left tum lane) Farm Bureau Insurance (alleyway signage) Wonderland MaNWonderland Village Affil an extensive study by the Police Depariand and Traffic Improvement Association CTIA), the speed limit on Vidor Parkway and Pembroke was increased to 30 MPH. Public awareness of the Commission was expanded by working with the Information Systems Department to add informative material to the City's web site about the Commission and traffic safety matters. In addition, a group email address was published on the web site that citizens or staff can use to contact the Commission. The Conmtission has also been referenced to by the Detroit News in some of thein community `help line" articles regarding triffic concerns in Livonia The Commission continues to work with TTA to obtain expert opinion and guidance on traffic concerns in the cormwtity. Several individual agenda ids were referred to ITA by the Commission during 2005 and TTA was requested to provide crash data for specific intersections related to agenda items. Furthemnore, ITA provided the Commission with traffic court data for all major sneds in Livonia along with a report surmianzing crash information for major City ivysections. Additionally, the Commission was invited to and was represented at two ITA meetings held in 2005. 105 CONCLUSION The Traffic Commission will contmue to monitor traffic and parking condNons within the City and will be particularly concerned with monitoring areas of rapid growth The Commission will also continue to meet with citizens and business owners to jointly address traffic and parking comems and to act promptly to alleviate dangerous conditions. Ongoing monitoring of traffic concems by this Commission will ensue that Livonia's streets and highways will continue to be safe and well mairdzined TREASURER The Treasurer's Department is responsible for collection, disbursement and custody of all revenues belonging to and held in trust by the City. All fiords colleclad by City agencies are transmitted to the Treasurer, verified and recorded through cash receipting, deposited and reported daily to the Finance Depammevt In addition, the Treasurer's Office, on instruction from the Finance Director, trmsaNs insWctions for the daily iwestient of City fiords among City banks to maximize the intens[ on its holdings. This year the Treasurer's Office once again sent letters to real and personal property taxpayers whose taxes for the 2004 tax year had not been paid by February 15, 2005. A total of 4,442 letters were mailed: 3,022 letters to real property owners and 1,420 letters to personal property taxpayers. Letters were also mailed to real & personal property taxpayers after the due date for the summer 2005 tax season A total of 1,652 letters were mailed to real property taxpayers and 810 letters were mailed to personal property taxpayers. The Treasurer's Office in 2002 nNated the practice of mailing letters to notify Livonia property owners that their property was listed in the Wayne County Treasurer's Office court petition to foreclose on their property for delivgn®t real property taxes. In 2004 the City of Livonia Treasurer sent out 89 such notices, as compared to 113 notices in 2003. As a result of this effort, the Wayne County Treasurer sold no Livonia parcels A tax auction in 2005 or 2004. The Treasurer's Offre is responsible for monitoring and maintaining the files on bankruptcy cases. proof of Claims for personal property taxes are filed with the courts by the City Treasurer. In 2005, 8 businesses with locations in Livonia filed for bankruptcy protection In 2004, 14 businesses and in 2003, 19 businesses with locations in Livonia filed for bankruptcy protection 106 The Treasurer's Office filed with the Wayne Canny Register of Deeds 19 personal property jeopardy tax bills for 2005. In 2004, the Treasurer's Office issued 44 personal property jeopardy tax bills. Applications for electronic fiord debit for tax payments were included in the 2005 summer real tax bills to property owners who are directly responsible for payment of their taxes. This resulted in a considerable increase in the number of taxpayers utilizing electronic fiords transfer for payment of tax bills. During the summer 2005 tax season 2,233 taxpayers participated in this convenient and no -cost service as compared to 1,891 during the summer of 2004, 1,819 during the summer of 2003, 1,417 during the summer 2002, and 664 taxpayers during the summer 2001 tax season. Tax bills can be paid wilh a credit card through Official Payments Corporation. There is a convenience fee collected and retained by Official Payments Corporation for this service. There is no cost to the City of Livonia for this service to be offered to the residents. Dining 2005, 340 taxpayers utilized this option , as compared to 216 taxpayers during 2004. This year the Treasurer's Office printed the summer and winter tax bills in -hese, which reached in a significant printing cost savings of $4,600 per tax season. Printing the tax bills m -base also allowed for greater control and efficiency, of mailing and distributing thetax bills m a timely fashion. The Treasurer's Office has strict procedures in place regarding the handling of City fimds. All deparhnents issue numbered receipts and timely deliver collected fiords to the Treasurer's Office for processing Large checks are deposited immediately to yield a higher rate ofinN TAX COLLECITON'S There are 43,894 taxpayersin the City: Surly far percent of the residents are responsible for paying their own property tax bills. Mortgage companies pay 14,185 (36%) of the real property tax bills. The tar levy breakdown Is m follows (includes Real, Personal, & IFTfor 2004 Winter and 2005 Summer): 107 2004 2005 Real Property 39,267 39,447 Personal Property 4,428 4,369 IFT 73 78 43,768 43,894 Surly far percent of the residents