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2005-2006 Annual ReportCITY OF LIVONIA ANNUAL REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2005-2006 OFFICE OF THE MAYOR JACK ENGEBRETSON 33000 CIVIC CENTER DRIVE w.vaR LIVONIA, MICHIGAN 481543097 j V34)40622D1 J FAX: (/34)421-0870 r C �GttN December 18, 2006 Honorable Members of the City Council City of Livonia, M 148154 Dear Council Members: The Annual Report for fiscal year 2005-2006 reflects activities of the Livonia City Departments, Commissions and Boards. The following reflects a sampling of the information contained in various reports and some personal observations. Department of Community Resources This Department has the administrative responsibilities for subsidized transportation for Livonia senior citizens and handicapped residents. The contract for SMART, as well as applicable grants are administered and monitored by the staff. The year was spent preparing for the opting out of the SMART transportation system and the development of an expanded transit service that induced a 'to work" program. As of November 27, 2006, the new Livonia Community Transit System was in operation. District Court The 16L District Court concluded 11 % months of union negofiations and signed its first ever labor agreements with the MAPE and TPOAM unions representing court employees. It also continued its use of the State of Michigan Collection Module and over $400,000 was collected from delinquent offenders. Finance Department The Finance Department continued to work with the City Council and the Mayor's Office to maintain the City's excellent bond ratings, which currently are rated AA3 at Moody's and AA at Standard and Poors. Because of these excellent bond ratings, more people will invest in City of Livonia bonds resulting in more competitive bidding from brokerage houses. Savings will continue into the future for the City due to these mfings. Fire Department The Fire Department has continued its dedicated efforts to public education including information in the "Fire Engineering' magazine (July issue), the nation's premier fire training magazine. "Couplings," an &page newsletter designed for adult fire and life safety made its debut this year. It appears in electronic forth on the City website and was included with the Observer newspaper. Inspection Department The Building Inspection portion of the Department issued approximately 8,452 permits in 2005/2006 for buildings, signs and mechanical installations, including new construction additions, renovations and alterations. The systematic annual inspection of existing buildings for compliance with B.O.C.A. property Maintenance Code continued through 2006, with 1,430 inspections being made, and violations issued when necessary and compliance obtained. The Sanitation and Ordinance Enforcement division, responsible for the health, safety and welfare of the residents as it pertains to pollution, hazardous waste, trash and debris, vacant buildings, weed cutting, and basic property maintenance, inducing 1,618 citizen complaints regarding the collection of municipal refuse and the delivery of 286 recycling bins. Summary I wish to begin by thanking our dedicated staff of City employees for their continued dedication to our mission of delivering first -rete services to the residents and businesses in our great community. We appreciate the cooperation of the City Unions in coming to agreement on contracts that we believe were fair and reasonable given all the difficult circumstances we have faced together in recent years. We are confident that the stage is set for Livonia to continue to be a great place to live, work, and raise families. The hiring freeze has officially ended and, thanks to the withdrawal from the SMART system, we will be able to address some badly -needed capital improvements. Finally, I want to thank our City Council and Leadership Staff for their cooperation during the past year as, together, we look forward to the new year with very positive expectations. I continue to believe that Livonia's brightest days lie ahead. Sincerely, Jack Engebrelson MAYOR CITY OF LI VONIA, MICHIGAN ANNUAL REPORT Fiscal Year 2005-2006 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. Assessing Department...................................................................................1 Review, Board of 2 City Clerk 3 Civil Service Department 8 Trustees, Board of 17 Community Resources Department 20 Aging Commission 24 Arts Commission 25 Cable Television Commission 26 Historic Preservation Commission 27 Historical Commission 29 Human Relations Commission 30 Youth Commission 31 District Court 32 Finance Department 37 Information Systems..........................................................40 Fire Department 42 Housing Commission 51 Inspection Department 55 Building Code Board of Appeals 57 Law Department 58 Library Department & Commission 61 Parks and Recreation Department & Commission 65 Planning Department& Commission 78 Police Department and Emergency Preparedness .........................85 Public Works Department 92 Engineering Division 93 Public Service Division 95 Traffic Commission 108 Treasurer 110 Zoning Board of Appeals 114 The 2006 stale equalized valuation of the city real and personal property was $5,977,916,100 which relates to the following statistics: CLASS PARCELCOUNT VALUATION Residential 38,113 3,933,544,410 Commercial 1,383 820,165270 Industrial 857 637,813,650 Personal 4,741 586,036,980 $ 5,977,916,100 In addition, valuation under the Industrial Facilities Act 198 provided total valuation of $157,397,920 as follows: IFF Real 38,439,200 IFF Personal 118,958,720 $157,397,920 All property appeared on the assessment roll at 50.00% of true cash value as mandated by State Law. Annual sales studies are conducted in order to determine market growth by neighborhood. The results of these studies are utilized to adjust area values to the required 50% of true cash value. The appraisal and maintenance of all residential field data is the responsibility of this department. Records for 133 new homes were created and revisions to approximately 1,292 existing property field sheets were made. Commercial and Industrial new buildings, alterations and additions numbered 158 and were reviewed for value for the 2006 assessment roll. The citywide canvass continues this year with the entering of the data gathered in prior years and the continuation of the field review of property record cards. This is an ongoing project with the goal of bringing the assessing office in closer compliance with the requirements of the Stale Tax Commission with regard to assessing procedures. Homesteads, Transfers, Rescissions and Uncapping Affidavits are being interpreted and processed on a daily basis. In 2006 this generated approximately 2,230 forms. Lots splits and combinations are processed by this department. This office reviews petitioners applications and departmental correspondence for compliance to city ordinances and procedures. If a split is nonconforming Council action will be required. Approximately 36 splits and combinations were completed in 2006. Olthese, 11 required Council action. Prior years Michigan Tax Tribunal appeals were finalized, 30 full tribunals and 7 small claims forthe years 1996-2005. Over 5,200 personal property statements were processed for the 2006 assessment roll. A continual inspection of properties in the city is being done to verify the fixed assets in the business as of tax day of each year. The Stale of Michigan has extended the Personal Property Audit program for 2006. This resulted in an additional 118 audits being scheduled by Tax Management Associates for this program. Fifty-two audits have been completed to dale and have generated additional city tax dollars in the amount of $106,690. Total lax revenue generated for all taxing entities was $485,483. The December Board of Review meeting was held on Tuesday, December 13, 2005 in accordance with Section 211.53b of the General Property Tax Law of Michigan to correct all mutual mistakes of fact and clerical errors. The Livonia City Council, on January 30, 2006 (CR#39-06), set the place and dates for the 2006 March Board of Review meetings as scheduled by the Assessor and notice was given and published in the local newspapers. The Board of Review meetings convened Tuesday, March 7, 2006 for a five (5) day session of public hearings, which included an evening session. Members Mark Thomas, Jollietta Coleman and Conrad Gniewek were in attendance. The Board heard 200 taxpayer appeals and acted on 605 mail -in petitions. Determination notices were mailed on April 10, 2006. The regular session of the 1985 83rd Stale of Michigan Legislature has amended Section 53b of Public Act 206 to include a July Board of Review meeting to correct clerical errors and mutual mistakes of fact. This meeting was held on Tuesday, July 18, 2006. CrrV CLERK This office is administered by the City Clerk, elected for a four-year term at an odd year election conducted bylhe City of Livonia. The powers and duties of the City Clerk are set forth in the City Charter and statutes of the State of Michigan. The Clerk is assisted by an Assistant City Clerk and a staff of seven who are trained specialists in delivering a variety of services to the citizens of Livonia and the several departments of the City administration, i.e.: (a) 'The Clerk shall be derk of the Council and shall attend all meetings of the Council and keep a permanent record of its meetings.." Special Meetings 1 1 This responsibility involves receiving all correspondence and communications fled with the Clerk for transmission to the Council; preparing official agendas for both Council Regular and Study Meetings; taking and transcribing complex minutes of all Council proceedings for the official journal as well as for all Public Hearings conducted by the Council as required by law; notification and publication of Notices and Public Hearings and Council proceedings in the official newspaper as designated by the City Council; preparation and forwarding of true copies of Council actions to the parties affected; maintaining the official record of all Ordinances enacted by legislative actions. City Council 2005 2006 Study Meetings 24 24 Regular Meetings 24 24 Special Meetings 1 1 Council Resolutions Recorded 602 616 Ordinances Adopted 35 52 Public Hearings Conducted 46 36 (b) 'The Clerk shall perform such other duties as are required of that office by State or Federal law, the City Charter, the Council or Ordinances of the City." DEPARTMENT OF VITAL STATISTICS Required by Stale Statute to record and file a record of all deaths and births occurring within the City for subsequent transmittal to the State and County Department of Health and make available for certification copies of such records, as can be legally released. Births Recorded Deaths Recorded 2005 2006 1259 1422 1282 1492 FEES COLLECTED $138,787.50 $141,060.00 (c) 'The City Clerk shall issue and sign all licenses granted and shall register same. LICENSING During the fiscal year this office of the City Clerk accepted and processed, etc., under Title 4 of the Livonia Code of Ordinances the following licenses: TYPE 2005 2006 Gas Stations, Dry Cleaners, Amusement Places, Taxi, Trailer Rental, Solicitors, Vending Machines, Restaurants, Caterers, etc. FEES COLLECTED Garage, Basement, Rummage Sales FEES COLLECTED Pet Licenses FEES COLLECTED Bicyde Licenses 1495 1480 $58,700.00 $57,180.00 2500 2800 $12,500.00 $14,000.00 3500 3262 $28,000.00 $28,978.00 20 12 $60.00 $36.00 (d) 'The City Clerk shall receive for filing: zoning petitions, subdivision plats, security bonds, etc. Comprehensive files covering all phases of development of new subdivisions from the Public Hearings of the City Planning Commission in proposed plats, to the filing of all bonds and payment of financial assurances established in the City Council's Master Bond Resolutions to the final signatures of the City Clerk after the final plat approval is given by the Council." 4 2005 2006 Zoning 15 9 Vacating 3 4 Miscellaneous (Waivers) 19 28 New Plats Authorized (Preliminary) 0 0 Final Plats 1 0 Extensions 3 3 BONDS Landscaping- Performance Bonds $119,700.00 $50,530.00 (e) Publication and Legal Notices The City Clerk is responsible for the publication of the City Council's proceedings in the official newspaper of the City and the insertion of Public Notices required by law of Public Hearings and all Ordinances duly adopted. In addition, Ordinances are printed, collated and distributed to al departments and interested parties. A complete file in excess of 2770 separate Ordinances is maintained, and the Livonia Code of Ordinances is continually updated, as amended, and on file in the City Clerk's office. (f) Duplicating and Mailing Figures The City Clerk's office produces copies of the following materials for meetings of the City Council. 2005• zoos• Council Regular Agendas 5808 5352 Council Study Agendas 5568 5592 Special Regular Agendas 232 223 Special Regular Minutes 242 71 Council Regular Minutes 1680 1704 Council Study Minutes 580 528 Attorney Notes for Council Regular Meetings 1392 1320 Synopsis of Regular Council Minutes 2328 2256 Council Public Hearing Notices 0 0 Public Hearing Minutes 1196 936 'Tables indicate number of sets required per year for distribution for each activity; number of pages vanes by event and is not induced in total. (Agenda totals include copies for the public.) MAILING FUNCTION All City Departments' outgoing mail is handled through mailing equipment in the City Clerk's office and the required postage in 2006 totaled $108,114.00. All incoming mail is handled daily by the Clerk's office and is distributed to the various departments of the City. (g) Election Commission of Livonia (Authority - State Statute) The City Clerk presides as Chairperson of the three-member Election Commission consisting of the Clerk, Mayor and City Attorney, charged with the responsibility of conducting all elections within the City. The compensation of election personnel shall be determined in advance by the Election Commission. In any case where Election procedure is in doubt, the Election Commission shall prescribe the procedure to be followed. STATISTICS RELATING TO THIS FUNCTION 2005 2006 Elections Held in City 1 Primary 1 Primary 1 General 1 General 2 School 1 School Notice of Cancellation of Registration Sale of Voter Registrations Lists $1,707.58 $2,430.16 2005 2006 New Registrations 4,847 5,194 Total Registered Voters 72,445 71,973 Change of Name 491 476 Change of Address 1,334 1,395 Cancellations 4,697 4,794 Registrations by Mail 229 539 Number of Absentee Ballots Issued 11,543 17,138 AV. Applications Issued 11,543 17,138 Notices of Election Inspectors 942 889 Notice of Cancellation of Registration Sale of Voter Registrations Lists $1,707.58 $2,430.16 (h) Other Duties and Responsibilities of the Clerk The Clerk shall have power to administer all oaths required by State Law, the Charter and Ordinances of the City. The Clerk shall be custodian of the City Seal and shall affix it to all documents and instruments requiring the Seal, and shall attest the same. The Clerk shall be custodian of all papers, documents and records pertaining to the City of Livonia, the custody of which is not otherwise provided for by the Charter. As custodian of records, the office of the City Clerk, in 1985 instituted a program of microfilming the birth and death records of the City. The Clerk shall give the proper officials of the City ample notices of expiration or termination of any official bonds, franchises, contracts or agreements. The Clerk shall examine and audit all accounts and claims against the City. In 2006 the Clerk examined, pre -audited and signed approximately 16,730 vouchers issued by the Department of Finance for transmittal to the City Treasurer. The Clerk shall possess and exercise the powers of a Township Clerk so far as the same are required to be performed within the City. The Clerk shall certify by signature all Ordinances and Resolutions enacted or passed by the City Council. The Clerk, as custodian of the cemeteries under City jurisdiction, is in charge of all burial procedures and in 2006 authorized one (1) opening and dosing at Clarenceville Cemetery. The fee collected for the services of the Clerk's office was $25.00. The Civil Service Commission held twelve (12) regular meetings and five (5) special meetings during fiscal year 2005-06. LABOR RELAMONS During fiscal year 2005-06, the City of Livonia completed negotiations with AFSCME Union Local 192 and AFSCME Supervisory Union Local 1917 for renewal of their contracts for the period December 1, 2004 to November 30, 2007 respectively. In addition, the Human Resources Director along with the City's labor attorney represented the City in contract negotiations with the le District Court and their two bargaining unions. The Livonia Police Officers Association (LPDA) received a partial award in the Act 312 Arbitration for renewal of their contract for the period December 1, 2003 through November 30, 2006. Currently the item still unresolved in the Act 312 Arbitration is the matter regarding a 12 -hour shift for Police Officers. The City commenced Interest Based Bargaining negotiations with the Livonia Fire Fighters Union (LFFU) for renewal of their contract for the period December 1, 2005 to November 30, 2008. The City and the union were unable to reach an agreement. The City requested mediation to resolve the firefighter contract. Mediation was unsuccessful in resolving the contract. In October the City requested compulsory arbitration to resolve the contract with the firefighters. Labor -Management Committee meetings have been scheduled to informally resolve employee grievances or concerns filed by members of the AFSCME Union Local 192, the Livonia Police Officers Association, the Livonia Police Lieutenants and Sergeants Association and the Livonia Fire Fighters Union. These Committees consist of representatives of the Union and the City. In the event the employee grievance cannot be resolved through informal measures, the formal procedure permits appeal to the Civil Service Commission and, if not resolved, through mediation and/or formal arbitration. The Personnel Review Committee, comprised of the Human Resources Director and the Director of Finance, met twenty-two (22) limes during the current fiscal year and reviewed and made seventy-three (73) recommendations to the Mayor on all new hires, replacement personnel and promotions. Since December 1, 1994, newly hired general employees who subscribe to hospitalization/medical insurance are required to co-pay a portion of their premium costs at $30.00 for single coverage, $35.00 for two-person coverage and $40.00 for family coverage per month. Effective December 1, 2006, all general employees who subscribe to hospitalization/medical benefit are required to co-pay a portion of their premium costs at the above rales per month. The annual Health and Wellness Fair was held on three (3) separate afternoons during February 2006 at various City locations, including the Police Headquarters Training Room, the Department of Public Works Administrative Conference Room and the City Hall Fifth Floor Gallery. Employees and retirees, along with their immediate family members, were encouraged to attend and participate in various health screening activities, including blood pressure, cholesterol and body fat content measurements, as well as receive handouts concerning wellness information. Representatives of the City's occupational health services providers, including St. Joseph Mercy Business Health and Providence- Corporate Health, conducted the medical screening. In addition, representatives from the Blue Cross/Blue Shield (BCBS) hospitalization/medical insurance plans, sponsored by the City, were present to permit employees to review and compare plan descriptions and obtain assistance with health care questions or problems. The meetings were well attended with more than 200 individuals due to the cancellation of Health Alliance Plan (HAP) and Blue Care Network (BCN) as providers. Effective April 1, 2006, BC/BS became the City's only hospitalization benefit provider, offering the BC/BS Blue Preferred Plan (PPO) and Point of Service plans. The PPO was replaced by the CB2 for LPOA members effective October 1, 2006. Twelve (12) members of the LPOA were transferred from the PPO plan to Community Blue 2 (CB2). At the end of the fiscal year, the employee and retiree hospitalization/medical insurance enrollments were as follows: BLUE CROSS/BLUE SHIELD 151 Employee subscribers BC/BS Preferred Plan 441 Retiree subscribers 306 Retirees on Medicare 1 COBRA BLUE CROSS/BLUE SHIELD 383 Employee subscribers Point of Service 109 Retiree subscribers 41 Retirees on Medicare 2 COBRA BC/BS 12 Employee subscribers COMMUNITY BLUE 0 Retiree subscribers (Effective 10/1/06 for LPOA 0 Retirees on Medicare Employees only) 0 COBRA A total of fifty-seven (57) full-time employees "opted ouf' of insurance coverage during the February 2006 open enrollment period and received $1,000.00 in lieu of hospitalization/medical coverage. LIFE INSURANCE & ACCIDENTAL DEATH & DISMEMBERMENT PLAN The City of Livonia currently contracts for group life insurance with the Hartford Insurance Company at the rate of $.18 per $1,000 per month volume. Accidental Death and Dismemberment (AD&D) group insurance coverage is also provided by the Hartford Insurance Company at a rate of $.02 per $1,000 volume per month. Currently, a total of six hundred thirty-six (636) employees have life insurance coverage in the aggregate amount of $32,394,500. In addition, Wenty-eight (28) retirees have a $3,000 death benefit coverage totaling $34,000; one hundred thirty-two (132) retirees have a $3,500 death benefit coverage totaling $462,000 and one hundred fourteen (114) retirees have a $5,000 death benefit totaling $570,000 for a total retiree group of two hundred seventy-four (274) having aggregate life insurance in the amount of $1,116,000. During the fiscal year, a total of $71,533.25 life insurance premium and a total of $7,693.41 AD&D premium were paid to the Hartford Insurance Company. WEEKLY DISABILITY INCOME PLAN The City of Livonia is self-insured for the weekly disability income coverage. Effective December 1, 2003 through November 30, 2006, the disability claims are administered by the Accident Fund Insurance Company of America for a monthly charge of $1.00 per eligible employee. This benefit provides $200/wk to disabled general full-time employees and $100.00 to disabled part-time employees for up to 45 weeks; $125/wk for totally disabled Police Dispatcher civilian ful4time employees for 45 weeks; and $42/Wk for the first 12 weeks and $1001wk for the 40 week balance of 52 weeks for totally disabled police and fire employees. The total premium paid to Accident Fund was $7,495.00 for this fiscal year. During the Fiscal Year 2005-06, there were a total of twenty-seven (27) weekly disability income claims for employees. A total dollar volume of $16,447.52 was paid by this self-insured program. TUITION REIMBURSEMENT The Civil Service Department staff administers the general employee union tuition reimbursement programs. A total of seven (7) members of AFSCME Union Local 192 expended $2,268.13 out of the maximum allocation of $10,000.00 during the fiscal year. One (1) member of the AFSCME Supervisory 10 and Technical Chapter of Union Local 1917 expended $245.00 out of the maximum allocation of $3,475.00 during the fiscal year. OPTICAL PLAN The City continued to offer a optical benefit program with three (3) providers: Suburban Eye Care (a private Livonia optometric practice), and retail providers, Co-op Optical and Detroit Optometric Centers (DOC) who have multiple area locations. Employee usage and costs incurred during the fiscal year at these centers or through the reimbursement option were as follows: Safety Glasses 14 $ 675.00 Direct Reimbursement 37 34� 81.92 Detroit Optometric 164 11,407.00 Center 19 1,461.00 Co -Op Optical Suburban Eye Care 138 11,425.00 372 $28,449.92 Total DENTAL PROGRAM All employees have a dental reimbursement or direct payment progmm to the Denfist as the expenses are incurred. Billings for services rendered during the fiscal year must be submitted within 30 days of the November 30r" fiscal year end for consideration. A summary of the employee reimbursements and hardship advances during the fiscal year to date are summarized as follows: Number Total of Claims Amount Paid Year Reim bursementlDirect Payment 1172 $281,088.00 2005-06 $169,697.00 2007-10 The dental reimbursement may also induce payment for Dental Insurance premiums. Employees are eligible for 50% of the fees for orthodontic services for a lifetime maximum of $1000 per family limited to the employee, their spouse and dependents until the end of the year they reach age 19. 