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2007-2008 Annual ReportCITY OF LIVONIA ANNUAL REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2007.2008 OFFICE OF THE MAYOR JACK E. KIRKSEY 33000 CIVIC CENTER DRIVE MAYOR LIVONIA, MICHIGAN 481543097 i VM) 4662201 FAX. (734)4214870 �LpN December 30, 2008 Honorable Members of the City Council City of Livonia, MI 48154 Dear Council Members: The Annual Report for fiscal year 2007-2008 reflects activities of the Livonia City Departments, Commissions and Boards. The following reflects a sampling of the information contained in various reports and some personal observations. Finance and Information Systems In 2008, these departments continued implementing a new financial management system called Tiagos.neC which will provide increased data management capabilities and online services for residents and employees when fully implemented. A wireless network was expanded in city facilities, and wireless was also offered to the public at the Civic Center Library and Livonia Community Recreation Center. A new website, www.Filml-ivonia.oro was added, an effort done jointly with the Mayor's Office, in order to draw film companies to Livonia. In the first three months of operation, this website had approximately 84,000 page views. Parks and Recreation The Community Recreation Center, in its fifth year of operation, continues to serve the community averaging over 3,000 visitors per day. Although the Center's membership has declined due to economic factors, the overall selection of programs and facilities there continue to out perform any other facility in the region. Police Department During the fiscal year 2008, the Training Division coordinated the attendance of their officers at 144 offsite training courses and oversaw the hiring of two Police Service Aides. As of the fall of 2008, the City has become compliant with the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices adopted by the Stale of Michigan in 2005, and, despite the inilial negative reaction from some citizens, traffic flow has improved, traffic speeds and numbers of accidents have decreased, and overall safety has increased. The Traffic Commission, Police Sergeant Dave Studt, Mayors Office staff, and the Planning Department staff deserve a tremendous amount of credit for the implementation and completion of this project. Treasurer This year the Treasurer's Office opened on Saturday, September 13, to enhance our customer service capabilities. The Office anticipates future Saturday hours as due dates for property taxes necessitate. The printing of summer and winter tax bills in-house has continued resulting in a significant printing cost savings of $4,600 per tax season, along with greater control and efficiency of mailing bills in a more timely fashion. Summary Our nation, region and community are facing challenging economic times, and forecasts are not bright for our immediate fiscal future. As we hope and work toward recovery, the City leadership staff continues looking for ways to reduce operating costs while, at the same time, trying to deliver an undiminished level of service. Our lop priority will continue to be providing the essentials — police, fire, advanced life support, homeland security and other critical services. Other vital work is provided by dedicated City employees who make sure our trash is collected, our elections run smoothly, our parks are clean, our ordinances are upheld, our streets are maintained, and all other services residents expect. For those employees who contribute to this mission of quality, I am truly grateful. My thanks go also to the members of City Council, the City Boards and Commissions, and all the hundreds of volunteers whose hard work has been evident this past year. Livonia may soon face even more difficult financial times. As a City, it will be necessary to once again look for new ways to do more with less. That may mean finding ways to trim City services in ways that are imperceptible to our residents. It will also mean that we redouble our efforts, as a City Administration, to retain and attract businesses here. I am confident we will succeed. Maintaining excellent service is our goal. We will continue to rely on the collaborative efforts of our entire team to keep the City's complex service organization providing for the needs of our wonderful community. Sincerely, Jack E. Kirksey MAYOR CITY OF LI VONIA, MICHIGAN ANNUAL REPORT Fiscal Year 2007-2008 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. Assessing Department...................................................................................1 Review, Board of 2 City Clerk 2 Civil Service Department 7 Trustees, Board of 16 Community Resources Department and Cade 19 Aging Commission 24 Arts Commission 24 Historical Commission 25 Historic Preservation Commission 27 Human Relations Commission 28 Youth Commission 29 District Court 30 Finance Department 36 Information Systems......................................................... 39 Fire Department 44 Housing Commission 53 Inspection Department 55 Building Code Board of Appeals 58 Law Department 58 Library Department & Commission 62 Parks and Recreation Department & Commission 67 Planning Department& Commission 79 Police Department and Emergency Preparedness .........................85 Public Works Department 92 Engineering Division 93 Public Service Division 96 Traffic Commission 112 Treasurer 114 Zoning Board of Appeals 118 ASSESSING DEPARTMENT The 2008 Stale Equalized Valuation of the City real and personal properly was $5,625,059,120 which relates to the following statisfics: CLASS PARCELCOUNT VALUATION Residential 38,190 3,560,611,990 Commercial 1,413 918,517,840 Industrial 868 602,713,080 Personal 4,558 543216210 $ 5,625,059,120 In addition, valuation under the Industrial Facilites Act 198 provided total valuation of $94,130,070 as follows: IFF Real 37,395,870 F - Personal 56,734,20 $94,130,070 All property appeared on the assessment roll at 50.00% of true cash value as mandated by Slate Law. Annual sales studies are conducted in order to determine market growth by neighborhood. The results of these studies are utilized to adjust area values to the required 50% of true cash value. The appraisal and maintenance of all residential field data is the responsibility of this department. Records for 20 new homes were created and revisions to approximately 553 existing property field sheets were made. Commercial and Industrial new buildings, alterations and additions numbered 142 and were reviewed for value for the 2008 assessment roll. The citywide canvass continues this year with the entering of the data gathered in prior years and the continuation of the field review of property record cards. This is an ongoing project with the goal of bringing the assessing office in closer compliance with the requirements of the State Tax Commission with regard to assessing procedures. Homesteads, Transfers, Rescissions and Uncapping Affidavits are being interpreted and processed on a daily basis. In 2008 this generated approximately 2,699 forms. Lots splits and combinations are processed by this department. This office reviews petitioner's applications and departmental correspondence for compliance to city ordinances and procedures. If a split is nonconforming Council action will be required. Approximately 18 splits and combinations were completed in 2008. Of these, 1 required Council action. Prior years Michigan Tax Tribunal appeals were finalized, 31 full tribunals and 17 small claims,for the years 2000 — 2008. Over 5,200 personal property statements were processed for the 2008 assessment roll. A continual inspection of properties in the city is being done to verify the fixed assets in the business as of lax day of each year. This year Tax Management Associates has completed 82 audits to date which have generated approximately $18,000 in additional city lax dollars. Total tax revenue generated for all taxing entities was $78,545. The December Board of Review meeting was held on Tuesday, December 9, 2007 in accordance with Section 211.53b of the General Property Tax Law of Michigan to correct all mutual mistakes of fad and clerical errors. The Livonia City Council, on February 13, 2008 (CR#42-08), set the place and dales for the 2008 March Board of Review meetings as scheduled by the Assessor and notice was given and published in the local newspapers. The Board of Review meetings convened Tuesday, March 4, 2008 for a len (10) day session of public hearings, which included an evening session. Members Conrad Gniewek, Jollietta Coleman and Linda Trewin were in attendance. The Board heard 589 taxpayer appeals and acted on 173 mail -in petitions. Determination notices were mailed on April 4, 2008. The regular session of the 1985 83rd State of Michigan Legislature has amended Section 53b of Public Act 206 to induce a July Board of Review meeting to correct clerical errors and mutual mistakes of fact. This meeting was held on Tuesday, July 21, 2008. CITY CLERK This office is administered by the City Clerk, elected for a four-year term at an odd year election conducted by the City of Livonia. The powers and duties of the City Clerk are set forth in the City Charter and statutes of the State of Michigan. The Clerk is assisted by an Assistant City Clerk and a staff of seven who are trained specialists in delivering a variety of services to the citizens of Livonia and the several departments of the City administration, i.e.: (a) 'The Clerk shall be clerk of the Council and shall attend all meetings of the Council and keep a permanent record of its meetings ..." Special Meetings 0 0 This responsibility involves receiving all correspondence and communications fled with the Clerk for transmission to the Council; preparing official agendas for both Council Regular and Study Meetings; taking and transcribing complex minutes of all Council proceedings for the official journal as well as for all Public Hearings conducted by the Council as required by law; notification and publication of Notices and Public Hearings and Council proceedings in the official newspaper as designated by the City Council; preparation and forwarding of true copies of Council actions to the parties affected; maintaining the official record of all Ordinances enacted by legislative actions. FUNCTION STATISTICS: LEGISLAWE DEPARTMENT City Council 2007 2008 Study Meetings 24 24 Regular Meetings 24 24 Special Meetings 0 0 Council Resolutions Recorded 583 506 Ordinances Adopted 19 20 Public Hearings Conducted 46 26 (b) "The Clerk shall perform such other duties as are required of that office by State or Federal law, the City Charter, the Council or Ordinances of the City." Required by Stale Statute to record and file a record of all deaths and births occurring within the City for subsequent transmittal to the Stale and County Department of Health and make available for certification copies of such records, as can be legally released. 2007 2008 Births Recorded 1,460 1,370 Deaths Recorded 1,560 1,550 $140,000.00 $136,000.00 (c) "The City Clerk shall issue and sign all licenses granted and shall register same. LICENSING During 2008 new software was implemented for processing of business, garage sale, bicycle and pet licenses. During the fiscal year this office of the City Clerk accepted and processed, etc., under Title 4 of the Livonia Code of Ordinances the following licenses: TYPE 2007 2008 Gas Stations, Dry Cleaners, Amusement Places, Taxi, Trailer Rental, Solicitors, Vending Machines, Restaurants, Caterers, etc. 1,490 1,400 FEES COLLECTED $58,100.00 $56,600.00 Garage, Basement, Rummage Sales 3,734 3,900 FEES COLLECTED $18,670.00 $19,500.00 Pel Licenses 2,948 3,119 FEES COLLECTED $22,918.00 $24,952.00 Bicyde Licenses 11 24 FEES COLLECTED $33.00 $72.00 (d) "The City Clerk shall receive for filing: zoning petitions, subdivision plats, security bonds, etc. Comprehensive files covering all phases of development of new subdivisions from the Public Hearings of the City Planning Commission in proposed plats, to the fling of all bonds and payment of financial assurances established in the City Council's Master Bond Resolutions to the final signatures of the City Clerk after the final plat approval is given by the Council." NUMBER AND TYPE OF PETITIONS FILED 2007 2008 Zoning 9 8 Vacating 0 1 Miscellaneous (Waivers) 39 30 New Plats Authorized (Preliminary) 0 0 Final Plats 0 0 4 Extensions (e) Publica0on and Legal Notices The City Clerk is responsible for the publication of the City Council's proceedings in the official newspaper of the City and the insertion of Public Notices required by law of Public Hearings and all Ordinances duly adopted. In addition, Ordinances are printed, collated and distributed to all departments and interested parties. A complete file in excess of 2,806 separate Ordinances is maintained, and the Livonia Code of Ordinances is continually updated, as amended, and on file in the City Clerk's office. (f) Duplicating and Mailing Figures The City Clerk's office produces copies of the following materials for meetings of the City Council. All City Departments' outgoing mail is handled through mailing equipment in the City Clerk's office and the required postage in 2008 totaled $126,133.00. All incoming mail is handled daily by the Clerk's office and is distributed to the various departments of the City. 2007• 2008• Council Regular Agendas 5,304 4,800 Council Study Agendas 5,640 5,040 Special Regular Agendas 0 0 Special Regular Minutes 0 0 Council Regular Minutes 1,632 1,608 Council Study Minutes 528 528 Attorney Notes for Council Regular Meetings 1,272 960 Synopsis of Regular Council Minutes 2,256 1,944 Council Public Heanng Notices 0 0 Public Hearing Minutes 1,196 576 'Tables indicate number of sets required per year for distribution for each activity; number of pages varies by event and is not induced in total. (Agenda totals include copies for the public.) All City Departments' outgoing mail is handled through mailing equipment in the City Clerk's office and the required postage in 2008 totaled $126,133.00. All incoming mail is handled daily by the Clerk's office and is distributed to the various departments of the City. (g) Election Commission of Livonia (Authority - Slate Statute) The City Clerk presides as Chairperson of the three-member Election Commission consisting of the Clerk, Mayor and City Attorney, charged with the responsibility of conducting all elections within the City. The compensation of election personnel shall be determined in advance by the Election Commission. In any case where Election procedure is in doubt, the Election Commission shall prescribe the procedure to be followed. STATISTICS RELATING TO THIS FUNCTION 2007 2008 Elections Held in City 1 Primary 1 Presidential Primary 1 General 1 Primary 1 School 1 General — 1 School 2007 2008 New Registrations 4,377 7,419 Total Registered Voters 72,022 75,083 Change of Name 512 563 Change of Address 1,457 2,015 Cancellations 3,918 4,825 Registrations by Mail 273 1,153 Number of Absentee Ballots Issued 13,351 29,961 AV Applications Issued 13,351 29,961 Notices of Election Inspectors 806 1,735 Notice of Cancellation of Registration 403 102 Sale ofVoler Registrations Lists $2,682.82 $2,851.05 (h) Other Duties and Responsibilities of the Clerk The Clerk shall have power to administer all oaths required by Slate Law, the Charter and Ordinances of the City. The Clerk shall be custodian of the City Seal and shall affix it to all documents and instruments requiring the Seal, and shall attest the same. The Clerk shall be custodian of all papers, documents and records pertaining to the City of Livonia, the custody of which is not otherwise provided for by the Charter. As custodian of records, the office of the City Clerk, in 1985 insfituted a program of microfilming the birth and death records of the City. In 2007 all birth and death records were scanned to create CD-ROM's. The Clerk shall give the proper officials of the City ample notices of expiration or termination of any official bonds, franchises, contracts or agreements. The Clerk shall examine and audit all accounts and claims against the City. In 2008 the Clerk examined, pre -audited and signed approximately 17,529 vouchers issued by the Department of Finance for transmittal to the City Treasurer. The Clerk shall possess and exercise the powers of a Township Clerk so far as the same are required to be performed within the City. The Clerk shall certify by signature all Ordinances and Resolutions enacted or passed by the City Council. The Clerk, as custodian of the cemeteries under City jurisdiction, is in charge of all burial procedures and in 2008 there were two authorized openings and closings at the cemeteries. CIVIL SERVICE DEPARTMENT The Civil Service Commission held twelve (12) Regular meetings and three (3) Special meetings during fiscal year2007-08. During fiscal year 2007-08, the City of Livonia completed negotiations with AFSCME Union Local 192 and AFSCME Supervisory Union Local 1917 for renewal of their contracts for the period December 1, 2007 to November 30, 2010; and the Livonia Police Officers Association (LPDA) for renewal of their contract for the period December 1, 2006 to November 30, 2010. The City and the Livonia Fire Fighters Union (LFFU) completed Act 312 Arbitration proceedings for a contract for the period December 1, 2005 to November 30, 2008. A tentative agreement was also reached with the Livonia Fire Fighters Union (LFF(J) for a contract for the period December 1, 2008 to November 30, 2012, however the Union backed out. Negotiations continue. Negotiations continue with the Livonia Lieutenants and Sergeants Association (LSSA) for renewal of their contract for the period December 1, 2006 through November 30, 2009. The organized effort to unionize Parks and Recreation employees resulted in an election in early 2008. The employees overwhelmingly voted not to be organized into a collective bargaining unit. Labor -Management Committee meetings have been held to resolve employee grievances or concerns fled by members of the AFSCME Union Local 192, the Livonia Police Officers Association, the Livonia Police Lieutenants and Sergeants Association and the Livonia Fire Fighters Union. These Committees consist of representatives of the Union and the City. In the event the employee grievance cannot be resolved through committee, the procedure permits appeal to the Civil Service Commission and, if not resolved, through mediation and/or formal arbitration. The Personnel Review Committee, comprised of the Human Resources Director, the Director of Finance, and the Director of Administrative Services met eighteen (18) times during the current fiscal year and reviewed and made seventy-five (75) recommendations to the Mayor on all new hires, replacement personnel and promotions. EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PROGRAMS HOSPITALIZATION -MEDICAL INSURANCE PLANS Since December 1, 1994, newly hired general employees who subscribed to hospitalization/medical insurance were required to pay a portion of their premium costs at $30.00 for single coverage, $35.00 for two -person coverage and $40.00 for family coverage per month. Effective December 1, 2006, all general employees and District Court TPOAM employees hired on or after December 1, 2004, who subscribe to hospitalization/medical benefits are required to pay a portion of their premium costs at the above rates per month. The annual Health and Wellness Fairwas held on three (3) separate afternoons during February 2008 atvarious City locations, including the Police Headquarters Training Room, the Department of Public Works Administrative Conference Room and the City Hall Fifth Floor Gallery. Employees and retirees, along with their immediate family members, were encouraged to attend. Representatives of the City's occupational health services providers were present to answer questions. In addition, representatives from the Blue Cross/Blue Shield (BCBS) hospitalization/medical insurance plans, sponsored by the City, were present to permit employees to review and compare plan descriptions and obtain assistance with health care questions or problems. The meetings were well attended with more than sixty (60) employees and family members. Effective April 1, 2006, BC/BS became the City's only hospitalization benefit provider, offering the BC/BS Blue Preferred Plan (PPO) and Point of Service plans. The PPO was replaced by the Community Blue 2 (PPO) for LPOA members effective October 1, 2006; and general employees (excluding District Court) effective December 1, 2006, At the end of the fiscal year, the employee and retiree hospitalization/medical insurance enrollments are: BLUE CROSS/BLUE SHIELD 21 Employee subscribers BC/BS Preferred Plan 447 Retiree subscribers 324 Retirees on Medicare 0 COBRA BC/BS 427 Employee subscribers Blue Choice Point of Service 126 Retiree subscribers 48 Retirees on Medicare 1 COBRA BC/BS 116 Employee subscribers COMMUNITY BLUE 16 Retiree subscribers 5 Retirees on Medicare 0 COBRA A total of ffty4wo (52) full-time employees 'opted out" of insurance coverage during the February 2008 open enrollment period and received $1,000.00 in lieu of hospitalization/medical coverage. Two employees opted back in due to loss of coverage. The City of Livonia currently contracts for group life insurance with the Mutual of Omaha Insurance Company at the rate of $245 per $1,000 per month volume. Accidental Death and Dismemberment (AD&D) group insurance coverage is also provided by Mutual of Omaha at a rate of $.02 per $1,000 volume per month. Currently, a total of six hundred sixlyone (661) employees have life insurance coverage in the aggregate amount of $35,442,431.20. In addition, Wenly-six (26) retirees have a $3,000 death benefit coverage totaling $78,000; one hundred thirty4ghl (138) retirees have a $3,500 death benefit coverage totaling $483,000 and one hundred forty-nine (149) retirees have a $5,000 death benefit totaling $745,000 for a total retiree group of three hundred thirteen (313) having aggregate life insurance in the amount of $1,306,000. During the fiscal year, a total of $104,810.96 life insurance premium and a total of $7,947.56 AD&D premium were paid to Mutual of Omaha. There were three (3) death claims fled during this fiscal year (1 employee and 2 retirees) totaling $75,000. WEEKLY DISABILITY INCOME PLAN The City of Livonia is self-insured for the weekly disability income coverage. Effective December 1, 2006 through November 30, 2009, the disability claims are administered by the Accident Fund Insurance Company of America for a monthly charge of $1.00 per eligible employee. This benefit provides $250/wk to disabled general full-time employees and $125.00 to disabled part-time employees for up to 45 weeks; $125/wk for disabled Police Dispatcher full -lime employees for 45 weeks; and $42/Wk forlhe first 12 weeks and $100/wk for the 40 week balance of 52 weeks for disabled police and fire employees. The total premium paid to Accident Fund was $7,726.00 for this fiscal year. During the Fiscal Year 2007-08, there were a total of twenty-six (26) weekly disability income claims for employees. A total dollar volume of $19,809.06 was paid by this self-insured program. The Civil Service Department staff administers the general employee union tuition reimbursement programs. Twelve (12) members of AFSCME Union Local 192 expended $3,041 out of the maximum allocation of $10,000.00 during the fiscal year. Three (3) members of the AFSCME Supervisory and Technical Chapter of Union Local 1917 expended $875 out of the maximum allocation of $3,475 during the fiscal year. OPTICAL PLAN The City offers a optical benefit program with two providers: Suburban Eye Care (a private Livonia optometric practice), and retail provider, Coop Optical who has multiple area locations. Employee usage and costs incurred during the fiscal year at these centers or through the reimbursement option were as follows: 10 Safety Glasses 3 $ 173.00 Direct Reimbursement 37 3,419.50 Co -Op Optical 69 5,272.00 Suburban Eye Care 207 17,372.00 Total 316 $26,236.50 DENTAL PROGRAM All employees have a dental reimbursement or direct payment program to the Dentist as the expenses are incurred. Billings for services rendered during the fiscal year must be submitted within 30 days of the November 30" fiscal year end for consideration. A summary of the employee reimbursements and hardship advances during the fiscal year to dale are: Number of Total Average Transactions Amount Paid Paymen Reimbursement/Direct Payment 1139 $315,952.16 $277.39 The dental reimbursement may also include payment for Dental Insurance premiums. General employees (excluding District Court) are eligible for 50% of the fees for orthodontic services for a lifetime maximum of $1500 per family limited to the employee, their spouse and dependents until the end of the year they reach age 19. Police, Fire and Court employees are eligible for 50% of the fees for a lifetime maximum of $1000 per family. The summary of the orthodontic service claims received this fiscal year is: Number of Claims Total Amount Paid Police/Fire 9 $ 7,616.50 General 15 $16767.58 Total 24 $24,384.08 The City of Livonia contracts the self-insured worker's disability compensation program with the third party administrator, Accident Fund Insurance Company of America. The contract for these services is effective December 1, 2006 through November 30, 2009. The net total incurred loss on open claims from December 1, 2007, through November 30, 2008, is $351,543.47, which is down from the 11 2006-07 loss of $905,490.47. This loss includes weekly wage loss indemnity benefits, medical services, related legal, vocational rehabilitation and other miscellaneous expenses for approximately one hundred fourteen (114) employee claims. Employees receive treatment for work-related injuries or illnesses at Providence Corporate Health Services and Midwest Health Center. The City of Livonia participates in the Michigan Municipal League Unemployment Compensation Group Account. The firm of TALX UC Express is the service agent of this group account. The Civil Service Department responded to approximately forty-nine (49) former employee claims for unemployment benefits fled with the Michigan Employment Security Administration (MESA). To dale, a total of $101,376 benefit charges have been received for this fiscal year. CIN PHYSICIAN AND MEDICAL CLINICS Pre-employment, return -to -work and occupational injurylllness medical examinations and treatment are provided by the authorized City Physician, Sl. John Providence Corporate Health Services. Also, Sl Mary Mercy Hospital has provided medical services for Police and Fire personnel and emergency services only for general employees. Our records indicate forty (40) regular employee preemployment (full -lime and part -lime) examinations, seventy (70) pre- employment physicals for temporary employees, and one hundred seven (107) physicals for return to work. Dr. Lyle Danuloff, Ph.D., the Citys Consulting Psychologist, conducted three (3) MCOLES examinations for Police Service Aides entrance into the Police Academy. Dr. Danuloff also completed twenty- one (21) evaluations for Public Safely new hire positions. In addition, there were medical consultations with regard to employee health and occupational safety matters as it related to infectious diseases and worker's compensation claims, including continuation of preemployment auditory, TB and pulmonary function examinations for fire fighter and police officer new hires in compliance with MIOSHA requirements. Alcohol and drug testing for employees assigned to drive specific types of Department of Public Works vehicles are being coordinated in compliance with federal regulations. SAFETY A representative of the Accident Fund Loss Prevention Division, the third party administrator of the City's self insured Worker's Compensation Program, conducted four (4) loss prevention facility lours with Civil Service and Public Works staff during the fiscal year. The facilities reviewed were the Public Service Garages, DPW Administration office, Vehicle Maintenance Garage Office and the Civic Center, Sandburg and Noble Libraries. 