are responsible for paying their own property tax bills. Mortgage companies pay 14,185 (36%) of the real property tax bills. The tar levy breakdown Is m follows (includes Real, Personal, & IFTfor 2004 Winter and 2005 Summer): 107 Delhrmnt Tea Collections Our personal delinquent property faxes Real Personal IFT TOW City of Livonia 45,187,696 6,486,691 990,994 52,665,381 Livonia Public Schools Tax Year 2001 2002 2003 Operating 21,163,659 10,050,961 1,652,053 32,866,673 Debt 9,961,211 1,455,851 217,167 11,634,229 Supplemental Tax 1,629,751 1,629,751 Wayne County Intermediate School District 13,549,970 1,954,203 278,270 15,782,443 Clarencewille Public Schools Operating 1,296,798 204,419 1,501,217 Debt 812,146 41,112 853,258 Supplemental Tax 110,933 110,933 Oakland Intermediate School District 757,444 38,343 795,787 State Education Tax 24,817,200 3,452,909 930,723 29,200,832 SchoolaaR Comm. Coll. 7,431,314 1,033,952 144,323 8,609,589 Wayne County 34,079,909 4,857,789 727,843 39,665,541 Wayne County Jail 3,715,553 533,374 81,497 4,330,424 Wayne County Parks 973,798 139,793 21,369 1,134,960 Huron Clinton Metro Audi. 852,988 122,453 18,710 994,151 Wayne Cnty. Transit Audi. 2,368,441 339,998 51,945 2,760,384 Special Assessments 1,915,606 1,915,606 Total 170,624,417 30,711,848 5,114,894 206,451,159 The total number of original tax bills mailed for Summer and Wnwx was 87,713. 2004 2005 Ongmal Tax Bills 87,487 87,713 Revisal Tax Bills 1,198 1,238 Checks Issued For- 772 609 Duplicate Payme , Overpayments & Revised Tax Bills Delhrmnt Tea Collections Our personal delinquent property faxes collected from 12-1-04 though 11-30-05 were $1,291,799. The collections breakdown is as follows: Tax Year Tax Year Tax Year Tax Year 2001 2002 2003 2004 Original Amount Levied 27,229,249 29,935,004 28,050,803 29,282,750 7�'.R'EVVbL SR1 lg Original Delinquency 2,028,054 2,062,013 1,689,473 2,163,730 Amount Collected This Year 75,666 271,406 276,319 596,018 DTE& Consumers Energy 692,348 707,193 746,398 984,529 Still Collectible 60,637 94,077 156,729 326,250 %Delinquent 6.94% 6.89% 6.02% 7.39% Invoices for Council authorized weed cuttings are mailed to taxpayers as well as my special assessments approved during the year. The Treasurer's Office records payment an these assessments and any unpaid amounts are added to the tax bills at year-end In 2005, the Treasurer's office issued 557 iwoices for weed bills, as compared to 512 invoices for 2004 and 406 invoices for 2003. 4 of Parcels $Amwmt 4 of Parcels $ AmourR Billed an Billedon Billed an Billed on 2003 Taxes 2003 Taxes 2004 Taxes 2004 Taxes Special Assessment Districts Sidewalk 64 24,693 47 16,817 Paving 537 160,911 472 126,606 Lighting 13,619 802,750 13,624 911,394 Weeds 90 12,734 121 13,258 Delinquent Water 1,123 800,214 1,146 847,531 15,433 1,801,302 15,410 1,915,606 TELLER COLLEMONS The Treasurer's two tellers processed $260,168,699 in cash, checks, and credit cards for the following items during the course of conducting City Fusmess: property taxes, water bills, the greens fees for the City's three municipal golf causes, Livonia Community Recreation Center memberships and fees, park permits, fees for swimming and skating, amusemew park ticket sales, registratien fees for Parks and Recreation league sports, inspection and engineering pemtit and bond fees, licenses, the fees for the City's three libraries, Police Department adjudicated, non -adjudicated drug and D.AAE. fiords, fees 109 for City sponsored special events such as the Highland Games and the Arts & Craft Fav, false alarm charges, accounts receivable items, SMART bus ticket sales, City grange sale, fees for using the City Dump, Police auction, rent payments for Silver Village, Newburgh Village, and city -owned homes, record duplication fees, etc. Of the amounts collected, $53,766.624 was for general deposit items and $206,402,075 was for property taxes. The tillers also receive walk-in water payments from residents. During this fiscal year, 11,841 water payments were processed by the Treasurer's Office. The busiest day was December 14, 2004 with 248 waw bills being processed. The average amoum of water bills processed was 48 per day. Total Collections 2004 2005 $235,590,309 $260,168,699 DISBURSEMENTS All payroll and payable checks are released through the Treasurer's Office on approval of the Finance Director and the City Clerk (internal auditor). 2004 2005 Payroll Checks 28,966 28,301 Vendor Checks —Ctiy 15,995 15,894 Vendor Checks - Court 1,875 2,020 46,836 46,215 The Zoning Board of Appeals is a seven (7) member Board created by State statute and Zoning Ordinance No. 543, as amended. City of Livonia The Board hears appeals from residential and business property owners when they are unable to comply with ordinance requirements and are rejected permits by the Inspection Department The Board meets on Tuesday evenings at 7:30 pm The following is a breakdown of the Appeal Cases prepared and heard by the Zoning Board of Appeals during the fiscal year December 1, 2004 through November 30, 2005. 110 Granted Denied New Cases 90 13 Rehearings 2 0 Actual Cases Heard Prepared and Scheduled** Total Cases Heard and Prepared Grated with Tabled or Modifications* Postpone Total 10 17 130 1 0 3 133 17 150 * Includes Cases which were Granted in ParMenied in Part ** Meeting material was prepared more than once, but far Nz ious reasons (Petitioner did not appear, asked to be rescheduled, etc.) these cases were not heard at the firs[ scheduled meeting *** Meeting material was prepared and Board heard case at meeting and made a decision to table for revised plans, etc. All meeting notices, agendas, etc. were redone when new meeting date was scheduled Number of Regular Meetings: 11 Number of Special Meetings: 27 (1 comprehensive meeting updating ZR4 Procedures and Michigan State Statutes) 111