11 The summary of the orthodontic service claims received this fiscal year is as follows: Numberof Claims TotalAmounl Paid Police/Fire 6 $ 2,430.00 General 5 4,395.0 Total 11 $ 6,625.00 The City of Livonia contracts the self-insured workers disability compensation program with the third party administrator, The Accident Fund Insurance Company of America. The contract for these services is effective December 1, 2003 through November 30, 2006. The net total incurred loss on open claims from December 1, 2005, through November 30, 2006, is $256,677.45, which includes payment for weekly wage loss indemnity benefits, medical services, related legal, vocational rehabilitation and other miscellaneous expenses for approximately one hundred thirty-four (134) employee claims. Employees may choose to receive treatment for work-related injuries or illnesses at one of four (4) Livonia occupational medicine treatment facilities including Concentra Occupational Health Centers (2), Providence Corporate Health Services and Sl. Joseph Mercy Business Health Services. The City of Livonia participates in the Michigan Municipal League Unemployment Compensation Group Account. The firm of TALX UC Express is the service agent of this group account. The Civil Service Department responded to approximately thirty (30) former employee claims for unemployment benefits filed with the Michigan Employment Security Administration (MESA). To date, a total of $43,085.00 benefit charges have been received for this fiscal year. CIN PHYSICIAN AND MEDICAL CLINICS Pre-employment, return -to -work and occupational injuryfillness medical examinations and treatment continued to be provided by the authorized City Physician, St. John Providence Health. In addition, Concentra, Providence and Sl. Joseph Mercy provided occupational medical services, along with the St. Mary Hospital Emergency Room under the City Workers Compensation Program. Our records indicate that twenty-eight (28) permanent employee pre- employment (full-time and part-time) examinations, seventy-one (71) pre- employment physicals for temporary employees, eighty-nine (89) physicals for return to work, seven (7) public safety pre-employment psychological evaluations by Dr. Harley Stock, the City's Consulting Psychologist, were performed. Providence, the City Physician, conducted three (3) Fitness for Duly medical 12 evaluations. Dr. Lyle Danuloff, Ph.D has been added to the City's resources for preemployment psychological and discipline evaluations. Dr. Danuloff has completed 19 evaluations for Public Safety positions. In addition, there were medical consultations with regard to employee health and occupational safety matters as it related to infectious diseases and workers compensation claims, including continuation of preemployment auditory, TB and pulmonary function examinations for fire fighter and police officer new hires in compliance with MIOSHA requirements. Alcohol and drug testing for employees assigned to drive specific types of Department of Public Works vehicles are being coordinated in compliance with federal regulations. SAFETY A representative of the Accident Fund Loss Prevention Division, the third party administrator of the City's self-insured Workers Compensation Program, conducted three (3) loss prevention facility tours with Civil Service and Public Works staff during the fiscal year. The facilities reviewed were the Police Administration Building and Parks and Recreation Storage; and the Fire Stations 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6. Employee accident reports were kept by all City Departments and reviewed by the Accident Review Committee consisting of seven (7) representatives from Fire, Police, Public Works, Engineering, Parks & Recreation, AFSCME Union Local 192, and Civil Service. The Accident Review Committee mel four (4) limes during the year and reviewed one hundred seventy 170 accident reports. Accident statistics are compiled into an annual MIOSHA City-wide report. One hundred forty-nine (149) employees received service recognition awards in FY 2005-06. Service Awards Level of Service Presented 29 Five Years Ten Years 29 Fifteen Years 27 Twenty Years 43 Twenty -Five Years 4 Thirty Years 2 Thirty -Five Years 4 FortyYears 0 Forty -Five Years 1 Total 139 13 The Civil Service Department has continued an affirmative recruitment program through newspaper advertisements in the Observer/Eccentric, the Detroit News/Detroit Free Press, and notices to various colleges, training schools, MESA, handicapper rehabilitation services, and minority community based organizations. The total number of advertisements published during Fiscal Year 2005-06 were: the Detroit News — 15; Livonia Observer — 15; Michigan Municipal League — 1; several professional association publications, the Internet recruitment service Monstertrak.com, tie City of Livonia Spring and Fall News, and Cable Channel 8. EQUAL EMPLOYMENTIAFFIRMATIVE ACTION In accordance with the Affirmative Acton policy adopted by the Civil Service Commission, the Civil Service staff continued its efforts to make examinations and position descriptions as job-related as possible. Proposed qualifications for each new examination were reviewed by the respective Department subject matter experts, staff and the Civil Service Commission in order to establish prerequisites which were appropriate to the positions being filled. In addition, the Civil Service staff completed several stale and federal equal employment opportunity reports, surveys from other communities and prepared a monthly summary report to the Civil Service Commission concerning the race and gender characteristics of all applicants for open -competitive examinations, the resulting eligible lists, and all permanent employee hires and terminations. The Civil Service staff continued to prepare and administer open -competitive and promotional examinations as requested by City Department Heads. During Fiscal Year 2005-06, a total of 15 open -competitive and 19 promotional examinations were announced. The Civil Service Department received 981 applications for opencompettive examinations and 48 for promotional examinations during the fiscal year. In addition the Department received 553 applications for temporary employment opportunities in various Parks and Recreation positions; 215 applications for Seasonal Laborer; 50 applications for Seasonal Clerk; 100 applications for Student Page; 109 applications for Library Page; 7 applications for Substitute Librarian; 71 applications for Temporary Clerical; 7 applications for School Crossing Guard; and 25 applications for Police Reserve Officer. In addition, the Civil Service Department received 13 applications for the Director of Public Works position and coordinated the testing for that position. TRAINING 14 Dunng FY 2005-06, the Civil Service Department sponsored several employee - training activities. These are summanzed as follow: Between December 2005 and November 2006, Civil Service Staff coordinated multiple educational presentations sponsored by financial representatives from the Deferred Compensation 457 Plan providers including Nationwide Retirement Solutions, ICMA Retirement Corporation and Community Choice Credit Union. Over 125 employees scheduled individual appointments with the Deferred Compensation 457 Plan on-site representatives. Mall Wallace, Account Representative of Great West Retirement Services, conducted numerous on-site meetings and training sessions. An extra effort was made to bang the Department of Public Works into the information exchange process since their work schedules are not conducive to the traditional schedule for training or one-on-one meetings. Visits to the Distnct Court for one-on-one interviews with participants were also scheduled. Twenty-eight (28) new participants to the Defined Contribution Plan were processed. Mr. Wallace has accepted a transfer to the Great West office in Colorado. A new representative will be starling in January 2007 EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM A subcommittee comprised of a police/fire union representative, a general employee union representative, the Youth Assistance Program Supervisor, two (2) behavioral health service EAP providers and the Human Resources Director continue to oversee the Emergency Behavioral Health Service Referral Network. For the FY 2005-06, a total of 10 employees, 3 employee family members and 3 residents received crisis intervention individual counseling sessions at the limit of 5 sessions totaling $400 per individual. In addition, EAP providers have been called upon to assist Departments with group conflict resolution exercises. Services totaled approximately $4,825.00. The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program has mirrored their behavioral health -counseling program to the City's EAP and uses many of the same referral network of providers. A total of $6,359.00 in CDBG funds has been expended during FY 2005-06 provided 10 25low-incomeresidents. SPECIAL PROJECTS 1. The Civil Service staff coordinated one (1) Employee Blood Dnve in 2006 and assisted in the coordination of two (2) additional dnves at the Community Recreation Center. A total of ninety-eight (98) pints of blood were donated by City employees dunng the drives, conducted in March, May and in September. 2. The Civil Service staff coordinated the 2006 United Way Campaign in all City Departments and Divisions. A total of $6,746.00 has been donated 15 by City employees to this year's Drive. Ten percent (10%) of City employees contributed to the United Way. 3. Computer reporting projects continued during FY 2005-06 induce: maintenance of the automated Life Insurance Employee Enrollment Report to enable the derical staff member to make monthly additions and deletions and achieve instantaneous Life Insurance totals and costs; maintenance of an employee Pension estimate program in an EXCEL spreadsheet format and implementation of each employee classification and wage/salary history on the ACCESS database to facilitate processing annual payroll Master Transfers. In coordination with the Information Systems Manager, the Civil Service Department has developed an applicant/examination database in ACCESS to improve the maintenance of applicant data for open -competitive and promotional examinations. This database enables staff to track the information necessary for EEOC record keeping and reporting. The staff maintains a website, which provides an overview of department responsibilities and activities, along with continuously updated job announcements and application guidelines. Civil Service Department staff has maintained a database for benefit tracking in ACCESS to facilitate self -administration of the employee dental reimbursement program. Staff continues to electronically track employee spouse and dependent utilization of the City's self-administered optical plan. 4. The Critical Incident Team comprised of members from Police, Fire, Law, Public Service, the Mayors Office, the Council Office, the Director of Emergency Preparedness and Civil Service continued its mission during the past year. The team continues to evaluate potential violence problems and recommends assessment or intervention plans. The members of the CIRT Team have not responded to any possible workplace violence situations this year. 5. On May 4, 2006, Compensation Statements illustrating total compensation, taxable earnings and the City's cost of various benefits were mailed to all permanent full-time and part-time employees. Also included in the Statement for the first time were the actual value of paid time off used Iasi year and the sick leave balance as of December 2005. 6. Dr. Kenneth Wolf continues to work with the Police Department on their Critical Incident Stress Debriefing Program. 7. The Civil Service staff continued the on-site "Flu Shot' program in cooperation with Providence Hospital Corporate Health Services. Ninety (90) employees and immediate family members received inoculations for a nominal fee at several City worksite locations. 16 BOARD OF TRUSTEES Following is a report on the activities and accomplishments of the Board of Trustees of the Livonia Employees Retirement System for the period December 1, 2005 through November 30, 2006: 1. DEFINED BENEFIT PLAN a) The Board of Trustees held twelve (12) Regular Meetings and one (1) Special Meeting during this period. b) As of November 30, 2006, the retirement system Defined Benefit Plan had five hundred twenty-seven (527) retirees or surviving spouses plus seven (7) Eligible Domestic Relations Orders (EDRO's) (Divorced Prior to Refirement) and four (4) Alternate Payees (Divorced after Retirement) for a total of five hundred thirty-eight (538) receiving pension checks. Sixteen (16) City retirees died during fiscal year 2005-2006. The total pension payroll fiscal year to date is $11,218,444 through November 2006. c) The team of David Sowerby and Kenneth Johnson, Loomis -Sayles and Company, advises the Board on investments for the Defined Benefit Plan and uses discretionary power regarding investments subject to confirmation by the Board. The Board approved investment transactions by LoomisSayles and Company at regular meetings. The Defined Benefit fund had a value of $198,002,273 as of October 31, 2006. d) In June 2006, the Board reviewed the fitly -third (53rd) annual actuarial valuation as of November 30, 2005, for the Livonia Employees Retirement System, prepared by the Board's Actuary, Rodwan Consulting Company. The Plan covered five hundred thirty- six (536) retirees, thirty (30) deferred and two hundred seventy-five (275) employees for a total of eight hundred 6rly-0ne (841). The Actuary reported that the accrued actuarial condition of the Retirement System is 'Very good". e) The funded ratio of actuarial value of assets to actuarial accrued liability for the Retirement System Defined Benefit Plan is 119.6%. f) Merrill -Lynch continues to provide quarterly performance evaluation of the Defined Benefit Plan. g) The 2005-06 annual soft dollar expense for the Merrill Lynch Performance Measurement Report was $57,000. 17 h) Effective July 5, 2000, the Board entered into a Securities Lending Agreement with Comenca Bank. Total earnings from December 1, 2005 through October 31, 2006 were $22,642.31. i) In June 2001, the Board approved a $5 million investment with MuniMae Midland LLC, in the Midland Multifamily Equity Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT) offering, In April 2002, the Board approved an additional $5 million investment for a total of $10 million invested in the Midland Multifamily Equity REIT. Total interest earnings from December 1, 20051hrough November 30, 2006 were $999,999.99. j) In March 2002, the Board approved a $5 million investment with Cohen & Steers Capital Management Inc., in a Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT), separately managed account. The account market value reported as of October 31, 2005 was $5,788,637. Note: On March 22, 2006, the Board of Trustees approved to take pmfits of $1.5 million out of the REIT and transfer the funds into the Loomis Sayles Large Cap Account for further investment at the discretion of the Investment Manager. The account market value reported as of October 31, 2006 was $6,328,661. k) The total value of the Defined Benefit Plan assets as of October 31, 2006 is $214,330,934. 1) Currently there is one participant in the Defined Benefit Plan military buy -in program. m) Approximately one hundred twenty (120) requests for retirement estimates under the Defined Benefit Plan were processed by the Civil Service Department Staff. n) The Board of Trustees continues to distribute monthly pension checks directly to members of the Defined Benefit Plan with these checks being processed by the staff of the Civil Service Department o) Members of the Board attended the Michigan Association of Public Employees Retirement System (MAPERS) Conferences at Soaring Eagle Resort, Mt. Pleasant Michigan, from May 20 to May 23, 2006 and at the Grand Hotel, Mackinac Island, Michigan, from September 16, 2006 to September 19, 2006. 18 2. DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLAN a) The Board of Trustees held twelve (12) Regular Meetings during this period. b) The Defined Contribution Plan Administrator continues to be Great West Retirement Services. c) The Defined Contribution Fund had a total account ending balance of $45,253,040 as of September 30, 2006, for three hundred seventy- two (372) active participants; sixty-two (62) participants who terminated employment and have an ending account balance; and three (3) participants with a zero ending account balance. d) As of November 30, 2005, a total of sixty-four (64) employees have retired under the Defined Contribution Retirement Plan. 3. LIVONIA RETIREE HEALTH AND DISABILITY BENEFITS PLAN (VEBA) a) The Board hell twelve (12) separate Regular Meetings for the VEBA. b) Mr. Sowerby and Mr. Johnson advised the Board on investments for the VEBA. The VEBA had a value of $46,909,339 as of October 31, 2006. Note: The VEBA was established at the recommendation of the former Actuary to the Board of Trustees, Gabriel, Roeder, Smith and Co., for purposes of placing in a tax free trust hospitalization -medical insurance benefit funds for members of the DB and the DC Plans, as well as to permit separate funding for DC Plan member disability retirements. c) In June 2006, the Board reviewed the eighth (8') annual actuarial valuation as of November 30, 2005, for the VEBA, as prepared by the Board's new Actuary, Rodwan Consulting Company. The Actuary reported that the amortization periods adopted by the Board of Trustees for the funding purposes of this Plan are 30 years for disability benefits and 50 years for health insurance benefits. The 50 year amortization period produces a contribution that is less than the Annual Required Contribution (ARC), and results in a contribution deficiency in the Plan's financial report. The Board is considering a decrease in the amortization period for funding purposes for post- retirement health insurance benefits to 30 years. This will result in an increase in the computed contribution requirement. 19 d) The funded ratio of actuarial value of assets to actuarial accrued liability for the Retirement System Defined Benefit Plan is 34.4%. e) Effective April 1, 2006 all retirees in HAP and Blue Care Network were transitioned to the Blue Cross POS plan. The POS plan is a self insurance health maintenance plan. Previously the self-insured PPO program was extended to retirees. Now all retirees are included in a self insured program. Retiree medical costs for 2006 are less than what would have been paid in insurance premiums. f) The Civil Service Staff is working with Blue Cross and HAP representatives to submit prescription costs incurred for reimbursement from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) under the Part D Medicare prescription program. Any reimbursement received will be returned to the VEBA fund. g) In June 2006 the Civil Service Staff prepared retiree statements of total compensation for each retiree. This first statement was well received. PUBLICATIONS • City Newsletter—four (4) issues published and mailed tower 43,000 residences and business. • Brochures, newsletter and flyers were prepared for specific programs. • Updated Guide to City Services published in May. VOLUNTEER & SPECIAL PROJECTS Information & Complaint Center — 4 volunteers handled 1,897 calls. There were no TTY/TDD calls or formal complaints processed City Hall Tours —There were no tours conducted Rouge Rescue / River Day — The activities at Rotary Park were coordinated by Public Service & Community Resource staff and over 140 volunteers. Together they filled 10 compost bags of brush & weeds; planted 20 seedlings; removed 8 trash bags of garlic mustard seed, cleaned & groomed 5 miles of nature trails; removed 1 tire, a screen door, ''/ cord of lumber and an exercise bike. In addition, 5 groups of 25 volunteers worked a combined total of 18 hours and 20 stenciled 109 storm drains. We acknowledge and extend a big "Thank You' to Steve's Family Dining, Stan's Market, Busch's Market, Mid -Joy Market & Larry's Foodland for their generous donations of refreshments & snacks RESIDENT ASSISTANCE • Emergency Certificates — assisted 20 families with $1,005.00 in Farmer Jack certificates, donated by the Commission on Children & Youth and Private Memorial Contribution • Utility Assistance (CDBG) — assisted 16 low-income households with utility shutoff bills totaling $ 7,394.35 • Holiday/Referral Assistance — assisted 82 low-income families with food and gift donations provided by 8 local sponsors • Commodity Food (TEFAP) — distributed 2,727 food bags, with the aid of 21 volunteers, to 247 low-income households • Focus HOPE — distributed 1,126 food boxes, with the aid of 14 volunteers, to 91 low-income senior households CITY COMMISSIONS/CULTURAL ACTIVITIES Clerical, technical and budgetary assistance was also provided to the Aging, Arts, Historical, Historic Preservation, Human Relations and Youth Commissions. LIVONIA COMMUNITY TRANSIT (LCT) Community Resources has administrative responsibilities for subsidized transportation for Livonia senior citizens and handicapped residents. Contract for SMART, as well as applicable grants are administered and monitored by Community Resources staff. The year was spent preparing for the opting out of the SMART transportation system and the development of an expanded transit service that included a "to work" program. As of November 27, the new Livonia Community Transit system was in operafion. Prior to November 27, LCT had a fleet of len (10) vehides (vans and small buses). The vehicles were driven by 21 CDL licensed part-time bus drivers. Five (5) part-fime employees coordinated the drivers and their schedules. After November 27, the fleet increased to 13 vehicles. An extra part-time person was added for a total of six (6) part-time employees that coordinate the drivers and their schedules. In all the system provided over 25,000 one-way rides within the City of Livonia. These rides totaled over 14,721 work hours and covered over 202,000 miles. 21 CIVIC PARK SENIOR CENTER Parfidpafion in actvites during 2006 totaled approximately 120,000 seniors. 17,700 congregate meals were served. Activities included: health screening, educational classes, support groups, fitness classes, cards and games, ad & crafts, senior sports, Medicare counseling etc. Volunteers logged 18,350 hours. SUPPORT SERVICES, GIFTS, GRANTS, AND TRANSPORTATION Senior Center Staffing Grant, Michigan Office of Services to the Aging Grant and C.D.B.G. funds totaled $180,557. $12,300 in donations was received. Federal and State grants and donations provided: • 443 hours of personal care service to 9 seniors. • 540 hours of homemaker services to 16 seniors • 101 hours of respite services to3 seniors • Home maintenance service to 39 homes • 18,804 one-way rides through the senior transporta0on program • 44286 meals were delivered by volunteers to home bound seniors • 3000+ seniors received referral service Personal Care, Homemaking, and Respite services provided through the Michigan Office of Services to the Aging ended as of March 31, 2006. LIVONIA YOUTH ASSISTANCE PROGRAM a 4y4a 27.11-Y•L7 Y•1 x-9 2006 Referrals: 88 New Cases — (53 males and 35 females) Carty Over Cases from 2005: 61 Total Cases served in 2006: 149 2006 Cases represent the following referral agencies: Livonia Police Department 45 Third Circuit Court -Juvenile Division 14 Surrounding Police Departments 24 Schools 02 Voluntary 03 • 27 parents completed our Altemafive Parenting Skills group. • Program youth performed 621 hours of Community Work Service. 22 58 youth completed "Project Impact' (social living skills) group (12 hours each). 32 males participated in the JAG (Juvenile Awareness Program) at Milan Federal Prison. 686 youth used the services of the Youth Employment Resource Center that listed over 1183 job openings — 412 Employers Youth Assistance staff participated on the EAP Committee and attended various Educational Seminars. Wayne County grant: Child Care Fund -$ 3,500 1110°i Mill Fund -$13,750 CABLE TELEVISION Community Resources has administrative responsibility for the Cable Television franchise and municipal programming. The report pertaining to these activities can be found underthe Cable Television Commission. Community Resources has administrative responsibility for the Historical and Historic Preservation Commissions. The reports pertaining to these activities can be found under the Historical Commission and Historic Preservation Commission. In addition, the Community Resources staff at Greenmead: • Conducted day to day operation of Greenmead • Maintained Historical Commission records including minutes, volunteer hours, caretaker reports, contracts, and budgets • Coordinated weekday lours, Sunday lours, Gift Shop operations, Newburg School usage, Newburg Church, Alexander Blue House, Meeting House rentals, and property usage including weddings, meetings, luncheons, private parties, a memorial service and a class reunion held at Greenmead. • Implemented Historical Commission resolutions • Assisted with the development, planning and implementation of 18 special events, fundraisers and community projects sponsored by the Historical Commission, Friends of Greenmead, Livonia Historical Society, Arts Commission, Sl. Andrew's Society of Detroit, Festival of Cultures Program, A.M.C. Car Club, Mustang Car Show and Garden Club • Worked with retired carpenter who volunteered to do major maintenance repairs on doors, window reconstruction at the barn, pillar repair at Kingsley House and restoration and repair of the Greenhouse • Worked with Printer's Guild to move printing press and equipment to the Print Shop 23 • Worked with D.P.S./ Engineering to define and prioritize maintenance work including repainting the Alexander Blue House, roof repair at Hill House, Roof replacement at History House • Assisted Building Inspection to coordinate Career Center Project at 2'd floor Blue House and plans for Blue House Roof repair. • Coordinated Greenmead's volunteer program, published issues of the Volunteer Voice Newsletter and scheduled volunteers for lours and special events • Provided work site and supervision for community service probationers and community service projects • Hosted several professional and volunteer gatherings such as a Volunteer Reception, Friends of Greenmead Luncheon, Historical Society and Police Reserves Picnic • Provided a project site for Master Gardener Program, established a new Hosta Garden at Hill Gardens and support for volunteer gardeners program • Provided a site and support for several Eagle Scout Projects The Commission continues to publish the "Heritage" as part of the City News. It is distributed to all homes in the City of Livonia. Commission funds are used. In May the Commission helped organize the annual Senior Center Consumer Fair. In June the Commission co-sponsored the annual Senior Citizens Picnic held at Eddie Edgar Ice Arena. The Commission paid for entertainment and a portion of the food. The Commission was in charge of bingo and a 50/50 raffle. In October the Commission provided handouts and worked at Senior Celebration Day. Commission funds were used. In November the Commission provided transportation for a holiday event A the Gem Theater for the Senior Center volunteers. Commission funds were used. At its November 2006 meeting, pursuant to its by-laws, the Commission held its annual election. The following officers were unanimously elected to one-year terms commencing December 1, 2006. Chairperson: Clam Karr 1st Vice Chairperson: Joan O'Brien 2"d Vice Chairperson: Josephine Smith Treasurer: Nancy Klein Secretary: Robert Cards 24 LIVONIA ARTS COMMISSION The Livonia Arts Commission meetings were held on the 4th Tuesday of every month in the Mayors Conference Room of City Hall, with the exception of the July meeting, which was held at an onsite location. The 2006 officers were: Chairperson: Bob Pernsh, Vice Chairperson: Audrey Coronado/Dan Spuding, Secretary: Donna Eno, Treasurer: Virginia Bosak. These positions remained in place for the 2005 calendar year. During the year, resignation letters were received from Audrey Coronado, Theresa Mastela and Rondi Andersen. Active Commission members include Virginia Bosak, Donna Eno, Mary Fisher, Conrad Gniewek, Robert Pernsh, Frank Petersmark, Carne Spurling, Dan Spuding, and Grace Karczewski. This years new commissioners include Shere DeLaFrenier and Vivienne Manwanng. At this time the Commission has four open positions. Budgeted Free -Admission Activities were: Noontime Concerts held atthe Civic Center Library at a cost of $2,000. Music Under the Stars was held at the park next to City Hall for all shows, with Livonia Symphony performing at the Community Recreation with a combined expense of $8,117. Commission Sponsored Community Activities are: a $500 grant to VAAL (Visual Arts Association of Livonia), one of Livonia's art clubs; and $100 for the Livonia Art Club. Scholarships were awarded this year in the amount of $6,000 to students majoring in an art -related field at a post high school learning institution. Commission Donations: Livonia Symphony, $5,000; Greenmead's Garden and Christmas Walks, $100. The Commission held its 9th Annual Fine Arts Exhibition in September. The artwork was displayed in the 2nd floor Art Gallery of the Civic Center Library. Out of over 300 submissions 99 entries were chosen for exhibition. Prize money totaled $2,750. Corporate sponsorship donations totaling $600 were received from Eastern Michigan University — Essex Benefit Group and Richard and Debbie Dufour. Expenses totaled $2,000. The Commission will stave to increase sponsor involvement neat year, in order to make this prestigious event an even more successful event. Artwork from regional artists was displayed monthly in the Civic Center Gallery and in the City Hall Atnum. Small craft and art collections were shown in the Library as well as City Hall display cases throughout the year. In November, Art Commissioners held an art show in the Library Gallery. 25 Commission -Sponsored Receptions: The Fine Arts Exhibit in September; Individual artist receptions were held monthly in the Civic Center Library Gallery. "Art from the Heart" in 2006 and was a complete success, after a major effort was completed to relocate the event to the grounds around City Hall. Profits generated were $18,950.36, a 60% increase from last year. The dollars generated from the Festival allow for the continued art and cultural experiences thatthe Commission works for each year. The Commission has created new promotional material and advertising along with its Livonia Arts Commission brochure to further spread the positive events and creative endeavors of Livonia and its residents. The Commission has developed its own web page, which is an extension of the City's site. It induces more timely information and has a more direct route of contacting commissioners concerning different events, plus forms and information, which can be downloaded. The Livonia Arts Commission mission statement: 'To preserve, promote, sponsor and develop the Arts in Livonia. To continue community access to art experiences, opportunities and improving community awareness" I1rL•] 711S4C.1-1 q =0 I q 1 ATA 611017 Kole] LY, I, 161-1101 7 The Livonia Cable Television Commission meets the first Thursday of the month in the 5"' Floor Gallery of City Hall. Produced programs (3,215.45 production hours) for City Channel 8, including the live coverage of City public meetings: City Council Study and Regular meetings and Planning Commission meetings. Utilized 332.6 hours of volunteer assistance from certified residents in the production of City Channel 8 programs. Logged 122 complaints/inquiries re: rates, reception, programming choices and the desire of competition for cable television and intern( access using cable modems. Maintained radio station WPZY, 1670 AM, providing up to date information regarding road closures, snow emergencies and other vital information relating to the public safety and well being within our community. 