12 One hundred nineteen (119) employees received service recognition awards in FY 2007-08. The Civil Service Department has continued an affirmative recruitment program through newspaper advertisements in the Observer/Eccentric, the Detroit News/Detroit Free Press, and notices to various colleges, training schools, MESA, handicapper rehabilitation services, and minority community based organizations. The total number of advertisements published during Fiscal Year 2007-08 were: the Detroit News — 8; Livonia Observer — 8; Michigan Municipal League — 1; several professional association publications, the Internet recruitment service Falcon Associates (government jobs), the City of Livonia Spring and Fall News, and Cable Channel 8. In accordance with the Affirmative Action policy adopted by the Civil Service Commission, the Civil Service staff continued its efforts to make examinations and position descnpfions as job-related as possible. Proposed qualifications for each new examination were reviewed by the respective Department staff and the Civil Service Commission in order to establish prerequisites which were appropriate to the positions being filled. In addition, the Civil Service staff completed several state and federal equal employment opportunity reports, surveys from other communities and prepared a monthly summary report to the Civil Service Commission concerning the race and gender characteristics of all applicants for open -competitive examinations, the resulting eligible lists, and all regular employee hires and terminations. 13 Service Awards Level of Service Presented Five Years 13 Ten Years 37 Fifteen Years 18 Twenty Years 37 Twenty -Five Years 8 Thirty Years 6 Thirty -Five Years 0 Forty Years 0 Forty -Five Years 0 Total 119 The Civil Service Department has continued an affirmative recruitment program through newspaper advertisements in the Observer/Eccentric, the Detroit News/Detroit Free Press, and notices to various colleges, training schools, MESA, handicapper rehabilitation services, and minority community based organizations. The total number of advertisements published during Fiscal Year 2007-08 were: the Detroit News — 8; Livonia Observer — 8; Michigan Municipal League — 1; several professional association publications, the Internet recruitment service Falcon Associates (government jobs), the City of Livonia Spring and Fall News, and Cable Channel 8. In accordance with the Affirmative Action policy adopted by the Civil Service Commission, the Civil Service staff continued its efforts to make examinations and position descnpfions as job-related as possible. Proposed qualifications for each new examination were reviewed by the respective Department staff and the Civil Service Commission in order to establish prerequisites which were appropriate to the positions being filled. In addition, the Civil Service staff completed several state and federal equal employment opportunity reports, surveys from other communities and prepared a monthly summary report to the Civil Service Commission concerning the race and gender characteristics of all applicants for open -competitive examinations, the resulting eligible lists, and all regular employee hires and terminations. 13 EXAMINATION PROGRAM The Civil Service staff continued to prepare and administer open -competitive and promotional examinations as requested by City Department Heads. During Fiscal Year 2007-08, a total of 13 open -competitive and 21 promotional examinations were announced. The Civil Service Department received 854 applications for open -competitive examinations and 128 for promotional examinations during the fiscal year. In addition the Department received 505 applications for temporary employment opportunities in various Parks and Recreation positions; 113 applications for Seasonal Laborer; 7 applications for Seasonal Laborer -Engineering; 31 applications for Seasonal Clerk; 88 applications for Student Page; 123 applications for Library Page; 5 applications for Substitute Librarian; 49 applications for Temporary Clerical; 18 applications for School Crossing Guard; 37 applications for Police Reserve Officer; and 2 applications for Police Matron. TRAINING During FY 2007-08, the Civil Service Department sponsored several employee - training activities. Between December 2007 and November 2008, Civil Service Staff coordinated multiple educational presentations sponsored by financial representatives from the Deferred Compensation 457 Plan providers including Nationwide Retirement Solutions, ICMA Retirement Corporation and Community Choice Credit Union. Over 125 employees scheduled individual appointments with the Deferred Compensation 457 Plan on-site representatives. Great West Retirement Services is the Plan Administrator for the 401(a) Defined Contribution Plan. The Account Representative, Greg Wood, conducted numerous on-site meetings and training sessions in 2008. Approximately one hundred sixty-nine (169) employees attended the sessions in which enrollment, investment education and training on the new investment product 'Reality Investing' was reviewed.. It should be noted that the City's contract with Great West was scheduled to end in September 2007, however, a month to month extension of the current agreement has been authorized by City Council until the Request For Proposal (RFP) process is completed. Additionally, this matter has been referred to the Finance, Insurance and Budget Committee to allow for presentations to City Council from the highest rated vendors. In November 2008, Civil Service staff coordinated Citywide day long training on "How to Handle the Upset Citizen" for thirty-seven (37) employees. 14 EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM A subcommittee comprised of a police/fire union representative, a general employee union representative, the Youth Assistance Program Supervisor, two (2) behavioral health service EAP providers and the Human Resources Director continue to oversee the Emergency Behavioral Health Service Referral Network. For the FY 2007-08, a total of 11 employees, 2 employee family members and 2 residents received crisis intervention individual counseling sessions at the limit of 5 sessions totaling $400 per individual. In addition, EAP providers have been called upon to assist Departments with group conflict resolution exercises. Services totaled approximately $3,840.00. The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program has mirrored their behavioral health -counseling program to the City's EAP and uses many of the same referral network of providers. A total of $1,688.60 in CDBG funds has been expended during FY 2007-08 provided to 15 I ow -income residents. SPECIAL PROJECTS 1. The Civil Service staff coordinated one (1) Employee Blood Drive in 2008 and assisted in the coordination of two (2) additional drives at the Community Recreation Center. A total of six"even (67) pints of blood were donated by City employees during the drives, conducted in March, May and in September. 2. The Critical Incident Response Team (GIRT) comprised of members from Police, Fire, Law, Public Service, the Mayor's Office, the Council Office, the Director of Emergency Preparedness and Civil Service continued its mission during the past year. The Team continues to evaluate potential violence problems and recommends assessment or intervention plans. The members of the Team have not responded to any possible workplace violence situations this year. 3. Dr. Kenneth Wolf continues to work with the Police Department on their Critical Incident Stress Debriefing Program and work in DPW investigating confrontational situations. 4. The Civil Service staff continued the on-site "Flu Shot" program in cooperation with Providence Hospital Corporate Health Services. Sixty (60) employees and immediate family members received inoculations for a nominal fee at several City worksite locations. 15 BOARD OF TRUSTEES Following is a report on the activities and accomplishments of the Board of Trustees of the Livonia Employees Retirement System for the period December 1, 2007 through November 30, 2008: 1. DEFINED BENEFIT PLAN a) The Board of Trustees held twelve (12) Regular Meetings during this period. b) As of November 30, 2008, the retirement system Defined Benefit Plan had five hundred thirty-seven (537) retirees or surviving spouses plus seven (7) Eligible Domestic Relations Orders (EDRO's) (Divorced Prior to Retirement) and five (5) Alternate Payees (Divorced after Retirement) for a total of five hundred forty-nine (549) receiving pension checks. Twelve (12) City retirees died during fiscal year 2007-2008. The total pension payroll fiscal year to date is $11,863,219 through November 2008. c) The team of David Sowerby and Kenneth Johnson, Loomis -Sayles and Company, advises the Board on investments for the Defined Benefit Plan and uses discretionary power regarding investments subject to confirmation by the Board. The Board approved investment transactions by Loomis -Sayles and Company at regular meetings. The Defined Benefit fund had a value of $148,560,368 as of October 31, 2008. d) In May 2008, the Board reviewed the fifty-fifth (551h) annual actuarial valuation as of November 30, 2007, for the Livonia Employees Retirement System, prepared by the Board's Actuary, Rodwan Consulting Company. The Plan covered five hundred forty-seven (547) retirees, twenty-six (26) deferred and two hundred forty-three (243) employees for a total of eight hundred sixteen (816). The Actuary reported that the accrued actuarial condition of the Retirement System is "very good". e) The funded ratio of actuarial value of assets to actuarial accrued liability for the Retirement System Defined Benefit Plan was 124.3% as of November 30, 2007. f) Merrill -Lynch continues to provide quarterly performance evaluation of the Defined Benefit Plan. g) The 2007-08 annual soft dollar expense for the Merrill Lynch Performance Measurement Report was $57,000. 16 h) Effective July 5, 2000, the Board entered into a Securities Lending Agreement with Comerica Bank. Total earnings from the Securities Lending Agreement with Comerica from December 1, 2007 through October 31, 2008 were $94,625.94. i) In June 2001, the Board approved a $5 million investment with MuniMae Midland LLC, in the Midland Multifamily Equity Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT) offering, In April 2002, the Board approved an additional $5 million investment for a total of $10 million invested in the Midland Multifamily Equity REIT. Total interest earnings from December 1, 2007 through November 30, 2008 were $954,448.18. j) In March 2002, the Board approved a $5 million investment with Cohen & Steers Capital Management Inc., in a Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT), separately managed account. The account market value reported as of October 31, 2008 was $3,281,466. k) Approximately seventy-five (75) requests for retirement estimates under the Defined Benefit Plan were processed by the Civil Service Department Staff. 1) The Board of Trustees continues to distribute monthly pension checks directly to members of the Defined Benefit Plan with these checks being processed by the staff of the Civil Service Department m) Members of the Board attended the Michigan Association of Public Employees Retirement System (MAPERS) Conferences at Soaring Eagle, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, from May 31 to June 3, 2008; and at the Grand Traverse Resort, Acme, Michigan, from September 13 to September 16, 2008. 2. DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLAN a) The Board of Trustees held twelve (12) Regular Meetings during this period. b) The Defined Contribution Plan Administrator continues to be Great West Refirement Services. It should be noted that the City's contract with Great West was scheduled to end in September 2007, however, a temporary extension of the current agreement on a month to month basis has been authorized by City Council until the Request For Proposal (RFP) process is completed. Additionally, this matter has been referred to the Finance, Insurance and Budget Committee to allow forpresentations to City Council from the highest rated vendors. 17 c) The Defined Contribution Fund had a total account ending balance of $40,077,076 as of September 30, 2008, for four hundred thirteen (413) active participants; sixty-six (66) participants who terminated employment and have an ending account balance; and two (2) participants with a zero ending account balance. d) As of November 30, 2008, a total of eighty-six (86) employees have retired under the Defined Contribution Retirement Plan. 3. LIVONIA RETIREE HEALTH AND DISABILITY BENEFITS PLAN (VEBA) a) The Board held twelve (12) Regular Meetings for the VEBA Plan. b) Mr. Sowerby and Mr. Johnson advised the Board on investments for the VEBA. The VEBA had a value of $42,172,036 as of October 31, 2008. Note: The VEBA was established at the recommendation of the former Actuary to the Board of Trustees, Gabriel, Roeder, Smith and Co., forpurposes ofplacing in a tax free trust hospitalization -medical insurance benefit funds for members of the DB and the DC Plans, as well as to permit separate funding for DC Plan member disability retirements. c) In May 2008, the Board reviewed the tenth (10"' annual actuarial valuation as of November 30, 2007, for the VEBA, as prepared by the Board's Actuary, Rodwan Consulting Company. The Actuary reported that the amortization periods adopted by the Board of Trustees for the funding purposes of this Plan are 30 years for disability benefits and 40 years for health insurance benefits. The 40 year amortization period produces a conlnbution that is less than the Annual Required Contribution (ARC), and results in a contribution deficiency in the Plan's financial report. d) The funded ratio of actuarial value of assets to actuarial accrued liability for the City of Livonia Retiree Health and Disability Benefits Plan and Trust (VEBA) was 45.6% as of November 30, 2007. The unfunded liability is $62,882,965. e) Effective April 1, 2006, BC/BS became the City's only hospitalization benefit provider, offering the BC/BS Blue Preferred Plan (PPO) and Point of Service plans. The PPO was replaced by the Community Blue 2 (PPO) for LPOA, LFFU and all general employees (excluding District Court employees). lD f) Effective December 6, 2007, all general employees (excluding Distract Court employees) are contributing 2% of pension eligible wages to the City's Voluntary Employee Beneficiary Association (VEBA) Retiree Health and Disability Benefits Plan. Effective December 1, 2006, all LPOA and LFFU employees are contributing 2% of pension eligible wages to the VEBA. This does not include overtime earnings and this contribution is in pre-tax dollars. g) The Board received $270,978.88 from the Centers of Medicare Retiree Drug Subsidy Program. This payment represents a return to the retirement system for prescription drug costs under Medicare Part D for retirees and covers the period December 1, 2006 through November 30, 2007. The funds were electronically deposited into the VEBA account on November 14, 2008. DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY RESOURCES AND CABLE PUBLICATIONS • City Newsletter — four (4) issues published and mailed to approximately 43,000 residences and businesses • Brochures, newsletters and flyers were prepared for specific programs COMMUNITY GARDENS • Cash collected for Garden Plots $5,580 • Plots available for planting 257 • Plots purchased 202 • Plots purchased by 100 residents 149 at $25. • Plots purchased by 50 non residents 53 at $35. Richard Strzalkowski hours for 2008: 294.5 hours In January of 2008, the gardeners from 2007 were contacted to pay for their plots ifthey wished to continue gardening in 2008. We added a Hold Harmless Agreement to the Community Garden sign-up this year. We also met with the City of Hazel Park to help them establish a Community Garden in their city. Open enrollment became available to all the Iasi week of March. The gardens were plowed by the Department of Public Works in May and slaked by the 16th Distract Court Probation Department. The Department of Public Works delivered six truckloads of mulch and four loads of wood chips. This was supervised by Richard Strzalkowski, the Garden Supervisor. Richard repaired and purchased hoses, helped all gardeners find their plots, and answered and resolved all garden issues. Richard was available three to four days a week during the entire 19 time the garden was open in order to assist gardeners with any issues that might arise. There were very few complaints this year. In September, we held the annual Gardeners' picnic, which was well attended. In October, we closed the Gardens, and once again the Department of Public Works plowed the gardens under after the 16"' District Court's Probation program cleaned up the gardens. VOLUNTEER & SPECIAL PROJECTS Information & Complaint Center — four (4) volunteers handled 801 telephone calls. There were no TTY/TDD calls or formal complaints processed. City Hall Tours — There were six (6) tours conducted with nine (9) various groups, for a total of 65 participants. • Rouge Rescue — Rouge Rescue activities, in conjunction with Take Pride in Livonia Day, were held at Moelke Park on May 3rd. These activities were coordinated by 17 staff from Public Service and three (3) Community Resource staff. They were assisted by 65 volunteers (Cub/Boy Scouts, Gid Scouts and Brownie Troops, Tiger Cub Scouts, Livonia Jaycees, Wolverine Sports & Conservation Club of Livonia, Livonia Rotary Club, Catholic Central High School, Franklin High School Interact Club, Holmes Middle School, Taft Elementary School, Sl. Damian School, Churchill High School, Stevenson High School Environmental Class, National Honors Society, Global Ed Class, and the Rosedale Gardens Presbyterian Church Youth Group). Activities focused on trash, debris, and invasive species removal. Volunteers filled 121 plastic garbage bags and removed six (6) shopping carts, three (3) appliances (washer, dryer and wood stove), a vacuum cleaner, plastic pool, car bench seat, roll of carpeting, metal barrel and an electric toy car. We acknowledge Stan's Markel, Busch's Market, Korca's Coney Island Restaurant and Larry's Foodland for their generous donations of refreshments and snacks. RESIDENT ASSISTANCE • Emergency Certificates — assisted 76 families with $3,050.00 in Stan's Markel and Larry's Foodland gift certificates thanks to the generous donations of local businesses, organizations and individuals • Utility Assistance - CDBG funds assisted nine (9) low-income households with utility shutoff bills totaling $ 4,193.56. Police - Forfeiture funds assisted four (4) low-income households with utility shutoff bills totaling $1,998.81 Clerical, technical and budgetary assistance was provided to the Aging, Arts, Cable, Historical, Historic Preservation, Human Relations and Youth Commissions. 20 LIVONIA COMMUNITY TRANSIT (LCT) Community Resources has the administrative responsibility of providing transportation for Livonia senior citizens and disabled residents. Livonia Community Transit also provides "to work" transportation for people using the SMART and D -DOT bus systems by picking them up from hubs located at Millennium Park and near Botsford Hospital and then taken to predetermined work locations. Riders are picked up beginning in the morning at 6:00, 7:00 and 8:00 a.m. and again for the return trip in the afternoon a14:00, 5:00 and 6:00 p.m. Municipal contracts and applicable grants, which are administered by SMART, are monitored and prepared by the Community Resources staff. The Livonia Community Transit system has a fleet of 15 vehicles (small buses and vans). The vehicles are driven by 27 part-fime bus drivers with Commercial Drivers Licenses. The Transit office is supervised by an Assistant Grant Manager and four (4) other part-time employees, who help coordinate the drivers and their schedules. The system provided over 40,000 rides. These rides totaled over 289,000 miles and over 17,000 service hours. CIVIC PARK SENIOR CENTER Participation in activities during 2008 totaled approximately 130,000 seniors. 14,455 congregate meals were served. Activities included: health screening, educational classes, support groups, fitness classes, cards and games, arts & crafts, senior sports, Medicare counseling, etc. Volunteers logged 15,393 hours. SUPPORT SERVICES, GIFTS, GRANTS, AND TRANSPORTATION Senior Center Staffing Grant, Michigan Office of Services to the Aging Grant and C.D.B.G. funds totaled $151,488. Donations in the amount of $13,000 were received. Federal and State grants and donations provided: 175 hours of Telephone Reassurance to 10 seniors 1,000 hours of Information and Referral to 1500 seniors Home maintenance service to 48 homes 15,740 one-way rides through the senior transportation program 38,736 meals were delivered by volunteers to home bound seniors REFERRAL SOURCES: 2008 Referrals: 77 New Cases — (38 Male and 39 Female) Carry Over Cases from 2007: 106 21 Total Cases served in 2008: 183 2008 NEW CASES REPRESENT THE FOLLOWING REFERRAL AGENCIES: Livonia Police Department 34 Third Circuit Court -Juvenile Division 09 Surrounding Police Departments 33 (Westland and Novi) Voluntary Referral 01 40 parents completed the Alternative Parenting Skills group. Program youth performed 770 hours of Community Work Service. 42 youth completed "Project Impact' (social Irving skills) group (12 hours each). 31 males participated in the JAG (Juvenile Awareness Program) at Milan Federal Prison. 29 males and 31 females attended the Wayne County Jail tour. 456 Youth used the services of the Youth Employment Resource Center that listed over 652 job openings with 350 employers Wayne County grants: Child Care Fund $ 4,500. 1/10r" Mill Fund $18,300. LIVONIA CABLE TELEVISION Produced 179 programs (4,066.45 production hours) for City Channel 8, including the live coverage of City public meetings: City Council Study and Regular meetings and Planning Commission meetings. Utilized 241.75 hours of volunteer assistance from certified residents in the production of City Channel 8 programs. Logged 68 Bright House Networks and 45 AT&T complaints/inquiries re: rates, reception, programming choices and the desire of competition for cable television and internet access using cable modems. Channel 8 staff maintained radio station WPZY, 1670 AM, providing up-to-date information regarding road closures, snow emergencies and other vital information relating to the public safety and well being within our community. Channel 8 staff produced Website streaming media and updated monthly. Upgraded Cable staff workroom Avid Computer -Based Editor. In cooperation with' LPD, using Homeland Security funds, purchased and installed new router for cable over -ride of Emergency Warning Signal. 