26 Installed new Server/Automation Playback System for City Channel 8 Programming, continuing the process toward switching to an all-digital formal. Upgraded Eddie Edgar Arena with permanent camera cables to facilitate taping of various events in the building. Celebrated City Channel 8's 20r" Anniversary with a small reception on September 21, 2006 with approximately 75 dignitaries and well-wishers in attendance. HISTORIC DISTRICT RESOURCES: The Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) meets the first Wednesday of the month in the Blue House at Greenmead, Livonia, Michigan. A website is being developed to highlight the historic districts in Livonia on the City Website. A first ever annual Historic District owners meeting was initiated and held in May to introduce the historic properly owners to HPC and to the resources available to Historic Property Owners. Information packets and a book highlighting Livonia History by David McGregor were passed out to the attending owners. A power point presentation of all the Historic Properties was assembled and given by HPC to highlight the Historic Districts and Historic Preservation in Livonia. The commission plans to repeat this meeting yearly to keep historic property owners aware of resources available to them. Two members of HPC authored a book "Livonia Preserved, Greenmead and Beyond" to benefit Greenmead and Historic Commission. The book's subject is Historic Preservation in Livonia, at Greenmead and in the Historic Properties throughout Livonia. KATOR— SHAY HOUSE Exterior changes to the house in 2005 have not been resolved with HPC. The changes (paint and front porch railings) were not reviewed by HPC per the local ordinance. The owner has been sent a follow-up letter to resolve the issues. The owners were also asked to attend a meeting to discuss the issues in the near future. 27 ASA B. SMITH HOUSE AND SITE HPC forwarded tax credit and restoration / preservation information to the current owner. GREENMEAD HPC recommends a Master Plan (Cultural Resource Management Plan) be developed for Greenmead before any future decisions are made. Newburg Church Plans to add a handicap entrance and ramp to the church were approved by the Historic Preservation Commission. Alexander Blue House Discussions were held regarding the re -roofing of the Blue House. The HPC assembled a Blue House re -roofing bid package for the City to solicit bids. Base bid replaces the older roof at the front of the house with new wood shingles; alternate bids include the complete re -roofing of the entire house with asphalt shingles. IRA WILSON HOME The house was re -roofed with inappropriate shingles and without the approval of HPC. A letterwas sentto the Friends of the Barn to resolve the issue. UNION CHURCH AND CEMETERY— 6 MILE ROAD A letter was sent to the Trinity Theater Group reminding them of the Historic Preservation Ordinance and encouraging them to make an appointment with HPC to review any changes to the building and to receive approval prior to the beginning of work. UNION CHURCH AND CEMETERY— FARMINGTON ROAD The Commission approved the requestto replace a side door ofthe building. COMMISSIONERS Commissioners Kathie Glynn, Sue Daniel and Gilbert Toth were reappointed to the Commission in 2006. Gilbert Toth resigned in June and moved out of the city. The Commission is actively pursuing another commissioner with a preservation background to fill his seat. OFFICER ELECTION Election of officers held in November, results as follows: • - Chairperson — Kathleen Johnson Bartshe • - Vice Chairperson — Don Knapp • - Secretary — Ralph Bakewe 11 • - Treasurer—James Kline 28 LIVONIA HISTORICAL COMMISSION Activities: Special Events - Spring and Summer Flea Markets, Highland Games, Mustang and AMC Car Shows. Children's Activities - Peter Rabbit, Mother Goose Halloween Walk Teas - Presidential, Victorian, Mid -Summers Night, Hannah's Autumn, Christmas Luncheon - Catherine's Table Operations: Marking of dothing collection at Hill House Developed new activity — Catherine's Table Maintenance: East door of Meeting House replaced - Robert Sloan Greenhouse glass - Robert Sloan Rear door of Bungalow replaced - Tom Beltowski Eagle Projects: Step for east entrance of Newburg School Hill House front porch and brick walkway Hinbern brick walkway Painting Christmas Decorations: Geer Store Hill House decorated by local Quester groups Exterior decorations by Bourgon Scout Troop Volunteers: Gardeners under the direction of Jan Whitcomb Tour Guides: Tours for school and adult groups Special events and Sunday tours June -October and December Food Booth: Spring and Summer Flea Markets, Highland Games, Mustang and AMC Car Shows Teas: Three -course teas — Presidential, Victorian, Mid -Summers Night, Hannah's Autumn, Christmas - plus tea and scones at the Highland Games 29 Rentals: Church, Meeting House and Alexander Blue House Donations: Friends of Greenmead Walmart Zonla Alpha Delta Kappa Livonia Community Foundation Gift Shop: Video won an award Redesigned The Livonia Human Relations Commission sponsored the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebrefion with P.L.A.I.D. (People of Livonia Addressing Issues of Diversity) at Livonia Churchill High School with featured speaker, Mr. Hue] Perkins, local Channel Fox 2 Anchorman. Also we held our annual Honor Roll celebration. This year's awardees were: BARBARA BRESLIN AND BILL HEATON The Commission invited the Michigan Department of Civil Rights to hold a public meeting in Livonia. It was scheduled for July 24, 2006, but was postponed until Spring 2007. Also, the H.R.C. Commissioner prepared a personal biography for posting on the city website. Members of the Commission met with the Livonia Chamber of Commerce and explained that the H.R.C. would like a closer working relationship with them. They were receptive. A letter was sent to the Livonia Observer responding to the arfide regarding housing discrimination in the city of Livonia. The Mission Statement of the H.R.C.: 'The Livonia Human Relations Commission will foster mutual self respect and understanding and promote amicable relatons among all racial, religious, and ethnic groups of the city. 30 LIVONIA COMMISSION ON CHILDREN AND YOUTH In 2006, the Youth Commission continued the administration of the scholarship program sponsored by the Livonia Anniversary Committee. The Commission distributed brochures advertising the scholarships to the local high schools and libraries. Information about the scholarships was presented in the Winter News, on City Channel 8, the city's website and also in the Department of Community Resources. More than twenty applications were submitted for the five $2500 awards. Commissioners Jeff Nork, Dan Spuding, Larry Johnson, and Paul Pyrkosz reviewed and selected the most deserving applicants. The Arbor Day Project, with the cooperation of the Livonia Public Schools and the Clarenceville Public Schools, was repeated again. Seedlings were packaged and distributed to all fourth grade classes in the two school systems. Global Releaf and the Youth Commission shared the cost of the trees. Commissioner Kenneth Balcoff chaired the committee this year. The Youth Commission again supported "All Night Senior Graduation Parties' at the high schools that requested help. Donations of two hundred fifty dollars ($250.00) were made to high schools in the city upon request. Honor Certificates were presented to all graduating seniors who had achieved a 3.0 honor point average or higher from all five high schools in Livonia. Commissioners Paul Pyrkosz and Jill Cramb handled this project. Emergency stickers, which are to be placed on the bedroom windows of children, senior citizens or handicapped individuals, continue to be available at City Hall and also from the Livonia Fire Department. Information on obtaining the stickers is shown on City Channel 8. Using the Livonia Community Recreation Center on a Saturday night, the Youth Commission hosted a Halloween Activity night for Upper Elementary and Junior High students. Any appropriate aged student was invited for a nominal fee to enjoy the safe and entertaining environment along with plenty of food. The event was the result of the entire Commission's efforts as well as support from Parks and Recreation. In an effort to reach out to the needy youth of Livonia the Commission hosts a Holiday Party on two consecutive Saturdays for families who register with Goodfellows. While the parents are interviewing with the Goodfellows representatives, the children are invited to enjoy snacks, crafts, gifts, and Santa at the Senior Center. While many items will be donated the Commission will ensure that every student leave with a gift bag. Commissioners Dan Spuding and Jeff Nork headed this project with each Commissioner involved in a role at the event. 31 The Commission supported Family Day at the Spree by donafing some of the prizes passed out to the hundreds of youth who participated throughout the day. Acknowledging that Back to School is a costly time of the year for parents, the Commission started a school supply program. Using the families provided by the Livonia Goodfellows, the Commission distributed 300 backpacks with appropriate school supplies purchased with funds and donations. Commissioners Dan Spuding and Jeff Nork were primarily responsible for this project. A "Who are you gonna call list?" is being investigated by Commissioners Jilian Cramb and Jessie Spuding. The project should yield a list of help phone numbers and website address that could be distributed to troubled teens or available to concerned parents. Commission officers for 2005-2006 were: Jeff Nork Chairperson; Dan Spurling Vice Chairperson, Jilian Cramb Secretary and Jessie Spuding, Treasurer. W JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT NEW CASES FILED CRIMINAL 1. Felony (FY) 301 2. Ordinance Misdemeanor (OM) 1126 3. Statute Misdemeanor (SM) 390 TRAFFIC 4. Felony Drank Driving (FD) 24 5. Felony Traffic (FT) 23 Total Felony Traffic 47 (#4+#5=) 6. Ordinance Drank Driving (OD) 241 7. Ordinance Civil Infractions (OI) 30482 B. Ordinance Traffic Misdemeanor (OT) 2810 9. Statute Drank Driving (SD) 28 32 CIVIL DIVISION 18. General Civil (GC) Total Drunk Driving 269 General Civil Miscellaneous (GZ) 6 (#6+#9=) Landlord Tenant (LT) 10. Statute Civil Infractions (SI) 2834 10 22. Small Claims (SC) Total Civil Infractions 33316 MISCELLANEOUS (#7+#10=) Civil Division Juries Selected 11. Statute Traffic Misdemeanor (ST) 308 28 25. Motions Total Traffic Misd. 3118 (#8+#11=) MISCELLANEOUS 12. Criminal/Traffic Junes Selected 5 13. Criminal/Traffic Cases Perfected to Appeal 3 NON -TRAFFIC CIVIL INFRACTIONS & PARKING 14. Ordinance Parking (OK) 1054 15. Ordinance Non -Traffic (ON) 11 16. Statute Parking (SK) 0 Total Parking 1065 (#14+#16=) 17. Statute Non-Traffic(SN) 5 Total Non -Traffic 16 (#15+#17=) CIVIL DIVISION 18. General Civil (GC) 2184 19. General Civil Miscellaneous (GZ) 6 20. Landlord Tenant (LT) 558 21. Land Contract Summary Proceedings (SP) 10 22. Small Claims (SC) 599 MISCELLANEOUS 23. Civil Division Juries Selected 2 24. Marriages 28 25. Motions 1257 33 26. Discovery/Debtor Exams 172 27. Gamishments 3456 28. Orders to Seize/Orders of Eviction 306 17 PROBATION 38 1. Number of Placements on Probation 1703 2. Pre -Sentence Investigation Reports 1250 3. Violation of Probation Warrants Issued 984 4. Show Cause Summons Issued 2188 5. Probation Cases Closed 1981 6. Number of Open Probation Cases 1351 7. Total Number of Days Worked on the Voluntary Work Program (in lieu ofjail) 4652 Felony Guilty Plea (reduced charge) 5 Bench Verdict 0 Bindover to 3'd CircuilCourt(afer Examination held or waived) 285 Dismissed by Party 0 Dismissed by Court 17 Inactive Status (Warrant)' 38 Local Diversion 0 Case Type Change 0 Total 345 Misdemeanors (Ordinance and Statute) Jury Verdict 1 Bench Verdict 10 Guilty Plea 1319 Dismissed by Party 287 Dismissed by Court 97 Inactive Status (Warrant)` 253 Local Diversion 19 Case Type Change 0 Total 1986 34 Felony, Misdemeanor and Civil Infraction Jury Verdict Bench Verdict Guilty Plea/Admission Bindover to 3'd Circuit Court (after Examination held or waived) Dismissed by Party Dismissed by Court Default Judgments Inactive Status (Warrant)' Local Diversion Case Type Change Total 0 3641 22568 44 853 2436 7532 723 2 0 `Note: Wamanl/Bench Warrant/On Appeal/Pending Forensic Examination Non -Traffic, Civil Infraction and Parking 37799 Verdict at Hearing 52 AdmissiorvWaivers 708 Dismissed by Party 7 Dismissed by Court 33 Default Judgments 276 Case Type Change 1 Total 33 CIVIL DEPARTMENT 5 Civil, Landlord/Tenant and Small Claims Jury Verdict 1 Bench Verdict 161 Uncontested/Defaults/Settlements 1795 Transferred 48 Dismissed by Party 689 Dismissed by Court 571 Inactive Status" 33 Other Disposition 5 35 1077 Case Type Change 0 "Note: Bankruptcy Stay Total 3303 FINANCIAL SUMMARY FINANCIAL Due to City of Livonia General Fund $3,531,086.40 Escrow Accounts Bonds $1,024,867.05 Restitution $ 37 359.30 Work Program $ 160 322.50 Miscellaneous' $ 112 138.13 • includes garnishment payments, escrow rent, refunds, etc. Due to Stale of Michigan $1,581,625.20 Due to County Library $ 124 750.80 Other Miscellaneous Payments $ 53.571.00 Court Building Improvement Fund $ 296.045.50 Drug Court Fund (set-aside effective 10/01/05) $ 16 530.00 UNAUDITED YEAR'S REVENUE TOTAL (excluding interest income) $6,938,295.88 2005-2006 Projects 1. The Court continues on its path to establishing both a "Drug Court" and "Sobriety Court', atthe 16th Judicial District Court. a. Grant Applications were filed, as a first step in the introduction of this intensive supervised probation program. b. Its team of professionals attended a weekly intensive training in St. Louis, Missouri this past August with Federal Government. This 36 was followed by four days of training in Lansing, Michigan with State Court personnel. 2. The Court concluded 11 % months of union negotiations and signed ifs first ever labor agreements with the MAPE and TPOAM unions representing court employees. 3. The Court continued its use of the Slate of Michigan Collection Module and over $400,000.00 was collected from delinquent offenders. 4. The Court installed a digitized recording system in courtrooms #1 & #2. This replaces audiocassette recording with computer -enhanced recording. 5. The Court has effectively taken over the updating and entering of misdemeanor offenses for Criminal History Reporting via compuler/LEIN directly to the Michigan State Police Central Records computer. In cooperation with the State Court Administrative Office this Court is working closely with the Livonia Police Department, Michigan State Police and Wayne County Sheriff Department to ensure proper information and procedure. The Department of Finance consists of Accounting, Management Information Systems, Water and Sewer Usage Billing, and the Division of Budget and Purchasing with a total staff of twenty-five people. The Director of Finance serves as administrative assistant to the Mayor in financial matters and is under the direct supervision of the Mayor. The function of the Department of Finance includes: Supervision over the administration of the financial affairs of the City. Keeping of accounts and financial records of the City and all departments, commissions and agencies of the City government. Maintenance of payroll records for all City employees. Preparation of checks for all financial obligations of the City. Billing and collection of over 150,000 water and sewer bills. 37 Responsibility for all computerized reporting and budget analysis for City Departments. Responsibility for evaluating and recommending computer hardware and software systems City-wide. Preparation of the annual budget for the Mayor. Taking of bids for all major purchases made by the City. Responding to City Council questions and providing additional reports and information as requested by Council. The Finance Director serves on a three-person Personnel Review Committee, which is responsible for review and evaluation of the hiring, placement and replacement of all employees for the City. Performs Treasurer function for the Plymouth Road Development Authority. Membership on the Community Development Block Grant Committee. Responsible for risk management of casualty and liability, worker's compensation and medical insurance for the City and is the City's representative to the Michigan Municipal Risk Management Authority (MMRMA). Representation at over 50 meetings of the City Council. Preparation of all debt issued by City. Responsible for investment of City funds in interest earning accounts in accordance with Stale law. Management of City -owned properties leased to third parties BUDGET -PURCHASING The Budget -Purchasing office is under the supervision and direction of the Director of Finance who also ads as Purchasing Agent for the City. The Budget - Purchasing activity processed a total of 23,261 requisitions for the purchase of goods and services for the City of Livonia. A total of 693 supply orders and printing requests were also filled for City Departments. M ACCOUNTING The volume of the Accounting Division activity is listed by comparative figures for the past two years: FISCAL YEAR ENDED NOVEMBER 30 2005 2006 i[ 510 :00KC041YRS• Payables Checks 17,914 17,610 Payroll Checks 28,271 27,952 Journal Entries 15,218 15,357 Retirement Checks (Payroll and Payables) 7,213 7,263 Accounts Receivable Invoices: False Alarms 1,567 1,111 Rescue Runs 4,087 4,289 Other 1,300 2,115 Water Bills Mailed 154,351 154,730 Water Bills Paid by EFT 12,534 15,801 Temporarily idle funds were invested in Certificates of Deposit and daily savings deposits, resulting in a total interest earned of $1,850,776 or 3.64% of City General Fund Revenue. SPECIAL PROJECTS 1. In 2006, the Finance, Accounting and Information Systems departments began implementing a conversion to a new financial management system called ".Net" from New Wald Systems, Inc. It is anticipated that we will have completed data conversions and training by 2007, and we will go live in phases during 2007. 2. The Finance Department refinanced $4,470,000 of the 1998 DDA bonds and $4,110,000 of the 2000 Water and Sewer bonds, resulting in a reduced future debt service cost of $420,000. 3. The Finance Department prepared exhibits and testified in both the AFSCME Local 192 Fad Finding proceeding and the Livonia Police Officer Ad 312 proceeding. These proceedings allowed the City to obtain very reasonable collective bargaining agreements with these groups. 4. The Finance Department continued to work with City Council and the Mayor's Office to maintain the City's excellent bond ratings, which currently are rated AA3 at Moody's and AA at Standard and Poors. Because of these excellent 39 bond ratings, more people will invest in City of Livonia bonds resulfing in more competitive bidding from brokerage houses. Savings will continue into the future for the City due to these refings. 5. The City of Livonia audit was completed and, once again, the City's auditors found no significant audit adjustments. 6. The Finance Department participated in several cooperative bids with surrounding communities that resulted in more competitive bids and reduced costs to the City. The Information Systems Department is responsible for the computer hardware and software used by the City. The IS Department assists other City Departments in evaluating, selecting and implementing computer systems. It also sets the standards for City computer systems. The Information Systems Director reports directly to the Finance Director. The staff of the Information Systems Department consists of five (5) employees. The Information Systems Department has five primary areas of responsibility. These are Computer and Network Support, Application Software Support, Training and End User Support, Website and Internet, and Geographic Information Systems. COMPUTER AND NETWORK SUPPORT The IS Department maintains the following hardware: 2002- 2003- 2004- 2005- 2003 2004 2005 2006 IBM AS/400 Midrange Computer 1 1 1 1 Windows 2000/2003 Server 11 10 10 17 Personal Computers 317 319 293 298 Due to failures with old equipment, we were able to replace our Network Infrastructure this year with a new Cisco Network platform. The old infrastructure was made of 10/100 MB Hubs and Switches and was over seven years old. The new infrastructure is 1 GB Switches and includes Power of Ethernet capabilities. This new infrastructure also provided for enhanced security for our network and will provide for future uses of our network for other purposes. We also replaced our 4 slowest wireless bridges. These bridges provide network connectivity to Greenmead, Silver Village, Newburg Village and McNamara 40 Towers. The old Pinnacle bridges ran at a speed of 11 MB and we could no longer get parts and service on them. The new Cisco wireless bridges run at a speed of 54 MB. APPLICATION SOFTWARE SUPPORT We began a project this year to replace our Financial, Payroll and Human Resource, Utility Billing and all of our Licensing Systems with New World Logos.Nel systems. The old Logos/400 systems were written back in the mid 1980's and updated several limes. This project has been kicked off and is progressing on -track. We are anticipating the completion of this project during the next fiscal year. We also have been involved with the installation of hardware and software for the new Transit System (RouleMatch). This has been a critical project that was implemented in a very aggressive schedule to meet the deadline for our withdrawal from SMART. TRAINING AND END USER SUPPORT The IS Department provides in-house training for City employees on how to use computers and software packages. A breakdown on training offered is: 2002- 2003- 2004- 2005- 2003 2004 2005 2006 Number of Classes Conducted 60 26 26 40 Number of Employees Trained 140 77 59 109 1,385 user support issues were recorded and resolved this year WEBSITE AND INTERNET The Information Systems Department also manages the City Website (httP1/ www.d.livonia.mi.us), which continues to find new uses and gran in usage. 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 Number of Page Views 950,967 1,042,874 1,107,921 The Department also provides e-mail and Internet access to City Employees 2003- 2004- 2005- 2004 2005 2006 Number of E-mail accounts 259 239 296 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS The Information Systems Department also manages the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for the City of Livonia. 41 Overall the GIS has continued to evolve here at the City. We have moved many of our most important data layers into the geodatabase format, acquired updated photography, and have continued to maintain data layers that are used in multiple map series. Specifically, we have: 1. Developed two new "series" of maps with the planning department (zoning, address) based on I/ section maps (144 maps in each series). We have also produced online "PDF" versions of all of our maps (tax maps, zoning, address). 2. Developed a set of "section -based" address maps for the Fire Department (36 maps). 3. Updated the dispatch room maps for the police and fire departments. 4. Developed a new procedure for notifying residents of zoning changes who live in apartment buildings and multi -tenant commercial strips. 5. Acquired 2005 SEMCOG aerial photography for the city. We also acquired 2005 photography for the surrounding communities. This is all orlhorectifed 6 -inch color photography in MrSID formal. 6. The City acquired Pictometry software/data for Livonia and surrounding communifies. I have installed software on approximately 15 machines within the City. Piclometry features an address lookup feature based on our parcel layer. 7. Moved many shape files and coverages into the personal geodalabase formal. This should make the upgrade to the Arc Spatial Data Engine (SDE) fairly simple. 8. Updated AmIMS and AmInfo to version 9.1. The newest version, 9.2, should arrive at the beginning of 2007. Version 9.2 will include new software — Aro GIS Server. 9. Located Tier -1 and Tier -2 EHS sites for the fire department. After the sites were identified, generated latitude and longitude coordinates for each site. 10.Parti cipated in the design for Arc Spatial Data Engine (SDE) database with InfoGeographics. Currently ironing out field label names and database content issues. LIVONIA FIRE & RESCUE During the fiscal year 2006, Livonia Fire & Rescue responded to 8,111 incidents, 82% involved emergency medical services, while fire related responses accounted for 18%. The following statistical breakdowns reflect the departmental activity for the current fiscal year. 42 Incidents Emergency Medical 6,689 Fire 264 Fire (other) 1,158 Total 8,111 For the Fire Incidents (other) category, carbon monoxide alarms accounted for 71 of the responses, 523 were false fire alar calls and 175 for downed wire incidents. Monetary Fire Loss Residential $1,274,625 Vehicle $250,705 Commercial $187,150 Educational/Institufional $15,550 Total $1,728,030 Of the total dollars lost, residential fires accounted for 73%, commercial fires 10%, educafional / assembly occupancy 3%, and vehicle losses 14%. Incidents by day of week Sunday 1,052 12.9% Monday 1,144 14.1% Tuesday 1,183 14.6% Wednesday 1,232 15.2% Thursday 1,179 14.5% Friday 1,192 14.7% Saturday 1,129 13.9% The busiesttime ofdayis 2:OOp.m. through 3:OOp.m. Throughout the year, in addition to the related acWtes listed below, this Division is responsible for updafing technical knowledge, maintaining job efficiency and state cerfifcafion for the department's Fire Inspectors. This is accomplished by attending numerous seminars, job related schools and other confining education programs. These schools would include but are not limited to Schoolcraft College, the National Fire Academy, Michigan State Police Arson 43 School, Michigan Fire Inspectors Conferences, Metro Detroit Fire Inspectors Society and the various (I.AA I.) International Association of Arson Investigators arson schools and seminars. Inspections Although not all encompassing, the following calegones reflect the majority of inspections conducted by the Fire Prevention Division: Advice 119 Inlenor Alterations 158 Alarm 49 Liquor License 17 Complaint 13 Liquid Propane Gas 6 Chemical Surveys 118 Life Safety Inspections 15 City License 121 New Construction 17 Carnival/Spree 8 Site Plan/Preliminary Plan 58 False Alarms 47 Re -occupancy 67 Fire Lanes 58 Revision 19 First Tenant 6 System Report Deficiency 173 Fireworks 48 Suppression 118 Hydrant/Flow 24 Temporary Structure 18 History File 142 Exterior 6 Alterations/Construction City Buildings 64 IGSFl C1:1:; Plan Reviews Alarm 42 Construction 192 Hood & Duct /Spray 23 Booth Site 58 Fire Suppression 94 Total 388 The above plan review totals reflect the number of projects received / assigned in the Fire Prevention Office and do not include the actual number of inspections made. Multiple site visits are required when inspecting various fire alarm, suppression or structural systems to insure compliance with the adopted codes and standard installation practices. A conservative estimate of site visits needed to complete a project would be four inspections. More complex jobs would require additional inspections, in some instances 10-20 site visits. Plans review and inspections are both up by eleven percent from last year. 44 The Fire Marshal and the Senior Fire Inspector in the Fire Prevention division continue to be Certified State of Michigan Fire Inspectors and Certified by the National Fire Protection Association to the level of Fire Inspector I. In addition to the above certifications the two senior investigators in Fire Prevention have attended both the National Fire Academy Arson Investigation course and the Michigan State Police Arson Investigation course. The Inspectors have completed Fire Officer 1 and It The Junior Inspector completed the Michigan State Police Arson Investigation course this fall. The Fire Marshal is an inlemationally certified fire investigator (CFI) through the International Association of Arson Investigators, one of only forty-five in the Slate of Michigan. The Fire Marshal also sits on the Board of Directors for the Michigan Chapter of the International Association of Fire Investigators. There were 97 fres investigated by the Fire Prevention Division of these 71 were accidental, 13 were arson and 13 were of an undetermined origin. The focus of the training office for fiscal year 2006 was to continue to assure compliance for the ongoing education (CEU) requirements for both EMT and Paramedic within the department. The number of overall CEU's for Paramedics is higher than that of an EMT and thus requires a more diligent training program in order to ensure that the department's personnel are always compliant with licensing requirements. The training office continues to improve its record management system related to training activities, which in tum ensures compliance with OSHA, ISO and nationally accepted standards on training and documentation. The training division continues to provide training commensurate with the mission of our department. Although EMS training takes up large amounts of resources and time, this office still facilitates training in fire suppression, specialized rescue, hazardous materials, utility emergencies and risk reduction. Other ongoing initiatives undertaken by the training office induce the administration and oversight of the department Grants. A previous grant award will allow the department to develop and deploy an electronic Patient Care Record System (ePCR) reducing redundancy in the current county paper reports, improving QAIQI processes, increase HIPAA security on PHI and allow the department to interface electronically with the city's third party EMS billing company. This new program will also enhance the department's ability to analytically view EMS trends and usage from a demographic perspective, as well as provide a tool for syndromic surveillance within the community. The department, with the approval of the law department, has entered into a contract with Medtronics Corporation (LifeNet Software). During 2006, initial training look place and the configuration process has recently been started. 