22 Upgraded City Hall Auditorium to more efficient and cooler television lighting. Community Resources has administrative responsibility for the Historical and Historic Preservation Commissions. The reports pertaining to these activities can be found under the Historical Commission and Historic Preservation Commission. In addition, the Community Resources staff at Greenmead: • Conducted day -today operation of Greenmead • Maintained Historical Commission records including minutes, volunteer hours, caretaker reports, contracts, and budgets • Coordinated weekday tours, Sunday lours, Gift Shop operations, Newburg School usage, Newburg Church, Alexander Blue House and Meeting House rentals. Properly usage includes weddings, meetings, luncheons, and private parties. • Implemented Historical Commission resolutions • Assisted with the development, planning and implementation of 20 special events, fundraisers and community projects sponsored by the Historical Commission, Friends of Greenmead, Livonia Historical Society, Queslers, St. Andrew's Society of Detroit, Greenmeadows — Native Lands, 17" Michigan Civil War Re -enactors, A.M.C. Car Club, Mustang Car Show and Garden Club. • Worked with D.P.S. to define and prioritize maintenance work including replacement of side door at the Alexander Blue House, and the replacement of the furnace at Farmhands House. Assisted with oversight on roof repair and ceiling replacement at the Hill House. Coordinated location and placement of additional outdoor lighting • Coordinated the painting of the General Store, and replacement of the light fixtures at Newburg School • Assisted Building Inspection with the coordination of the finish work and painting of offices on the second floor of the Blue House, installation of security cameras, intercom security -entrance system, and purchase of furniture for the Blue House. • Coordinated Greenmead's volunteer program, published issues of the Volunteer Voice Newsletter, and scheduled volunteers for lours and special events • Provided work site and supervision for community service probationers and community service projects • Hosted several professional and volunteer gatherings such as a Volunteer Reception, Friends of Greenmead Luncheon, Historical Society, and Police Reserves Picnic • Provided a project site for the Master Gardener Program and support for the volunteer gardeners program 23 • Provided a site and support for several Eagle Scout Projects The Commission continues to publish the "Heritage' as part of the City Newsletter. It is distributed to all homes and businesses in the City of Livonia. Commission funds are used. In April, the Commission helped organize the annual Senior Center Consumer Fair. In June, the Commission co-sponsored the annual Senior Citizens Picnic held at the Eddie Edgar Ice Arena. The Commission paid for entertainment and a portion of the food. The Commission was in charge of bingo and a 50/50 rattle. In October, the Commission provided handouts and worked at Senior Celebration Day. Commission funds were used. In November, the Commission provided transportation for a holiday event for the Senior Center volunteers. Handouts were purchased for the holidays. Commission funds were used. At its November 2008 meeting, pursuant to its by-laws, the Commission held its annual election. The following officers were unanimously elected to one-year terms commencing December 1, 2008. Chairperson: Clara Karr 1"Vice Chairperson: Joan O'Brien 2n° Vice Chairperson: Josephine Smith Treasurer: Florence Yeomans Secretary: Robert Carris LIVONIA ARTS COMMISSION The Livonia Arts Commission held its meetings on the 4"' Tuesday of each month in the Mayor's Conference Room of Livonia City Hall. The 2008 officers were: Chairperson: Donna Eno; Vice Chairperson: Dan Spuding; Secretary: Vivienne Manwaring/Grace Karczewski; Treasurer: Virginia Bosak. During the year, a resignation letter was received from Vivienne Manwaring. 24 Active Commission members include Virginia Bosak, Jason Claypoole, Donna Eno, Mary Fisher-Smith, Conrad Gniewek, Grace Karczewski, Frank Petersmark, Came Spuding, and Dan Spurling. The years newest appointed commissioners were returning commissioners Fred Aceni and Seymour Le Vine. At this time, the Commission has four open positions. Budgeted Free-Admission Activities: The Commission appropriated $2,000 to co-sponsor the monthly Noontime Concerts held at the Civic Center Library. Music from the Heart was held at Civic Center Park and at the Community Recreation Center in July and August and included the Livonia Youth Symphony. Three Garage Band music concerts for teens were also held at Civic Center Park. The Youth Commission donated $500 toward the series. Total expenses for both series were $13,200. Commission Sponsored Community Activities: A $500 grant to the Visual Arts Association of Livonia and a $300 to Emily Poppenger for Fine Arts Camp were awarded. Scholarships were awarded totaling $4,000 in an art-related field at a post high school learning institution. Commission Donations: Livonia Symphony, $5,000; Greenmead's Garden and Christmas Walks, $100 each. The Commission held its 11" Annual Fine Arts Exhibition in September. The selected artwork was displayed in the 21d floor Art Gallery of the Civic Center Library. Ninety two entries were chosen for exhibifion from the over 300 submissions. Prize money awarded totaled $2,950. A $250 corporate sponsorship donation was received from Eastern Michigan University. Artwork from regional artists was displayed monthly in the Civic Center Library Gallery and in the City Hall Atrium. The Library-sponsored Teen Camp appeared in the Gallery in February. Arts Commissioners displayed their artwork in July and City employee art was displayed in November in the City Hall Atrium. Commission-Sponsored Receptions: The Fine Ads Exhibifion was held in September at the Civic Center Library. Greenmead was the site of a reception for scholarship winners, and individual artist receptions were held monthly in the Civic Center Library Gallery. Art from the Heart in 2008 consisted of approximately seventy five exhibitors, and was held in Civic Center Park. Dollars generated from the fesfival allow for the continued art and cultural experiences that the Commission works to host each year. Seymour Le Vine secured a grant in the amount of $1,050 from Michigan's Arts & Humanities to present Jazzistry, a louring company that includes jazz music and 25 history. This event will be presented to the public in the Civic Center Library auditorium on January 21, 2009. Seymour Le Vine attended Arlserve's Arts and Advocacy Day in Lansing in March. Dan Spurling, Donna Eno, and Seymour Le Vine attended a seminar on the Cultural Data Program in October. Livonia Public Schools PTSA asked the Commission to judge its entries in their Reflections competition. The Commission co-sponsored the Martin Luther King, Jr. art contest, along with the Human Relations Commission, during the January celebration event. The Commission maintains a website, artsaci.livonia.mi.us The Livonia Arts Commission's mission statement is: 'To preserve, promote, sponsor and develop the Arts in Livonia. To continue community access to art experiences, opportunities and improving community awareness" LIVONIA HISTORICAL COMMISSION The Livonia Histoncal Commission was established by ordinance in June of 1958 and has celebrated its 50"' anniversary this year. One hundred and thirty eight volunteers have helped the staff and the commission to hold 17 activities at Greenmead Historical Park this year. Teas were held this year in December, February, April and July. About 80 women attended the Catherine's Table luncheon was held in November. Peter Rabbit's adventure was held in May, and a Halloween Walk was held in October. A Flea Markel was held by the commission in June and by the Livonia Historical Society in September. Greenmead is one of the starting points for the Friend's of Greenmead Garden and Christmas Walks. Sl Andrews Society held their 159"' Highland Games in August. The Mustang and American Motors clubs each held car shows in August. Green Meadows rented the grounds for their Native Lands program in the sprang. About three thousand children and adults attended that event. Two nights of candlelight tours closed out the season. There were 25 Church rentals, and the Alexander Blue House was rented 55 times. Twenty three gardeners cared for the flower gardens around the Hill House and two gardens in the historical village. In May the gardeners held a plant sharing. 26 The Geer Store was painted and rotted wood was replaced, where needed. The original part of the Alexander Blue roof was reroofed with wood shingles. The Historical Society helped pay forthis project. Eagle projects: The walkways up to the Geer store were redone, and the area in front of the building was regraded. Porches were painted at the Kingsley, Bungalow and the Farm Hands houses. The Hill House basement was cleaned out. Lindy Donigan, a granddaughter of the Hill's, held a fund raiser on the back lawn in late summer to raise funds for the restoration of the Hill House. The Michigan One -Room Schoolhouse Association held its stale conference at the Alexander Blue House in May. In the fall, the Greenmead office was moved from Hinbern to the 2n° floor of the Alexander Blue House. The gift shop at Hinbern was expanded and the back area is being used for processing and cataloging of the artifact collection. A staff person and a commissioner attended the spring MOMCC (Midwest Outdoor Museum Coordinating Council) Conference in northern Indiana. Two staff members and four commissioners attended the fall MOMCC conference at Spring Mill State Park in southern Indiana. Kathie Glynn, Historic Preservation Commissioner, also attended both the spring and fall conferences and is helping to plan the March 2009 conference, which will be hosted by Greenmead. HISTORIC DISTRICT RESOURCES: The Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) meets the first Wednesday of the month in the Blue House at Greenmead, Livonia, Michigan. A website is in development to highlight the historic districts in Livonia on the City Website. KATOR— SHAY HOUSE Exterior changes to the house in 2005 are in the process of being resolved with the HPC. The changes (paint and front porch railings and paint) were not reviewed by HPC per the local ordinance. The owner has been in contact with the commission to resolve the issues (paint and front porch railings), and has received commission approval in 2008 to repaint the house and trim with approved commission colors. GREENMEAD The HPC recommends that a Master Plan (Cultural Resource Management Plan) be developed for Greenmead before any future decisions are made. 27 Alexander Blue House The Blue House was reroofed with appropriate cedar -shake shingles as approved bythe HPC in 2007. Hill House The HPC has representafives on the restorafion committee to renovate the Hill House. The committee is reviewing the requirements of the Historical Commission and the necessary repairs to the structure, while considering alternate fuel sources for healing and cooling. NEWBURG CEMETERY The Commission was contacted by Boy Scout Eric Mlynar of a Westland Troop to clean up the cemetery located on Ann Arbor Trail for an Eagle Scout project. The Commission approved the proposal and requirements for the clean up with Eric. The boy scouts removed old brush and debris and repainted the fence along Ann Arbor Trail. COMMISSIONERS The Commission is actively pursuing the appointment of another commissioner with a preservation background to fill the vacant commission seat. Commissioners James Kline and Ralph Bakewell were reappointed by the Mayor to the commission for another three year term. OFFICER ELECTION Election of officers held in November, results as follows: • —Chairperson— Kathleen Johnson Barlshe • —Vice Chairperson—Don Knapp • —Secretary— Ralph Bakewell • -Treasurer — James Kline On January 21, 2008, The Livonia Human Relations Commission, along with the Arts Commission and PLAID (People of Livonia Addressing Issues of Diversity) celebrated Martin Luther King Jr's. birthday with a formal program held in the Livonia City Hall Library Auditorium. Our keynote speaker was Warren C. Evans, Wayne County Sheriff. On April 17, 2008, the Human Relations Commission presented Kathy La Combe and Livonia Public Schools, Webster Elementary with Honor Roll Awards for their promotion of diversity and distinguished community service. The awards were presented by Mayor Jack E. Kirksey at a reception held in their honor. 28 The Commission was represented at the Mayor's State of the City address on March 11, 2008. On November 12, 2008, Deputy Chief Curtis Caid from the Livonia Police Department reported to the Commission on Hate Crimes in the City of Livonia for 2008. Officers for 2008 were George Saba — Chairperson James Roye— isr Vice Chairperson Catherine Starks —2nd Vice Chairperson Secretary—Ronald Amen (Elaine Livingway, Christopher Deal) LIVONIA COMMISSION ON CHILDREN AND YOUTH In 2008, the Livonia Commission on Children and Youth continued the administration of the scholarship program sponsored by the Livonia Anniversary Committee. The Commission distributed brochures advertising the scholarships to the local high schools and libraries. Information about the scholarships was presented in the Winter News, on City Channel 8, the City's website, and was also made available at the Department of Community Resources office. More than thirty applications were submitted for the eight $2,000 awards. Commissioners Dan Spurling, Jeff Nork, Jessica Claypoole, and Jerry Krause reviewed and selected the most deserving recipients. Awards were presented during the Spree Breakfast in June. Acknowledging that Back to School is a costly time of the year for parents, the Commission held its school supply program for the third consecutive year. The Commission dslribuled more than 300 backpacks and school supplies, which were purchased with its funds as well as donations, to families whose names were provided by the Livonia Goodfellows. Commissioners Dan Spuding and Jeff Nork were primarily responsible for this project and were assisted by other Commissioners and City staff. The Arbor Day Project, coordinated in cooperation with the Livonia Public Schools and the Clarenceville Public Schools, was repeated again. Seedlings were packaged and distributed to all fourth grade classes in the two school systems. Global Releaf and the Youth Commission shared the cost ofsupplying more than eighteen hundred trees. Commissioner Kenneth Balcoff chaired the committee this year. The Youth Commission again monetarily supported the "All Night Senior Graduation Parties" at the high schools that requested our help through 29 donations of $250 to each requesting school The Youth Commission presented Honor Certificates to all graduating seniors who had achieved a 3.0 grade point average or higher from all five high schools in Livonia-- Churchill, Franklin, Stevenson, Clarenceville and Ladywood. Emergency stickers, which are to be placed on the bedroom windows of children, senior citizens and/or handicapped individuals, continue to be available at City Hall and also from the Livonia Fire Department. Information on obtaining the stickers is shown on City Channel B. The Youth Commission joined with the Livonia Arts Commission to put on the garage band concert series, Music from the Garage. The Youth Commission donated $500 toward t -shirts. The Commission, in an effort to reach out to the needy youth of Livonia, hosted a holiday party on two consecutive Saturdays in November for families who registered with the Goodfellows. While the parents were interviewed by the Goodfellow representatives, approximately 800-900 children in attendance were invited to enjoy snacks, crafts, gifts, and to visit and have their photograph taken with Santa at the Senior Center. While many items were donated, the Commission ensured that every child Teff with a gift bag of goodies for themselves and family members. Commissioners Dan Spurling and Jeff Nork headed this project and were aided by Commissioners and volunteers from the community. An informational pamphlet or CD entitled, "Who You Gonna Calf' is being updated. The project should yield a list of helpful phone numbers and website addresses that could be distributed to troubled teens or made available to concerned parents. Commission Officers for 2008-2009 will be: Dan Spurling - Chairperson; Jeff Nork -Vice Chairperson; Jim Keller— Secretary. W JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT NEW CASES FILED ANNUAL REPORT: 12/01107 —11130108 CRIMINAL 1. Felony (FY) 414 2. Ordinance Misdemeanor (OM) 1665 30 3. Statute Misdemeanor( SM) 276 TRAFFIC 4. Felony Drunk Driving (FD) 40 5. Felony Traffic (FT) 15 Total Felony Traffic 55 (#4 + #5 =) 6. Ordinance Drunk Driving (OD) 243 7. Ordinance Civil Infractions (OI) 33309 8. Ordinance Traffic Misdemeanor (OT) 2582 9. Statute Drunk Dnving(SD) 30 Total Drunk Driving 273 (#6 + #9 =) 10. Statute Civil Infractions (SI) 1591 Total Civil Infractions 34900 (#7 + #10 =) 11. Statute Traffic Misdemeanor (ST) 205 Total Traffic Misd. 2787 (#8 + #11 =) MISCELLANEOUS 12. Criminal/Traffic Juries Selected 7 13. Criminal/Traffic Cases Perfected to Appeal 5 NON -TRAFFIC CIVIL INFRACTIONS & PARKING 14. Ordinance Parking (OK) 1568 15. Ordinance Nor-Traffic(ON) 7 16. Statute Parking (SK) 1 Total Parking 1569 (#14 + #16 =) 17. Statute NorvTraffic(SN) 2 Total Non -Traffic 9 (#15+#17 =) 31 Felony Guilty Plea (reduced charge) CIVIL DIVISION Bench Verdict 18. General Civil (GC) 2665 19. General Civil Miscellaneous (GZ) 2 20. Landlord Tenant (LT) 623 21. Land Contract Summary Proceedings (SP) 6 22. Small Claims (SC) 508 MISCELLANEOUS 23. Civil Division Junes Selected 3 24. Marriages 35 25. Motions 1670 26. Discovery/Debtor Exams 154 27. Gamishmenls 4380 28. Orders to Seize/Orders of Eviction 399 PROBATION 1. Number of Placements on Probation 1938 2. Pre -Sentence Investigation Reports 1406 3. Violation of Probation Warrants Issued 880 4. Show Cause Summons Issued 2546 5. Probation Cases Closed 1900 6. Number of Open Probation Cases 1237 7. Total Number of Days Worked on the Voluntary Work Program (in lieu of jail) 4196 Felony Guilty Plea (reduced charge) 8 Bench Verdict 0 Bindover to 3"Circuit Court (after Examination held or wa ived) 391 Dismissed by Party 2 Dismissed by Court 25 Inactive Status (Warrant)' 263 Local Diversion 0 Case Type Change 0 Total 687 32 Misdemeanors (Ordinance and Statute) Jury Verdict 1 Bench Verdict 17 Guilty Plea 1517 Dismissed by Party 328 Dismissed by Court 120 Inactive Status (Warrant)` 516 Local Diversion 0 Case Type Change 1 Total 2500 Felony, Misdemeanor and Civil Infraction Jury Verdict 0 Bench Verdict 3963 Guilty Plea/Admission 24256 Bindover to 3'd CircuilCourt(afer Examination held or waived) 50 Dismissed by Party 853 Dismissed by Court 3336 Default Judgments 8444 Inactive Status (Warrant)' 934 Local Diversion 0 Case Type Change 11 Total 41847 'Note: Warrant/Bench Warrant/On Appeal/Pending Forensic Examination Non -Traffic, Civil Infraction and Parking Verdict at Hearing 77 Admission/Waivers 1033 Dismissed by Party 6 Dismissed by Court 98 Default Judgments 465 Case Type Change 0 Total 1679 33 CIVIL DEPARTMENT Civil, Landlord/Tenant and Small Claims Jury Verdict 2 Bench Verdict 160 Unconlesled/Defaults/Settlements 2258 Transferred 47 Dismissed by Party 652 Dismissed by Court 856 Inactive Status" 58 Other Disposition 0 Case Type Change 0 Total "Note: Bankruptcy Slay FINANCIAL SUMMARY Due to City of Livonia General Fund $3,701,428.50 Escrow Accounts: Bonds $1,186,350.30 Restitution $ 19852.16 Work Program $ 140 564.00 Miscellaneous' $ 25008.20 • includes garnishment payments, escrow rent, refunds, etc. Due to Stale of Michigan $1,710,885.40 Due to County Library $ 103 427.07 Other Miscellaneous Payments $ 52.796.20 Court Building Improvement Fund $ 426.207.00 Drug Court Fund (set-aside effective 10/01/05) $ 24 940.00 UNAUDITED YEAR'S REVENUE TOTAL (excluding interest income) $7,391,458.70 34 4033 2007-2008 Protects 1. Since last year, the W District Court has developed a fully operational "Drug/Sobriety Court' that was recognized by the State Court Administrative Office (SCAO). The mission of this program is to protect the community by reducing impaired and drug related offenses and their cost and providing comprehensive program of treatment and intensive supervision of high risk offenders addicted to drugs and /or alcohol. The Honorable Kathleen J. McCann takes great pride in the program and has dedicated her efforts for its continued growth. a. The grant applications that were filed last year to help launch the program were accepted by SCAO and the court is pleased to announce that that we received a grant in the amount of $30,000 from the Michigan Drug Grant Program (MDCGP) administered by the State Court Administrative Office. This grant will help supplement the additional probation officer needed to efficiently supervise the probation population. The court also established our 501C-3 recognition of exemption status for this program which will allow the members of the Livonia Drug/Sobriety Council to reach out to the community to supplement the mission of the program. Contributions to the Livonia Drug/Sobriety Council by government agencies and private individuals will allow the program to pay for drug and alcohol testing, counseling services, psychological, parenting and other support services that otherwise would not be provided due to lack offunds. c. The program currently has 26 participants who are being required to adhere to strict intensive regimen of reporting to probation, the judge, attending support groups, counseling and drug testing in an effort to aid them in reaching and maintaining sobriety. 2. The court has also engaged in the implementation of electronic integration with Secretary of State for license suspensions (a process that was previously performed manually). This acquisition and installation has permitted the Court to realize several significant operational advantages, including less labor-intensive case processes, and reduced cost of processing. 3. In 2007, collections program efforts resulted in the payment of $896,915.55 in revenue on approximately 4,717 delinquent cases. Since 35 the program inception in 2005, the Court has realized $2,389,499.54 revenue on over 11,903 delinquent cases. a. The 16" District Court collections program has generated significant results with a minimal increase in expenditures. The additional work to administer the program has been absorbed by current staff and the hard work and commitment of the staff have made the program such a success. b. The court also continues the use of a third -party credit card service through Government Payment Exp (Gov Pay EXP) formerly Government Payment Services ). This service offers customers a user-friendly credit card payment option available 24 hours per day, seven days per week via a loll -free number. A 5% service fee is paid by the cardholder to service. 4. The Court is currently in negotiations with the MAPE (Supervisory Union) and we anticipate ratifying a contract in the near future. The clerical representative union, TPOAM has been replaced by a vote of its members. 5. The court is currently looking at the initial phases of utilizing electronic citations in collaboration with the Livonia Police Department. This system will help improve the officer's ability to issue a ticket via the use of inlemel based system and provide the ticket information electronically to the court. In tum this will increase the efficiency of the court clerks and will eliminate the backlog of tickets to enter. The electronic citations can immediately be transmitted to the court or jurisdiction, reducing the amount of data entry required now by court personnel. This system will also allow for full featured online intemet payment of tickets. 6. After 37 years of service to the citizens of Livonia, the 16"' District Court Judge Robert Brzezinski is retiring at the end of this year. Mr. Sean P. Kavanagh is the newly elected Judge to succeed Judge Brzezinski starting January of 2009. Judge Brzezinski has been a pillar in this community who helped build the very foundations that have made this court such a success. This organizations will miss him and we all wish him the very best. Also, we congratulate Mr. Kavanagh and wish him much success althe i 6"' District Court in the new scope of his duty. The Department of Finance consists of Accounting, Management Information Systems, Water and Sewer Usage Billing, and the Division of Budget and 36 Purchasing with a total staff of twenty-five people. The Director of Finance serves as administrative assistant to the Mayor in financial matters and is under the direct supervision of the Mayor. The function of the Department of Finance includes: Supervision overthe administration ofthe financial affairs oflhe City. Keeping of accounts and financial records of the City and all departments, commissions and agencies of the City government. Maintenance of payroll records for all City employees. Preparation of checks for all financial obligations of the City. Billing and collection of over 150,000 water and sewer bills. Responsibility for all computerized reporting and budget analysis for City Departments. Responsibility for evaluating and recommending computer hardware and software systems City-wide. Preparation of the annual budget forthe Mayor. Taking of bids for all major purchases made by the City. Responding to City Council questions and providing additional reports and information as requested by Council. The Finance Director serves on a three-person Personnel Review Committee, which is responsible for review and evaluation of the hiring, placement and replacement of all employees for the City. Performs Treasurer function for the Plymouth Road Development Authority. Membership on the Community Development Block Grant Committee. Responsible for risk management of casualty and liability, workers compensation and medical insurance for the City and is the City's representative to the Michigan Municipal Risk Management Authority (MMRMA). Representation at over 50 meetings oflhe City Council. Preparation of all debt issued by City. Responsible for investment of City funds in interest earning accounts in accordance with State law. 37 Manage ment of City -owned properties leased to third parties. BUDGET -PURCHASING The Budget -Purchasing office is under the supervision and direction of the Director of Finance who also acts as Purchasing Agent for the City. The Budget - Purchasing activity processed a total of 10,556 requisitions for the purchase of goods and services for the City of Livonia. A total of 616 supply orders and printing requests were also filled for City Departments. ACCOUNTING The volume of the Accounting Division activity is listed by comparative figures for the past two years: FISCAL YEAR ENDED NOVEMBER 30 2007 2008 4,275 General Fund & Other Fund Payables Checks 20,277 17,232 Payroll Items ' 22,478 34,540 Journal Entries " 10,613 6,277 Retirement Checks (Payroll and Payables) 7,312 8,268 The 2007 figure is for payroll checks only. The 2008 figure includes both payroll checks and electronic fund transfers. Journal entry volume was decreased as a result of a new methodology used to process journal entries in the recently upgraded financial management system. Accounts Receivable Invoices: False Alarms Rescue Runs Other Water Bills Mailed Water Bills Paid by EFT 1,036 983 4,250 4,275 2,100 2,150 155,326 155,066 16,656 16,632 Temporarily idle General Fund cash was invested in Certificates of Deposit and daily savings deposits, resulting in a total interest earned of $1,077,285 or 1.99% of City General Fund Revenue. 38 SPECIAL PROJECTS 1. In 2008, the Finance, Accounting and Information Systems departments continued implementation to a new financial management system called "Logos.nel" from New World Systems, Inc. When fully implemented, this new system will provide increased data management capabilities and online services for residents and employees. 2. The Finance Department spent a significant amount of time in the evaluation and eventual implementation of a new Brownfield Authonty to encourage economic development. 3. The Finance Department continued to work with City Council and the Mayors Office to maintain the City's excellent bond ratings, which currently are rated AA3 at Moody's and AA at Standard and Poor's. Because of these excellent bond ratings, more people will invest in City of Livonia bonds resulting in more competitive bidding from brokerage houses. Savings will continue into the future for the City due to these ratings. 4. The City of Livonia audit was completed and, once again, the City's auditors found no significant audit adjustments. 5. The Finance Department participated in several cooperative bids with surrounding communities that resulted in more competitive bids and reduced costs to the City. The Information Systems Department is responsible for the computer hardware and software used by the City. The IS Department assists other City Departments in evaluating, selecting and implementing computer systems. It also sets the standards for City computer systems. The Information Systems Director is appointed by the Mayor and reports directly to the Finance Director. The staff of the Information Systems Department consists of six (6) employees. The Information Systems Department has five primary areas of responsibility. These are Computer and Network Support, Application Software Support, Training and End User Support, Website and Internet, and Geographic Information Systems. 39 COMPUTER AND NETWORK SUPPORT The IS Department maintains the following hardware: 2005- 2006- 2007- 2006 2007 2008 IBM AS/400 Midrange Computer 1 1 1 Windows 2000/2003 Server 17 20 20 Personal Computers 298 309 323 We replaced two older tape library units used for backing up our data with 2 newer units that are faster and hold a much larger capacity. The newer units are also much less expensive to maintain. This change also reduced the number of backup tapes uses on a daily basis from 5 to 2. In 2008, we expanded our wireless network in city facilities. We previously installed equipment covering the main City Hall, and this year we added the Senior Center, Emergency Operations Center at Police HQ and the Administration Building at DPW. This wireless equipment offers two different networks, a highly secured one for city employees and a public one that is available for everyone else. The City also offers wireless to the public at the Civic Center Library and Livonia Community Recreation Center. We added an e-mail archive appliance this year to comply with new legal and stale archive requirements. This unit allows us to keep all e-mail for two years and provides the ability to search by keywords to extract data or retrieve individual e-mails. We replaced our Symantec Antivirus software with Trend Micro. This new software has a much smaller footprint and has not caused any conflicts with our hardware and software. We had problems with the previous product causing conflicts and slowing down the computers. We also assisted the Library with replacing their Antivirus software under our license with Trend Mcro to lower their cost. We moved the computers and printers at Greenmead from the old office area to the new office area of the Blue House. We worked with City Council to replace their leased laptop computers from HP with leased laptop computers from Dell. The new computers have proven themselves to be easier to use and more reliable. We replaced our Firewall with a new unit from WatchGuard that provides better security and protection for our network, data and computers. 40 APPLICATION SOFTWARE SUPPORT We continued the project this year to replace our Financial, Payroll and Human Resouroe, Utility Billing and all of our Licensing Systems with New World Logos.Nel systems. The old Logos/400 systems were written back in the mid 1980's and updated several times. We have completed implementing the Utility Billing system. The AS/400 will be returned in December 2008 to the leasing company. We also completed an upgrade to version 5.2 of this software. We also worked with the Clerk's Department to implement all new licensing software for Business Licenses, Animal Licenses and Garage Sale Permits. The old software ran on the AS/400. The new software is windows based and comes from BS&A Software. At the Civil Service Department, we installed and helped implement a new ID system. Al DPW, we upgraded the Gas Boy and Compu-Spread systems to new versions that are supported on Windows XP. Al Livonia Community Recreation Center, we upgraded their Safari Membership and Activity software package to a newer version (4.2). We upgraded the Transit RouleMatch System to a new version. TRAINING AND END USER SUPPORT The IS Department provides in-house training for City employees on how to use computers and software packages. Classroom training was resumed this year after having to mostly suspend it last year due to the implementation of the new financial software system. 2005- 2006- 2007- 2006 2007 2008 Number of Classes Conducted 40 6 36 Number of Employees Trained 109 58 185 We implemented our new Help Desk this year. The help desk is now handling approximately 40 phone calls per week for assistance. This has had a significant impact on relieving interruptions from senior staff and provided faster resolution of problems with the desktop computers. 1,645 user support issues were recorded and resolved this year. 41 The Information Systems Department also manages the City Website (http://www.ci.livonia.mi.us), which continues to find new uses and grow in usage. This year our website was recognized as being tie Best Government Website in Michigan by Mi-GMIS. This year we did major renovations on the Housing and Parks and Recreation portions of the website. On the Housing pages we added virtual lours and many pictures of the Housing facilities in an effort to try and help them to improve their marketing efforts. On the Parks and Recreation pages, we modified the look/feel of their pages to give them a much friendlier appearance. We also added a number of slideshows and videos showing the facilities in use. A major project this year was our www.FilmLivonia.org website. This was an effort done jointly with the Mayor's Office to develop a marketing tool to draw film production companies to Livonia. This project was brought forward in a very rapid fashion, going from a concept to a completed project in less than six (6) weeks. In the first three months of operation, this website had approximately 84,000 page views. We also worked with the Cable Department to offer video streaming of City Council meetings. We had 14,730 sessions of video streaming this year. Website statistics include 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 Number of Page Views 1,107,921 1,947,426 5,591,853 The Department also provides e-mail and Internet access to City Employees 2005- 2006- 2007- 2006 2007 2008 Number of E-mail accounts 296 268 281 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS The Information Systems Department also manages, operates and maintains a Geographic Information System (GIS) to help manage its maps and spatially referenced data. 2008 GIS Accomplishments 1. SDE enhancements - Enhancements to SDE (a relational database management system for our GIS) continued during 2008. Most notably, changes have been made to our data editing procedures that take 42 advantage of SDE's data management capabilities. Rather than having all GIS editing done by a single individual as it had been in the past, SDE allows the GIS editing/maintenance load to be distributed to various departments within the City. The Planning Department, for example, now maintains the different data layers that concern zoning and current land use, while DPW maintains our various utility layers (stone, sanitary, and water). SDE manages the simultaneous editing of all layers in the database by creating different "versions" of the database. Once a data layer has been successfully edited, SDE is used to "reconcile" and "post' the new edits to the database for use by everyone. Parcel Update - This year marks our departure from using AutoCAD - derived drawings to generale our parcel layer updates. Unlike the previous parcel update procedure that required the use of Aro Macro Language scripts (AML's) to convert data from AutoCAD formal into something that the GIS could work with, SDE has allowed us to produce our first parcel layer update without using the AML's. This has resulted in a considerable savings of time. Due to the nature of SDE (as a relational database), updates now flow smoothly and GIS users enjoy continuously updated parcel data. New Data Layers - Several new data layers were added to our GIS during 2008. These layers included a large -type road annotation layer for small- scale maps (1:12,000 scale), an address grid file, a DTE circuit layer, a "view" file containing all of our ancillary data merged with our parcel data, feature -linked annotation for our parcel lot numbers, and a new lot dimension layer. Other layers were modified as needed, most notably our leaf pickup schedule layer was changed to reflect the 2008 pickup dates, and our voter precinct layer was changed to depict new polling places caused by the closing of several school buildings. Mapping Support - Several "series' of maps have been updated and distributed during the past year. Most notably our quarter -section lax maps (144 maps), quarter -section existing lard use maps (144 maps), and quarter -section zoning maps (144 maps) have all been updated. On- line PDF versions of these maps have been produced for use by various departments within the City. A set of section -based maps were generated for the Fire Department (36 maps). Additional maps produced during 2008 including a series of large-scale park maps, Livonia voter precincts and polling places, leaf pickup schedule, soccer fields, ball diamonds, and future food pantry. EOC Activities - Over the past year -and -a -half the IS Department assisted in the planning and development of the Emergency Operation Center's GIS. Recommendations were made regarding required computer resources, scanners and printers, network connections, and GIS software. The GIS computer and software have been installed and tested in the EOC. Registration Issues - Registration between our parcel layer and existing aerial photography has caused problems when generating maps depicting 43 both data derived from our parcel layer and aerial photography. Registration between the two data sources vanes across the City, with some portions of the City spot -0n, while others may be off by as much as 50 feet or more. During 2008 changes were made to correct most of these alignment problems. The parcel layer was modified to better fit the aerial photography by visually adjusting 'blocks' of parcel data. Simple translation and rotation were used to fix most of the registration issues within the city. Unfortunately any layers derived from the parcel layer (split lines, combination lines, zoning boundaries, land use boundaries, subdivision boundaries and annotation layers) all required adjustment as well. While most of these layers have been identified and adjusted, there are still a few that will require additional work. Most notably work continues on the subdivision layer. ArcGIS Server - During 2008 work has begun on converting our intemet mapping service (ArclMS) to the next generation of map server software (ArcGIS Server). Unlike the current ArcMS system which utilizes a custom piece of software to generate web maps, ArcGIS Server will allow the City to serve up maps on our web site using our "normal' GIS software. This is a big plus as it makes it easier to publish maps on the web and makes the web site easier to manage as there are many more GIS users available to create and modify maps for our web pages. A system design is nearing completion for implementation next year. New Software: MapAPP - During 2008 new software was purchased to make generating a large "series' of maps easier. MapApp will first generate a map template for the map series, then, utilizing a second layer such as section line boundaries, or quarter sections, it will generate the entire series of maps automatically. This software has been used extensively by DPW. LIVONIA FIRE & RESCUE During the fiscal year 2008, Livonia Fire & Rescue responded to 8,610 incidents, 80% involved emergency medical services, while fire related responses accounted for 20%. The following statistical breakdowns refiect the departmental activity for the current fiscal year. Incidents Emergency Medical 7,176 Fire 207 Fire (other) 1,227 Total 8,610 m For the Fire Incidents (other) category, carbon monoxide alarms accounted for 89 of the responses, 519 were false fire alarm calls and 208 for downed wire incidents. Incidents by day of week Sunday 1,101 13% Monday 1,288 15% Tuesday 1,261 14.7% Wednesday 1,259 14.7% Thursday 1,254 14.6% Friday 1,261 14.7% Saturday 1,186 13.8% The busiest time (hour) ofdayis 11.00 a.m. through 12:00 p.m. Throughout the year, in addition to the related activities listed below, this Division is responsible for updating technical knowledge, maintaining job efficiency and state certification for the departments Fire Inspectors. This is accomplished by attending numerous seminars, job related schools and other continuing education programs. These schools would include but are not limited to: Schoolcraft College, the National Fire Academy, Michigan State Police Arson School, Michigan Fire Inspectors Conferences, Metro Detroit Fire Inspectors Society and the various (I.A.A.I.) International Association of Arson Investigators arson schools and seminars. Inspections Although not all encompassing, the following categories reflect the majority of inspections conducted by the Fire Prevention Division: Advice 130 Liquor License 17 Alarm 41 Liquid Propane Gas 10 Complaint 20 Life Safety Inspections 20 Chemical Surveys 100 New Construction 33 City License 52 Site Plan/Preliminary Plan 31 Carnival/Spree 12 Re -occupancy 103 False Alarms 50 Revision 3 Interior Alterations 99 System Report Deficiency 100 First Tenant 14 Suppression 105 Fireworks 30 Temporary Structure 14 Hydrant/Flow 20 Exterior Alterations/Construction 13 45 History File 32 Total 1049 Plan Reviews Alarm 41 Construction 132 Site 31 Fire Suppression 105 Total 309 The above plan review totals reflect the number of projects received / assigned in the Fire Prevention Office and do not include the actual number of inspections made. Multiple site visits are required when inspecting various fire alarm, suppression or structural systems to insure compliance with the adopted codes and standards installation practices. A consewafive esfimale of site visits needed to complete a project would be four inspections. More complex jobs would require additional inspections, in some instances 10-20 site visits. The Fire Marshal and his Inspectors regularly go to the fire stations and review false alarms with the station Officers. This allows the Fire Prevenfion Division to address those occupancies that are having multiple false alarms. Dialogue with the suppression personnel gives the inspection division a second avenue for finding and corecting building deficiencies. This division also provides fire investigations for determination of odgin and cause. Whenever a question adses from a fire officer that a fire may not have started accidentally, we are requested to respond. Also, any large loss or fatal fres are also examined and documented. We responded to approximately 150 fres in 2008. Nearly 25% of these fires required extensive documentation and follow-up varying from simple photography to exhaustive research and interviews as in the case of our Webster School arson investigations. The focus of the training office for fiscal year 2008 was to continue to assure compliance for the ongoing educafion (CEU) requirements for both EMT and Paramedic within the department. The number of overall CEU's for Paramedics is higher than that of an EMT and thus requires a more diligent training program in order to ensure that the department's personnel are always compliant with licensing requirements. New State of Michigan standards require the obtaining of both lecture and practical credits, which brought on additional challenges, but were met without major problems. The training office continues to improve its record management system related to training activities, which in tum ensures compliance with OSHA, ISO and nationally accepted standards on training and 46 documentation. The training division continues to provide training commensurate with the mission of our department. Although EMS training takes up large amounts of resources and time, this office still facilitates training in fire suppression, specialized rescue, hazardous materials, utility emergencies and risk reduction. The training office continues to be forward thinking in regards to capturing available grant funding and alternative ways to finance departmental capital needs both in training programs and equipment. Enhancing relationships with both local businesses and community educational institutions has also been a priority in hopes that a mutual sharing of resources increases overall operational effectiveness. Grants through State Farm, MMRMA, and Belfour construction have allowed the department to move ahead with programs that have left unfunded due to budgetary constraints over the last three years. Fire Officer training commensurate with the CBA continues to be a top priority as it pertains to off-site training and in preparing our Company level officers for each new position. Our Livonia Fire & Rescue Company Officer Development program rolled out in October of 2007, which will consist of 8 modules of training for our Drivers and Engineers, as they look ahead to temporary and permanent appointment to officers in the department in the future. This was completed in June of 2008, as the program was well received. The RAFT (Regional Alliance for Fire Training) organization has developed a new Company Officer II course. Several of our members were involved in the development and teaching of the classes. RAFT continues to offer firefighter training that many of our members have taken advantage of. This office continues to look at ways to improve our overall service and maintain the highest level of pre -hospital care to the citizens of Livonia. The department's EMS Quality Assurance (QA) program continues to strive to comply with stringent county and stale requirements regarding QI/QA. The training office continues to administrate and facilitate the Medical Priority Dispatch system that is used in dispatching EMS calls city-wide. The system has proven to be extremely effective in risk reduction for responders, as well as the public, by assigning a priority to the medical call. Because of the increasing EMS run call volume each year, the MPD system allows the prioritizing of all EMS related calls to ensure that the most life threatening emergencies receive assistance above those of a lesser degree. The Training Coordinator and Engineer Jon Unruh continue to provide the needed continued education units (CEU) required for recertification of dispatchers every two years. This office was also responsible for tracking and fulfilling the MPD Quality Assurance requirements as outlined in county Medical Control protocols. Since the MPD program came on line in May of 2001, the training office meets and discusses QI related issues quarterly, as to ensure compliance within county and stale guidelines. 47 The "Quick Drill" program has armed our station officers with training information that can be used easily. The program grew from our first year (2006) of 12 drills to an additional 20 drills added in 2007. In 2008, year has saw this popular program increase to 25 issues. The focus of the training office in 2008 will be to establish updated company level drills, continue efforts in the monthly "Quick Drill" program, revise and implement a new Driver/Operator program, and continue in-house Company Officer training program. With continued changes in the slate's Fire Officer programs, new records and additional training will be required in order to fulfill the CBA and meet the new state requirements. With the addition of Tower 1 to our fleet (2006 American LaFrence Aerial Tower), training took place for many weeks during the summer to get our members ready to move into this vehicle. The Livonia Fire & Rescue Maintenance Division is comprised of one Fire Apparatus Supervisor and one Senior Fire Equipment Mechanic who are responsible for specification writing, ordering, care, maintenance and repair of all mechanized and related fire, rescue and paramedic equipment. The division provides firefighters, Livonia cifizens, and visitors of Livonia with safe and reliable ambulance, rescue and fire fighting vehicles and related equipment. This year the responsibilities of the Maintenance Division included the following: Completed 465 work orders/requests Inspected pumpers, rescue vehicles, aerial lower, administrative cars, and all equipment on each vehicle on a semi-annual and annual basis. Installed equipment on the USAR trailer. Worked on WWC Hazmat trailer as well as the new Hazmat trucks. Annual Pump Tests on all Fire Pumps. Finalize blue prints for the new Pumper and Squads. Worked with American La France and Medic Master on warranties of vehicles. Specified and ordered new Battalion Chiefs vehicle, including all installed equipment and graphics. Made ready used Farmington Hills truck for use as reserve 48 Worked with American LaFrance for modifications to new Platform. Flew to Pennsylvania for final inspection ofAmencan LaFrance platform before delivery. In coordination with the Training Division, instructed Firefighter and E.M.T.D's on the operational requirements of vehicles. Also aided in training exercises when necessary. Responded to major fires to assist the department in set up of equipment, filling of SCBA bottles, repair and refueling of vehicles. Provided assistance, as needed, to neighboring fire departments and members of Western Wayne Mutual Aid Association. Provided assistance to the following Project Mangers • SCBA Officer - ordering parts, repairing SCBA air packs. • Hose Officer - specification writing, ordering and mounting of nozzles, adapters, and hose. • Building Maintenance Officer- repair of vehicle electrical drop lines. • EMT Officer- installation of ALS equipment. • Communications Officer — mounting hand held prep radio vehicle chargers and installation of new radio and complete computer systems for ALS and relocation of some radios in pumpers, and repair of same. • Apparatus Officer - ordering and mounting of new equipment/hand tools and mounts. • Public Relations Committee - equipment. This Division provides maintenance on all of the following items: Vehicles • 1 -1976 Sutphen Aerial Tower, 1250 GPM Pump • 1 -1994 Ford F350/Horton Swat Squad • 1 -1988 Pierce Arrow 1250 GPM Pumpers • 1 -1988 Pierce Dash Heavy Duty Rescue • 1 — 1997 Navistar/Horton Water Rescue/Technical Unit • 1 -1994 Smeal/Spartan 1250 GPM Pumper • 1 -1995 Ford Horton Fire Investigation Unit • 1 -1996 GMC 3/4 -Ton Pick -Up • 1 -1997 Chevrolet Lumina 49 • 1 -1997 Intematonal/Horton Reserve Alpha Unit • 1 -1998 Chevrolet Lumina • 1 -1999 Chevrolet Tahoe • 2— 2000 Freightliner/Medic Master Alpha Units • 1— 2001 Freightliner/Medic Master Alpha Units • 1-2006 Freightliner/Medic Master Alpha Unit • 1-2007 Freightliner/Medic Master Alpha Unit • 1 — 2001 Ford Crown Vic Sedan • 1 — 1992 E -One 1250 GPM Pumper • 1 —2002 American LaFrence 2000GPM 75FT. Aerial • 1 —2006 American La France 2000GPM 100FT. Aerial Platform • 3-2003 American LaFmnce Eagle 1250 GPM Pumpers • 1- 2003 Ford 450 Maintenance Truck • 1 — 2003 Mercury Marine Inflatable Rescue Boal, Motor and Trailer • 5— 2003 Ford Crown Vic Sedans • 1— 2007 Chevrolet Trailblazer • 1 —2007 Chevrolet 2500 Pick-up • 1 — 2009 GMC 2500 Yukon XL • 1 — 2003 Club Car Ambulance and Hauling LS Enclosed Trailer • 1— 2006 Haulmark Trailer(C.B.R.N.E.) • 1 — 2006 Spartan Spencer HAZMAT Truck • 1-28R USAR Trailer • 1 — 2007 Fire Safety Unit • 38—Total Vehicles Equipment on Vehicles • Thousands of feet of fire hose • Fire hose nozzles • Axes and adapters • Foam equipment, hand and vehicle mounted • Deluge equipment • 110 V electrical lighting • Tools (hand and fire fighting) • 9- auxiliary generators • 43 - ISI Viking Air Pack • 94 -Air Bottles • 89 — ISI Viking Masks • Bauer Air Compressor Cascade System • 1 - 6000psi 4 Air Bottle Cascade System • 1 — K-950 Saw • 2-K-12 Saw 50 • 7 -Chain saws • 2- Amkus Power Tools • 2 -TNT Power Tools • 7- Life Jack PPV fans • 1 - Hose repair tool and parts • Medical equipment on Alpha Vehicles • Various hazardous material and confined space rescue equipment. Garage Equipment • 1 — Hose test Pump • 2 - In -ground garage hoist hydro -testing • 1 - Garage tool replacements • 1 - Pumper pump lest tool as needed to comply with NFPA 1911. The 2008 fiscal year was an exciting year for our Public Education division. The division is tasked with educating our citizens on all fire and life safety topics at different places and times that will have the highest impact. Each year Livonia Fire & Rescue responds to numerous requests from the public for Fire Safety Education programs. These requests are forwarded to either the on -duty Battalion Chief or to the Fire Safely Education Committee, based on the needs of the requesting person or group. If the caller is requesting to visit a fire station or have a fire apparatus visit them as part of the educational effort, the on -duty Battalion Chief handles the request. If the group requests an individual to speak at a prearranged time and location that does not require firefighting apparatus, the Fire Safety Education Committee is contacted. Currently, most requests are handled by on -duly crews at the fire stations, while remaining in- service to respond to emergency calls in our area. Fire Prevention records indicate that we responded to approximately 200 requests during this fiscal year, reaching thousands of our citizens. These requests are handled routinely by the Battalion Chiefs office and are conducted by the on -duty crews working out of all five of Livonia's fire stations. Our firefighters who also do public education have teamed up with Livonia Police Department to deliver one C.E.R.T. (Community Emergency Response Teams) class this year. We helped with leaching fire safety, fire extinguisher use and the basics of light rescue, victim removal and first aid. Our C.E.R.T. volunteers have given back by offering to help us man some of our educational events held throughout the year. 51 In June of 2008, we held our annual "School's Out, Safety's In" Open House. This summer safety event reaches out to our community and invites them into our fire station # 3 and gives them an opportunity to meet many of our firefighters. In October of 2008, Livonia Fire & Rescue held its annual Fire Prevention Week Open House'. The Open House has proven to be a highly anticipated event by our community, reaching a crowd estimated at 2,000. While in attendance, visitors received information on fire and life safetyand are given an opportunity to practice life safety skills. In addition, the Department showcased our award- winning extrication team, who practiced their skills on two cars. The scenario was that of laking an injured victim out of a car that cannot be opened the conventional door method. There was an area where kids can practice their fire safety behaviors, as well. Livonia firefighters participated in a September event held at Laurel Park Place Mall called the "Passport to Safely". This project was a huge success- crowds were estimated in the thousands who attended the event. After being involved in the four-year annual event, more effort is being directed into this area. The large number of children that attend the indoor event is encouraging. Our dedicated efforts to educate our citizens are among the best anywhere. Our ideas were shared with the fire service community in one article that appeared in "Fire Engineering" magazine, (July 2008 issue), the nation's premiere fire training magazine. Other ideas were presented to firefighters seen at the website for Fire Engineering magazine, that has weekly featured articles. We had seven articles appear on the web, showcasing our efforts. This is the fourth year we took on the project of creating a Fire Safety insert that was carried along with the Livonia Observer newspaper. The eight -page insert was designed for elementary -age students and families, and went out with the 21,000 copies of the Observer on October 5, and they were handed out to our Open House attendees on October 11. The newsletter "Couplings" came out twice this year, for the third year in a row. The newsletter is an 8 -page newsletter designed for adult fire and life safety. It appears in electronic formal on the city website, and copies went out with the Observer as well. Several informational articles were prepared and ran in the Livonia Observer Newspaper, to further reach out to our adult audiences with messages of fire and life safety. This year, six articles appeared in the Observer written by Livonia Firefighters. 