45 The training office continues to be forward thinking in regards to capturing available grant funding and alternative ways to finance departmental capital needs both in training programs and equipment. Enhancing relationships with both local businesses and community educational institutions has also been a priority in hopes that a mutual sharing of resources increases overall operational effectiveness. Grants through State Farm, MMRMA, and Belfour construction have allowed the department to move ahead with programs that have left unfunded do to budgetary constraints over the last three years. Fire Officer training commensurate with the CBA continues to be a lop priorly as it pertains to off-site training and in preparing our Company level officers for each new position. The RAFT (Regional Alliance for Fire Training) organization has developed a new Company Officer course. Two of our members were involved in the development of the course and were instructors for the first pilot class. Three of our members were in the pilot class. This office continues to look at ways to improve our overall service and maintain the highest level of pre -hospital care to the citizens of Livonia. The department's EMS Quality Assurance (QA) program continues to strive to comply with stringent county and stale requirements regarding QI/QA. The training office continues to administrate and facilitate the Medical Priority Dispatch system that is used in dispatching EMS calls city-wide. The system has proven to be extremely effective in risk reduction for responders, as well as the public, by assigning a priority to the medical call. Because of the increasing EMS run call volume each year, the MPD system allays the prioritizing of all EMS related calls to ensure that the most life threatening emergencies receive assistance above those of a lesser degree. The Training Coordinator and Engineer Jon Unruh continue to provide the needed continued education units (CEU) required for recertification of dispatchers every two years. This office was also responsible for tracking and fulfilling the MPD Quality Assurance requirements as outlined in county Medical Control protocols. Since the MPD program came on line in May of 2001, the training office meets and discusses QI related issues quarterly, as to ensure compliance within county and state guidelines. This fiscal year has also brought added responsibility in regards to the facilitation of grant money awarded under the 2004 Homeland Security Grant. This office has been tasked with the oversight of seven grant projects approved under this grant program that primarily focuses on operational readiness and personal protective equipment as it applies to WMD/CBRNE events. The goal in each of the projects was to take an "all hazards' approach in design of the projects, while still complying with the strict DHS grant guidelines on expenditures for approved equipment. The training office has worked closely with the LPD Homeland Security Officer in meeting the cilys purchasing guidelines, securing quotes, 46 seeking City Council approval where needed, and ordering all associated equipment for the seven grant projects. The focus of the training office in 2007 will be to establish updated company level drills, continue efforts in the monthly "Quick DnII" program, revise and implement a new Dnver/Operator program, and begin development on a new in-house Company Officer training program. With continued changes in the state's Fire Officer programs, new records and additional training will be required in order to fulfill the CBA and meet the new state requirements. The Livonia Fire & Rescue Maintenance Division is comprised of one Fire Apparatus Supervisor and one Senior Fire Equipment Mechanic who are responsible for specification writing, ordering, care, maintenance and repair of all mechanized and related fire, rescue and paramedic equipment. The division provides firefighters, Livonia citizens, and visitors of Livonia with safe and reliable ambulance, rescue and fire fighting vehicles and related equipment. This year the responsibilities of the Maintenance Division included the following: Completed 423 work orders/requests Inspected pumpers, rescue vehicles, aerial tower, administrative cars, and all equipment on each vehicle on a semi-annual and annual basis. Built a new test gun for pump testing and centrifugal pumps received their annual testing, along with MIOSHA tire inspections. Two inspection trips were made to Florida, (final inspections of two new Ambulances). Worked with Medic Master on warranties of vehicle chassis and box. Two Medic Master Ambulances (SQ -5, 6) were shuttled to and from Indianapolis for complete repaint under warranty. Also E-1 was sent to Grand Rapids for Warranty paint repair. One inspection trip was made. Made ready and disposed of equipment removed from service (i.e. Fire Investigation Unit, Technical Rescue Unit, New SQ -3, New SQ -5) In coordination with the Training Division, instructed Firefighter and E.M.T.D.'s on the operational requirements of vehicles. Also aided in training exercises when necessary. Responded to major fires to assist the department in set up of equipment, filling of SCBA bottles, repair and refueling of vehicles. 47 Provided assistance, as needed, to neighboring fire departments and members of Westem Wayne Mutual Aid Association. Provided assistance to the following Pmject Mangers: • SCBA Officer -ordering parts, repairing SCBA airpacks. • Hose Officer - specification writing, ordering and mounting of nozzles, adapters, and hose. • Building Maintenance Officer- repairofvehide electrical drop lines. • EMT Officer- installation of ALS equipment. • Communications Officer — mounting hand held prep radio vehicle chargers and installation of new radio and complete computer systems for ALS and relocation of some radios in pumpers, and repair of same. • Apparatus Officer - ordering and mounting of new equipment/hand tools and mounts. • Public Relations Committee - equipment. • Radio Technician - the installation and removal of communications systems for vehicles going into and coming out of service along with installations of ALS radio equipment. This Division provides maintenance on all of the following items: Vehicles 1 -1976 Sutphen Aerial Tower, 1250 GPM Pump 1 -1988 C-30 Chevrolet/Invesfigafive Unit 2 -1988 Pierce Arrow 1250 GPM Pumpers 1 -1988 Pierce Dash Heavy Duty Rescue 1 -1994 Ford Horton Water Rescue Unit 1 -1994 Smeal/Spartan 1250 GPM Pumper 1 -1995 Ford Horton Reserve Alpha Unit 1 -1996 5-10 Chevrolet Pick -Up 1 -1996 GMC 3/4 -Ton Pick -Up 1 -1997 Chevrolet Lumina 1 -1997 Intemational/Horton Reserve Alpha Unit 1 -1997 International/Horton Alpha Unit 1 -1998 Chevrolet Lumina 48 1 -1999 Chevrolet Tahoe 2-2000 Freighlliner/Medic Master Alpha Units 2 — 2001 Freighlliner/Medic Master Alpha Units 1 — 2001 Ford Crown Vic Sedan 1 — 2002 American LaFrence 2000GPM 75FT. Aerial 3-2003 American La France Eagle Pumpers 1 -2003 Ford 450 Maintenance Truck 1 — 2003 Mercury Marine Inflatable Rescue Boal, Motor and Trailer 5— 2003 Ford Crown Vic Sedans 1 — 2003 Club Car Ambulance and Hauling LS Enclosed Trailer 1 — 2006 Haulmark Trailer (C.B.R.N.E.) 1 — 2006 Freightliner/Medic Master Alpha Unit 1 — 2007 Freightliner/Medic Master Alpha Unit 35—Total Vehicles Equipment on Vehicles Thousands of feet of fire hose Fire hose nozzles Axes and adapters Foam equipment, hand and vehide mounted Deluge equipment 110 V electrical lighfing Tools (hand and fire fghfing) 9 -Auxiliary generators 43 - ISI Viking Air Pack 4— ISI Magnum Air Pack 74 -Air Bottles 89 — ISI Viking Masks 4— Magnum Masks 1- Bauer Air Compressor Cascade System 1 - 4 - 6000 Air Bottle Cascade System 1 — K-950 Saw 2 - K-12 Saw 7 - Chain saws 2 - Amkus Power Tools 2 - TNT Power Tools 7- Life Jack PPV fans 1 - Hose repair tool and parts Medical equipment on Alpha Vehicles Various hazardous material and confined space rescue equipment. 49 Garage Equipment 1 — Hose test Pump 2 - in -ground garage hoist hydro -testing 1 - Garage tool replacements 1 - Pumper pump test tool as needed to comply with NFPA 1911. PUBLIC EDUCATION The 2006 fiscal year was one that saw new challenges for educating our citizens through the Fire Safety Education Program within Livonia Fire & Rescue. While remaining committed to providing quality fire safety education programs throughout the community, public fire safety education has had to reevaluate the number and types of programs we deliver. Each year Livonia Fire & Rescue responds to numerous requests from the public for Fire Safely Education programs. These requests are forwarded to either the on -duty Battalion Chief or to the Fire Safety Education Committee, based on the needs of the requesting person or group. If the caller is requesting to visit a fire station or have a fire apparatus visit them as part of the educational effort, the on -duty Battalion Chief handles the request. If the group requests an individual to speak at a prearranged time and location that does not require firefighting apparatus, the Fire Safety Education Committee is contacted. Currently, most requests are handled by on -duty crews at the fire stations, while remaining in- service to respond to emergency calls in our area. Fire Prevention records indicate that we responded to approximately 200 requests during this fiscal year, reaching thousands of our citizens. These requests are handled routinely by the Battalion Chiefs office and are conducted by the on -duty crews working out of all five at Livonia's fire stations. In June of 2006, we held our annual "School's Out, Safety's In" Open House. This summer safety event reaches out to our community and invites them into our Fire Station #3 and gives them an opportunity to meet many of our firefighters. In October of 2006, Livonia Fire & Rescue held its annual Fire Prevention Week Open House". The Open House has proven to be a highly anticipated event by our community, reaching a crowd estimated at 2,000. While in attendance, visitors received information on fire and life safety and are given an opportunity to practice life safety skills. In addition, the Department showcased our award- winning extrication team, who practiced their skills on two cars. The scenano was that of taking an injured victim out of a car that cannot be opened the conventional door method. There was an area where kids can practice their fire 50 safety behaviors, as well. A new addition to our Open House for 2006 included a Halloween Safety table. This year, that table was modified and expanded upon. Livonia firefighters participated in a September event held at Laurel Park Place Mall called the 'Passport to Safely." This project, spearheaded by Sgt. Teeter of LPD, was a huge success. Crowds were estimated in the thousands who attended the event. Atter being involved in the third -year annual event, more effort is being directed into this area. The large number of children that attend the indoor event are encouraging. Our dedicated efforts to educate our citizens are among the best anywhere. Our ideas were shared with the fire service community in one article that appeared in "Fire Engineering" magazine, (July issue), the nation's premiere fire training magazine. Other ideas were seen at the website for Fire Engineering magazine that has weekly featured articles. This is the second year we took on the project of creating a Fire Safety insert that was carried along with the Livonia Observer newspaper. The eight -page insert was designed for elementary -age students and families, and went out with the 21,000 copies of the Observer on October 8, and they were handed out to our Open House attendees on October 14. The newsletter "Couplings' made its debut this year. The newsletter is an & page newsletter designed for adult fire and life safety. It appears in electronic formal on the dlywebsite, and copies went outwith the Observer as well. Several informational arfides were prepared and ren in the Livonia Observer Newspaper, to further reach out to our adult audiences with messages of fire and life safety. We were also able to distribute our fire and life safety messages to the citizens of Livonia through the use of the following sources: Livonia Public Schools City Channel 8 Bright House Networks Livonia Observer The Livonia Housing Commission submits the following information on its acfivities and accomplishments for Silver Village, Newburgh Village, Community 51 Development Block Grant Program, McNamara Towers #1 and #2, Section 8 Rent Subsidy Program and Brashear Tower. SILVER VILLAGE -33780 LYNDON Silver Village occupancy was at 100% at all times. The wailing list consists of 52 "Livonia residents" and 33 "parents of Livonia residents." Activities and Accomplishments 1. Silver Village lumoverwas 12 units in 2006. 2. The mailbox structures and concrete pad extensions were replaced throughout Silver Village. 3. Carpeting was replaced in 8 one and two bedroom apartments, thereby completing our cycle replacement program. 4. The outside lighting poles and heads were replaced throughout the facility. 5. All apartments were inspected for safety and maintenance purposes. NEWBURGH VILLAGE -11999 NEWBURGH ROAD During 2006, 120 apartments were inspected and necessary repairs were made, in order to ensure decent, safe and sanitary housing, whereby maintaining resident satisfaction. Activities and Accomplishments Roofs and skylights in all 10 apartment buildings were replaced and the roof was replaced in the community building. Parking lots were re -striped and apartment numbers re -painted. Electronic fund transfer for rental payment was offered to all residents. Currently, there are 70 resident apartments enrolled in this program. There were 15 turnovers from January 1, 2006 through October 31, 2006. Occupancy remains at 100%. There are approximately 50 names on the Newburgh Village "resident waiting list" and approximately 14 names on the ..parents of residents waiting list." 52 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT The Community Development Office administered the following programs during the 2005-2006 fiscal year, through the Community Development Block Grant Program. Total CDBG expenditures for the year were $812,254.95. Below please find the accomplishments produced by each ofthese programs. Major Home Rehabilitation Loan 16 Households Served Program Emergency Home Rehabilitation Loan 16 Households Served Program Minor Home Repair Program 89 Households Served Emergency Utility Shut-Off Assistance 22 Households Served Senior Van Transportation Program 412 Persons Served Transportation Vouchers 3 Persons Served Mental Health Counseling Program 25 Persons Served First Step (Western Wayne County 189 Persons Served Project on Domestic Assault) Fair Housing Initiative NotApplicable Scattered Site Rental Homes 15 Households Served (Mngt./Maint.) Help Source 10 Persons Served Total Served: 797 HouseholdslPersons McNAMARA TOWERS #1 & #2 -19300 PURLINGBROOK & SCATTERED SITE HOMES McNamara Towers Building #1 1. All apartments were inspected and repairs made according to Housing Quality Standards (HQS). 2. 20 new refrigerators were installed. 3. 35 new air conditioners were installed. McNamara Towers Building #2 1. All apartments were inspected and repairs made according to Housing Quality Standards (HQS). 2. 20 new refrigerators were installed. 3. 40 new air conditioners were installed. The original parking lot at McNamara Towers was resurfaced at a cost of approximately $200,000. Installation of all automatic door openers was completed. 53 McNamara Towers had a total of 23 vacancies during 2006. Scattered Site Housing Kitchen renovations were made in two of the scattered site homes along with the routine repairs and maintenance. Unfinished landscaping from the previous year was completed at all the site homes. The Livonia Housing Commission Section 8 Rent Subsidy Program currently administers a Housing Choice Voucher Program consisting of 803 families. Fiscal Year 2005 SEMAP, Section 8 Management Assessment scored as a High Performer. An audit was conducted on the Section 8 program and no findings were found. We will be updating our waiting list again in 2007. We currently have 1,281 applicants on the waiting list. The current Section 8 Voucher Leasing rale is 98% WILLIAM W. BRASHEAR TOWER -17841 N. LAUREL PARK DRIVE The waiting list consists of approximately 10 applicants as of November 10, 2006. Brashear Tower is cumemy advertising 30-60 day occupancy for 1 bedroom units. Activities and Accomplishments 1. Replaced refrigerators in 14 units. 2. Installed new carpeting in 14 units. 3. Repainted 28 units for new move -ins. 4. Installed new vertical blinds in 28 units. 5. Completed repairs to exterior building panels in June, July and August 2006 to correct interior leaks to units and common areas. 6. Annual inspections were done in 196 units and the building common areas performed by the Livonia Housing Commission on October 11 and 12, 2006. 54 INSPECTION DEPARTMENT is responsible for all construction operations on private property. Included in its jurisdiction is building inspection, plan review, sanitation and ordinance enforcement. Areas of involvement include Zoning Board of Appeals, Building Code Board of Appeals and various civic groups. Coordination with State government agencies involving building construction is handled by this department. Plan Review for new buildings, alterations and additions, pools, demolitions, zoning compliance and signs is an integral part of the department's function, as well as the issuance of permits, sanitation and enforcing the City's Code of Ordinances designated as Inspection's responsibility. Inspections were made and permits issued for the rehabilitation of homes for the Community Development Block Program. Additionally the Inspection Department reviews lot splits for the Department of Assessment and reviews site plans and waiver use petitions for the Planning Department and provides support to all other departments as needed. BUILDING INSPECTION issued approximately 8,452 permits in 2005/96 for buildings, signs and mechanical installations, inducing new construction, additions, renovations and alterations. 34 permits were issued for new residential homes and 13 permits were issued for new commeroialfindustrial structures. In other activity, 102 single-family condominium units were constructed or are currently under construction. No permits for apartment buildings were issued this year. Mechanical permits (plumbing, electrical, heating and refrigeration) numbered approximately 4921 for the year. Residential additions/alterations, garages, decks/patios, fire repairs, pools, signs, zoning compliance, commercial/industrial additions, demolitions and moving permits comprised the remainder of permits issued. 59 demolition permits were issued during the year, 29 of which were residential structures. Permits for Christmas tree sales lots, pennant and banner displays, awnings, underground storage tanks and various special inspections were issued as required. Certificates of Occupancy are issued for all new residences, commercial and industrial buildings upon completion. State building, mechanical, plumbing, electrical and sign contractor licenses are registered yearly in this office. Additionally, official records are kept on fence contractors, excavators and demolition contractors. The systematic annual inspection of existing buildings for compliance with B.O.C.A. Property Maintenance Code continued through 2006. In connection with this program, 1430 inspections were made, violations issued when necessary and compliance obtained. This program is designed to maintain health and safety standards in the city. In addition to the annual inspection program the Inspection Department now requires that all one, two and multiple family rental dwelling units be licensed and inspected on an annual basis. This year 916 rental units were inspected by the City. 55 Additionally, 555 formal complaints were received and responded to throughout the year as they related to properly code violations. There were approximately 626 rental inspection violations and 1001 annual inspection violations that were issued for various code infractions during 2005/06. The valuation of new building activities for 2005/06 is $107491317. The revenue collected from all building activities was approximately $2,471,130. SANITATION AND ORDINANCE ENFORCEMENT is responsible for compliance with the City Zoning Ordinance #543 and also the Code of Ordinances #1688 as it pertains to the majority of all nuisance and noncriminal violations. These responsibilities include those things that affect the health, safety and welfare of the residents of the City, such as pollution, hazardous waste, trash and debris, vacant buildings, weed cutting, basic property maintenance and supervision of the collection of municipal refuse. The enforcement of special conditions of approval made by the Zoning Board of Appeals, City Council and the Planning Commission relative to site plans, variances, and waiver uses are the responsibility of Ordinance Enforcement. STATISTICS 2005-06 Total General Inspections Made 23,927 Building Maintenance and Repair 1277 Parking Lot Repairs 98 Trash and Debris 2635 Junk Vehicles 2290 Noxious Weeds' 5229 Noise/Air/Odor 203 Nuisances 2289 Illegal Signs on Commercial Property 722 Illegal Signs Removed from Public Properly 3057 Illegally Parked Recreational Vehicles 1069 Illegally Parked Commercial Vehicles 1094 Illegal Sales, Use and Occupancy 685 Misc. Illegally Parked Vehicles 1240 Right of Way encroachments 365 Vacant Buildings (Re-inspected/Posted) 1251 Snow on Sidewalks 252 License Violations 171 Sanitation activities included 1,618 citizen complaints regarding the collection of municipal refuse and the delivery of 286 recycling bins. 56 Enforcement of the Noxious Weed Ordinance induced the invesfigation of citizen complaints and the abatement of violations through the mowing of weeds and removal of debris from 897 properties by the CityWeed Mowing Contractor. BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS The Building Code Board of Appeals provides any person the right to appeal a decision of the code official refusing to grant a modification of the building code covering the manner of construction or materials to be used in the erection, alteration or repair of a building or structure. An application for appeal shall be based on a claim that the true intent of the code or the rules legally adopted there under have been incorrectly interpreted, the provisions of this code do not fully apply, or an equivalentfonn of construction can be used. A summary of the activities of the Building Code Board of Appeals for the fiscal year 2005-06 is as follows: Meetings Scheduled 5 Appeals Filed 6 Hearings Held 6 Re -hearings 0 Appeals Granted 6 Appeals Denied 0 Appeals Dropped 0 Appeals Tabled 0 All records are on file in the offices of the Inspection Department. 57 DEPARTMENT OF LAW LITIGATION There are three (3) cases pending in the Circuit Court for the County of Wayne, where the City of Livonia, and/or City officials, are involved either as plaintiffs or as defendants. Nine (9) other cases were resolved in 2005-2006 either pursuant to a stipulation or by final judgment of the Wayne County Circuit Court. There are no civil cases pending in the 16th District Court. Three (3) civil cases were resolved in the 16th District Court and one (1) case was resolved in the 80th District Court. Two (2) cases are pending in the Michigan Court of Appeals and two (2) other cases were resolved. No cases are pending in the Michigan Supreme Court. Two cases were resolved in the Michigan Supreme Court. Four (4) cases are pending in the United Stales District. Seventy-one (71) cases are pending before the Michigan Tax Tribunal. Thirty-six (36) other cases were disposed of. (NOTE: Settlement agreements may have been reached in some of the cases reported as pending. It is the practice of the Law Department to keep a case open unlil the Tax Tribunal has entered a final order; the Tribunal often takes several weeks to enter final orders atter receipt of the stipulation of the parties.) The foregoing does not include any appeals taken in ordinance violation cases from the District Court to the Circuit Court, and/or the Court of Appeals, and/or the Supreme Court. DISTRICT COURT From December 2005 through November 2006, the following number of cases were disposed of in the Livonia District Court. Criminal Traffic Jury Trials Ordinance Misdemeanor 1126 2810 0 Ordinance Drank Driving 241 1 There are three (3) cases which were appealed from the 16th District Court which are pending in the Michigan Court of Appeals. In addition, five (5) other cases which were appealed from the 16th District Court to a higher court have been resolved. 58 OPINIONS No formal opinions were issued by the Department of Law during 2005-06. Upon request, the Department issued a substantial number of recommendations in correspondence to the various City Departments, Boards and Commissions and the City Council by members of the legal staff upon various subjects and matters. ADMINISTRATIVE APPEALS This office represents the City and its officials from time to time in formal appeals and grievance proceedings before the Civil Service Commission. We also appear in matters involving the City before various State agencies, including the Michigan Public Service Commission, the Michigan Employment Relations Commission and the Michigan Liquor Control Commission. ARBITRATION At present there are no arbitration cases pending in which this office is involved. No civil rights complaints are pending before the Michigan Civil Rights Commission or EEOC. Two (2) civil nghls/EEOC complaints were resolved. ORDINANCES The following number of ordinances, prepared by the Department of Law, were submitted to the City Council and were adopted by the Council during the year 2005-06: 12 amendments to the Zoning Ordinance and Zoning Map; 11 amendments to the substance of the Zoning Ordinance; 2 vacating ordinances; and 25 amendments to the Livonia Code of Ordinances. In addition, three (3) proposed ordinance amendments have been prepared and submitted to the City Council and the same are now awaiting Council action. 59 PROPERTY TRANSACTIONS 1. Pursuant to Council Resolution 390-04, property located at 14917 Country Club in Section 20 was purchased from Wayne County in 2004. Pursuant to Council Resolution 355-06, this property was sold to Glen Gates for the amount of back taxes ($6,637.15), plus Inspection Department costs ($4,081.76), delinquent water bills ($3,911.70), closing, recording and transfer fees ($21.00), court costs ($179.88) and Law Department administrative costs ($750.00), for atotal of $15,581.49. This transaction was completed on July 28, 2006. NOTE: Not included in this report are the numerous transactions involving the acquisition of easements without monetary consideration. 1. Preparation and dreffing of proposed resolutions in connection with City Council meetings. 2. Providing a representative at meetings of the Zoning Board of Appeals, and, upon request, at meetings of the City Planning Commission, the Board of Trustees of the Employees Retirement System and other City commissions and agencies. 3. Preparation and review of all contracts entered into between the City and other persons, as well as approving "as to form" all legal documents that are processed in the City. 4. Approval, typing and transmission to the District Court warrant requests (445) as submitted by the Police Division and the Inspection Department. 5. Provide assistance to other departments in the collection of delinquent fees, charges and taxes by taking whatever steps may be necessary, including the institution of litigation. 6. Refer to the Michigan Municipal Risk Management Authority for disposition all lawsuits and claims of action against the City which would be covered through the Citys agreement with the Authority. 7. Provide legal assistance to various City department heads and supervisors with respect to labor matters, including review of proposed disciplinary actions. 8. Citizens' disputes and problems requiring the advice and counsel of this office are increasing and require more time than ever before. 60 DIRECT SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC Once again activity and service levels have remained high despite reductions in staffing and other resources. Attendance at library sponsored programs remains very high and circulation has actually increased for the first time in several years, which defies recent decreases in circulation experienced by the public library community at large. Technology-based services have continued to grow in popularity, as indicated by the dramatic increase in internet workstation use. Patrons have also stepped up their use of the many useful links and other services provided on the Library website. The Livonia Public Library now has 1342 professionally selected and organized links to make using the internet even easier. Patrons can still search the library catalog and check their record from home, as well as having the ability to renew items online or by phone. Citizens can now also apply for their library card online. An exciting new service at the Library is our'Wireless" internet access, which gives library users the opportunity to make more efficient use of library resources, by being able to interact directly with their laptops at the same time. This is an important addition to the onsite internet workstations already available. Business people, job hunters and students all benefit from the convenience of the library's computer services, along with citizens who may not have access to technology at home. The Sam internet management system that was installed at Civic Center Branch last year, has now also been installed at our Sandburg Branch. This allows fair and equal use of library computers with minimal staff intervention. Patrons enjoy the ability to self -serve and staff can devote more time to assisting citizens with more complicated research questions. The Auto Reference Center database is a new and popular online subscnpfion that allows patrons easy access to automotive repair information. News of upcoming events, new reference books and seasonal facts and trivia remain popular with the many recipients of the Library's e -newsletter, which now has 548 subscribers. The Library still offers quick and efficient automated phone call notification that requested books have arrived. Public meeting rooms provided at Civic Center, Noble and Sandburg branches continue to be in high demand as a venue for performances and a forum for community events and informational meetings, as well as the many library - sponsored programs that are offered. Numerous small citizen groups, clubs, and associations, as well as other City departments look to this significant public resource as a vital and valuable public service. Civic Center branch is always in particularly high demand with the public and we are looking forward to the opportunity to repair and upgrade the auditorium through capital improvements to the light and sound systems in the new budget year. The Library enjoyed positive coverage from multiple media outlets again this year. Local papers featured articles on the library including pieces by the Detroit 61 News on children's programs like the Winter craft program at Sandburg and the "Bob the Builder" and "Angelina Ballerina' programs at Civic Center. The Detroit Free Press published a feature on an impressive Olympics memorabilia display at Noble branch. The Livonia Observer printed a color front page arfide on one of the many wonderful storytime program offered at Noble branch. The Livonia Public Library also captured national attention in the major professional magazine "Public Libraries" with an artide about Children's Librarian Dottie Kennedy blending her hobby of raising exotic birds with her work as a Children's Librarian. The Livonia Observer once again generously printed the names of the lop -performing Summer Reading participants. City Channel 8 taped some of the Noontime Concerts again this year, broadcasting free musical entertainment to the community. The display areas at all time branches were busy again this year with all kinds of colorful and informative exhibits. The Livonia Arts Commission booked monthly art exhibits into the Civic Center gallery and display cases at all of the branches showcased items like Depression glass, Barbie dolls, teapots, pilgrims, Olympic memorabilia, rocks and minerals, handmade toys, collectable spoons and a special set of dollhouses bringing awareness to the childhood condition of Turner Syndrome. Library programs were very popular with our community again this year, with impressive attendance at events like the Summer Reading Program, which keeps up students' reading skills over the summer and encourages children and teens to enjoy the Library and to embrace reading as a lifelong skill. The Library offers something for all ages, starting with Mother Goose, Pied Piper, Melody Lane and other storytime sessions designed to help develop pre -reading skills in toddlers and young children, continuing through older children with programs like family movies, sign language, dance, crafts, making your own book, mime and book- related events featuring popular books like Harry Potter, Harold and the Purple Crayon, and Lemony Snicket. Teen programs included practical information like Dollars for College, AAA Teen Driver Program and Babysitting Workshops, as well as fun programs like Anime Movie night, scrapbooking, comic book drawing and dance instruction and DDR (dance, dance revolution) programs. The library offers something for the older crowd, loo, with instructional classes on using MS Office and the Internet, book discussion clubs and informative speakers on gardening, astronomy, quilts, travel and free music concerts. The Library also does obituary searches and proctors exams for institutions like MSU, CMU, WMU, Oakland University, Jackson Community College, DeVry Business School, The Gemological Institute, Indiana University and Brigham Young. The Livonia Public Library has been fortunate in its many partnering relationships with various organizations. The Library provided entertainment and craft programs in conjunction with the City's Tree Lighting Ceremony and in cooperation with the Livonia Parks and Recreafion Department and the Livonia 62 Rotary Club. The Library also worked with the Livonia Public Schools through the Perrinville Parent -Preschool Jamboree and other programs highlighting the importance of reading to preschoolers, and by giving library tours and making numerous classroom visits. The Library also partnered with the Livonia Public Schools on a number of other projects, including ELVs (Early Literacy Volunteer — a volunteer tutoring program), the 'Young Author' program, and the "Author in Autumn" outreach program, which benefits local school children. The Clowns around Redford performed their annual clown show and a number of CAPA programs look place at the Library. The Library receives generous cooperation and support from many local businesses that provide incenfives for the Summer Reading Program. The Library was fortunate in hating the Livonia Arts Commission co-sponsor the popular Noontime Concert Series again this year and we also were graciously given the opportunity to have a booth promoting the Summer Reading Program and other Library services at the Arts Commission's "Art four the Heart" event. The Livonia Observer cooperated with us again by graciously making room in their pages for the names of the top readers in our Summer Reading Program. A number of programs throughout the year were co- sponsored by the Rising Stars Youtheatre and the Detroit Story League, encouraging performance, creativity and storytelling as an important part of the educational process. The Library also assists City employees and other City departments by providing meeting room facilites for various meetings and events. The Library also assisted with collections for the Livonia Goodfellows and the Gift of Reading program. FACILITIES A number of internet workstations were updated at Civic Center to allow for greater patron functionality. The SAM internet management system became fully functional at Civic Center and has recently been installed at Sandburg branch, as well. Wireless Internet is the hot new service that came up at Civic Center this year. Patrons love the ability to use their laptops and access the Library's internet and other services at the same time. Several monitors, a color printer, and new replacement workstations were installed in several areas of the library. The Library experienced a major upgrade of our circulation software and new telecommunications lines have been installed in cooperation with the TLN (The Library Network — the cooperative that hosts our shared automation system) and we hope to have increased response time by the end of the year. New DVD players were purchased for use in the public meeting rooms and the carpel was replaced in the Sandburg meeting room. New storage and display shelving for AV and Teen materials was added at Sandburg and Civic Center. Despite the heavy road construction on Seven Mile Road over the summer, circulation and program attendance remained steady atthat location. Hours of Library service were maintained at the same slightly reduced level as the past several years, despite the loss of additional staff. We are looking forward to restoring the original hours of service to Civic Center, once sufficient 63 staff can be replaced in the new budget year. This will allow us to provide even greater service and convenience to the community. We are grateful for the continued generosity of the City Clerk's Office in sharing their delivery van with us so that we can make our daily inter -library deliveries. Making deliveries continues to be difficult, however, since there is no longer a vehicle in the general City pool to cover the times when be City Clerk van is unavailable. Deliveries are, therefore, sometimes missed. This can cause workflow problems for staff and slows down service to our citizens. Library Commissioners Patsy Girnys, Richard Joyner and Audette Palmer were re -appointed to serve another term beginning in October. Program Supervisor Sandy Pinkosky retired creating an opportunity for a string of internal promotional opportunifies. Karen Delany was promoted to the position of Program Supervisor, Maureen Gordon and Dianne DelVecchio filled the vacant Library Aide II posifions, and Ghada Bochenek and Debra Finkbeinerwere promoted to Library Aide I status. We look forward to the ability to replace a number of positions at Civic Center Branch in the new budget year, alloying us to restore our previous hours ofservice. Staffing levels will continue at a reduced level at Noble and Sandburg branches and reduced hours of operation will remain in effect in those locations into the new budget year. FUNDING The millage continues to be the major source of revenue for the Library holding at 82.2%. The portion of the Library's budget that comes from the millage has shifted in recent years due to reductions in the contributions from the City's general fund. Stale Ad to Libraries was reduced last year. These funds are expected to increase a little in the new year, but funding to the library cooperatives that provide services to public libraries in the state are expected to go down, leaving no net gain from this funding source going into the new year. Unique Management Service was back to doing more regular collections for the Library this year. Funds recovered through this agency allow the Library to replace lost and stolen items. The Library continues to seek ndside funding and support to help supplement services to the community. The Livonia Arts Commission approved another generous grant to help underwrite the costs of the Noontime Concert Series. The Children's Department received a grant from The Michigan Humanities Council to cover the Pippin Puppets performance during the Summer Reading Program. Local businesses generously donated incentives to the Library for its Summer Reading Program to help encourage young readers. The Library extends its heartfelt thanks to the many citizens who donated money to the Library in honor or in memory of their loved ones over the past year. 64 The Friends of the Livonia Public Library awarded two $1500 scholarships to worthy staff members pursuing their college educations this year. The Friends continue to work tirelessly to organize and carry out their Book Sale events and they have also reopened the old gift shop space as a used bookstore. The Library is especially appreciative of their hard work and generous donations, as we have moved through a period of continuing economic hard times. We are grateful for the funds that the Friends donate to us every year, but the labor and revenue attached to this wonderfully supportive volunteer group cannot be guaranteed or planned on as part of the regular budget planning process of the Library as a City Department. 1 G\ IIA 1CNa11111:1A91 TA PARKS AND RECREATION We Create Community Through People, Parks and Programs A strong commitment to Parks and Recreation services is a key component to the success of our community. We provide facilities, programs, classes and opportunities where ones leisure time can: become wholesome, where memories are created, skills are developed and where the quality of life of our residents, theirfamilies and fiends are enhanced. With the assistance of 13 full time staff and 300 dedicated and enthusiastic part- time staff, including the Department of Public Services, Building Maintenance, and Park Maintenance, we served: 65 October 2005 October2006 Library Program Attendance 28,541 26,609 Meeting Room Attendance 53,132 46,785 Registered Borrowers 50,716 46,592 ` Items in the Collection 294,195 289,663 " Circulation 651,477 720,134 Library Website Usage 150,004 211,312 Internet Workstations 49,778 75,071 Inactive Library cards were purged this year "Outdated and damaged materials are weeded from the collection periodically "9ncrease of over 70% ""Increase of over 66% PARKS AND RECREATION We Create Community Through People, Parks and Programs A strong commitment to Parks and Recreation services is a key component to the success of our community. We provide facilities, programs, classes and opportunities where ones leisure time can: become wholesome, where memories are created, skills are developed and where the quality of life of our residents, theirfamilies and fiends are enhanced. With the assistance of 13 full time staff and 300 dedicated and enthusiastic part- time staff, including the Department of Public Services, Building Maintenance, and Park Maintenance, we served: 65 ? 26,359 individuals who participated in registered classes, programs, and leagues. ? An average of 3,000 individuals visited the LCRC daily. ? 112,804 golfers played at our three courses. ? 6,600 individuals participated in Special Events. ? 17,173 visitors enjoyed the outdoor pools. ? 30,340 attended an organized picnic at a pavilion. We received $49,702.00 in donations for: improvements to athletic fields, parks, Wilson Barn and also for programming and special events. Through the assistance of Housing and a Community Block Grant a play structure, picnic table and bench were installed at Broadmoor Park. Proud recipient ofthe: MRPA Community Service Award— Livonia Civic Chorus MRPA Brochure Marketing Award —"L" Magazine MRPA Special Flyer Award — Personal Trainer Tri -fold Three major projects underway are the Master Park Plan, V.I.P. Plan and Emergency Action Plan. The Master Park Plan is a general roadmap for what programs, parks and facilifies that Livonia should attempt to develop in the next few years. This year phase two of the Master Park Plan involved focus group meetings and a survey. The purpose of the survey and focus groups was to gather community input, which will aide in the planning for the future, and also to evaluate our current strengths and weaknesses within the department. The five focus groups that we targeted were seniors, athletic groups, city employees, staff and an open meeting to the community at large. The results of these meetings provided valuable information as to usage of the current facilities, as well as what the community saw as the need for open space, future facilities and programs. The department sent surveys to every household (39,249 in total) in Livonia by including a survey in the L magazine; the response rale from this blanket survey was approximately 1% of the total households in Livonia. In addition we directly mailed a second set of surveys to randomly chosen participants in our parks and recreation programs. This second set of surveys received a much higher response rale. The rate was between 12% and 16% depending on our six service divisions. Kirbach Consultancy compiled the survey results. The research shaved that the public in general was happy with our services both as a whole department, and also in each division. The report also looked at survey results by age, gender, quadrant of the city, income levels, length of residency, and nearest elementary school. For the most part these findings were not appreciably different than the aggregate survey, and any differences that we see is something that we will need 66 to take into account in our future plans, such as a performing arts auditorium, more nature trails, a showcase park and park restroom facilities. The VIP Plan (Vision, Insight and Planning) involves all full time staff in each service division meeting to develop a strategic plan for the overall direction and focus of the department. Emphasis is placed on core values, guiding principles (finance, marketing, programs & services, infrastructure and development), Mission and Vision Statements. As part of our Emergency Action Plan we have a Training Coordinator who works with all staff in first aid and CPR training, developing an emergency training handbook and working with Police and Fire. The Department works cooperatively with and delivers services to other City Departments, civic organizations, community businesses and the Livonia and Clarenceville Public Schools. The most important communication tool of all is word-of-mouth by satisfied customers/participants. Through staff training we emphasize the importance in serving our customerstguests. On a daily basis we continue to improve our means of communication through the City's web site, Community Center monument marquee, plasma screens, message boards, ktiosk, display board, press releases, tri -folds, cable releases, event flyers, guest appearances on Channel 8 and at civic organization/business meetings. Distribution of comment cards and evaluations continues to provide important feedback on our performance. Our award winning "L" Magazine, which varies in size from 56 to 72 pages, has been received well and is a great source in distributing information to our residents informing them of the opportunities available to them. Our Department recognizes the dynamic and unique role we play in fostering a healthy community and lifestyles of those we serve, through one of our six Service Divisions. • Aquatics • Athletics • Community Center • Gott • Special Events • Parks 67 AQUATIC DIVISION The Aquatics Division is comprised of two indoor pools at the Community Recreation Center and three (Botsford, Clements Circe, Shelden) outdoor pools. We provide safe, educational, and enjoyable aquatic services to the citizens through a wide array of swim lessons, water fitness classes, open swim, lap swim, diving lessons, pool rentals, synchronized swimming, special events, and swim teams. Communitv Recreation Center This year we provided the Pass Holders the opportunity to swim at any one of the three (3) outdoors pools. A total of 1,209 members purchased the $5.00 pass. Over the last year the classes and programs we offered have over 4,038 participants, not including the swim teams. This is an increase of 288 participants over last year. We were the host of swim practices for four (4) swim teams, and are considered the home pool for three (3) of those teams. We are also the home of the Catholic High School League Swimming and Diving championships for both men and women. We are also the host of the BC District meet for USA swimming. Other large meets that we hosted this year at our facilities include the WLAA relay meet, the country club league championships, the snowball splash, the Spartan Invitational, and the WLAA women's junior varsity meet. The listed meets had between 300 and 1,200 participants each. In addition we hosted eight (8) dual meets for Ladywood High School, and three (3) dual meets for Catholic Central High School. Our Community Center special events this year included the V annual Cardboard boat races, and a very successful theme night called Treasure Island Day. The Lap pool was shut down for routine and preventive maintenance in April, and the Leisure pool was shutdown in August. Outdoor Pools Botsford opened on June 10 and Clements Circle on June 17. Botsford dosed August 27 and Clements Closed September 10. We had over 16,000 people enjoy the pools this year (4,824 at Botsford, 6,815 at Clements Circle, and 5,534 at Shelden) inducing day and season passes. This year saw the return of Shelden pool to the aquatic division, the pool opened on June 25 and dosed on August 13. In order to bring Shelden up to the quality 68 standards that are enjoyed at all of our pools we replaced the pool heater, pump, pump motor, chlorinator, and flowmeter. Clements Circle pool also saw a major improvement this year. The filter and associated plumbing was removed and replaced. Botsford had to be shut down for a period of two weeks this summer due to an electrical problem leading into the building, this is the likely cause of the laver participant numbers and is definitely a cause of decreased rental revenue and swim lesson participation. Our swim lesson program had 481 students at the Botsford and Shelden pods, and we had 473 season pass holders. Five (5) different swim teams used our outdoor pools for summer practice. This year we held our V Annual Super Youth Triathlon, which had 61 participants. We hosted eight (8) special event theme nights and also held a Family fun night weekly at each pool. ATHLETIC DIVISION Athletic Services provides a wide variety of athletic programs for adults and youth of all ages. Programs include league play men'sfladies softball, men's basketball, youth basketball, t -ball, coach pitch, softball, baseball, ice skating program, roller skating, soccer, archery, tennis and bowling. League Play We offered over 30 different activities for team sports, had over 6,676 participants and played over 2,000 games. We offered the following team sports for participants ranging in age from four years to over 65 years old. We had over 148,822 contact hours in our athletic programs. Programs Ages # of # of # of Avg Game Contact Teams Games Players Time Hours* Winter Men's 18 & older 16 112 192 1 hour 3,360 Basketball UAL 14& 83 415 1,245 1.25 hours 15,562 Basketball under Summer UAL Baseball 16 & 100 590 1,500 2.5 hours 59,000 & Softball under Collegiate 20& 8 124 160 2.5 hours 12,400 Baseball under Men's Softball 18 & over 74 518 1,332 1.25 hours 25,900 Men's 18 & over 9 63 162 1.25 hours 3,150 Modified Women's 18 & over 14 98 252 1.25 hours 4,900 FF Softball Co -Ed Softball 18 & over 17 119 306 1.25 hours 5,950 Senior Softball 55 & over 7 70 105 1.25 hours 4,200 T -Ball SS yr olds 25 100 450 1.25 hours 5,000 Coach Pilch 7-8yrolds 38 152 684 1.25 hours 7,600 10& 8 32 144 1.25 hours 1,600 Girl's under Slowpilch 13& 6 24 144 1.25 hours 1,200 under `Contact Hours: 1. Baseball and softball equals number of games x 40 (2 teams @ 20tteam) x length of game. 2. Basketball equals number of games x 30 (2 teams@ 15/team) x length of game. 3. Does not include practice time or number of spectators at games. Archery Range The outdoor Archery Range open April through October has seven (7) targets at various distances with an additional broad -head range. The range hosted several instructional workshops throughout the summer as well as a Shoot to Score Competition. Several area Boy Smut and Girl Scout groups utilized the range for badge certifications. Approximately 845 people attended the range through general admission and season passes and the revenue for the range is $2,951. Ice Skating The City owns two ice arenas, Eddie Edgar and Devon -Aire. The Livonia Hockey Association manages both rinks and offers leagues, clinics, tournaments and open skating. Additional locker rooms were added to the Devon -Aire Arena this summer. Our Learn to Skate Program provided 668 individuals the opportunity to take skating classes. Representing Livonia were 90 skaters in local and state competitions. In addition, 42 girls joined one of three Synchronized Skating Teams. Over 150 skaters ended the season with three performances in our spectacular ice show called "Michigan Music on Ice'. Attendance exceeded 2,100 spectators. The skating program touched over 800 different youth through the year. 70 The Community Center in its third year of operation continues to meet its mission of serving the whole community by offering annual memberships, daily admissions, dass participation, league play, community group partnerships and rentals. Through all the ways we serve the community, the recreation center alone averages over 3,000 visitors per day. Since the center is only closed nine (9) days per year, over 1 million people come through the door each year. Total Annual Membership 14,578 Family 10,120 Adult 1,422 Couple 1,258 Senior 728 Business/Corporate 414 Youthr-een 283 Young Adult 280 Matinee 73 Summer membership grew in 2006 with a total of 1,440 members Grand Total of 57,397 day passes Class activity has also increased. Not only an increase in the number of offerings but also an increase in the number of people participating in each class. Many classes and leagues reach the maximum enrollment each session. Internet class registration increased 39%. Making registration more convenient to our participants is important. Participants peracdvity Aerobics Resident Non -Residents Total Day Passes 42,573 14,824 Youth 18,590 6,911 Teens 12,975 3,414 Adults 10,095 4,173 Seniors 913 326 Grand Total of 57,397 day passes Class activity has also increased. Not only an increase in the number of offerings but also an increase in the number of people participating in each class. Many classes and leagues reach the maximum enrollment each session. Internet class registration increased 39%. Making registration more convenient to our participants is important. Participants peracdvity Aerobics 6,156 Camp Swoosh 514 Climbing Wall 243 Fitness Center 177 Classes/Leagues 4,466 Personal Training 682 Special Events 280 Swim Lessons 3,215 Water Exercise 1,343 Special projects completed in 2006 were: 71 1. Addition of six (6) new light poles in the drive area. 2. 18 surveillance cameras installed inside and outside the building. 3. Automatic door opener on the family locker room door for handicap access. 4. 26 new cardio equipment pieces. 