52 We were also able to distribute our fire and life safety messages to the citizens of Livonia through the use of the following sources: Livonia Public Schools City Channel 8 Time Warner Cable Livonia Observer The Livonia Housing Commission submits the following information on its activities and accomplishments for Silver Village, Newburgh Village, Community Development Block Grant Program, McNamara Towers #1 and #2, Section 8 Rent Subsidy Program and Brashear Tower. SILVER VILLAGE -33780 LYNDON Silver Village occupancy was at 100% at all times. The waiting list consists of 52 "Livonia residents" and 45 "parents of Livonia residents" Activities and Accomplishments 1. Silver Village had a turnover of 12 units in 2008 2. All apartment entry doors were replaced 3. All apartments received a new range 4. The asphalt throughout the parking lots and Lyndon Ave. was resurfaced 5. 6 dead trees were replaced 6. All the apartments have been inspected and necessary repairs were made, in order to insure decent and safe housing, whereby maintaining resident satisfaction :I AU -111 YH: VII I UCH off l -TTI N WA:111 *33 Z107a1 V3 Newburgh Village occupancy was at 100% at all times. The wailing list consists of 47 "Livonia residents" and 26 "parents of Livonia residents." Activities and Accomplishments 1. Newburgh Village had a turnover of 15 units in 2008 2. All apartments received new electric ranges 3. 102 apartments received new dishwashers 4. A storage garage was constructed 53 5. All the apartments have been inspected and necessary repairs were made, in order to insure decent and safe housing, whereby maintaining resident satisfaction COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT The Community Development Office administered the following programs during the 2007-2008 fiscal year, which began on 7/1/07 and ended 6/30/08, through the Community Development Block Grant Program. Total CDBG expenditures for the year were $726,838.21. Below please find the accomplishments produced by each of these programs. Activities and Accomplishments 1. Major Home Rehabilitation Loan Program 2. Emergency Home Rehabilitation Loan Program 3. Minor Home Repair Program 4. Emergency Utility Shut -Off Assistance 5. Senior Van Transportation Program 6. Mental Health Counseling Program 7. First Step (Western Wayne County Project on Domestic Assault) 8. Fair Housing Initiative 9. Scattered Site Rental Homes (Mngt./Main(.) 10. Help Source 13 Households Served 7 Households Served 100 Households Served 19 Households Served 390 Persons Served 15 Persons Served 81 Persons Served Not Applicable 15 Households Served 7 Persons Served Total Served: 647 Households/Persons McNAMARA TOWERS #1 & #2 -19300 PURLINGBROOK Activities and Accomplishments 1. McNamara Towers #1 & #2 had a turnover of 24 units from 1/1/08 to 11/07/08 2. 20 new refrigerators were installed 3. 21 new window a/c's were installed 4. Custom stone address numbers were installed on the buildings exteriors 5. Vinyl siding and dimensional shingles were installed on the garage 6. Dimensional shingles were installed on the shelter 7. All the apartments have been inspected and necessary repairs were made, in order to insure decent and safe housing, whereby maintaining resident satisfaction The Public Housing Program was awarded a High Performer designation according to HUD guidelines. 54 SECTION 8 RENT SUBSIDY HOUSING PROGRAM The Livonia Housing Commission Section 8 Fbntal Subsidy Program currently administers a Housing Choice Voucher Program consisting of 909 families. Fiscal Year 2007 Section 8 Management Assessment scored as a High Performer. An audit was conducted on the Section 8 program and no findings were found. The Housing Choice Voucher program has 541 applicants on the wailing List. The current Section 8 Voucher Leasing rate is 99 WILLIAM W. BRASHEAR TOWER, 17841 N. LAUREL PARK DRIVE The waiting list consists of approximately 20 applicants as of November 1, 2008 for the one -bedroom list, and three (3) applicants for the two-bedroom list. 196 units were inspected for health, quality and safety by the Livonia Housing Commission on October 15 and 16, 2008. Annual inspections were performed to the generator, fire suppression equipment, fire alar system and the elevators. Activities and AccomDlishmenls 1. Brashear Tower had a turnover of 34 units in 2008. 2. Upgraded smoke detectors and GFCI electrical outlets in kitchens in 196 units. 3. Installed front load washers on Floors 3, 6, and 7 to accommodate handicap residents. 4. Completed repairs to exterior building panels from July -October 2008 to correct exterior leaks to units and common areas. 5. Installed new supplemental boiler for heating system. INSPECTION DEPARTMENT is responsible for all construction operations on private properly. Included in its jurisdiction is building inspection, plan review, sanitation and ordinance enforcement. Areas of involvement include Zoning Board of Appeals, Building Code Board of Appeals, CDBG, Cost Recovery Appeal Hearings, and various civic groups. Coordination with Stale government agencies involving building construction is handled by this department. Plan Review for new buildings, alterations and additions, pools, demolitions, zoning compliance and signs is an integral part of the department's function, as well as the issuance of permits, sanitation and enforcing the City's Code of Ordinances 55 designated as Inspection's responsibility. Inspections were made and permits issued for the rehabilitation of homes for the Community Development Block Program. Additionally the Inspection Department reviews lot splits for the Department of Assessment and reviews site plans and waiver use petitions for the Planning Department and provides support to all other departments as needed. BUILDING INSPECTION issued approximately 6227 permits in 2007/08 for buildings, signs and mechanical installations, including new construction, additions, renovations and alterations. 19 permits were issued for new residential homes and 12 permits were issued for new commerciallnduslnal structures. In other activity, 4 single-family condominium units were constructed or are currently under construction. No permits for apartment buildings were issued this year. Mechanical permits (plumbing, electrical, heating and refrigeration) numbered approximately 3651 for the year. Residential additions/alterations, garages, decks/patios, fire repairs, pools, signs, zoning compliance, commercial/industrial additions, demolitions and moving permits comprised the remainder of permits issued. 33 demolition permits were issued during the year, 12 of which were residential structures. Permits for Christmas tree sales lots, pennant and banner displays, awnings, underground storage tanks and various special inspections were issued as required. Certificates of Occupancy are issued for all new residences, commercial and industrial buildings upon completion. State building, mechanical, plumbing, electrical, and sign contractor licenses are registered in this office. Additionally, official records are retained on fence contractors, excavators and demolition contractors. The systematic annual inspection of existing commercial buildings for compliance with B.O.C.A. National Property Maintenance Code 1996 continued through 2007-2008. In connection with this program, 656 inspections were made, violations issued when necessary and compliance obtained. This program is designed to maintain health and safety standards in the city. In addition to the annual inspection program the Inspection Department requires that all one, two and multiple family rental dwelling units be licensed and inspected on an annual basis. This year 1,101 rental units were inspected by this Department. Additionally, 242 formal complaints were received and responded to throughout the year as they related to property, zoning and ordinance code violations. There were approximately 736 rental inspection violations and 859 annual inspection violations that were issued for various code infractions during 2007/08. This office also provides the enforcement of special conditions of approval by the Zoning Board of Appeals, Building Code Board of Appeals, Planning Commission and City Council relative to site plans, variances, waiver uses and grants, The valuation of new building activities for 2007/08 is $152657047. The revenue collected from all building activities was approximately $1 889 249. 56 SANITATION AND ORDINANCE ENFORCEMENT is responsible for compliance with the City Zoning Ordinance #543 and also the Code of Ordinances #1688 as it pertains to the majority of all nuisance and noncriminal violations. These responsibilities include those things that affect the health, safety and welfare of the residents of the City, such as pollution, hazardous waste, trash and debris, vacant buildings, weed cutting, including direct supervision of the city weed contractor, basic properly maintenance and supervision of the collection of municipal refuse. The enforcement of special conditions of approval made by the Zoning Board of Appeals, City Council and the Planning Commission relative to site plans, variances, and waiver uses are also the responsibility of Ordinance Enforcement. STATISTICS 2007-08 Total General Inspections Made 25,785 Building Maintenance and Repair 486 Parking Lot Repairs 45 Trash and Debris 2310 Junk Vehicles 1482 Noxious Weeds' 3041 Noise/Air/Odor 111 Nuisances 443 Illegal Signs on Commercial Property 470 Illegal Signs Removed from Public Property 3873 Illegally Parked Recreational Vehicles 517 Illegally Parked Commercial Vehicles 726 Illegal Sales, Use and Occupancy 130 Misc. Illegally Parked Vehicles 281 Right of Way encroachments 354 Vacant Buildings (Re-inspected/Posted) 76 Snow on Sidewalks 711 License Violations 175 Sanitation activities included 1,440 citizen complaints regarding the collection of municipal refuse and the delivery of 854 recycling bins. Enforcement of the Noxious Weed Ordinance included the investigation of citizen complaints and the abatement of violations through the mowing of weeds and removal of debris from 1,108 properties by the City Weed Mowing Contractor. 57 The Building Code Board of Appeals provides any person the right to appeal a decision of the code official refusing to grant a modification of the building code covering the manner of construction or materials to be used in the erection, alteration or repair of a building or structure. An application for appeal shall be based on a claim that the true intent of the code or the rules legally adopted there under have been incorrectly interpreted, the provisions of this code do not fully apply, or an equivalent form of construction can be used. A summary of the activities of the Building Code Board of Appeals for the fiscal year 2007-08 is as follows: Meetings Scheduled 2 Appeals Filed 2 Hearings Held 2 Re -hearings 0 Appeals Granted 2 Appeals Denied 0 Appeals Dropped 0 Appeals Tabled 0 All records are on file in the offices of the Inspection Department. DEPARTMENT OF LAW LITIGATION There are five (5) cases pending in the Circuit Court for the County of Wayne, where the City of Livonia, and/or City officials, are involved either as plaintiffs or as defendants. One (1) other case was resolved in 2007-08 either pursuant to a stipulation or by final judgment of the Wayne County Circuit Court. One (1) case was resolved in the Wayne County Probate Court. There are no civil cases pending in the 16th District Court. Seven (7) civil cases were resolved in the 58 16th Dislnct Court and two (2) of these cases had money judgments granted by the Court which remain unpaid. In addition, we (1) case which had a money judgment granted in 2007 was paid in full in 2008. There are no cases pending in the Michigan Court of Appeals or the Michigan Supreme Court. One (1) case was resolved in the Michigan Supreme Court. Three (3) cases are pending in the United Slates District Court, and one (1) other case was resolved. One hundred forty-two (142) cases are pending before the Michigan Tax Tribunal. Forty-four (44) other cases were disposed of. (NOTE: Settlement agreements may have been reached in some of the cases reported as pending. It is the practice of the Law Department to keep a case open until the Tax Tribunal has entered a final order; the Tribunal often takes several weeks to enter final orders after receipt of the stipulation of the parties.) The foregoing does not include any appeals taken in ordinance violation cases from the Dislnct Court to the Circuit Court, and/or the Court of Appeals, and/or the Supreme Court. 1II6111 Nlot iK6111a1 From December 2007 through November 2008, the following number of cases were disposed of in the Livonia District Court. Criminal Traffic Jury Trials Ordinance Misdemeanor 1665 2582 0 Ordinance Drunk Driving 243 0 One (1) case which was appealed from the 16th District Court to a higher court was resolved. OPINIONS No formal opinions were issued by the Department of Law during 2007-08. Upon request, the Department issued a substantial number of recommendations in correspondence to the various City Departments, Boards and Commissions and the City Council by members of the legal staff upon various subjects and matters. 59 ADMINISTRATIVE APPEALS This office represents the City and its officials from time to time in formal appeals and grievance proceedings before the Civil Service Commission. We also appear in matters involving the City before various Stale agencies, including the Michigan Public Service Commission, the Michigan Employment Relations Commission and the Michigan Liquor Control Commission. ARBITRATION At present there are no arbitration cases pending in which this office is involved. No civil rights complaints are pending before the Michigan Civil Rights Commission or EEOC. One (1) civil rights complaint before the U.S. Department of Justice was resolved. One (1) civil rights/EEOC complaint before the Michigan Civil Rights Commission was resolved. The Law Department fled a Petition for Contested Case with the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality with regard to an NPDES permit which is currently pending. ORDINANCES The following number of ordinances, prepared by the Department of Law, were submitted to the City Council and were adopted by the Council during the year 2007-08: 5 amendments to the Zoning Ordinance and Zoning Map; 1 amendment to the substance of the Zoning Ordinance; 0 vacating ordinances; and 12 amendments to the Livonia Code of Ordinances. In addition, two (2) proposed ordinance amendments have been prepared and submitted to the City Council and the same are now awaiting Council action. One (1) additional rezoning ordinance amendment was submitted to Council but failed for lack of support. 60 1. The property at 18301 Farmington Road in Section 9 was split into two parcels. Pursuant to Council Resolution 324-07, the City sold one parcel to Terrence Shay in 2007. The remaining parcel was sold to D'Orazio Investment, LLC for $10,000 on May 19, 2008. 2. Pursuant to Council Resolution 345-08, lax foreclosed property located at 9001 Hugh in Section 35 was purchased from Wayne County for $9,7346.81, using CDBG funds. This property will be added to the Cilys low-income housing program NOTE: Not included in this report are the numerous transactions involving the acquisition of easements without monetary consideration. OTHER BASIC FUNCTIONS 1. Preparation and drafting of proposed resolutions in connection with City Council meetings. 2. Providing a representative at meetings of the Zoning Board of Appeals, the Board of Ethics and, upon request, at meetings of the City Planning Commission, the Civil Service Commission, the Board of Trustees of the Employees Retirement System, as well as other City commissions and agencies. 3. Preparation and review of all contracts entered into between the City and other persons, as well as approving "as to form" all legal documents that are processed in the City. 4. Approval, typing, and transmission to the District Court warrant requests (765) as submitted by the Police Division and the Inspection Department in addition, 62 warrant requests were reviewed and refused. 5. Provide assistance to other departments in the collection of delinquent fees, charges and taxes by laking whatever steps may be necessary, including the institution of litigation. 6. Refer to the Michigan Municipal Risk Management Authority for disposition all lawsuits and claims of action against the City which would be covered through the City's agreement with the Authority. 61 Provide legal assistance to various City department heads and supervisors with respect to labor matters, including review of proposed disciplinary actions. Citizens' disputes and problems requiring the advice and counsel of this office are increasing and require more time than ever before. LIBRARY COMMISSION DIRECT SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC Activity and service levels have remained high, but the size of the collection, number of citizens with library cards and overall circulation of materials have all increased significantly. New services this year include the creation of a new local obituary index and the microfilming of a portion of the Livonia Observer not covered by the newspaper itself. Oral history projects were launched to document Livonia history, as well as to record experiences of local veterans for the National Veteran's History Project. A personal donation also allowed the Library to start a circulating book discussion kit collection to help small local book clubs. The Livonia Public Library maintains a large set of professionally selected and organized links to make using the internet even easier. Patrons can still search the library catalog and check their record from home, as well as having the ability to renew items online, with staff assistance by phone, and via 24-hour toll-free automated phone renewal service as well. Citizens can still apply for their library card and update their information online. Two years out the "wireless" service at the Library continues to be popular, giving library users the opportunity to make more efficient use of library resources, by being able to interact directly with their laptops at the same time. New furniture has been ordered for the library atrium and has started to arrive. The Library is finally realizing its goal of providing business people, job hunters and students the benefit and convenience of a special area for laptop users to take advantage of the Library's computer and other services. Onsite public internet stations and electronic card catalogs continue to serve citizens who may not have access to technology at home, especially during these difficult financial times. The Sam internet management system continues to provide more efficient sharing of the Library's public access computers by the many users of the service and has finally been implemented system wide with the addition of Noble Branch in 2008. This allows fair and equal use of library computers with minimal staff intervention. Patrons enjoy the ability to self -serve and staff can devote more time to assisting citizens with more complicated research questions. The Library is going into its second year of participation in the MAP (Museum Adventure Pass) program. The pilot season of this project was so popular that Macy's has agreed to underwrite another year of this service which offers free passes to a variety of 62 area cultural institutions, by checking them out at your local library. The Librarys E -newsletter still remains popular and can also be viewed on the Library's website, along with an interactive schedule of upcoming events. The Library still offers quick and efficient automated phone call notification that requested books have arrived. Public meeting rooms provided at Civic Center, Noble and Sandburg branches continue to be in high demand as a venue for performances and a forum for community events and informational meetings, as well as the many library - sponsored programs that are offered. Numerous small cifizen groups, clubs, and associations, as well as other City departments look to this significant public resource as a vital and valuable public service. Civic Center branch is always in particularly high demand with the public. The long -planned repairs and improvements to the auditorium finally began this year and include upgrades to the auditorium's light and sound systems. The Library enjoyed positive coverage from multiple media outlets again this year. Local papers featured articles on library programs and services, including pieces on children's and teen programs like the "Library Card Gift for the Holidays' and the Prom Dress exchange, as well as general interest services like the regional MAP museum pass program. The Livonia Observer once again generously printed the names of the lop -performing Summer Reading participants. City Channel 8 taped some of the Noontime Concerts again this year, broadcasting free musical entertainment to the community. The display areas at all three branches were busy again this year with all kinds of colorful and informative exhibits. The Livonia Arts Commission booked monthly art exhibits into the Civic Center gallery, while display cases maintained by library staff at all of the branches showcased items like hockey pucks, Olympic memorabilia, dolls, rocks and gems, Elvis collectables and a display of "Golden Books" in honor of the 50"' anniversary of the beloved children's books. Library programs were very popular with our community again this year. There was not a special set of grant funded events at the beginning of the season to boost attendance like last year, but there was a wonderful series of author events to celebrate the Civic Center Branch Library's 20"' anniversary. Despite the slow start to this year, attendance at Library programs has increased incredibly in recent months, peaking with a 60 % increase in September. Impressive attendance continued for events like the Summer Reading Program, which keeps up students' reading skills over the summer and encourages children and teens to enjoy the Library and to embrace reading as a lifelong skill. The Library offers something for all ages, starting with Mother Goose, Pied Piper, Melody Lane and other storytime sessions designed to help develop pre -reading skills in toddlers and young children, continuing through older children with programs on bats, bugs, Pokemon tournaments and the "Write a Soldier" project. Teen programs included practical information like college planning and personal safety, as well 63 as fun programs like Hip Hop and Salsa dance lessons and "American Idol" style karaoke and video game events all bring teens into the library and gives the staff a chance to let them know what else the Library has to offer. The economy has made free family entertainment especially appealing. Movie programs at all locations and for all different ages have proven extremely popular, including the new "Books to Film" series. There were additional offerings for the older crowd, inducing instructional classes on using MS Office and the Internet, book discussion clubs and informative speakers on retirement planning, astronomy, travel, free music concerts and an English as a Second Language discussion group. A new series called "History Lives at the Library' started this year including programs on the Titanic and the Edmund Fitzgerald, as well as a special traveling bus exhibit called "Behind Barbed Wire' about the WWII experiences of prisoners of war. The Library also does obituary searches and proctors exams for institutions like CMU, Jackson Community College, Indiana State University, Pennsylvania State University, Brigham Young University and the Atlanta Arts Institute. The Livonia Public Library has been fortunate in its many partnering relationships with various organizations. Bright House donated the use of the costumed "Froggy" character for children's programming. Local high school students have begun doing one -0n -one computer tutoring for seniors at the Civic Center Branch. The Library hosted exhibitions of student artwork from both Livonia and Clarenceville Public Schools again this year. Entertainment and craft programs were also provided in conjunction with the City's Tree Lighting Ceremony and in cooperation with the Livonia Parks and Recreation Department and the Livonia Rotary Club. The Library also worked with the Livonia Public Schools through the Perinville Parent -Preschool Jamboree and other programs highlighting the importance of reading to preschoolers, and by giving library tours and making numerous classroom visits. The Library also partnered with the Livonia Public Schools on a number of other projects, including ELVs (Early Literacy Volunteer — a volunteer tutoring program), the "Young Author" program, and the "Author in Autumn" outreach program, all of which benefit local school children. Once again the Library received generous cooperation and support from many local businesses that provided incentives for the Summer Reading Program. The Library was fortunate in having the Livonia Arts Commission co-sponsor the popular Noontime Concert Series again this year. The Livonia Observer cooperated with us again by graciously making room in their pages for the names of the lop readers in our Summer Reading Program. A number of programs throughout the year were co-sponsored by the Rising Stars Youlheatre and the Detroit Story League, encouraging performance, creativity and storytelling as an important part of the educational process. The Library supported City employees and other City departments by providing meeting room facilities for various meetings and events. The Library also assisted with collections for the Livonia Goodfellows and the Gift of Reading program. 64 FACILITIES Major improvements this year included an ADA accessible family bathroom at Noble and a new quiet study room enclosure. The parking lots at both Noble and Sandburg were repaired and resurfaced in 2008. Work finally commenced on the Civic Center Branch Library's auditorium and furniture for the wireless internet area in the atrium has started to arrive. The Civic Center Branch celebrated its 20"' Anniversary this year. New firewalls telecommunications switches were installed this year and a number of public access computers were upgraded. Patrons love the ability to use their laptops and access the Librarys internet and other services at the same time. Civic Center Branch also installed special workstations in the public area to make training patrons more efficient and less intrusive to our regular internet users. The library also acquired a laminatorto assistwith children's programs and other departmental needs. Hours of Library service were maintained at the same slightly reduced level as the past several years at Noble and Sandburg and Civic Center Branch completed its first full year of restored operating hours at Civic Center including Sunday and Thursday morning hours. This has allowed us to provide even greater service and convenience to the community. Library Commissioners Elizabeth Newlon and Trudy Pinto were reappointed to serve anotherlenn beginning in October. Richard Joyner and Anna Weidnerboth retired from the Commission in 2008, but we are happy to welcome Donna Anagnoslou and Dianne Policelli as new members of the Livonia Library Commission. Longtime employee Dianne DelVecchio left her position with us as a Library Aide II, but was gracious enough to continue on in a part-time temporary capacity until her position could be permanently filled. This set off a chain of transfers and promotional opportunities that have worked to the advantage of both the staff and the Library alike. Sadly, after 13 years of service, Library Page William Majeske passed away in 2008. He will be missed by his friends and co-workers at the Library. We menlored a paraprofessional library student from Oakland Community College this year. Staff also instituted a LibraryWiki to assist in our internal communications. FUNDING The millage continues to be the major source of revenue for the Library at approximately 83.2% (82.5% last year). The portion of the Library's budget that comes from the millage has shifted in recent years due to reductions in the contributions from the City's general fund and State Funding issues. Slate Aid to Libraries was distributed this year, but once again at an even further reduced level. Direct State Aid to Livonia Public Library has dropped by over 17% within the last year alone. 2008 also witnessed the first significant downward swing in 65 Penal fines that lelp fund public libraries. Penal fine revenue to Livonia Public Library dropped over 21% in the last year. State Aid reductions not only impact Livonia directly, but also indirectly through the TLN library co-op that is our service organization. Unfortunately, this area of funding continues to be under threat of reduction or elimination at a time when the economy causes citizens to need and use our services all the more. Unique Management Service continued to function as our collection agency, recovering funds that allow the Library to replace lost and stolen items. The Library continues to seek outside funding and support to help supplement services to the community. The Livonia Arts Commission approved another generous grant to help underwrite the costs of the Noontime Concert Series. The Children's Department received a grant from The Michigan Humanities Council to cover programs during National Library Week. Local businesses generously donated incentives to the Library for its Summer Reading Program to help encourage young readers. The Library extends its heartfelt thanks to the many citizens who donated money to the Library in honor or in memory of their loved ones over the past year. The Friends of the Livonia Public Library awarded three $1500 scholarships to worthy staff members pursuing their college educations this year. The Friends continue to work tirelessly to organize and carry out their Book Sale events and the Friends Used Bookstore has proven to be extremely popular. The Library is especially appreciative of their hard work and generous donations, as we have moved through a period of continuing economic hard limes. We are grateful for the funds that the Friends donate to us every year, but the labor and revenue attached to this wonderfully supportive volunteer group cannot be guaranteed or planned on as part of the regular budget planning process of the Library as a City Department. Registered borrowers and total items in the collection are both up, but circulation statistics are up almost 9%, indicating that citizens continue to need and use Library services even more in these difficult economic limes. 66 October 2007 October2008 Library Program Attendance 29,305 21,984 Meeting Room Attendance 66,388 64,593 Registered Borrowers 44,831 46,601 Items in the Collection 312,472 327,915 Circulation 751,641 818,193 ` Library Website Usage 246,489 197,671 " Internet Workstations 88,310 79,498 " Registered borrowers and total items in the collection are both up, but circulation statistics are up almost 9%, indicating that citizens continue to need and use Library services even more in these difficult economic limes. 66 " Due to a major crash and significant downtime of the shared automation system in early 2008, some statistics were lost, so these figures are low and do not accurately reflect computer usage in 2008. We Create Community Through People, Parks and Programs A strong commitment to Parks and Recreation services is a key component to the success of our community. We provide facilities, programs, classes and opportunities where one's leisure time can: become wholesome, where memories are created, skills are developed and where the quality of life of our residents, theirfamilies and friends are enhanced. With the assistance of 14 full-time staff and 300 dedicated and enthusiastic part- time staff, including the Department of Public Services, Building Maintenance, and Park Maintenance, we recorded: ? 27,270 individuals who participated in registered classes, programs, and leagues. ? An average of 3,000 individuals visited the LCRC daily. ? 121,084 rounds ofgolfwere played at ourthree courses. ? 7,278 participants i n Special Events. ? 19,603 visits to the outdoor pools. ? 36,200 who attended an organized picnic at a pavilion. We received $2,114.50 in donations for: improvements to athletic fields, parks, Wilson Barn and also for programming and special events. Parks and Recreation works cooperatively with and delivers services to other City Departments, civic organizations, community businesses and the Livonia and Clarenceville Public Schools. Our Department recognizes the dynamic and unique role we play in bslering a healthy community and lifestyles of those we serve through one of our six Service Divisions. • Aquatics • Athletics • Community Center • Gott • Special Events • Parks 67 Marketing The Marketing Department strives to promote the assets of the department and how they influence the lives of those we serve, as well as, develop and cultivate partnerships, collaborations and volunteerism. As a department we are devoted to offering quality programs and facilities while providing the highest standards of customer service possible. The 64 -page Parks and Recreation L Magazine continues to be our primary source of advertisement to our users. The L is distributed to Livonia's 39,000 plus households and the Livonia Recreation Center's non-resident pass holders. The L Magazine is also available on our website. Other avenues to promote and advertise are through email blasts, news releases, website, flyers, posters, mailings, Channel 8 cable releases, open houses, testimonials, and word of mouth. AQUATIC DIVISION The Aquatics Division is comprised of two indoor pools at the Community Recreation Center and three (Botsford, Clements Circle and Shelden) outdoor pools. We provide safe, educational, and enjoyable aquatic services to the citizens through a wide army of swim lessons, water fitness classes, open swim, lap swim, diving lessons, pool rentals, synchronized swimming, special events, and swim teams. Community Recreation Center A total of 261 Pass Holders embraced the opportunity to swim at any one of the three (3) outdoors pools by purchasing a $5.00 pass. Over the last year the classes and programs we offered had over 4,257 participants, not including the swim teams. This is a slight increase over last year when we had 4,039 participants. We were the host of swim practices for four (4) swim teams, and are considered the home pool for three (3) of those teams. We are also the home of the Catholic High School League Swimming and Diving championships for both men and women. We are also the host of the BC District meet for USA swimming. Other large meets that we hosted include Tri County Swim League championships, the Snowball Splash, and the Spartan Invitational. The listed meets had between 300 and 1,200 participants each. In addition we hosted eight (8) dual meets for Ladywood High School, one (1) dual meet for the University of Detroit Jesuit High School, and three (3) dual meets for Catholic Central High School. 68 Special events held at our Community Center special events this year included the 5" Annual Cardboard Boat Races and the 2"d Annual Beat the Winter Blues Indoor Triathlon which had 60 athletes competing. The Lap pool was shut down for routine and preventive maintenance in April, and the Leisure pool was shut down in August. During this time the leisure pool was resurfaced. LomrmElzWenr Botsford Pool was open June 7"' through August 24"', Clements Circle was open June 14r" through September 7", and Shelden was open June 23'd through August 161". 19,603 visits were recorded at the pools this year (7,083 at Botsford, 9,715 at Clements Circle, and 2,805 at Shelden) including day and season passes. This year both Shelden and Botsford Pool received a new domesfic water heater. Botsford also got five (5) new lane lines. Our swim lesson program had 589 students at the Botsford and Shelden pools. This was an increase of 57 students over last year. We had 355 season pass holders. Five (5) different swim teams used our outdoor pools for summer practice. This year we held our 5" Annual Super Youth Triathlon, which had 59 participants. We hosted three (3) special event theme nights and also held a Family Fun Night weekly at each pool. ATHLETIC DIVISION Athletic Services provides a wide variety of athletic programs for adults and youth of all ages. Programs include league play men's/women's softball, men's basketball, youth basketball, tball, coach pitch, softball, baseball, ice skating program, rollerskating, soccer, archery, tennis and bowling. League Play We offered over 30 different activities for team sports, had over 7,300 participants and played over 2,600 games. We offered the following team sports for participants ranging in age from four years to over 65 years old. We had over 159,000 *contact hours in our athletic programs. Programs Ages # of # of # of Avg Game Contact Teams Games Players Time Hours* Winter Men's 18 & older 16 112 192 1 hour 2,688 Basketball me UAL 14 & 108 540 1,620 1.25 hours 20,250 Basketball under Summer Co-sponsored 16 & 121 714 1,815 2.5 hours 71,400 Baseball & under Softball Collegiate 20 & 8 140 160 2.5 hours 12,600 Baseball under Men's Softball 18 & over 83 560 1,494 1.25 hours 25,200 Men's 18 & over 7 42 126 1.25 hours 1,890 Modified Women's 18 & over 15 98 270 1.25 hours 4,410 Softball Co -Ed Softball 18 & over 16 112 288 1.25 hours 5,040 Senior Softball 55 & over 6 90 90 1.25 hours 3,375 T -Ball 5-6yr olds 28 112 504 1.25 hours 5,040 Coach Pilch 7-8yrolds 37 152 666 1.25 hours 6,840 Girl's 10& 6 24 108 1.25 hours 1,080 Slowpilch under 13 & under Cancelled due to low enrollment *Contact Hours: 1. Baseball equals number of games x 40 (2 teams @ 20rteam) x length of game 2. Softball equals number of games x 36 (2 teams @ 18/team) x length of game 3. Basketball equals number of games x 30 (2 teams @ 12/team) x length of game 4. Does not include practice time or number ofspectators at games Archery Range The outdoor Archery Range opened this year on Saturday, April 5. The range has seven (7) targets at various distances with an additional broad -head range. The range hosted several instructional workshops throughout the summer and had over 50 participants. Several area Boy Scout and Girl Scout groups utilized the range for badge certifications. The range is open April through October on weekends from 10:00 a.m. — 4:00 p.m. and on Tuesdays and Thursdays in Septemberthrough Octoberfrom 4:00 p.m. until dusk. Over 850 people attended the range through general admission and season passes and the revenue for the range is $2,253. 70 Ice Skating The City owns two ice arenas, Eddie Edgar (2 sheets) and Devon -Aire (1 sheet). The Livonia Hockey Association manages both rinks and offers leagues, clinics, tournaments and open skating. Our Learn to Skate Program provided 792 enrollments. Representing Livonia were 72 skaters in local and stale competitions. In addition, 40 girls joined one of three Synchronized Skating Teams. The City hosted its bi-annual ice show "On the Radio" with over 113 skaters performing. This enrollment is down from 153 skaters in 2006. The skating program touched over 690 different youth through the year The Community Center, in its fifth year of operation, continues to meet its mission of serving the whole community by offering annual memberships, daily admissions, class participation, league play, community group partnerships and rentals. Through all the ways we serve the community, the recreation center alone averages over 3,000 visitors per day. Since the center is only closed nine (9) days per year, over 1 million people come through the door each year. Membership has declined by 6.4%. Certainly the economy has had an effect on membership. Increased competition in the market place for fitness centers has had an impact with four (4) businesses opening in 2008. The overall selection of programs and facilities at the Community Center continues to out perform any facility in the region. The Community Center has introduced the electronic fund payment plan for membership fees. With a loss of 878 members since 2007 this new plan will help residents spread payments over the entire year. Total Annual Membership 13,165 Family 8,833 Adult 1,507 Couple 1,158 Senior 774 Business/Corporate 340 Youth/Teen 206 Young Adult 271 Matinee 76 Summer membership 1,200 71 Resident Non -Residents Total Day Passes 33,617 15,191 Youth 13,477 6,754 Teens 10,135 4,168 Adults 9,099 3,949 Seniors 906 320 Grand Total of 48,808 day passes Class activity has decreased slightly. Many classes and leagues still reach the maximum enrollment each session. Internet class registration is 12% of our total, with more people taking advantage of this easy registration method. Total Enrollment 19,970 Participants per activity Aerobics 6,850 Personal Training 4,167 Camp Swoosh 705 Special Events 604 Climbing Wall 245 Swim Lessons 2,995 Fitness Center 281 Water Exercise 1,262 Classes/Leagues 3,214 Special projects completed in 2008 were: 1. New carpel outside locker rooms and concessions 2. 26 new cardio equipment pieces. 3. Refinished leisure pool. 4. New flooring in Tree Fort Fitness and Wellness Fitness and Wellness programming in the LCRC continues to offer variety. Members can take advantage of a number of services offered by the LCRC. Fitness and Wellness offerings include: fitness hub workouts, fitness assessments, climbing wall classes, personal training, nutritional counseling, massage therapy, group exercise (aerobics) and Livonia's 100 Days to Health wellness program. The fitness hub has remained a very busy area of the LCRC. Equipment orientations are offered free of charge by the personal training staff. We also offer Polar BodyAge assessments. The BodyAge assessment provides an individual with a baseline measurement of their overall fitness level. The assessment takes into account a number of health and fitness markers including your strength, flexibility, percent body fat, nutntion, cardiovascular fitness and more to calculate the fitness of your body. For youth, we offer two types of youth orientations: Teens in Training Part I and Teens in Training Part 11. The fitness hub has 86 cardio machines, 17 selectonzed weight -training machines, 2 cabled functional trainers, 2 sets of 5115-10011b dumbbells and 1 set of 20115-110115 foxed 72 curl bars. Cardio equipment is also available for member use on the bridge leading to the track and in one of the track comers. Also available for member use is an assortment of plate -loaded machines such as a smith machine, squat rack, leg press, calf raise and chest press benches. Another feature of the fit hub is the Eneroise Cardio Theater function found on most of our cardio equipment. The Enercise unit enables the member to tune into a T.V. program while getting their cardio workout in. The climbing wall continues to be a unique feature of the recreation center. The wall has 13 routes ranging in degree of difficulty in order to challenge the novice through elite climber. The wall remains open for use seven days a week. We offer a range of youth and adult climbing classes throughout the weekends. A couple of specialty programs that we have at the climbing wall are the rock the wall climbing social every Friday night and a Boy/Girl Scout Merit Badge program. The Boy/Girl Scout Merit Badge program is a 3A hour class with classroom lectures and climbing wall time. Personal training continues to be utilized on a consistent basis. Members can utilize personal training as an individual, couple or in a group setting. Personal trainers help members become successful with their fitness goals. The LCRC currently has a staff of 13 certified personal trainers. Nutritional counseling is an additional service that the LCRC is offering. We currently have two registered dietitians on staff. Members meet with the dietitians on an individual basis. This service is by appointment only. We have also incorporated dietary services into some of our class and seminar offerings as well. Massage therapy is a service that is offered to members as well as nonmembers. We currently have two (2) certified massage therapists on staff. This service is by appointment only. Massage therapy is currently being offered two (2) days per week. Group exercise (land aerobics) continues to be a popular offering here at the LCRC. The LCRC currently offers 97 dasses, seven days a week. The majority of our group exercise classes have been 50 minute class lengths. We now offer 30 minute classes as well. Women on weights, lifestyle/body makeover, yoga, cycle, step and pilates are a few of our most popular classes. The LCRC currently has a staff of 28 certified aerobics instructors. Livonia's 100 Days to Health has become a successful community wide initiative to build partnerships with area businesses and increase community involvement with the use of programming through the Livonia Community Recreation Center. The goal of the program is to provide participants with simple, factual and educational information on nutrition, exercise, health and wellness for the entire family. The program runs from January to April. The 2008 event attracted 542 73 participants. Corporate partners include St. Mary Mercy Hospital, Dick's Sporting Goods, Time too Savor, Running Fit, Madonna University Dietetics Department and Masn Orthodontics. Grocery stores that are also participating include Kroger's, Busch's, Joe's Produce and Trader Joe's. Participants involved in the 100 Days have access to exercise classes, nutrition seminars, wellness seminars, grocery store lours, rock climbing and free workouts and swimming on Fridays here at the LCRC during the length of the program. Sports and Leisure In 2008, we continued to offer a variety of leisure classes to our citizens, covering all ages and all interests. We strive to offer quality programs at affordable prices for all our customers. Between the 2 winter sessions, 1 spring session, 1 summer session and 2 fall sessions, we offered over 345 dasses, clinics, camps, and leagues. The Recreation Center's Leisure classes include pre-school developmental classes such as Little Explorers, 2's on the Move, Fun 2B Fit, and Interactive Play Program. We also offer dance classes for adults and youth including hip hop, lap, ballet, jazz, and ball room. Kids Night Out continues to add fun and excitement every V Friday of the month for kids ages 5-12. We offer 20 different martial arts dasses ranging from Tae Kwon Do to Kung Fu to Karate. We also offer enrichment classes for youth in the form of art and music programs, as well as Spanish language and painting classes for adults. Indoor sport programs include volleyball, basketball, soccer, and tennis. They are run in a variety of formats including seven (7) week class sessions, 2-3 day clinics, week-long camps and instructional leagues. Camp Swoosh continued to provide so much more then just a place for kids to go in the summer. Each week, Camp Swoosh offered kids the opportunity to make friends, unforgettable memories, build leadership and social skills, use their creative side through art and themed projects, stay physically active and involved instead of sifting at home watching TV all day, and most of all it instills a sense of pride to be a part of such a special group. This year Camp Swoosh generated just under $50,000 in revenue and averaged just over 34 campers a week. Kid Quarters Our short term care operation continues to serve the needs of our members, residents, and non residents, allowing parents to stay active and involved while their children are in a safe and friendly environment while they work out. 74 Rentals The opportunity for family, friends and neighbors to use the center for special gatherings is a great way for people to take advantage of the Community Center services. The following events look place in 2008: Birthday Parties 563 Rentals 313 Party/gathering 55 Meetings 47 Showers 27 Company Outings 21 School Groups 20 Bar/Bat Mitzvah 14 Scout Groups 13 Team party 8 Church groups 7 Total 1,088 Many teams rent gym time during offseason training to keep athletes in shape. After hour outings are an opportunity to have a more private event. GOLF DIVISION The City of Livonia Golf Division is proud to report that revenues are up for the first time since 2004. 