5. Added file floor in three (3) party rooms making the room more user friendly. Fitness and Wellness Programming continues to expand and includes: climbing wall dasses, fitness hub workouts, personal training, nutritional counseling, group exercise (aerobics), fitness assessments and health/wellness seminars. We have finalized a massage therapy program that will begin in 2007. The climbing wall continues to be a popular feature with 13 routes ranging in degree of difficulty in order to challenge the novice through elite climber. A wide range of youth and adult climbing classes are offered throughout the weekends. Specially programming has been added and includes: rock the wall climbing socials on every Wednesday and camp climb classes. We have also added a Boy/Gid Scout Merit Badge program. This program is a 34 hour class with classroom lectures and climbing wall time. The fitness hub has remained a very busy area. Free equipment orientations are offered on an hourly basis. We also offer the Polar BodyAge assessment. The assessment measures fitness levels of an individual and calculates their individual BodyAge. For youth, we offer two types of youth orientations: Teens in Training Part I and Teens in Training Part 11. The Ft Hub has 80 cardio machines, 17 selectorized weight -training machines, 2 cabled functional trainers, 2 sets of 5lb-1001b dumbbells and 1 set of 20lb-1101b fixed cud bars. Also available for member use is an assortment of plate -loaded machines such as a smith machine, squat rack, leg press, calf raise and chest press benches. Another feature of the fit hub is the Eneroise Cardio Theater function found on most of our cardio equipment. The Eneroise unit enables the member to tune into a television program while getting their cardio workout in. Personal Training continues to be utilized on a consistent basis. With 14 certified personal trainers, members can utilize personal training as an individual, couple or even in a group setting. Personal trainers help members become successful with their fitness goals. Nutritional counseling is an additional service that the LCRC is offering. We currently have two (2) registered dietitians on staff. Members meet with the dietitians on an individual basis. We have also incorporated dietary services into some of our dass and seminar offerings as well. 72 With 26 certified aerobics instructors our group exercise classes continue to expand and grow. Eighty-nine classes are currently offered seven (7) days a week. Women on weights, lifestyle/body makeover, yoga, cycle, step and pilates are a few of our most popular dasses. Sports and Leisure The LCRC continues to offer a variety of sports leagues and clinics, reflecting the diversity and strengths of the community. This past year we offered the following leagues: Boys and Girls Youth Basketball, Men's Basketball, Co -Ed Indoor Volleyball, Sand Volleyball, Youth Roller Hockey, Youth Soccer, and our newest addition, Adult Floor Hockey. We continue to offer a number of youth sports clinics anc/or camps for volleyball, roller hockey, soccer, basketball, pre-school sports, tennis, and cheer. This past summer we partnered with Scicluna Soccer to offer three (3) weeks of full day soccer, swimming, and advanced skills camps, which proved to be extremely successful. We also continue to diversify in our pre-school, youth, and adult leisure classes and programs. Some core examples of classes include martial arts, ballet, jazz, pre-school skills classes, music with joy interactive classes, art, and Parent Break Night to name a few. Summer Camp Swoosh, which is an adventure day camp, proved once again to be a success and a necessity in the community. Camp Swoosh increased in revenue from the previous year by approximately 15%. This year a pre-school half-day version of Camp Swoosh, called Mini - Swoosh was introduced. Kid Quarters Our short term child care operation, continues to serve our customers needs, allowing parents to stay active and involved not only in the community but in a healthy lifestyle, while their children are in a safe and convenient environment. Kid Quarters generated approximately $20,300.00 in sales. Rentals The LCRC leads the way in birthday party fun. Each weekend 10-20 parties are held at the recreation center, totaling over 700 parties, featuring the leisure pool, tree fort or climbing wall. Many groups and teams rent gym time during off- season training. After -hour rentals keep the center hopping into the night on weekends. These large special gatherings give time for great socialization for family, friends and neighbors. A total of 1,175 events took place. 73 GOLF DIVISION The City's three (3) Golf Courses, Idyl Wyld, Fox Creek, and Whispering Willows, had a successful season considering the unseasonable weather in summer and fall. Rounds Played - Whispering Willows 39,246 Idyl Wytd 35,456 Fox Creek 38102 Total 112,804 Summer temperature in June kept golfers home in the air condition; fall rains and early snow kept golfers away during the fall season. Unfortunately, the weather was not the only obstacle that effected revenue. The City of Livonia changed restaurant operators at Fox Creek Golf Course; consequently, outing revenue was down over $30,000. Despite the 2006 outing revenue loss, the outing patrons were quite pleased with the service they received. Customers simply did not want to book an outing in advance while the facility was under renovations. Organization and planning for the 2007 is already underway and both parties are looking forward to the next season. Capital Expenditures included phase II of the Fox Creek Ash Tree restoration; trees have been planted and removed. A new outdoor bathroom facility has been installed at Fox Creek and purchase orders have been issued for work on the Driving Range at Whispering Willows and the replacement of culverts at Idyl Wyld. All other approved capital expenditures are being held over to the 2007 season. Expenditures that will be held over include completing phase II of the Fox Creek tree restoration, panting lot surfacing at the Fox Creek maintenance building, Fox Creek Club House renovations and Idyl Wyld Club House renovations. Programs for the year included: Senior Citizens Golf Leagues and Championships. Senior participation was up $54,000 this season. Women's 9 and 18 hole Golf Leagues and Championships. Youth Golf Progmm and tournaments were successful. Youth and Senior Golf Clinics were held for free at all three courses. Program participation increased for both the paid and non -paid programs. Hearts of Livonia outing was a great success. Observer-Eccentdc Golf Tournament had increased participation. 74 SPECIAL EVENT DIVISION The Department places great emphasis on special events and programs. It is our intent to play an integral role in developing community involvement by working with local businesses and civic organizations that provide professional input, volunteers and/or financial assistance. A sense of family and individual pude and community spirt is developed through such events as; Daddy/Daughter dance, Mother/Son dance, holiday activities, summer playground program, youth fitness meet, tree lighting ceremony, Cardboard boat races, Elk's soccer shoot and hoop shoot, Winter Fest, Pitch, hit &con, to mention a few. Over 6,600 individuals have benefited from participating in our special events, totaling 76,000 hours in which we had direct contact with them. Event Ages #of Time #of Contact Co -Sponsored Days People Hours By Programs Winter/Spring/Fall Roller& Inline 5& 24 1 375 9,000 Riverside Skating up wks Arena Youth Bowling 18 & 26 2 433 22,516 Merri-Bowl, Leagues under wks Clovedanes, Wondedand, Woodland Summer Playground 5-10 35 5 164 28,700 Parks & Program Recreation Tennis Lessons 6-18 16 1 56 896 Parks & Recreation Intro to Archery 10& 1 4 36 144 Parks& up Recreation Triathlon 6-12 1 3 52 156 Walmart, Wolverine Sports, and Conservation Club Total Baseball 7-17 3 4 18 216 Parks & Recreation Mad Science 5-12 4 4.5 33 594 Parks & Camps Recreation Nature Camp 5-12 4 2 16 128 Parks & Recreation 75 Special Events Winter Santa's Workshop Gr K- 1 0.5 120 60 Livonia Kiwanis Calling 2 and Community Resources Santa Bowling 3-6 1 1.5 132 198 Mem-Bowl Santa Mailbox 7 & 1 0.5 184 92 Livonia Kiwanis under Essay Contest 5-12 1 1 383 383 Friends of the Wilson Barn Tree Lighting All 1 2 400+ 800+ Rotary Club, Ceremony Libraries, Civic Chorus, and Youth Choir Lunch with Santa 12 & 1 2 41 82 Jaycees and under Kiwanis Elk's Hoop Shoot 8-13 1 2.5 50 125 Livonia Elks Contest Lodge MRPA Hoop 7-14 1 2 93 186 MRPA Shoot Contest Daddy/Daughter 4-16 1 2 102 204 Parks & Dance Recreation Mother/Son 4-9 1 2 62 124 Parks & Dance Recreation Civic Chorus All 1 1 150 150 Civic Chorus Concert Spring Take Pride in All 1 3 200 600 Rotary Club, Livonia Day Smuts, and School Groups Memorial Day All 1 4 200+ 800+ Veteran's Ceremony Alliance Hunter Safety 11 & 1 12 43 516 Parks & Course up Recreation Easter Egg Hunt 12 & 1 3 1,000 3,000 Livonia Rotary under and Jaycees Civic Chorus 18& 2 2 200 800 Livonia Civic Concert up Chorus Easter Bunny 12 & 1 2 63 126 Jaycees and Lunch under Kiwanis Pilch, Hit & Run 7-14 1 2.5 24 60 Parks & Recreation 76 =I Music From the All 8 1.5 zoo+ 2,400+ Arts Heart under Commission Relay for Life All 1 2.5 25 62.5 City Elks Soccer Shoot 13 & 1 3.5 26 91 Departments Youth Fitness 7-14 1 4 154 616 Parks & Meet 12 & 1 0.25 1,100 275+ Recreation Shoot to Score All 1 4 21 84 Parks & Craft Hours 10& 1 4 63 252 Recreation Fall Lunch with 12 & 1 2 86 172 Livonia Goblins under Jaycees & Kiwanis Elks Soccer Shoot 13 & 1 3.5 26 91 Livonia Elk's under Lodge Haunted Stroll 12 & 1 0.25 1,100 275+ Friends of the under Wilson Barn Craft Hours 10& 1 4 63 252 Friends of the under Wilson Barn Saturday Scream All 1 4 140 560 Parks & Fest Recreation Hunter Safety 11 & 2 12 90 1,080 Parks & Course up Recreation and Michigan DNR Turkey Trot All 1 2 75 150 Parks & Recreation Punt, Pass & Kick 15 & 1 1.5 14 21 Parks & under Recreation Ja1 r1L69r1VA611017 Our parks are a great place for families and groups to gather for picnics, outdoor activities or just to visit, walk, hike or use various amenities; pavilions, grills, play structures, ball fields, soccer fields, tennis courts, nature trails, walking paths, fitness dusters, in-line courts, playgrounds, sand volleyball courts or Wilson Barn. It is impossible to put a total number of individuals visiting our parks, now that's priceless" Park Maintenance maintains all parks, handles inspections and works with us in providing safe, clean and quality parks fiat our residents have raved about and come to expect. Approximately 425 permits were issued for picnics at Rotary, John Slymelski Veteran's, Bicentennial, Clements Circle, Mies and Shelden Parks. Our revenue 77 for the pavilion rentals was $29,319 for the season. Five (5) picnic packs were rented. The parks were also the sites of numerous special events and activities. Cross- country ski trails were set at Bicentennial Park, Fox Creek, Whispering Willows and Idyl Wyld Golf Courses and had limited use. The Rotary Club continues to assist us in park improvements. Activities and projects handled by the Planning Commission and the Planning Department for the year 2006 included the following: Subdivision Plats Considered Preliminary Plats 0 Final Plats 0 Extensions 0 Petitions Processed Rezoning 9 Waiver of Use 29 Vacating 4 Site Plans 20 Site Condominiums 5 Sign Permits 4 Greenbelt& Landscape 3 Satellite Dish 0 Meetings Held Public Hearings (48 items) Regular Meetings Study Meetings Special Regular Meetings Amendments Master Plan Amendments Language Amendments (Ord. 543) 9 19 19 1 0 3 Throughout the past year, the Planning Department was closely involved in a number of new developments, as well as several expansion and redevelopment projects, including: 1) Approval of a new 6,300 square foot one-story medical office building located on the west side of Middlebelt Road between Seven Mile Road and Bretton Road; 2) Approval of a new Fleming's Steakhouse on the campus of College Park (currently under construction); 78 3) Approval of a new Walgreen's Drugstore at the southwest comer of Newburgh and Six Mile Roads (under construction); 4) Approval of Churchill Manor Site Condominiums (31 units) located on the west side of Newburgh Road between Joy Road and Ann Arbor Trail; 5) Approval of Cade Meadows Site Condominiums (11 units) located on the south side of Ann Arbor Trail between Newburgh Road and Dowling Avenue; 6) Replacement and expansion of the Consumers Energy substation located on the east side of Newburgh Road between Plymouth Road and Amrhein Road; 7) Expansion of Sl. Mary Mercy Hospital with the construction at a new 15,800 square fool Cancer Center with associated parking and storm water management improvements; 8) Approval of The Learning Experience, a new child day care facility to be located on the north side of Seven Mile Road between Vidor Parkway and Bethany Road; 9) Construction of a new Community Alliance Credit Union on the south side of Plymouth Road between Newburgh Road and Jughandle Road; 10)Approval of Sunset View Site Condominiums (10 units) located on the weslside of Sunset Avenue between Fargo Avenue and Eight Mile Road; 11)Expansion and remodeling of Community Choice Credit Union located on the east side of Farmington Road between Five Mile Road and RoycroR Avenue; 12)Approval of a new two (2) story office buildings at the campus of College Park; 13)Demoliton of the old building and construction of a new Burger King Restaurant located on the south side of Seven Mile Road between Middlebelt Road and Maplewood Avenue; 14)Approval of Quail Chase Site Condominiums (29 units) located on the west side of Newburgh Road between Joy Road and Ann Arbor Trail; 15)Construction of a new KFC Restaurant located on the north side of Plymouth Road between Haller Avenue and Camden Road; 16)Approval at a new two (2) building office complex known as Centennial Plaza South to be located west side of Farmington Road between Lyndon Road and Five Mile Road; 17)Approval of Livonia Manor II Site Condominiums (21 units) location on the north side of Seven Mile Road between Merriman Road and Auburndale Avenue; 18)Approval of a new 14,300 square foot single story medical office building located on the south side of Six Mile Road between Oporto Avenue and Middlebelt Road; 19)Approval of a new TCF Bank at the site of the former Derby Bar on tie west side of Middlebelt Road between SchoolcraR Road and the CSX Railroad; 20)Expansion of the Woodhaven Retirement Community located on the south side of Wentworth Avenue, west ofMiddlebelt Road; 79 21)Expansion of the Plymouth Food Store located on the north side of Plymouth Road between Cavell Avenue and Inkster Road; 22)Expansion and remodeling of an old office building into the A&C Animal Hospital located on the west side of Farmington Road between Plymouth Road and railroad nghtof-way; 23)Approval of a new 4,500 square fool one-story general office building on property located at the southeast comer of Seven Mile Road and Blue Skies Avenue. 2006 Land Use Inventory Report 2006 Land Use Quarter Section Colored Maps 2006 Lot Splits Reports - 33 2006-2011 Capital Improvement Plan The Planning Department oversees and coordinates the activities and functions of the office of Economic Development. The Department provides oversight, guidance and assistance to the Economic Development Director. The new and expanded program is to lend assistance to business and industrial firms in the City by maintaining a list at available properties and buildings, provide guidance through the permit process and by administering to the Economic Development Corporation. Special emphasis of the new program is to assist in promoting, retaining and attracting local industrial, commercial and retail enterprises within the City thereby strengthening and protecting the local economy and tax base. Below is a summary oflhe major activities that the City's Economic Development Office has been involved with over the past year: • 62 Retention Calls and/or Prospect Meetings negotiations etc. Including 21 joint calls with MEDC. This number does not induce phone contact work with businesses. • City Representative a 18 Networking events: i.e. diarity, chamber, & various after hours networking events such as German -American Chamber Reception during Society of Automotive Engineers show • Customer Service and/or Conflict Resolution: 29 issues resolved (e.g.: lax, IFEC, utility, city services, Variance, MEDC, EPA issues etc.) • Tax Incentive Program A) Created two new Industrial Development Districts B) Established one Act 198 "Spec" building for marketing purposes M C) Transferred active IFECs to Awrey Bakeries new owners 12/05 D) Completed five Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificates • 13 Council Public Hearings and/or Committee/Study Presentations • Researched & Dratted 7 Memos and/or Letters for Mayor and/or Council • Directed Chamber creation & publication of Livonia Industrial Demographics attraction brochure W"Industrv's Highway" theme. E- mailed piece to 325 local contacts and 1,600 international site selection and corporate real estate contacts provided by Mayor's E.D. Task Force. • 3 Public Speaking Engagements: A) Livonia Chamber Breakfast (2) B) Livonia Exchange Club Seminars, Memberships. Committees • Michigan Econ. Dev. Association (MEDA) • International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC) • Detroit Metro Airport Technical Advisory Committee • ICSC Michigan Idea Exchange (Livonia information booth) • MEDC Business Development Funds Seminar • MEDC booth representative @ SAE Show, Cobo Hall • SEMCOG Brownfield Seminar • Wayne County Community & E.D. Forum (4 meetings) • Wayne County E.D. Forecast • Wayne County Long Range Planning Committee • Wayne County TURBO Orientation Seminar Misc. • Chaired 2 Mayor's Economic Development Task Force meetings. • Participated in 19 additional Task Force committee meetings. • Prepared 22 Building Search/Attraction packets, and/or prospect tours. • 10 Media interviews (Detroit News, Free Press, WSJ, Observer, Novi News, Livonia Gazette & Crain's) • Submitted Council of Mayor's National Brownfields Survey • Submitted U of M Dearborn School of Management Entrepreneurial Communities Research Survey • Conducted 4 Livonia sites-andorientaton tours for E.D. partners • Conducted 31 Livonia E.D. "partnership" meetings with representatives from DTE Energy, AT&T, MEDC, industrial & commercial brokers, MEDC, Michigan Works, MEDA colleagues, CSX Rail etc. 81 2006 New Business & Expansion Investment Highlights, lists are "new jobs" • Skyway Precision, $4.3 million (Plymouth) (IFEC) 55jobs • Ford Transmission, $44 million (IFEC) • Webaslo Roof Systems, $2.39 million (IFEC) • Delta Research $3.05 million (IFEC) • Michigan Dairy $1.5 million (IFEC) • TCF Bank $2.2 million (Ann Arbor) regional HQ relocation, 250jobs • GST Autol-ealher c. $3 million (Maryland), R& D relocation, 30jobs • Schostak Brothers & Co. (Southfield) corporate HQ relocation, 152 jobs • Metro PCS (Dallas expansion) $9.2 million, 85jobs • Inlegnty Truck Driving School (Grand Rapids expansion), 5jobs • U.S. Industrial Technologies (Novi), 8jobs • Holiday Inn $10 million renovation (Watermark Capital Partners LLC) • Farmer Jack (Admin. consolidation from Detroit) 35jobs 2006 Known Job losses • AAR Cargo Systems (Cadillac consolidation), 100 jobs • Sovereign Sales (sale of assets to competitor) 113 jobs • Trio Tool (closed) 45jobs • ZenaComp(Farmington Hills office relocation), 50 jobs • Sequoia Industries (GM work moved to Canada), 50 jobs • Advantage Logistics (Ohio, new Kroger cold storage facility), 160 "`Report Includes December 2005 activity The Planning Department continues to provide oversight and clerical support to the Plymouth Road Development Authority (PRDA). The full-time Director of the Plymouth Road Development Authority works with the Planning Director and department staff in coordinating and administering the various programs as assigned by the Authority. The Department secretary maintains custody of records, books, documents and other papers of the Authority. Planning Department personnel attend all meetings of the Board and keep a record of its proceedings. 82 The PRDA board is happy to report continued success of the development along the Plymouth Road Condor in 2006. In 2006, the Authority continued their street furniture maintenance program by having all benches and trash receptacles repainted to match the street light poles and street signs poles that were painted the previous year. The Board also expanded the tree maintenance program to address issues of tree health, appearance and tree conflict with streetlights, wires and sign exposure. A contractor was hired and all trees the full length of the corridor were examined and pruned where necessary to meet those objectives. A new web site consulting company has been retained by the Board. The new company will host the site and has been given the assignment to update the site and its programming. MAPS The Planning Department has prepared many new maps for City use and has revised others. These maps are used allhe various public hearings conducted by the Planning Commission and City Council. The maps are also made available to other City departments and groups. GIS The Planning Department continues to work closely with the Information Systems Department and other City Departments involved in the development and maintenance of the City's desktop Geographic Information System (GIS). The City's GIS is a powerful collection of computer hardware and software designed to visualize, explore, query and analyze data geographically. The Planning Department utilizes the GIS on a daily basis for a variety of planning related tasks including: mapping, obtaining land use statistics and information, generating mailing labels for public notification purposes, and much more. As part of its responsibility of providing accurate and current land use information, the Planning Department maintains the following spatial GIS layers and accompanying attribute information: Zoning Liquor Licenses Act 198 Industrial Districts Existing Land Use Wireless Communication Facilities Vicinity Control Areas Future Land Use Truck Routes Building Footprints 83 PLANNING DATABASE The Planning Department continues to expand the use of its computer database, which was designed and developed forlhe purpose oftracking and storing information about all ofthe various pelifions that the Department is responsible for overseeing. The new database was created with several benefits in mind, including faster and more efficient delivery of information to residents, other City Departments and developers, better record keeping, and expandability and compatibility with other computer software programs including the GIS. The Planning database was developed using Microsoft Access and includes detailed information on each petition inducing the type of project, the review procedure, the applicant, critical deadlines (i.e., public notification), past history, zoning, etc. Select information can be linked directly with the GIS and viewed in a spatial context. For example, maps can be generated showing the locations of all properties involved in certain types of land use proposals (i.e., restaurants), over a given period of time. As of November 2006, the Planning database contains detailed information on approximately 1,517 petitions. Hundreds of hours have been spent supplying other departments with technical help including: Community Resources Assessors Office Historical Commission Engineering/Inspection Legal Department Library Commission Parks & Rec. Finance Department Historic Preservation Housing Commission SITE PLANS Since the adoption in July of 1972 of the General Site Plan Approval Ordinance, approximately 1,197 site plans for commercial and office developments have been processed. Recommendations are made on site development proposals in order that functional, aesthetically pleasing developments, which are compatible to surrounding developments, are accomplished. Through landscape treatment of sites, the Planning Commission and Department maintain strong emphasis on quality ofsile developments. 84 LIVONIA DIVISION OF POLICE SuoDolt Services The Administration section consists of the Chief of Police, one Deputy Chief, three Captains (one Support Services Division, one Uniform Division, one Investigative Division), one Sergeant, one Police Officer, one Program Supervisor, one Account Clerk and one Secretary. The bureau is responsible for the efficient day -today operation of the department. Preparing and maintaining the budget, purchasing, training, personnel, labor relations, contact with citizen groups, and investigating citizen complaints are also importanlfunctions. During fiscal year 2006, the Training Division coordinated the attendance of our officers at 193 offsite training courses. Of our Officers, 106 attended 40 hours of in-house training through our Police Officer Refresher Training Program. Twenty-two Supervisors attended 16 hours of training in Unified Incident Command. The Training Division oversaw the receipt and application of police officer "302" funds, dispatcher wireless 911 training funds and the Bulletproof Vest Grant Application. The firearms range provided training for all officers a minimum of two times a year as well as extensive training by the SWAT team and outside agencies. The in-house training resouroes were used by department members as well as outside agencies. The Training Division oversaw the installation and deployment of use of the new FATS machine and organized its use by the consortium partners. During fiscal year 2006, the Training Division was responsible for establishing a process for the hiring of 2 dispatchers, 2 Police Officers and 6 Police Service Aides. This process included administering Personal History Questionnaires, completing initial records checks, setting up and administering oral boards at the department level, insuring background investigations were done in a timely manner, conducting pre-employment interviews and developing the orientation week after the personnel were hired. Communications Activities include the maintenance of the department's MA/Com radio system (consisting of over 575 mobiles and prep radios citywide); a dispatch room and site equipment; and thirty-six "in -car" video systems. Other activities include the maintenance of our building U.P.S. machine (and its battery bank) and support of Computer Services in the maintenance and programming off" in -car computer systems. 85 Computer Section This unit consists of one Police Officer, one Systems Analyst II, one Computer Administrator II and one Data Processor (one Data Processor below staffing level). Computer Services is responsible for maintaining and improving both the Police and Fire Department's IT infrastructure. This includes deploying, servicing and supporting new and existing hardware and software (including mobile units), as well as providing statistical information and reporting tools. Computer Services is also a disaster recovery site and training facility for CLEMIS. Central Records Central Records is staffed by one Sergeant, five Gerk Typists and two Clerk II's. This bureau receives and files all incident reports and arrest documents, forwarding the proper documentation to State and Federal agencies. In addition, they fulfill request information from Freedom of Information, Subpoenas, and Discovery Orders and are responsible for the issuance of pistol purchase permits. Central Records personnel also review and enter reports and traffic citations into the data base. Property/Licensin A sergeant and a police officer staff the Property and Licensing Unit. Work activities induce the processing of property and evidence; control and tracking of impounded vehicles; daily maintenance of the in -car videotapes and DVD's; taxicab licensing and inspection of vehicles; and licensing investigations under Title 5 of the Livonia Code of Ordinances. Investigative Division The Investigative Division is comprised of several units including: Detective Bureau, Crime Scene Unit, Crime Prevention, Special Victims Unit, Court Services/Liquor Control Enforcement, Internet Crimes against Children, and School Resource. The Investigative Division Lieutenant is in charge of six sergeants, eighteen police officers and one clerk typist. Two sergeants, seven police officers and one clerk typist staff the Detective Bureau. Their responsibilities include the investigation of most of the reported crimes. These include assaults, robberies, burglaries, larcenies, frauds and motor vehicle theft. One sergeant and one police officer make up the Crime Scene Unit. This unit is responsible for processing crime scenes, inducing the development, collection and analysis of evidence. A sergeant is responsible for Crime Prevention. His duties include lours of the police facility as well as leaching civic groups and businesses crime prevention techniques. The Special 86 Victims Unit is comprised of one sergeant and two police officers. This unit investigates reports of domestic violence and sexual assaults. One officer is also responsible for administering polygraph examinations when necessary. One sergeant and one police officer are assigned to Court Services/LCC enforcement. These officers handle the daily court activity and process all warrants. They also investigate Michigan Liquor Control Commission license applicants and enforce the MLCC laws. One officer is assigned to the Michigan Stale Police Internet Crimes against Children (ICAC) unit. The ICAC unit investigates individuals who, via the internet, attempt to lure minors to commit illicit acts. The School Resource unit is comprised of six officers who are assigned to the middle and high schools. They provide a liaison between the police and schools and investigate any crimes that occur at the schools. Patrol Bureau The Patrol Bureau is operated by (1) Captain, (4) Lieutenants, (12) Sergeants, (70) Police Officers, (6) Police Service Aides and (10) Dispatchers. The Vehicle Maintenance Coordinator is also under the Uniform Division. The Patrol Bureau provides around -the -dock uniform assistance, protection and law enforcement to the City of Livonia. Traffic Bureau The Traffic Bureau is curently staffed with a Sergeant, four road officers, and one motor carrier officer. The bureau is responsible for: 1. On -scene serious injury traffic crash investigations and reconstruction. 2. The department's in -station breath test instrument and calibration of the portable preliminary breath test instruments for the road officers. 3. The scheduling and training of school crossing guards. 4. Federally certified child seat safety checks. 5. Planning commission research and reports. 6. Zoning board research and reports. 7. Traffic related crime investigation, arraignments and prosecution. 8. Selective enforcement activities throughout the city. 9. Motor carter enforcement activities. 10.Traffic crash pattern analysis. 11.Traffic analysis and recommendations for enhanced traffic flow. 87 The bureau is currently in the process of evaluating all traffic control devices in the city to assure compliance with the new Federal and State regulation. This bureau does all scheduling and billing of countywide task force selective enforcement activities. We continue to participate in the State funded seat belt and drunk driving campaigns in conjunction with Wayne County and the State Police. The bureau Sergeant represents the city on the executive board of the Wayne County Traffic Safety Committee and the Traffic Improvement Association of Oakland County, and sits on the Traffic Commission as an ad hoc member. Community Service Bureau One Sergeant and one Police Officer staff the Community Service Bureau. The unit is responsible for the administration of the Police Reserve Program, consisting of 40 Reserve Officers. This bureau also supervises the Community Event Volunteers and the Police Explorer Post #213. The Police Explorer Post, in conjunction with the national Learning for Life organization is a community-based group that gives young adults interested in law enforcement a chance to experience law enforcement and community service. There are currently 15 explorers actively involved who have been engaged in a number of community- based activities in 2006. The Community Service Bureau also provides personnel and support for emergency events including snow alerts, downed power lines, and crowd control. Members of the bureau have also recently been trained as instructors in the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) concept, and plan to begin development of a Livonia CERT team in 2007. Uniformed personnel in this bureau worked 5,583 hours at special events throughout the City of Livonia during 2006, including school functions, Livonia Spree, and other civic events. The total cost of services for the year is estimated at $163,024.50 with fractional reimbursement at $76,255.96. Discounted and unsubsidized services amount to $86,710.50. INTELLIGENCE BUREAU One Lieutenant, five Sergeants, six Police Officers and one Clerk Typist staff the Intelligence Bureau. Their responsibilities are as follows: As the Officer in Charge, the Lieutenant supervises all the members of the bureau and is responsible for officer training and the efficient administration and operation ofthe bureau. 88 One Sergeant supervises six Police Officers. These Officers are responsible for investigating all narcotic crimes affecting the City of Livonia. Officers also track other criminal activity in Livonia and surrounding communities. Bureau supervisors prioritize the intelligence and conduct follow up investigations that may include surveillance and search warrant executions. This unit also networks and shares intelligence with other law enforcement agencies on federal, state, and local levels. The second Sergeant handles all evidence processing, court work, and forfeiture actions. The third Sergeant is assigned to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and works in conjunction with Federal Agents in criminal prosecutions, as well as Federal Forfeiture of the assets of drug dealers. The fourth Sergeant is assigned to the United Stales Immigrafion and Customs Enforcement Outbound Currency Task Force (ICE-OCTF). The ICE-OCTF is a mulfi-agency task force created to ensure compliance with currency reporting requirements and to disrupt the illegal money-laundering activity of criminal organizations. The fifth Sergeant is assigned to the Fugitive Apprehension Service Team (FAST). The FAST unit is responsible for arresting fugitives of the Criminal Justice System. The Clerk Typist is responsible for records management and employee time records of both the Intelligence and Detective Bureaus. The City of Livonia has a Police Lieutenant who serves as the City's Director of Emergency Preparedness. The Director of Emergency Preparedness coordinates planning, training, equipment, exercise, management and the administration of Livonia's resources necessary to respond and recover from both natural disasters and acts of terrorism. The Director of Emergency Preparedness maintains liaison with not only City personnel but also neighboring communities, Wayne County, the Stale of Michigan and Federal agencies. During financial year 2006, Emergency Preparedness accomplished the following: • Completion of a Hazard Mitigation Plan that determined the risks facing Livonia. • Certified personnel as trainers for a Citizens Emergency Response Team (CERT). 89 • Trained all Police personnel in the National Response Plan (NRP) to disasters. • Updated training of Damage Assessment personnel. • Attended training and planning for pandemic flu. • Worked with Wayne County and neighboring jurisdictions on countywide homeland security initiatives that are expected to result in approximately $500,000 in federal homeland security grant investments for Livonia. • Completed training in Unified Incident Command management system for all police personnel. • Issued Air Purifying Respirators to all Police personnel along with "fit testing" and training. • Met with multiple community groups regarding disaster readiness. • Facilitated the addition of training new operators for the local amateur radio group (Radio Amateur Civil Emergency) • Participated with countywide and regional governing boards on future expenditures of federal homeland security funding. ACTIVITIES: Central Records D: Fiscal Fiscal Distributed 2005 Amount 2006 Amount % Change Accident Reports @ $13 874 $ 4,380 390 $ 4,686 -124.10 Incident Reports @ $5 291 1,458 213 1,145 36.62 Fingerprints @ $54 80 1,404 296 16,200 72.97 Fingerprints @ $15 938 14,070 855 15,416 5.71 Fingerprints -N/C 46 45 -2.22 LCC 13 13,350 14 17,125 7.14 Gun Registrations - WC 1,378 1,371 -0.51 Purchase Permits @ $5 449 2,250 494 2,575 9.11 Purchase Permits -N/C 109 49 -122.45 Record clearance @ $6 257 1,524 204 1,230 -25.98 Record clearance- INC 781 797 2.01 PV License @ $20 34 $675 63 1,245 46.03 PV License @ $12 91 $350 49 606 -05.71 FOIA/Discovery: 927 10,737 965 9,685 3.94 Tapes (VT, AT, CD) 132 125 5.60 Photographs 109 77 -41.56 Pages copied 9,911 6,673 -48.52 TOTAL REVENUE: $50,198 $69,913 D: Property & Licensin Investicative Division 2005 2006 % Change Public Vehicle Permit Applications Investigated 60 109 55 Taxicab Inspections 14 14 0 Business License Applications Investigated 59 69 8 Impounded Vehicles Processed 1,499 1,515 1 Properly Items Received and Processed 4,375 4,060 -1 Investicative Division 91 FY 2005 FY2006 % Change Total Cases Investigated 5,785 5,887 1 Felony Warrants Requested 405 287 -29 Misdemeanor Warrants Requested 604 624 3 Precious Metal Documents 309 678 110 Crime Scenes Processed 81 78 -4 Vehicles Processed 38 46 21 Pieces of Evidence Processed 2,325 2,610 12 Latent Prints Identified 120 150 25 Reports by Crime Scene Unit 371 350 -6 AFIS Cases 171 373 181 Polygraphs Administered 51 41 -20 Referrals to Youth Assistance 30 43 43 Warrants Processed 6,116 4,980 -19 MLCC Reports 36 37 0 MLCC Inspections (on-site & decoy) 150 236 57 MLCC Violations Reports 15 18 20 MLCC Applicants Investigated 30 47 56 Patrol Bureau 2005Actual 2006 Projected % Change Calls for service (Police) 36,368 38,287 5.28 Calls for service (Fire) 8,376 7,639 -8.80 Reports taken 8,749 8,027 -8.30 Adult arrests 3,670 3,705 0.95 Juvenile arrests 203 236 16.26 Traffic crashes reported 3,468 2,939 -15.30 Uniform Law Citations issued 24,083 24,114 0.13 Use offorce incidents 65 65 0 Vehicle pursuits 29 25 -13.79 91 Traffic Intelliaence Bureau 2005 2006 % Change Serious Injury Investigation 8 17 112.5 Traffic crashes investigated 522 401 -23.2 Drunk Driving 321 280 -12.8 Traffic Related Investigations 48 51 6.3 OWI forfeitures 19,745 19,000 3.8 STAR Details 550 573 4.2 STAR Citations 13,886 14,284 2.9 Scheduled Fines - STAR 1.5 million 1.5 million Motor Carrier Inspections 256 267 4.3 Motor Carrier Citations 349 361 3.4 Scheduled Fines -M.C. 359,000 370,000 3.1 Intelliaence Bureau DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS The Department of Public Works includes the Public Service Division and the Engineering Division, which operate under the direction of the Director of Public Works. The responsibilities oflhe two Divisions are as follows: Public Service Division - This Division is responsible for the performance of a wide variety of maintenance functions. These functions range from in-house activities such as building maintenance and vehicle maintenance (except Police and Fire) to the more visible maintenance of public utilifies, park sites and roadways. There are 130 full-time and 14 part-time positions in the Division. Engineering Division - The Engineering Division is under the direction of the City Engineer and is responsible for all construction operations within public rights-of- way and/or public easements. The department has provided engineering 92 2005 2006 % Change Assigned Cases 685 638 -6.9 Search Warrants (Raids) 105 94 -10.5 Cocaine Purchases 14 12 -14.3 Marijuana Purchases 85 40 -52.9 Heroin/Other Purchases 18 3 -83.3 Criminal Surveillance 34 34 0 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS The Department of Public Works includes the Public Service Division and the Engineering Division, which operate under the direction of the Director of Public Works. The responsibilities oflhe two Divisions are as follows: Public Service Division - This Division is responsible for the performance of a wide variety of maintenance functions. These functions range from in-house activities such as building maintenance and vehicle maintenance (except Police and Fire) to the more visible maintenance of public utilifies, park sites and roadways. There are 130 full-time and 14 part-time positions in the Division. Engineering Division - The Engineering Division is under the direction of the City Engineer and is responsible for all construction operations within public rights-of- way and/or public easements. The department has provided engineering 92 services as directed by the Mayor, the City Council, and various Boards and Commissions, as well as for the general public. During the past fiscal year, the work was handled by 13 full-time employees. The department consists of three sections: administrative, design, and field. Highlights ofthis years accomplishments include: Administrative Section This section is under the direction of the City Engineer and an Assistant Oty Engineer. This section prepares reports for the City Council, subdivision bond establishments and releases, and various other reports; reviews the design of public improvements in connection with the development of residential subdivisions, commercial and industrial site plans; prepares legal descriptions as required by other departments; and provides technical assistance and advice to administrative and legislative groups within the City as well as State and County governmental units. This section also issues permits for work in the public rights - of way and/or easements. Attendance at Council, Commission and citizen meetings is also a function ofthis section. The Administrative Section was involved with the following matters during 2006 in addition to attending meetings with State and County officials, and investigating citizen complaints: • Wayne County Resurfacing and Reconstruction Projects - Seven Mile Road— Middlebelt Road to Farmington Road • Traffic Signal Improvements • Numerous Reconstruction and Rehabilitation Projects in Conjunction with the Annual Paving Program • Water Main Replacement Project • Water Main Relocation Project on Seven Mile Road Fourteen site condominium projects, one subdivision, and numerous commercial and industrial projects were also reviewed and/or inspected by the Division. • Brookside Condominiums • Boulder Pines 11 Condominiums • CB Estates Condominiums • Churchill Manor Condominiums • Churchill Place Condominiums • College Park Condominiums • Fountain Park Condominiums • Golf Ridge Properties • Hunters Park Estates Condominiums 93 • Livonia Manor Condominiums • Pastena Villa Condominiums • Rosati Industrial Park Subdivision • Sarah Estates Condominiums • Savile Row Condominiums • Sl. Martins Commons Condominiums Design Section This section, in conjunction with the Administrative Section, prepares plans, specifications and bidding documents for the City's public improvement projects. It also prepares legal descriptions as needed. In addition, this section provides utility information to the public, assigns addresses and reviews residential site plans. The following projects were designed and/or built in 2006: • 2006 Sidewalk Program • Pickford Avenue SAD • 2006 Water Main Replacement Program • 2006 Lane Line Marking Program • 2006 Joint and Crack Sealing Program • Seven Mile Road Water Main Relocation Program Field Section This section is responsible for providing all field inspection and survey services in connection with contract plans and specifications for projects constructed under the jurisdiction of the Engineering Division, as well as all subdivision and commercial developments involving the installation of public improvements. Numerous public improvement contracts amounting to approximately $1,798,985.97 were handled by the division during the past year. Major projects which were designed, engineered and inspected by the Engineering Division may be summarized as follow: • 2006 Sidewalk Program = $448,282.00 • 2006 Pavement Joint and Crack Sealing Program = $127,360.00 • 2006 Pavement and Sidewalk Repair— Water Main Breaks = $45,000.00 • 2006 Lane Line Marking Program = $63,341.00 • 2006 Water Main Replacement= $649,662.47.00 • Seven Mile Road Water Main Replacement= $168,785.00 • Pickford Avenue SAD = $296,555.00 94 PUBLIC SERVICE DIVISION Administrative Section • Provided administrative services forlhe City telecommunications system. • Prepared annual budget submittal forlhe Public Service Division. • Assisted with union contract negotiations. • Worked on adaptation and installation of comprehensive new software installation for the Department of Public Works operations. • Conducted employment interviews. • Administered safety programs within the Department. • Maintained an alcohol and controlled substance testing program per requirements of Federal law. • Provided for public relations information for Rouge Sub -Watershed Project. • Administered a West Nile Virus — Mosquito Control public information program and a larvidding program for City parks, facilities, and over 12,000 storm sewer catch basins. Sanitation • Prepared monthly payment submittals for solid waste contract. • Operated Recycling Center and City Office Paper Recycling Program. Collected 189.27 tons of recyclable material. • Administered Curbside Recycling Program. Collected 7,455.77 tons of recydable material. • Administered Separated Yard Waste Collection Program. Diverted to compost facility 256,814 yards of yard waste material. • Prepared and distributed to all Livonia households a Household Hazard Waste Day postcard announcement for the various City and County events. • Conducted a Household Hazardous Waste Drop -Off Day at Ford Field on May 6, 2006. A total of 1,652 vehicles utilized the service of which 1,386 were from Livonia. (Northville/Northville Township conducted a dropoft event on September 23, 2006, which was utilized by 398 vehicles from Livonia). • Maintained City Type III landfill in compliance with all Federal, Slate and County requirements. • Prepared and submitted all solid waste reports required by Stale of Michigan and Wayne County. • Continued community solid waste and recyding educational programs through use of City newsletter. • Prepared and distributed to all Livonia households a Bulk Leaf Pick -Up Program brochure. 95 Snow and Ice Control • Maintained roads on primary salt routes in a 'Wet pavement or better" condition 2417 throughout the 2005-2006 snow season. Salted primary routes 5 times in November, 15 times in December, 6 times in January, 10 times in February, and 2 times in March for a total of 38 times using 5,242 tons of road salt. • Plowed primary and secondary routes 9 times. • Plowed all roads City-wide (370 miles) in 2 separate snow cycles, using a combination of City resources and contracted road graders. • Provided plowing and ice control services on City parking lots. • Filled and maintained salt barrels at key locations throughout the City. • Spot salted water break and house fire locations. • Assembled tanks, spray bars and materials to begin an anti -icing program on select areas of our major roads. Sweeping and Grading • Graded parks, alleys and gravel roads 4 times and added gravel as needed. • Restructured drainage ditches, culverts and gravel road surfaces to improve road surface longevity and improve drainage. • Applied calcium chloride twice City-wide to gravel roads for dust control. • Applied calcium chloride to parks and alleys 2 times. • Swept City local streets 7 times, major roads 7 times, and industrial roads 7 times. • Performed street sweeping after SPREE (3 times). • Swept all paved City streets after Leaf Pickup Program. Landfill Transfer Station and Recvding Center • Maintained City landfill; composted 44,408 cubic yards of leaves from the Leaf Pickup Program. • Processed 14,400 cubic yards of household refuse from 4,407 users of the Refuse Disposal Transfer Site. Brash Pickup • Picked up bulk brush throughout entire City every 10 working days, picking up 9,515 cubic yards of brush with 18,684 slops. • Removed and disposed of chips resulting from stump grinding at approximately 75 locations. • Trained new seasonal laborers in operational and safety requirements of brush pickup. 96 Leaf Pickup • Picked up 44,408 yards of bulk leaves at curbside; provided a minimum of two (2) pickups for each residence. Construction Road Maintenance and Miscellaneous • Repaired, adjusted or rebuilt 266 catch basins, gate wells, and storm and sanitary manholes. • Repaired or replaced 11 sanitary and storm sewer lines. • Replaced 14,823 square feet of concrete road, drive and walk. • Milled concrete streets to eliminate heat pops or water ponding problems at 80 locations. • Repaired or replaced 7 concrete curbs. • Milled major roads in 8locations to eliminate pavement heal pops. • Completed 45 asphalt repairs or replacements consisting of 797 tons of asphalt. • Patched potholes on 370 miles of City -maintained roads, as well as trip point locations from the Engineering Division and repair sites from the Water and Sewer Section. • Repaired potholes reported on the Pothole Hotline within 48 hours. • Responded to 2350+ homeowner service requests. • Picked up and cleaned oil spills, large debris or lost loads from trucks on City streets 18 times. • Performed 3 road ditch upgrade projects in various locations. • Installed 4 new, hinged drain grates in Denmar drainage system. • Repaired washout at Hubbard Road bridge. • Mud jacked concrete pavement at 11 sites. • Changed truck attachments (buckets, blades, boxes, salt spreaders) from construction season/summer mode to leaf pickup mode to plowing/salting configuration. • Cleaned outfalls and inlets of City storm drains 32 times. • Performed illicit discharge inspections and water sampling as needed on storm water outfalls to maintain IDEP compliance. • Repaired 6 storm outfall sites. • Cleared brush from 75+ storm outfalls and inlets in floodplains throughout the City. • Repaired or replaced 6 guardrails and barricades. • Cut and cleared brush from City -owned alleyways. • Placed and removed over a mile of snow fence to prevent excessive drifting on City roads. • Repaired lawns or sprinklers resulting from Water Section activities and snowplow damage at 282 locations. • Trained employees for Commercial Drivers License test to allow for upgrading class or endorsements when needed. 97 • Conducted snowplow training for guest operators to assist in snow emergencies. • Delivered and picked up voting supplies for 2 elections. • Assisted the Livonia Goodfellows with their annual holiday food and toy program. • Moved election equipment between storage building, City Hall, and new precinct locations after school closings as requested by the City Clerk. • Picked up brush, assisted in removing downed trees and other storm damage from roads. Sion Maintenance • Traffic Signs: Repaired or Removed: 438 Installed or Replaced: 174 • Traffic Posts: Repaired or Removed: 562 Installed or Replaced: 123 • Street Name Signs: Repaired or Removed: 200 Installed or Replaced: 120 • Street Name Posts: Repaired or Removed: 284 Installed or Replaced: 25 • Engraved approximately 60 signs for various City departments. • Assisted with the setups, signing, snow fencing, barricading and traffic control devices for SPREE, Arts and Crafts Festival, several Wilson Barn shows, Livonia Heritage Festival, Highland Games, plus an additional 17 events at Greenmead. • Updated 7 Arbor Day signs City-wide. • Assisted with the setup of the Easter Egg Hunt, Rotary Barbecue, Police Department and Fire Department open house events, and the Youth Fitness Meet. • Assisted with setup for Clarenceville and Franklin parades. • Handled approximately 133 work orders and 30 complaints. • Cut 65 miscellaneous oil board stencils for various City departments. • Applied and repaired vehicle markings on 20 new and 4 current City vehicles, including new bus additions to the bus fleet. • Applied Eyes and Ears decals to new vehicles. • Striped 28 miscellaneous road locations. • Posted subdivision entrances for the Leaf Pickup Program. • Changed safety posters on County roads once and replaced wooden backings on posts as needed. • Maintained barricades and construction signs for all City departments. • Made 30 new wood jacks and stenciled and branded 200 cones and 50 plastic barricades. M Animal Control • Provided animal control services for residents and businesses which included requests for service as follows: 68 abuse to animal/cruelty complaints, 117 barking dog complaints, 4 bird problems, 11 cat biles, 23 coyote sightings/complaints, 10 d=ad crows/robins (West Nile Virus) complaints, 82 dog bites, 3 excessive pet complaints, 110 injured animal reports, 7 kennel complaints, 32 vicious animal complaints, 93 pick up contained animal requests, 35 sick wildlife reports, 177 stray animal reports, 16 trapped animal complaints, 4 waste (feces) complaints, 25 wildlife complaints, 3 wildlife bites, and 100 dog -at -large complaints. • Continued trapping program and eliminated nuisance coyotes. • Issued animal ordinance violations as required. PARK AND ATHLETIC FIELD MAINTENANCE SECTION • Floated and lined all City baseball/softball diamonds, soccer and football fields on a routine schedule. • Mowed, trimmed, edged, weeded, fertilized, applied herbicides and fungicides, trimmed trees and routine maintenance to Ford Field, Bicentennial Diamonds 1-3, Greenmead soccer fields, Civic Center, Sandburg and Noble libraries, Wilson Bam, Greenmead, and other parks and fields. • Installed banners at the Civic Center and Recreation Center for Music Under the Stars, SPREE, Arts and Crafts Festival, Christmas, special events and everyday patriotic banners. • Rolled and aerifed baseball diamonds and soccer fields. • Performed safety inspections, repaired or removed damaged playground equipment in all City parks and installed 1000 yards of "Softfall" under playground structures. Also began adding woodchips under structures that currently have none. This is a result of changing regulations from the Playground Safety Institute. • Added sand to beach volleyball courts at Clements Circle, Rotary, Recreation Center and Stymelski Parks. Also, replaced wom and tattered nets. • Added material, extended the infield, removed the infield lip, and graded diamonds at Ford Field, Bicentennial, McCann and Rotary Park ball diamonds. • Monitored trashcans on athletic fields that could not be reached by Waste Management. Also, cleaned dog stations and lrashcans in City parks on weekends. • Performed snow removal services for City buildings and nghl-0f--way sidewalks leading to parks on an as -needed basis. This included shoveling, plowing and salting sidewalks. • Performed winter maintenance to equipment, which included miscellaneous repairs, painting, blade sharpening, preventative maintenance and thorough 99 cleanings. • Sprayed "Roundup' weed killer on nghl-of-way fences to control growth of weeds. • Applied the biological control "VectoLex' to control mosquito -breeding populations in recreational parks. One application was accomplished this year. Also, helped with the spring application to catch basins in roads. • Added topsoil and grass seed to goal mouths on all soccer fields. Greenmead, the Recreation Center, and Clement Circle fields were closed for a short time for sodding in those areas. • Set out and brought in picnic tables and trash barrels for the picnic season. • Repaired picnic tables as needed. • Pruned trees and shrubs in parks, City buildings and athletic fields where needed. • Planted canna tubers in some flowerbeds this year. The annual display was severely impacted by funding this year. • Assisted with all SPREE -related activities, including setup, takedown and daily garbage detail. Also repaired damage to diamonds 3S as a result of parked vehicles on the diamonds. • Completed 85 "Requests for Service" that related to special activities for other City departments (entailed delivered, setting up, taking down canopies, tents, picnic tables and garbage cans), delivering and setting up the Showmobile, delivering TEFAP commodities for Community Resources, Wilson Barn, Greenmead activities, and other City activities. • Repaired and maintained irrigation systems at Civic Center, Livonia Community Recreation Center, Ford Field, Bicentennial Park, and Greenmead. Due to the retirement of a Parks Maintenance Worker III, the systems at Noble and Sandburg Library, Wilson Barn, Fire Station #5, and the Six Mile Road islands were not turned on this year. This was the third year Parks was unable to maintain the systems because of the personnel shortage. • Maintained the Livonia Community Recreation Center including soccer field renovations and landscape work. • Replaced swing set at Clements Circle Park. • Cleared deadfall trees and branches off Nature Preserve walkways. • Contracted services removed 120 dead ash trees in eight parks this summer. City crews removed another 50 last winter. • Continued testing vacuum breakers as part of Wayne County's DEQ requirements regarding irrigation systems. • One employee attended the Playground Safety Institute which recertified him as a playground inspector. • Set up and monitored ice on the Qty's three outdoor ice rinks. It was not a good winter for ice. • Applied a protecting stain to the Beverly Park play structures. • Added new mil fences to parks at Moelke, Bicentennial, and Broadmoor to differentiate between the parking lot and playground areas. 100 • Contracted for joint and crack sealing on tennis courts at Wilson Acres, Devonaire, Country Homes, and Shelden Park. • Began replacing Christmas decorations to change some of the lawn ornaments for the City Hall display. • Achieved Tree City USA status for the eighth year and received our third year "growth award" • City Forestry personnel trimmed 50 trees which generated 200 yards of woodchips. • Instituted young tree training program for 200 trees which helps trees with proper form and strong structure as they mature and helps reduce the amount of pruning later in the tree's mature life. • Forestry personnel removed 200 trees and 250 slumps. Some of the trees were ash trees infested by the Emerald Ash Borer. Others were maples that are succumbing to old age. • Supervised the removal of 410 trees and slumps by Ashton Tree Service. Approximately 100 of the trees were ash that had died. • Supervised and administered the planting of 2100 trees associated with the 2005 and 2006 planting lists. 