2007 was the first year that the courses were noldismpled due to construction on the course or changes in the food and beverage operation. Al the end of 2007 we were proud to report that we held on and revenue was flat. Now, at the end of 2008 two full seasons without disruptions in our operation; we can proudly say we are 4% up over last season in this trying economy. Whispering Willows golf course successfully completed installing 650 ft. of new drainage on number one along with renovating the irrigation system / pump house and building a new forward lee on number five. Perhaps the most exciting news of the year is that Whispering Willows is now in the preliminary design phase for a new clubhouse. Greens speed is the most exciting thing to talk about for Fox Creek; customers have been raving about tie difference in quality. New maintenance practices have proven to be a success at Fox Creek; a much truer and fast paced roll has been achieved. Forward and back tees on number five have been renovated as well as a new forward lee on number seven. The office addition was completed in the spring of 2008 along with new drainage on number ten and eighteen. 75 The most compliments of the year went to Idyl Wyld; the course was in much better shape this season; both leagues and daily fee customers look the time to compliment the staff. A new bunker was created on number fifteen and new drainage on number 13. Many new flower beds were put in throughout the course; some of which are full of wildflowers that were planted by a local Livonia resident, Mrs. Dell Wisecarver. A septic field was installed at the maintenance facility; bringing us one step closer to being able to provide more sanitary conditions for our staff. SPECIAL EVENT DIVISION The Department places great emphasis on special events and programs. It is our intent to play an integral role in developing community involvement by working with local businesses and civic organizations that provide professional input, volunteers and/or financial assistance. A sense of family and individual pride and community spirit is developed through such events as; Daddy/Daughter dance, Mother/Son dance, holiday activities, summer playground program, Youth Fitness Meet, Tree Lighting Ceremony, Cardboard Boal Races, Elk's Soccer Shoot and Hoop Shoot, Winter Fest, Pilch, Hit & Run, to mention a few. Over 7,278 individuals have benefited from participating in our special events, totaling 90,700 hours in which we had direct contact with them. Event Ages #of Time #of Contact Cosponsored Days People Hours By Programs W nter/Spring/Fall Roller & Inline 5 & 24 1 500 12,000 Riverside Skating up wks Arena Youth Bowling 18 & 26 2 395 20,540 Mem-Bowl, Leagues under wks Cloverlanes, Wonderland, Woodland Summer Playground Program 5-12 35 5 264 46,200 Tennis Lessons 6-10 6 1 58 348 Triathlon 6-14 1 3 60 180 Walmart, Wolverine Sports and Conservation Club Nature Camp 5-8 5 2 18 180 Special Events 76 Winter Santa's Workshop Gr K- 1 0.5 161 80.5 Livonia Kiwanis Calling 2 Santa Bowling 3-6 1 1.5 165 247.5 Mem-Bowl Santa Mailbox 7 & 1 0.5 268 134 Livonia Kiwanis under Essay Contest 5-12 1 1 198 198 Friends of the Barn Tree Lighting All 1 2 700+ 1400+ Rotary Club, Ceremony Libraries, Civic Chorus, and Youth Choir Lunch with Santa 12 & 1 2 101 202 Jaycees and under Kiwanis Elk's Hoop Shoot 8-13 1 2.5 45 112.5 Livonia Elks Contest Lodge MRPA Hoop 7-14 1 2 27 54 MRPA Shoot Contest Daddy/Daughter 4-16 1 2 192 384 Livonia Elks Dance Lodge Mother/Son 4-9 1 2 81 162 Livonia Elks Dance Lodge Civic Chorus All 1 1 150 150 Civic Chorus Concert Guitar Hero 9-14 1 3 14 42 Tournament Spring Take Pride in All 1 3 350 1050 Rotary Club, Livonia Day Scouts, and School Groups Memorial Day All 1 4 zoo+ 800+ Veteran's Ceremony Alliance Hunter Safely 10& 1 12 67 804 DNR Course up Civic Chorus 18 & 2 2 200 800 Livonia Civic Concert up Chorus Easter Bunny 12 & 1 2 52 104 Jaycees and Lunch under Kiwanis Pilch, Hit & Run 7-14 1 2.5 16 40 Summer Music From the All 8 1.5 zoo+ 2,400+ Arts Heart Commission Rotary BBQ All 1 6 100+ 600 Rotary Club SK8 Jam 7 & 1 2 12 24 Up 77 WWCTR Picnic All 1 2.5 100+ 250 WWCTR Extravaganza Fall Lunch with 12 & 1 2 21 42 Livonia Goblins under Jaycees & Kiwanis Elks Soccer Shoot 13 & 1 3.5 28 98 Livonia Elk's under Lodge Haunted Stroll 12 & 1 0.25 1,152 288 Friends of the under Barn Craft Hours 10 & 1 4 56 224 Friends of the under Barn Turkey Trot All 1 2 252 504 Wolverine Sports and Conservation Club, Goodfellows Punt, Pass & Kick 15 & 1 1.5 10 15 under Hunter Safely 10& 1 12 65 780 DNR Course Up Ja1N 16111ITA G9P17 Our parks are a great place for families and groups to gather for picnics, outdoor activities or just to visit, walk, hike or use various amenities; pavilions, grills, play structures, ball fields, soccer fields, tennis courts, nature trails, walking paths, fitness clusters, in-line courts, playgrounds, sand volleyball courts or Wilson Barn. It is impossible to put a total number of individuals visiting our parks, now that's priceless!! Park Maintenance maintains all parks, handles inspections and works with us in providing safe, clean and quality parks that our residents have raved about and come to expect. Approximately 452 pavilion permits were issued for Rotary, John Stymelski, Veteran's, Bicentennial, Clements Circle, Mies and Shelden Parks. Our revenue for the pavilion rentals totaled $30,527.00. Fifteen (15) picnic packs were rented. The parks were also the sites of numerous special events and activities. Cross- country ski trails were set at Bicentennial Park, Fox Creek, Whispering Willows and Idyl Wyld Golf Courses and had limited use. The Rotary Club continues to assist us in park improvements. 78 Improvements to the parks include a pavilion at Rotary Park, tennis court and inline skate court refurbishing at Rotary Park, Wilson Acres Park, Country Homes Park, Newburgh & Five Mile Park, Compton Park, and Castle Gardens Park and paving of panting lots at Botsford Park and Jaycee Park. Baseball and softball backstops are being refurbished or replaced. Sites done or currently being worked on are Ford Field, Rotary Park, Compton Park, Dooley Park, and Nash Park. Activities and projects handled bythe Planning Commission and the Planning Department for the year 2008 included the following: Subdivision Plats Considered Preliminary Plats 0 Final Plats 0 Extensions 4 Petitions Processed Rezoning 9 Waiver of Use 30 Site Plans 12 Site Condominiums 0 Sign Permits 6 Greenbelt & Landscape 2 Satellite Dish 0 Lot Splits 11 Meetings Held Public Hearings (44 items) 10 Regular Meetings 10 Study Meetings 19 Special Regular Meetings 1 Amendments Master Plan Amendments 0 Language Amendments (Ord543) 4 Vacating 1 Throughout the past year, the Department has worked closely with the Mayors Office and has been involved in the planning of several new developments, as well as several expansion and redevelopment projects, including: 1) Expansion to the Marycrest Manor senior housing facility located on the west side of Middlebelt Road between Five Mile Road and Wentworth Avenue, including the construction of a new three-story independent living complex and a new one-story assisted living facility; 2) Approval of a new 11,000 sq.R. neighborhood shopping center on vacant property located on Joy Road between Inkster Road and Cardwell Avenue; 79 3) Facade remodel and other exterior improvements to the Wine Palace store located on the west side of Middlebelt Road between Schoolcraft Road and Bentley Avenue; 4) Approval of a new 16" District Courthouse to be located at the corner of Five Mile Road and Brookfield Avenue, just east of the Main Library on the grounds oflhe Civic Center Campus; 5) Reuse of the former UAW Childcare facility on Ann Arbor Road between Eckles and Hix Roads into a preschool/elementary school (Brookfield Academy); 6) Renovation of the former Ground Round Restaurant to a new Buffalo Wild Wings Restaurant and MaslercraR Jewelry store, located on the east side of Laurel Park Drive South between Six Mile Road and Professional Center Drive; 7) Approval of a new Tim Horton's drive-thru coffee shop and restaurant on the west side of Middlebell Road between Munger Ave. and Six Mile; 8) Approval of a new 85 R. high wireless communication support structure (cell lower) at Emerson Middle School, located on the north side of West Chicago between Middlebell Road and Harrison Avenue; 9) Development of a new retail shopping complex at the northwest corner of Middlebell and Seven Mile Roads that will involve the demolition of the former Livonia Mall and the construction of seven (7) new buildings having a combined total floor area of approximately 320,000 sq.R. 10)Renovation of the Advance Marketing Partners building located on Joy Road between Inkster Road and Cardwell Avenue; 11)Expansion of the Angela Hospice Home Care facility located on the east side of Newburgh Road between SchoolcraR Road and Five Mile Road; and 12)Expansion of the McLaren Performance Technologies complex located on Eight Mile Road between Merriman Road and Hubbard Road; 2008 Land Use Quarter Section Colored Maps 2008 Lot Splits Reports - 11 The Planning Department oversees and coordinates the activifies and functions of the office of Economic Development. The Department provides oversight, guidance and assistance to the Economic Development Director. The new and expanded program is to lend assistance to business and industrial firms in the City by maintaining a list of available properties and buildings, provide guidance through the permit process and by administering to the Economic Development Corporation. Special emphasis of the new program is to assist in promoting, retaining and attracting local industrial, commercial and retail enterprises within the City thereby strengthening and protecting the local economy and lax base. M Below is a summary of the major activities that the City's Economic Development Office has been involved with over the past year: • 43 Retention Calls and/or Prospect Meetings negotiations etc. (Personal meetings — number does not include phone contact work) • City Representative a 23 Professional and/or Networking events: i.e. charity, SEMCOG, SAE, MEDA, chamber, & various social and professional events. • Customer Service and/or Conflict Resolution: 39 issues resolved (e.g.: tax, IFEC, utility, city services, Vanance, MEDC, EPA issues, etc.) • Tax Incentive Program A) Completed Induslnal Development Overlay District project with Council: 2008 Two Public Heanngs & Council approval created final two (of six) City Section IDD Overlay Districts covering all M-1 & M-2 addresses within Industrial Corridor. Project effectively condensed redundant ACT 198 application and review process from two, to one- step application and Council review procedure. B) Created Induslnal Development District for 7 Mile office address C) Completed 4 Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificates D) Created Plant Rehabilitation District (closed GM warehouse reuse) E) Represented City at MEGA Board for NYX Inc. • 11 Council Public Hearings and/or Committee/Study Presentations • Drafted 10 Memos and/or Lepers for Mavor and/or Council • Public Speaking Engagements: A) Livonia Exchange Club B) 3 class project interviews for EMU, Wayne State & Madonna students Seminars. Memberships. Committees • Michigan Econ. Dev. Association (MEDA) • International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC) • Detroit Metro Airport Technical Advisory Committee • Brownfield National Conference (prepared & worked Livonia Booth) • Malaysia —U.S. Business Opportunities Seminar • AutoDesk Experience • Organized & co -hosted Livonia Orientation luncheon & Roush lour for 16 International Trade Commissioners from Greater Chicago with Roush Industries and Detroit Econ. Growth Corp. • ICSC Midwest Alliance (Chicago) • ICSC Michigan Deal Makers 81 • ICSC Global Real Estate Convention (Las Vegas) • 8 Mile Blvd Association (Golf Committee) • Automation Alley • MML "Effects of PA 198" Seminar • SEMCOG Econ. Dev. Seminar • Michigan Defense & Innovation Symposium • NextEnergy"New Economy Sustainability Strategies" seminar Misc. • Prepared 30 Building Search/Attraction packets, and/or prospect lours. • 11 Media interviews (Detroit News, Free Press, WSJ, Observer, Novi News, Livonia Gazette & Crain's) • Conducted 28 Livonia E.D.'partnership" meetings with representatives from DTE Energy, AT&T, MEDC, industrial & commercial brokers, Michigan Works, MEDA colleagues, CSX Rail etc. 2008 New Business & Expansion Investment & Job Highlights • Ford: $121 Million M&E— 350 jobs retained (IFEC) • Admiral Tool: $1.05 Million M&E— 73 job retained & 11 new (IFEC) • Tower Automotive World Headquarters — 300 new jobs from Novi • Foremost Duct: (95,000 sq. R. lease) — 50 new jobs • West Win Ltd: (90,00 sq. R. lease)-- 25 new jobs from Detroit • NYX Inc: $21 Million, 250,000 sq. R. vacant building rehab— 150-hD- 200 new jobs (IFEC, MEGA, Plant Rehab District) • Henrob: $2.6 Million, 60,000 sq. R. — 25 new jobs from Novi (IFEC) • AT&T Plymouth Road Service Facility (TBD) • Trinity Home Health Services at College Park 2008 Known Job losses • SuperValue (Kroger warehouse) 366, cold storage consolidation in Delaware, Ohio • TeslTek (2009) 150, to Wixom higlrbay crane building • Roush Cru Cam 60, consolidates three facilities to Farmington high bay building. • Chep 30 (pallet renovation — closed) • World Super Service 12 (closed) served SuperValue • Michigan Heritage Bank SE Michigan consolidation • Exel North America 45, Livonia & Chicago consolidation in Plymouth The Planning Department continues to provide oversight and clerical support to the Plymouth Road Development Authority (PRDA). The full-time Director of the Plymouth Road Development Authority works with the Planning Director and 82 department staff in coordinating and administering the various programs as assigned by the Authority. The Department secretary maintains custody of records, books, documents and other papers of the Authority. Planning Department personnel attend all meetings of the Board and keep a record of its proceedings. Work continued on the corridor with the PRDA Streetscape Program. At the Stark Road and Wayne Road intersections, new mastarms for traffic signal lights and lighted street signs were awarded. Ranhom Electric was awarded the contract and preliminary site work is underway. Completion will occur in 2009. Coupled with these improvements, the slreetscape at these intersections will feature the plaza designs typical of what has occurred at other intersections where mastanns have been installed. Designs for these plazas have been prepared and approved. Bids will be lel for this work in 2009. The Authority financed the repaving of the four municipal parking lots on Plymouth Road between Mernman Road and Hubbard Road. The contract for the work and related construction administration was handled by the City of Livonia. The Authority, along with Schoslak Brothers and Company planned, developed and managed a very successful Summer Open House at the new Wonderland Village Shops. Plans are now underway to schedule a similar event on the corridor in 2009. iv, l_11.9 The Planning Department has prepared many new maps for City use and has revised others. These maps are used at the various public hearings conducted by the Planning Commission and City Council. The maps are also made available to other City departments and groups. GIS The Planning Department continues to work closely with the Information Systems Department and other City Departments involved in the development and maintenance oflhe City's desktop Geographic Information System (GIS). The City's GIS is a powerful collection of computer hardware and software designed to visualize, explore, query and analyze data geographically. The Planning Department utilizes the GIS on a daily basis for a variety of planning related tasks including: mapping, obtaining land use statistics and information, generating mailing labels for public notification purposes, and much more. As part of its responsibility of providing accurate and current land use information, the Planning Department maintains the following spatial GIS layers and accompanying attribute information: Zoning Liquor Licenses Act 198 Industrial Distncts 83 Existing Land Use Wireless Communication Facilities Vicinity Control Areas Future Land Use Truck Routes Building Footprints The Planning Department continues to expand the use of its computer database, which was designed and developed for the purpose of tracking and storing information about all of the various petitions that the Department is responsible for overseeing. The new database was created with several benefits in mind, including faster and more efficient delivery of information to residents, other City Departments and developers, better record keeping, and expandability and compatibility with other computer software programs including the GIS. The Planning database was developed using Microsoft Access and includes detailed information on each petition including the type of project, the review procedure, the applicant, critical deadlines (i.e., public notification), past history, zoning, etc. Select information can be linked directly with the GIS and viewed in a spatial context. For example, maps can be generated showing the locations of all properties involved in certain types of land use proposals (i.e., restaurants), over a given period of time. As of November 2008, the Planning database contains detailed information on approximately 1,693 petitions. Hundreds of hours have been spent supplying other departments with technical help including: Community Resources Assessors Office Historical Commission Engineering/Inspection Legal Department Library Commission Parks & Recreation Finance Department Historic Preservation Housing Commission Police Department SITE PLANS Since the adoption in July of 1972 of the General Site Plan Approval Ordinance, approximately 1,256 site plans for commeroial and office developments have been processed. Recommendations are made on site development proposals in order that functional, aesthetically pleasing developments, which are compatible to surrounding developments, are accomplished. Through landscape treatment of sites, the Planning Commission and Department maintain strong emphasis on quality of site developments. 84 LIVONIA DIVISION OF POLICE Su UUort Services The Administration section consists of the Chief of Police, one Deputy Chief, three Captains (one commanding the Support Services Division, Uniform Division, and Investigative Division), one Lieutenant, one Sergeant, one Police Officer, one Program Supervisor, one Secretary, and one Clerk - Typist. The bureau is responsible for the efficient day -today operation of the department. Preparing and maintaining the budget, purchasing, training, personnel, labor relations, contact with citizen groups, and investigating citizen complaints are also important functions. During fiscal year 2008, the Training Division coordinated the attendance of our officers at 144 offsite training courses. Of our Officers, 111 attended 40 hours of in-house training through our Police Officer Refresher Training Program. 125 officers and civilian employees attended 4 hours of Diversity training, taught by former Detroit Police Chief Isaiah McKinnon. The Training Division oversaw the receipt and application of police officer "302" funds and the Bulletproof Vest Grant Application. The firearms range promded training for all officers a minimum of two times a year. Cement work was completed on the rifle range and the parking lot was repaved. During fiscal year 2008, the Training Division oversaw the hiring of 2 Police Service Aides. Communications Activities include the maintenance of the department's Ericsson radio system (consisting of over 550 mobiles and prep radios citywide); a dispatch room and site equipment; and thirty-six "in -car' video systems. Other activities include the maintenance of our building U.P.S. machine (and its battery bank) and support of Computer Services in the maintenance and programming offorty 'in -car" computer systems. Computer Services This unit consists of one Police Officer, one Systems Analyst II, one Computer Administrator II and one Data Processor. Computer Services is responsible for maintaining and improving both the Police and Fire Department's I.T. infrastructure. This includes deploying, servicing and supporting new and existing hardware and software (including mobile units), as well as providing 85 statistical information and reporting tools. Computer Services is also a disaster recovery site and training facility for CLEMIS. In 2008 Computer Services deployed 45 new mobile data workstations; transitioned to NetRMS records management system, including its impound and property modules; deployed scanning for NetRMS; deployed 40 new workstations; deployed WebSence intemel monitoring software; acquired a replacement for an outdated tape data backup system, software and hardware; deployed server and workstations for ICOP digital dash cam system; deployed new gun range software; deployed property bar-coding; ordered card swipes and printers for CLEMIS ecilation module; acquired a new server for LFD fire programs; completed the hardware and software deployment for new warning siren system; and arraigned for the first installation of the automated license plate recognition software in a patrol car. Central Records Central Records is staffed by one Sergeant, four full-time Clerk Typists, 1 part- time clerk typists and two Clerk II's. This bureau receives, reviews and files all arrest & history information and verifies & updates information on incident reports as required by the Slate. In addition, they fulfill request information from Freedom of Information, Subpoenas, and Discovery Orders and are responsible for the issuance of pistol purchase permits. Central Records personnel also enter all traffic citations information into the database. Property/Licensing A sergeant and a police officer staff the Property and Licensing Unit. The main function of the Property and Licensing Unit is to receive, document, and store evidential and nonevidental property, coming into the possession of The Livonia Police Department, in a safe and secure environment. Other work activities of the unit include the control and tracking of impounded and abandoned vehicles, oversight of vehicle auctions conducted by lowing agencies, categorize and submit confiscated firearms to The Michigan Slate Police for destruction, licensing of taxi cab operators and other licensing investigations under Title 5 of The Livonia Code of Ordinances, and holding an annual property and bicycle auction. The Investigative Division is comprised of several units including: Detective Bureau, Crime Scene Unit, Crime Prevention, Special Victims Unit, Court Services/Liquor Control Enforcement, Internet Crimes Against Children, School 86 Resource, Crime Analysis and Western Wayne Auto Theft task force. The Investigative Division Lieutenant is in charge of six Sergeants, nineteen Police Officers, one Clerk -Typist and a Crime Analyst. Two Sergeants and seven Police Officers staff the Detective Bureau. Their responsibilities include the investigation of most of the reported crimes. These induce assaults, robberies, burglaries, larcenies, and frauds. One Sergeant and one Police Officer make up the Crime Scene Unit. This unit is responsible for processing crime scenes, including the development, collection and analysis of evidence. A Sergeant is responsible for Crime Prevention. His duties include lours of the police facility as well as leaching civic groups and businesses crime prevention techniques. The Special Victims Unit is comprised of one Sergeant and two Police Officers. This unit investigates domestic violence and sexual assault cases. One Police Officer is also responsible for administering polygraph examinations when necessary. One Sergeant and one Police Officer are assigned to Court Services/LCC enforcement. They handle the daily court activity and process all warrants. They also investigate Michigan Liquor Control Commission license applicants and enforce the MLCC laws. One Police Officer is assigned to the Michigan Stale Police Internet Crimes Against Children unit. The ICAC unit investigates individuals who, via the Internet, attempt to lure minors to commit illicit ads. The officer assigned to the Western Wayne Auto Theft task force is responsible for investigating auto theft complaints in the city and also working as a task force member to deter, investigate and prosecute auto theft cases at a regional level. The School Resource unit is comprised of five Police Officers who are assigned to the middle and high schools. They provide a liaison between the police and schools and investigate any crimes that occur at the schools. The Crime Analyst is responsible for research, compilation, analysis, mapping of crime trends/patterns and the distribution of such findings throughout the department. The information assists patrol, investigative and administrative staff in planning the deployment of resources for the prevention, intervention, and suppression of criminal activities within the city. Patrol Bureau The Patrol Bureau is currently staffed with (1) Captain, (4) Lieutenants, (12) Sergeants, (69) Police Officers, (7) Police Service Aides, (11) Dispatchers and (1) Vehicle Maintenance Coordinator. The Special Operations Unit (SOU) is also part of the Patrol Bureau. SOU consists of (1) Sergeant and (5) Police Officers, which includes a 149 Officer. The Patrol Bureau provides around-the-clock assistance, protection and law enforcement to the City of Livonia. 