1600 trees were planted from Apnl until June, and the restwere done in October. • Planted three trees (Japanese Scholar tree, Goldenrein tree, and yellowwood tree) in connection with the Arbor Day Program. The trees were planted in the right-of-way to replace three silver maples damaged by the road construction on Levan Road in front of the Hoover Elementary School. Also, 500 seedling spruce trees were handed out as part of the program to the children at the school. • Removed approximately 500 yards of woodchips as part of DPS brush pickup program. • Treated 12 wasps nests, mainly in August and September, with insecticide to kill the wasps. • Completed 56 storm -related tree trimmings. • Received and investigated approximately 2200 requests for service; Of those, three-quarters have been closed as either serviced or answered. • Performed miscellaneous repairs and blade sharpening on the Section's saws and trimming equipment. • Assisted other departments (Water, Engineering, Ordinance, etc.) with emergencytree removals, site inspections, and tree inspections. • Performed snow removal operations to City buildings and right-of-way sidewalks including plowing, shoveling and salting. • Assisted in the Rouge River cleanup day held at Rotary Park which was a rousing success. • Supermsed one contractor who trimmed approximately 6300 trees in four City sections. These trees were trimmed to current International Society of 101 Arboriculture Standards for street tree elevations. • Supervised the same contractor doing resident call -out trim requests. The contractor completed over 650 of them. • Finished the removal of 3298 ash trees killed by the Emerald Ash Borer. A few ash trees remain but will be removed as they die. • Tracked gypsy moth populations in Sections 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, and 22 as part of the gypsy moth egg mass survey; no spraying was needed in 2006. • Attended the following seminars to increase job knowledge: Michigan Nursery and Landscape Association annual meeting; Michigan Turfgrass Foundation annual meeting; Michigan Forestry and Parks Association annual meeting; Metro Detroit Landscape Association annual meeting; various seminars on chainsaw safety, tree climbing, hazard assessment and aerial rescue training, roping and rigging training, and equipment repairtraining. Miscellaneous Repairs and Imorovemenls • Opened, closed, and winterized City out and pool buildings. • Started up, serviced and shut down pump systems as needed. • Maintained City -owned outside lighting fixtures at various locations. • Performed preventative maintenance on equipment as able. • Replaced all flags and maintained flagpoles semi-annually. • Stripped and finished floors in buildings as needed and able. • Spot and cleaned carpeting in buildings as needed and able. • Cleaned inside and outside first floor windows on all buildings as needed and able. • Cleaned exteriorwindows at City Hall, Library and Community Center. • Relocated and installed outlets/power and lighting as requested. • Monitored building automation and climate control systems. • Monitored electronic access systems. • Answered environmental complaints as able. • Performed yearly shutdown maintenance and custodial assignments at Community Center. • Continued to enhance custodial job assignment checklists for all buildings. • Tested and treated all process water systems. • Assisted with all other departmental projects as requested. • Serviced overhead and pedestrian doors as needed. Roof Replacement Maintenance and Repairs • Replaced Parks Maintenance garage roof on Building 12. • Repaired roof leaks at City Hall (atrium, Council office, and fifth floor hall and stairwell), Senior Center, Noble Library, Police Station, Civic Center Library, Devonaire Ice Arena, and Livonia Aid Center. 102 Painting • Repainted trim on Building 13 (Building Maintenance). • Re -wallpapered second floor conference room. Health and Safety • Continued with Lock Out/ Tag Out program. • Tested fire alarms, sprinklers and suppression systems in City buildings. • Maintained compliance with Wayne County Backflow Certification program as requested; certified in-house tester. • Maintained compliance with State of Michigan boiler and elevator inspections and certifications. • Maintained employee State -required licensing, certifications and training. • Exterminated or removed pests in City buldings as needed. • Conducted safety inspections of City facilities with control specialists as requested. • PM and load -bank tested generators. • Reset all clocks, lighting and equipment for time changes. • Cleaned debris and growth from building rooftops, sumps and gutters. • Tested and repaired panic buttons in City Hall and DPW Administrative Office. • Performed required CSDA lest on all boilers. • Installed automatic transferswilch on DPS Administrative Building generator. • Added devices and systems to City Hall generator as able and requested. • Installed new PA system at City Hall. • Replaced transformer and door openers at City Hall to allow wiring to generator Greenmead • Assisted with all events held on grounds (Art in the Park, Highland Games, Flea Markets, Car Shows, Fall Harvest). • Installed and removed decorations for Holiday and special events. • Moved, set-up and installed furniture, furnishings and equipment as requested. • Continued maintenance and custodial services • Assisted with second floor remodeling project. • Repaired and re -roofed Hill House. • Purchased additional materials as needed for Blue House second floor office renovation. 103 :Ad•PF-1@1gFTr11rx.T*=@ li7Wrr • Installed subsoil drain and sump pump system in Fire Headquarters basement. • Enlarged Building 13 garage door to allow for inside truck parking. • Replaced file floor in LPD radio room. • Replaced pedestrian door and reinforced overhead door in Water and Sewer garage. Special Proiects and Interdepartmental Assistance • Assisted with Rotary Club BBQ. • Assisted with SPREE on an as requested basis. • Assisted with various City Hall functions as requested. • Provided set up and tear downs for meetings and events as requested. • Maintained facilities leased from the City. • Moved furniture, computers, work stations and materials and equipment as requested. • Responded to and performed daily maintenance requests on equipment and facilities as requested. • Assisted with Senior Citizen Craft Show and events. • Regularly cleaned out grease trap in Senior Center kitchen. • Jetted and maintained basement drains at Fire Station #1. • Assisted with snow removal and cycles as requested. • Transferred personnel temporarily to leaf pickup as needed. • Assisted with special facility projects at Community Center. • Installed wiring and controls for new brine tank pump system. • Provided service for golf course buildings as requested. • Repaired items at Fox Creek restaurant as requested. • Administered Honeywell Service contract for Community Center. • Assisted with Veterans Park project and City flag procurement as requested. • Assisted with the reopening of Shelden Center pool facility. • Assisted with Goodfellows as requested. • Assisted Friends of the Barn with installation of new security and alarm notification system. EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE • Performed over 1,300 regular preventative maintenance inspections, emergency repairs, modificafions and road calls to over 800 City -owned vehicles and other various pieces of equipment. • Maintained and provided service for 11 SMART buses for Livonia Community Transit. • Maintained and provided service for 6 SCAN buses (Senior Transportation). 104 • Wrote specifications and purchased 12 new buses for the replacement of SMART units for Livonia Community Transit System. • Maintained and operated computerized fuel system for LPD, LFD, DPW, Golf Courses, and other various locations. • Provided assistance to LPD and LFD with fabrication projects and other miscellaneous repairs throughout the year. • Provided Commercial Drivers License training for City employees. • Provided and maintained generators at various intersections throughout the City during power outages. • Worked with County to have quick disconnects installed at Six Mile Road and Farmington for traffic control. • Wrote specifications for and purchased the following equipment: Two (2) street sweepers (still in Committee of the Whole for discussion) Two (2) leaf vacuums One (1) Tink claw for Leaf Pickup Program One (1) stump grinder Two (2) brush chippers One (1) backhoe One (1) tandem axle dump truck One (1) Vactorjel mcder truck Four (4) pickup trucks One (1) work truck for Sign Maintenance One (1) stake truck with plow for construction am and snow removal Two (2) pickup trucks for Recreation One (1) pickup truck for the 16" District Court • Fabricated storm grate covers for various locations throughout the City • Provided both technical and service educational training for mechanics throughout the year. Water Systems • Inspected, exercised 942 water gate valves, the condition of the structure and updated inspection forms • Repaired 110 water gate valves and replaced old gland packing with onng type; about 12% need repair after exercising gate valve • Inspected and maintained 1,689 fire hydrants completing the major roads in the City's 36 sections • Repaired 199 fire hydrants in the field in these sections above; about 12% need repair after exercising fire hydrant and inspection • Repaired 116 water main breaks or leaks which is down 22.7% from Iasi fiscalyear • Repaired or replaced 122 water stop boxes • Staked over 5,178 locations for Miss Dig system 105 • Made 63 service line repairs for various reasons • Retired 38 water service lines • Painted 534 hydrants • Installed 2 new gate valves and 6 new fire hydrants Meters • Replaced 34 antiquated large commercial water meters • Repaired 104 large commercial meters • Replaced 432 water meters for various reasons • Made 31,906 water related service calls • Completed 3,442 service slips • Placed 1,250 note cards at residential homes requesting to gain access to home for internal meter repairs • Installed 25 outside read device systems • Installed 193 water meters for new accounts • Established 40 new commercial accounts • Established 125 new residential accounts • Established 9 new seasonal irrigation amounts • Installed and removed 312 seasonal irrigation meters • Tested 87 commercial meters Storm Sewers • Answered 107 storm sewer complaints • Retrieved and replaced 31 catch basin covers Sanilary Sewers • Cleaned 226.55 miles in 15 City sections of sanitary sewer lines by hydrant flushing, power flushing, bucketing, chemical and power root cutting • Cleared 6 main sewer backups • Investigated 154 sanitary sewer complaints • Televised 1,500 feel of sanitary sewer • Inspected 19 City sections for sanitary lines and structures Special Projects • Worked with cross training the office staff at front desk and cross training the water and sewer foremen for handling emergency situations. • Updated computer programs relating to lawn, concrete and asphalt repairs along with new tap list and CarteGreph associated work orders to other sections for request to repair. • Updated computer programs relating to Sensus water meter reading system and hardware. 106 • Coordinated hydrant repair requests for the Uvonia Fire Department. • Assisted Roads with asphalt, concrete, lawn, catch basin and pavement restorations. • Assisted Engineering with water main and fire hydrant replacement and proposed projects for 2007 water main and sanitary sewer replacement. • Worked on updating the water stop box location and seasonal contact information in MS Access database. • Inspected 98 water taps made by water section contractor (82-new construction, 6-irrigation, 5-to replace well water, 1-upgrade existing and 4- lead lead replacement). • Worked on sewer connection program, inspected 153 OSDS at homes for septic failure. • Helped with flan tests for water model, SCADA system and flow test with Livonia Fire Department and water replacement program. • Updated the contract and hardware for Profile rain gauges and sanitary sewer monitors. • Provided all section office staff with desktop computers and computer training. • Worked on inventory pricing database for future software changes to take place with CarteGraph 7 upgrade. • Assisted Engineering with sidewalk, driveway approaches and major road replacement projects. • Worked with various contractors for road, water and sewer main installations and repairs. • Installed 2 multi readers and 179 MXU radio remote water meter devices thus reducing monthly and quarterly reading labortime. • Checked road structures before road improvements and cleaned catch basins. • I.D.E.P. (Illicit Discharge Elimination Program) inspections of storm sewer outtall sampling. • Assisted with water activities for the Livonia SPREE, Race for the Cure and other activities. • Continued the replacement program for antiquated large commercial compound Badger and Rockwell water meters. • Responded to 3 illicit discharge complaints and 3 emergency spill hazards on major roadways. • Updated the 3 phone dialers for sanitary sewer flood control; all now have the same hardware and software, so the acknowledgements to respond back to dialers are all same codes. 107 TRAFFIC COMMISSION The Traffic Commission is responsible for the planning, coordination, and determination of proposed traffic control devices to improve traffic flow and to provide maximum safety for all drivers, pedestrians, and property. As provided by the City Charter, the Commission consists of seven citizens who are appointed by the Mayor. The Commission meets once a month to discuss and implement traffic control measures which have been brought to their attention by citizens, as well as other City departments. The Commissioners work in conjunction with the Traffic Bureau oflhe Police Department. SIGNIFICANT ISSUES IN 2006 Issues for 2006 related primarily to areas of maintaining and updating traffic control devices along existing city streets. Throughout the year citizen concerns and the Police Department will bring issues from placement of informational signs (Handicapped Child in Area on Frederick Street), review of existing signage and requests for placement/removal of existing signs. The year saw an increase in interest in the proper placement of slop and yield signs as the Police Department worked on the cataloging of the Traffic Control orders for all signs placed in the city right-of-way and maintained by the city under its jurisdiction. Also construction within the city brought about changes to signals within the city in coordination with the county. Changes in signals were made in conjunction with Wayne County at Purlingbrook and Seven Mile Road as well as in the area of Middlebelt and Plymouth Road. Signage requests for placement or modification were made regarding "No Tum on Red" signs at Newburgh and Seven Mile Road and Seven Mile and Farmington Road in conjunction with Wayne County during the Seven Mile Road construction. Speeding in residential areas continues to be a common concern reported to the Traffic Commission by citizens. As a result of citizen requests, speed studies and requests for increased traffic enforcement were conducted in several areas, including: Harrison and N. Clements Circe Schoolcra0 (Inkster to Newburgh) Shadyside near Seven Mile and Farmington Road The Commission worked with a number of business owners in the City to discuss or address traffic concerns around their business. These include: Joe's Produce St. Michael's Church Wonderland Mall/Wondedand Village 108 Parking concems were another constant as requests were received for placement of "No Parking" signs in several areas: Fairfield and Plymouth Road Jamison Road near St. Genevieve Church Omngelawn and Richmond The actions of the Traffic Commission have become more visible to the public as the commission works to revisit all traffic control devices in the city and assure compliance with the Michigan Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MMUTCD). The area of Levan and Five Mile Road was the most contentious issue as intersections in the area of Hoover school were re-signed from a four way stop at Roycrott and Levan to the standards in the MMUTCD where Yield signs are placed for the minor road (Roycrott) and the Primary road is permitted to proceed through the intersection with the right of way. Understandably, there was confusion when the intersection was re-signed for motorists passing the intersection on a regular basis who were no longer required to slop. The Traffic Commission does recognize the importance of informing the public prior to significant changes. As there will inevitably be changes similar in magnitude in the future due to the fact that with any developed city as road and sign standards change there will be the need to revise intersections. The commission is working to update its website presence to include meeting agendas and rinutes and allow residents to sign up for meeting notices online. The Commission continues to work with TIA to obtain expert opinion and guidance on traffic concems in the community. Several individual agenda items were referred to TIA by the Commission during 2006 and TIA was requested to provide crash data forspecific intersections related to agenda items. Furthermore, TIA provided the Commission with traffic count data for all major streets in Livonia along with a report summarizing crash information for major City intersections. CONCLUSION The Traffic Commission will continue to monitor traffic and parking conditions within the City and will be particularly concerned with monitoring areas of re- development and construction. The Commission will also continue to meet with citizens and business owners to jointly address traffic and parking concerns and to act to alleviate dangerous conditions. Ongoing monitoring of traffic concerns by this Commission will ensure that Livonia's streets and highways will continue to be safe and well maintained. 109 TREASURER The Treasurer's Department is responsible for collection, disbursement and custody of all revenues belonging to and held in trust by the City. All funds collected by City agencies are transmitted to the Treasurer, verified and recorded through cash receipting, deposited and reported daily to the Finance Department. In addition, the Treasurers Office, on instruction from the Finance Director, transmits instructors for the daily investment of City funds among City banks to maximize the interest on its holdings. ADMINISTRATION This year the Treasurer's Office once again sent letters to real and personal property taxpayers whose taxes for the 2005 tax year had not been paid by February 15, 2006. A total of 4,413 letters were mailed: 3,211 letters to real property owners and 1,202 letters to personal property taxpayers. Letters were also mailed to real & personal property taxpayers after the due date for the summer 2006 tax season. A total of 1,812 letters were mailed to real pmpertylaxpayers and 930 letters were mailed to personal pmpertytaxpayers. The Treasurer's Office in 2002 initiated the practice of mailing letters to notify Livonia property owners that their property was listed in the Wayne County Treasurer's Office court petition to foreclose on their properly for delinquent real property taxes. In 2005 the City of Livonia Treasurer sent out 45 such nofices, as compared to 89 notices in 2004 and 113 notices in 2003. As a result of this effort, the Wayne County Treasurer sold no Livonia parcels at tax auction in 2006, 2005 or2004. The Treasurer's Office is responsible for monitoring and maintaining the files on bankruptcy cases. Proof of Oaims for personal property taxes are filed with the courts by the City Treasurer. In 2006, 8 businesses with locations in Livonia filed for bankruptcy protection. In 2005, 8 businesses with locations in Livonia filed for bankruptcy protection, in 2004, 14 businesses and in 2003, 19 businesses with locations in Livonia filed for bankruptcy protection. The Treasurer's Office filed with the Wayne County Register of Deeds 11 personal property jeopardy tax bills for 2006. In 2005 the Treasurers Office issued 19 personal pmpertyjeopardy lax bills. Applications for electronic fund debit for tax payments were included in the 2006 summer real tax bills to property owners who are directly responsible for payment of their taxes. This resulted in a considerable increase in the number of taxpayers utilizing electronic funds transfer for payment of tax bills. During the 110 summer 2006 tax season 2,281 taxpayers participated in this convenient and no - cost service as compared to 2,223 during the summer of 2005, 1,903 during the summer of 2004, 1,819 during the summer of 2003, 1,417 during the summer 2002, and 664 taxpayers during the summer 2001 tax season. Tax bills can be paid with a credit card through Official Payments Corporation. There is a convenience fee collected and retained by Official Payments Corporation for this service. There is no cost to the City of Livonia for this service to be offered to the residents. During 2006, 399 taxpayers utilized this option, as compared to 340 taxpayers during 2005 and 216 taxpayers during 2004. This year the Treasurers Office continued printing the summer and winter tax bills in-house, which results in a significant printing cost savings of $4,600 per tax season. Printing the tax bills in-house also allowed for greater control and efficiency of mailing and distnbuting the lax bills in a timely fashion. The Treasurer's Office has stud procedures in place regarding the handling of City funds. All departments issue numbered receipts and timely deliver collected funds to the Treasurer's Office for processing. Large checks are deposited immediately to yield a higher rete at interest. There are 44,203 taxpayers in the City: 2004 2005 2006 Real Property 39,267 39,447 39,684 Personal Property 4,428 4,369 4,443 IFF 73 78 76 43,768 43,894 44,203 Sixty four percent at the residents are responsible for paying their own properly tax bills. Mortgage companies pay 14,437 (36%) of the real property tax bills. The tax levy breakdown is as follows (induces Real, Personal, & IFF for 2005 Winter and 2006 Summer): 111 Real Personal IFF Total City of Livonia 47,080,491 6,559,448 919,160 54,559,099 Livonia Public Schools Operating 22,145,589 10,249,593 1,419,227 33,814,409 Debt 10,705,253 1,522,134 210,433 12,437,820 Supplemental Tax 1,595,334 1,595,334 111 Wayne County Intermediate School District 14,235,563 1,993,715 266,430 16,495,708 Clarenceville Public Schools 2002 2003 2004 2005 OpemUng 1,357,703 188,305 29,282,750 1,546,008 Debt 1,057,273 47,075 1,104,348 Supplemental Tax 107,920 1,689,473 2,163,730 107,920 Oakland Intermediate 163,091 340,501 347,470 School District 791,535 35,243 826,778 Slate Education Tax 26,065,329 3,515,819 827,715 30,408,863 SchoolcmR Comm. Coll. 7,805,064 1,052,791 138,183 8,996,038 Wayne County 36,019,485 4,945,777 673,447 41,638,709 Wayne County Jail 3,878,642 540,394 75,734 4,494,770 Wayne County Parks 1,016,545 141,634 19,858 1,178,037 Huron Clinton MetroAuth. 887,127 123,604 17,323 1,028,054 Wayne Cnty. Tmnsil Auth. 2,472,402 344,473 48,272 2,865,147 Special Assessments 1,952,053 1,952,053 Total 179,173,308 31,260,005 4,615,782 215,049,095 The total number of original tax bills mailed for Summer and Winter was 88,168. 2005 2006 Original Tax Bills 87,713 88,168 Revised Tax Bills 1,238 1,252 Checks Issued For- 609 475 Duplicate Payments, Overpayments & Revised Tax Bills Delinquent Tax Collections Our personal delinquent property taxes collected from 12-1-05 through 1130-06 were $1,024,778. The collections breakdown is as follows: 112 Tax Year Tax Year Tax Year Tax Year 2002 2003 2004 2005 Original Amount Levied 29,935,004 28,050,803 29,282,750 29,887,374 (Personal Property) Original Delinquency 2,062,013 1,689,473 2,163,730 1,403,277 Amount Collected This Year 161,275 163,091 340,501 347,470 112 DTE& Consumers Energy 707,193 746,398 984,529 379,114 Still Collectible 35,380 53,025 132,068 338,891 %Delinquent 6.89% 6.02% 7.39% 4.70% OTHER COLLECTIONS Invoices for Council authorized weed cuttings are mailed to taxpayers as well as any special assessments approved during the year. The Treasurers Office records payment on these assessments and any unpaid amounts are added to the tax bills at yearend. In 2006, the Treasurer's office issued 631 invoices for weed bills, as compared to 557 invoices for 2005 and 512 invoices for 2004. #of Parcels $Amount #of Parcels $Amount Billed on Billed on Billed on Billed on 2004 Taxes 2004 Taxes 2005 Taxes 2005 Taxes Special Assessment Districts Sidewalk 47 16,817 46 11,788 Paving 472 126,606 384 99,246 Lighting 13,624 911,394 13,653 949,983 Weeds 121 13,258 150 14,316 Delinquent Water 1 146 847 531 1 269 876,879 15,410 1,915,606 15,502 1,952,212 The Treasurers two tellers processed $261,961,027 in cash, checks, and credit cards for the following items during the course of conducting City business: properly taxes, water bills, the greens fees for the City's three municipal golf courses, Livonia Community Recreation Center memberships and fees, park permits, fees for swimming and skating, amusement park ticket sales, registration fees for Parks and Recreation league sports, inspection and engineering permit and bond fees, licenses, the fees for the City's three libraries, Police Department adjudicated, ron-adjudicated drug and D.A.R.E. funds, fees for City sponsored special events such as the Highland Games and the Arts & Craft Fair, false alar charges, accounts receivable items, SMART bus ticket 113 sales, City garage sale, fees for using the City Dump, Police auction, rent payments for Silver Village, Newburgh Village, and city -owned homes, record duplication fees, etc. Of the amounts collected, $50,044.444 was for general deposit items and $211,916,583 was for property taxes. The tellers also receive walk-in water payments from residents. During this fiscal year, 11,418 water payments were processed by the Treasurer's Office. The busiest day was December 12, 2005 with 294 water bills being processed. The average amount of water bills processed was 46 per day. Total Collections 2005 2006 $260,168,699 $261,961,027 DISBURSEMENTS All payroll and payable checks are released through the Treasurers Office on approval ofthe Finance Director and the City Clerk (internal auditor). 2005 2006 Payroll Checks 28,301 27,952 Vendor Checks — City 15,894 14,932 Vendor Checks - Court 2820 1882 46,215 44,766 ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS The Zoning Board of Appeals is a seven (7) member Board created by Stale statute and Zoning Ordinance No. 543, as amended, City of Livonia. The Board hears appeals from residential and business property owners when they are unable to comply with ordinance requirements and are rejected permits by the Inspection Department. The Board meets on Tuesday evenings at 7:30 p.m. The following is a breakdown of the Appeal Cases prepared and heard by the Zoning Board of Appeals during the fiscal year December 1, 2005 through November 30, 2006. 114 • Includes Cases which were Granted in ParUDenied in Part " Meeting material was prepared more than once, but for various reasons (Petitioner did not appear, asked to be rescheduled, etc.) these cases were not heard at the first scheduled meeting. Meeting material was prepared and Board heard case at meeting and made a decision to table for revised plans, etc. All meeting notices, agendas, etc. were redone when new meeting date was scheduled. Number of Regular Meetings: 11 Number of Special Meetings: 22 (l comprehensive meeting updating ZBA Procedures and Michigan State Statutes) 115 Granted with Tabled or Granted Denied Modifications' Postponed"* Total New Cases 71 8 8 22 109 Rehearings 3 0 0 0 3 Actual Cases Heard 112 Prepared and Scheduled" 7 Total Cases Heard and Prepared 119 • Includes Cases which were Granted in ParUDenied in Part " Meeting material was prepared more than once, but for various reasons (Petitioner did not appear, asked to be rescheduled, etc.) these cases were not heard at the first scheduled meeting. Meeting material was prepared and Board heard case at meeting and made a decision to table for revised plans, etc. All meeting notices, agendas, etc. were redone when new meeting date was scheduled. Number of Regular Meetings: 11 Number of Special Meetings: 22 (l comprehensive meeting updating ZBA Procedures and Michigan State Statutes) 115