87 Traffic Bureau The Traffic Bureau is currently staffed with a Sergeant, four road officers, one desk officer, and one motor carrier officer. All seven have been trained in traffic crash investigations — which is the primary focus of this bureau. Secondary responsibilities include investigations of traffic related crimes and their prosecution, selective enforcement activifies, traffic crash pattern analysis, engineering enhancements for improved traffic flow and increased safety, breath lest instrument calibrations, school crossing guards, child safety seat checks, and planning board and zoning board research. The Traffic Bureau Sergeant is an ad-hoc member of the Livonia Traffic Commission and attends all meetings, sits as an executive board member of the Wayne County Traffic Safety Committee, and assists the Traffic Improvement Association of Oakland County in engineering projects and training. As a result of the success of the Strategic Traffic Accident Reduction (STAR) program in the past few years, traffic safety programs of the bureau were expanded this year. Using the same approach as STAR did by employing the "three E's" of traffic safety (Education, Engineering, and Enforcement), evaluation of the City's traffic signs and signals was started. Evaluation is based on compliance with the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices adopted by the Slate of Michigan in 2005. As of September 2007, 18 of the City's 36 square miles have been completed. The entire City will be in compliance with Slate Law by fall of 2008. Despite the initial negative reaction from some citizens, traffic flow has improved, traffic violations in these areas have decreased, and overall safety has increased. Traffic crashes are down another 8 %this year, and have been reduced 34% overall since the beginning of the STAR program in mid -2003 (from 13 to 8 a day). A second expansion program was the start of the Safe Routes 2 School program. This international program encourages students to walk and bike to school for increased physical activity, enhanced attention span for their studies, and reduced traffic congestion near and on school property. The Traffic Bureau and Livonia Public Schools teamed up to begin this initiative at Coolidge and Rosedale schools. This effort included evaluation of every K-4 school zone area in the City. As a result, numerous enhancements were performed in these areas, which increased pedestrian and vehicular safely in and around the schools. Community Service Bureau The Community Service Bureau is staffed by one Police Officer. The unit is responsible for the administration of the Police Reserve Program, consisting of 39 Reserve Officers. This bureau also supervises the Community Event Volunteers and the Police Explorer Post #213. The Police Explorer Post, in conjunction with the national Learning for Life organization is a community-based M group that gives young adults interested in law enforcement a chance to experience law enforcement and community service. There are currently 18 explorers actively involved who have been engaged in a number of community- based activities in 2008. The Community Service Bureau also provides personnel and support for emergency events including snow alerts, downed power lines, and crowd control. Members of the bureau have also recently been trained as instructors in the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) concept. Along with members of the Livonia Fire Department, the Community Service Bureau conducted 1 CERT training sessions in 2008. There are currently 92 active CERT members. Uniformed personnel in this bureau worked 6,919 hours at special events throughout the City of Livonia during 2008, including school functions, Livonia Spree, and other civic events. The total cost of services for the year is estimated at $176,994 with fractional reimbursement at $74,572. Discounted and unsubsidized services amount to $102,422. One Lieutenant, five Sergeants, six Police Officers and one Clerk Typist staff the Intelligence Bureau. Their responsibilities are as follows: As the Officer -In -Charge, the Lieutenant supervises all members of the bureau and is responsible for the management and administration of the unit. The Lieutenant reports directly to the Chief and Deputy Chief of Police. Two Sergeants directly supervise six Police Officers in two teams. These teams are responsible for all narcofics enforcement and criminal surveillance affecting the City of Livonia. The third Sergeant handles all narcofics evidence for the Department, court presentation and narcotics related civil forfeiture actions. The fourth Sergeant is assigned to a Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Task Force. He works along side local and Federal Officers developing cases on large-scale drug traffickers in the Detroit Metropolitan area. The fifth Sergeant is assigned to a United States Marshall Fugitive Apprehension Team. This unit is responsible for the arrest of felony fugitives who have fled prosecution in local, state and Federal criminal cases. The Clerk Typist is responsible for records management and employee time records. 89 Emergency Preparedness The City of Livonia has a Police Lieutenant appointed as the Director of Emergency Preparedness. The Director of Emergency Preparedness coordinates planning, training, equipment, exercise, management and the administration of Livonia's resources necessary to respond and recover from major emergencies, including natural disasters and acts of terrorism. The Director of Emergency Preparedness works with City personnel, including Police, Fire & Rescue and Public Mrks as well as with area hospitals, neighboring communities, Wayne County, the State of Michigan and Department of Homeland Security. During the 2008 financial year emergency preparedness activities included the following: upgrade and replacement of the outdoor warning system, upgrade of the emergency warning system cable override, upgrade of the City's Emergency Operations Center communications, technology and audio-visual capabilities, participation in a regional functional exercise, modification of emergency operation plans to ensure proper alignment with the National Incident Management System (NIMS) standards and the development of logistics and resource management typing. ACTIVITIES Central Records Distributed Est. Fiscal Amount Fiscal 2007 Amount 2008 Accident Reports $13ea 446 $5,798 501 $4,460 Incident Reports $5ea 212 $1060 204 $1048 Fingerprints @$49.25 251 $12,361.75 302 $14,873.5 Fingerprints @ $15 656 $9,840 663 $9,945 Fingerprints -N/C 165 34 $0 LCC 16 $16927 29 $31850 Gun Registrations - N/C 1964 $0 1299 $0 Purchase Permits $5ea 604 $3,020 265 $1,650 Purchase Permits- N/C 53 24 $0 Record Clearance $6ea 172 $1.032 209 $1,254 Record Clearance - N/C 641 535 $0 PV License $20ea 42 $840 39 $780 PV License $12ea 44 $528 68 $816 FOIA / Discovery 1107 $10,473 1010 $10201.06 Tapes (VT, AT, CD) 208 202 Photographs Na Na Pages Copied 9059 6235 m TOTAL REVENUE $61,880 $76,877 P & L Activities Investigative Division 2007 2008 Public Vehicle PermitA lications/Renewals Investigated 104 115 Taxi Cab Inspections 14 14 Business License Applications Investigated 55 79 Impounded/Abandoned Vehicles Processed 1345 1312 Property Items Received & Processed 3907 3630 Investigative Division Patrol Bureau FY 2007 FY2008 %Change Total Case Investigated 6189 5359 -12.70 Felony Warrant Requests 311 368 18.32 Misdemeanor Warrants Requested 834 836 0.23 Precious Metal Documents 1104 2180 97.46 Crime Scenes Processed 83 80 3.61 Vehicles Processed 55 50 5.09 Pieces of Evidence Processed 3062 3215 4.99 Latent Prints Identified 135 165 22.22 Reports by Crime Scene Unit 372 613 64.78 AFIS Cases 212 413 94.81 Polygraphs Administered 60 36 -40.00 Referrals to Youth Assistance 42 34 -11.11 MLCC Reports 35 39 -15.00 MLCC Inspections (one site & decoy) 234 170 -27.35 MLCC Violation Reports 20 17 -15.00 MLCC Applicants Investigated 50 47 -6.00 Patrol Bureau 91 2007 Actual 2008 Pro ected %Chan e Calls for service Police 37955 35262 -7.09% Calls for service Fire 8442 7753 -8.16% 91 Reports taken 7847 6705 -14.55%' Adult Arrests 4287 4480 4.3% Juvenile Arrests 292 331 11.78% Traffic Crashes Reported 3155 3020 -4.27% Uniform Law Citations 34607 33708 -2.59% Use offorce incidents 62 75 17.33% Vehicle Pursuits 23 30 23.33% • Decrease in part attributed to changing of collection methods due to computer program change. Intelligence Bureau DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS The Department of Public Works includes the Public Service Division and the Engineering Division, which operates under the direction of the Director of Public Works. The responsibilities of the two Divisions are as follows: Public Service Division — This Division is responsible for the performance at a wide variety of maintenance functions. These functions range from in-house activities such as building maintenance and vehicle maintenance (except Police and Fire) to the more visible maintenance of public utilities, park sites and roadways. There are 135 full-time and 21 part-time positions in the nine maintenance/service sections of the Division. 15 positions are assigned to managerial/administrative functions. The Department currently has 29 vacant positions. Engineednq Division—The Engineering Division is under the direction of the City Engineer and the Assistant City Engineer (currently vacant) and is responsible for all construction operations within public rights-ofway and/or public easements. The department has provided engineering services as directed by the Mayor, the City Council, other City departments and various Boards and Commissions, as well as for the general public. During the past fiscal year, the 92 2007 2008 % Changee Assigned Cases 628 628 INC Search Warmnis 80 85 +.94 Cocaine Purchases 19 10 -48.4 Marijuana Purchases 25 36 +41.6 Heroin/Other Purchases 13 8 - 39.5 Criminal Surveillance 37 28 -32.5 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS The Department of Public Works includes the Public Service Division and the Engineering Division, which operates under the direction of the Director of Public Works. The responsibilities of the two Divisions are as follows: Public Service Division — This Division is responsible for the performance at a wide variety of maintenance functions. These functions range from in-house activities such as building maintenance and vehicle maintenance (except Police and Fire) to the more visible maintenance of public utilities, park sites and roadways. There are 135 full-time and 21 part-time positions in the nine maintenance/service sections of the Division. 15 positions are assigned to managerial/administrative functions. The Department currently has 29 vacant positions. Engineednq Division—The Engineering Division is under the direction of the City Engineer and the Assistant City Engineer (currently vacant) and is responsible for all construction operations within public rights-ofway and/or public easements. The department has provided engineering services as directed by the Mayor, the City Council, other City departments and various Boards and Commissions, as well as for the general public. During the past fiscal year, the 92 work was handled by 10 full time employees, one temporary employee and one part time contractual employee. The department consists of three sections: administrative, design and field. Highlights oflhis year's accomplishments include: Administrative Section This section is under the direction of the City Engineer. This section prepares reports for the City Council, subdivision bond establishments and releases, and various other reports; reviews the design of public improvements in connection with the development of residential subdivisions, commercial and industrial site plans; prepares legal descriptions as required by other departments; and provides technical assistance and advice to administrative and legislative groups within the City as well as State and County governmental units. This section also issues permits for work in the public rights-of-way and/or easements. Attendance at Council, Commission and citizen meetings is also a function of this section. The Administrative Section was involved with the following matters during 2008 in addition to attending meetings with Slate and County officials, and investigating citizen complaints: MDOT Resurfacing and Reconstruction Project — Seven Mile Bridge Over 1-275 Traffic Signal Improvements Five Mile Right Turn Lane Addition and Newburgh Road Resurfacing from 1-96 to Five Mile Numerous Reconstruction and Rehabilitation Projects in conjunction with the Annual Paving Program Water Main Replacement Project Numerous Utility Permits for AT&T/SBC Upgrade Newburgh Road — Seven Mile Road to Eight Mile Road (Special Project in Conjunction with OHM) Numerous Parking Lot Paving Projects Tennis Court Rehabilitation Project Storm and Sanitary Sewer Project at Wonderland Lanes and Bates Silver Village Repaving Project Numerous Subdivision and Condominium Development Street Light Installation Projects LPD Gun Range Improvement Project Ten site condominium projects, one subdivision, and numerous commercial and industrial projects were also reviewed and/or inspected by the Division. 93 • Angela Hospice Addition (14100 Newburgh Road) • Apple Crest Dental (37500 Seven Mile Road) • Bob Evans Renovations (13911 Middlebelt) • Churchill Manor Condominiums • College Park Office Building C (Markel Strategies —17430 College Parkway) • Curtis Creek Site Condominiums • CVS Pharmacy (37340 Five Mile Road) • Davenport University • Eight Mile Place • Fargo Avenue Proposed Office Building • Fifth Third Bank (33246 Plymouth Road) • Genesis Park Site Condominium (Plymouth and Eckles) • Golf Ridge Properties • Gmnberger Dental Office (15939 Middlebelt) • Hunters Park Estates Condominiums • LA Fitness • The Learning Experience (37550 Seven Mile Road) • Livonia Manor Condominiums • Livonia Marketplace (Livonia Mall Redevelopment) • L.J. Griffin Funeral Home Addition (8809 Wayne Road) • Lowes • Madonna University • New 16" District Court Building • New Shopping Plaza (27420 Joy Road) • Paslena Villa Condominiums • Police Rifle Range • Rosati Industrial Park Subdivision • Sarah Estates Condominiums • Savile Row Condominiums • Starbucks (Six Mile and Haggerty) • Slone Mountain Coffee Shop (28085 Plymouth Road) • Tim Horton's (16815 Middlebelt) • TRW — Tech V Site (12220 Tech Center Drive) • Tyler Elementary School Parking Lot Addition • Walgreens (Six Mile Road and Newburgh Road) • Walgreens (33239 Eight Mile) • Wonderland Redevelopment Design Section This section, in conjunction with the Administrative Section, prepares plans, specifications and bidding documents for the City's public improvement projects. 94 It also prepares legal descdpfions as needed. In addition, this section provides utility information to the public, assigns addresses and reviews residential site plans. The following major projects were designed and/or built in 2008: • 2008 Pavement Joint and Crack Sealing Program • 2008 Lane Line Marking Program • 2008 Parking Lot Paving Project • 2008 Tennis Court Rehabilitation Project • 2008 Pavementand Sidewalk Repair—Water Main Breaks • 2008 Sidewalk Program • Silver Village Repaving Project • Storm and Sanitary Sewer Project— Section 36 and Section 16 Sanitary Sewer Project Field Section This section, in conjunction with the Administrative Section and the Design Section, prepares, administrates and provides all field inspection and survey services in connection with contract plans and specifications for projects constructed under the jurisdiction of the Engineering Division, as well as all subdivision and commercial developments involving the installation of public improvements. Inspection and surveying services were provided for projects valued at approximately $1,952,235.35 were handled by the division during the past year. These are summarized as follows: • 2006 Catch Basin Repair Program Balance = $3,000.00 • 2007 Sidewalk Repair Program Balance = $3,000.00 • 2008 Pavement Joint and Crack Sealing Program = $113,030.00 • 2008 Lane Line Marking Program = $130,648.15 • 2008 Parking Lot Paving Project= $562,358.50 • 2008 Pavement and Sidewalk Repair— Water Main Breaks = $54,332.25 • 2008 Sidewalk Program = $439,120.00 • Silver Village Repaving Project=$223,694.80 • Storm and Sanitary Sewer Project — Section 36 and Section 16 Sanitary Sewer = $78,155.00 In addition to the public improvement contracts, this section was also responsible for the field inspection and survey services of. • All inspection of work under permits numbers 08-001 through 08-341 • 2009 Sidewalk Program 95 • 2010 Sidewalk Program • Lawsuit Investigations • Drainage Complaints • Catch Basin Complaints • Soil Erosion Permits • Grade Inspections Administrative Section • Provided administrative services for the City telecommunications system. • Prepared annual budget submittal for Public Service Division. • Worked on adaptation and installation of comprehensive new software installation for the Department of Public Works operations. • Conducted employment interviews. • Administered safety programs within the Department. • Maintained an alcohol and controlled substance testing program per requirements of Federal law. • Provided for public relations information for Rouge Sub -Watershed Project. • Administered a West Nile Virus - Mosquito Control public information program and a larviciding program for City parks, facilities and over 12,000 storm sewer catch basins. Sanitation • Prepared monthly payment submittals for solid waste contract • Operated Recycling Center and City Office Paper Recycling Program. Collected 144.51 tons of recyclable material. • Administered Curbside Recycling Program. Collected 7,269.03 tons of recyclable material. • Administered Separated Yard Waste Collection Program. Diverted to compost facility 28,310 yards of yard waste material. • Prepared and distributed to all Livonia households a Household Hazard Waste Day postcard announcement for the various City and County events. • Conducted a Household Hazardous Waste Drop -Off Day at Ford Field on May 3, 2008. 1,352 total vehicles utilized the service ofwhich 1,029 were from Livonia. (Northville/Northville Twp conducted a dro"ff event on September 05, 2008, which was utilized by 624 vehicles from Livonia). • Maintained City Type III landfill in compliance with all Federal, Slate and County requirements. • Prepared and submitted all solid waste reports required by Stale of Michigan and Wayne County. 01 • Continued community solid waste and recycling educational programs through use of City newsletter. • Prepared and distributed to all Livonia households a Bulk Leaf Pick-Up Program brochure. ROAD MAINTENANCE Snow and Ice Control • Maintained roads on primary salt routes in a 'Wet pavement or better" condition 2417 throughout the 07-08 snow season. Salted primary routes 8 times in December, 17 limes in January, 23 tmes in February, and 11 times in March for a total of 59 limes. Placed 5,385 tons of road salt. • Plowed all City maintained roads citywide (370 miles) 4 times during snow emergencies, using a combination of City resources and contracted road graders. • Provided plowing and ice control services in City parking lots. • Filled and maintained citizen-access salt barrels at key locations throughout the city. • Spot salted water break, problem area and house fire locations. • Continued anti-icing program on select areas of our major roads. Treated bridge decks, deceleration lanes, road curves and ice-prone intersections 4 times. Based on the positive results in '07, we are expanding this program during the '08 season to cover more areas of our major roads and select parking lots. Sweeping and Grading • Graded all parks, alleys and gravel roads 4 limes, did additional spot grading and added gravel as needed. Used grading contractor for initial reshaping of the roads, then continued maintenance using our underblade dump trucks. • Restructured drainage ditches, culverts and gravel road surfaces to improve road surface longevity and improve drainage. Re-dug 2,800 feet of ditch and replaced 4 driveway cross lubes. • Had contractor apply calcium chloride citywide once to gravel roads, alleys and parking lots for dust control, and applied brine solution 3 more times to improve and extend the performance of the more expensive chloride. • Swept City local streets 5 times, major roads 5limes, and industrial roads 5limes. • Did street sweeping of SPREE grounds and surrounding area 3 times during the event. • Swept all remaining City parking lots 3 times. • Swept all paved City streets after leaf pickup program. 97 Landfill Transfer Station and Recycling Center • Maintained City landfll; composted 53,722 cubic yards of leaves from the Leaf Pickup Program. • Processed 13,220 cubic yards of household refuse from 3,834 users of Refuse Disposal Transfer Site. • Maintained licensed City landfill, including clay closure cap, underground leachate pumping system, exposed slopes, access roads, drainage pipes and ditches in compliance with Stale of Michigan and Wayne County regulations. Moved materials, relocated stored materials in the Glendale storage yard to allow the installation of a methane containment system. • Installed methane containment system around landfill area as required by DEQ. • Installed grout collars around underground utilities exiting the Glendale landfill area to prevent methane gas from migrating off-site as required by DEQ. • Saved 53,700 cubic yards of landfill space by composting leaves collected during the Leaf Pickup Program. • Saved 9,812 cubic yards of landfill space by sending woodchips to an electric cogeneration plant. • Maintained the bene and contact water pumping system along the limits of the Glendale licensed landfill area in order to contain leachate. • Accompanied State of Michigan and Wayne County on landfill site inspection, made minor repairs to monitoring wells as requested. • Installed methane vents and igniters in premously active landfill areas. • Maintained solid street waste de -watering site, hauled de -watered solids to licensed area of the Glendale landfill. • Maintained the cardboard, paper, glass, oil, battery and antifreeze recycling facility per County and State regulations. • Maintained the citizen solid waste drop-off / transfer area to County and Slate specs. • Pumped over 4,009,287 gallons of leachate water from the landfill to be processed at the Detroit sewage treatment plant. • Monitored the contractor bulk brush and woodchip disposal operation in conjunction with transfer site operation. Brush Pickup • Picked up bulk brush throughout entire city every 10 working days, picking up 9,812 cubic yards of chipped up brush with 17,412 slops. • Removed and disposed of chips resulting from stump grinding. • Trained new equipment operators and seasonal laborers in operational and safety requirements of brush pickup. 98 Leaf Pickup • Picked up 53,700 cubic yards of bulk leaves at curbside, provided two or more pickups for each residence. • Provided street sweeping to clean paved streets and clear storm drain grates after final leaf pickup. Construction, road maintenance and miscellaneous • Repaired, adjusted or rebuilt 66 catch basins, gate wells, storm and sanitary manholes. • Repaired or replaced 9 sanitary and storm sewer lines. • Replaced 2,397 square feel of concrete road, drive and walk. • Milled concrete streets to eliminate heat pops or water ponding problems at 52 locations. • Repaired or replaced 3 concrete curbs. • Milled or chipped concrete major roads in 2 locations to eliminate pavement heat pops. • Completed 40 asphalt repairs or replacements consisting of 551 tons of asphalt. • Patched potholes on 370 miles of City -maintained roads, as well as trip point locations from the Engineering Division, parking lot repairs and sites from the Water and Sewer section. • Repaired potholes reported on the Pothole Hotline within 48 hours. • Responded to 2,200+ service requests from residents, businesses and other City departments. • Picked up and cleaned oil spills, large debris or lost loads from trucks on City streets 18 times. • Assisted Livonia Fire Dept. with trench rescue training activities. • Closed roads, rerouted traffic when needed due to downed power lines, traffic accidents and storm damage. • Purchased an additional truck -mounted tank, and 2 dump trucks equipped to use liquid deicers as a supplement and sometimes subsfitute for rock salt. • Installed additional hinged drain grates in Denmar drainage system. • Removed large logjam using heavy equipment at Angling Rd. bridge. • Removed large quantities of logs, stumps and branches from sections 19, 20 and 21 afte r a tornado went through the area. • Repaired badly eroded embankments to prevent road and bridge damage on Ellen Rd. north of 5 Mile. • Mud jacked concrete pavement back to correct grade at 6 sites. • Restored badly eroded banks of creek at Idyl Wyld Golf Course using boulders, rip -rap and clay. 99 • Changed truck and tractor attachments (buckets, blades, boxes, salt spreaders) from construction season/summer mode to leaf pickup mode, then to winter plowing/salfing configuration. • Cleaned outfalls and inlets of major City stone drains 30 times to prevent flooding and done drain backups. • Performed illicit discharge inspections and water sampling on storm water outfalls to maintain IDEP compliance. • Repaired 6 storm outfall sites. • Cleared brush from 25+ storm outfalls and inlets in floodplains throughout the city. • Repaired or replaced 3 accidenldamaged guardrails. • Cut and cleared brush from city -owned alleyways. • Placed and removed over a mile of snow fence to prevent excessive drifting and minimize the cost of snow removal on City roads. • Made lawn and or sprinkler repairs resulting from Water Dept. activities and occasional snow plow damage a1282 locations. • Trained employees for Commercial Drivers License test to allow for upgrading class or endorsements when needed. • Conducted snowplow training for operators from other departments to assist in snow emergencies. • Delivered and picked up voting supplies for 2 elections. • Assisted the Livonia Goodfellows with their annual holiday food and toy program. SIGN MAINTENANCE • Traffic Signs: Repaired or Removed: 886 Installed or Replaced: 808 • Traffic Posts: Repaired or Removed: 482 Installed or Replaced: 298 • Street Name Signs: Repaired or Removed: 121 • Installed or Replaced: 213 • Street Name Posts: Repaired or Removed: 103 Installed or Replaced: 8 • Engraved 95 signs for various City departments. • Assisted with the setups, signing, snow fencing, barricading and traffic control devices for SPREE, LCRC Swim Meet, Fire Dept. Open House, Eddie Edgar Ice Show, Rotary Easter Egg Hunt, Rouge Rescue, Music From the Heart, Art From the Heart, several Wilson Barn shows, Livonia Heritage Festival, the Highland Games plus an additional 6 events at Greenmead, and the Memorial Day Ceremony. • Launched new Signview module in our Carlegmph system. Added intersecting road information fields and updated data to reflect numerous changes made this year from Traffic Control Orders. 100 • Restriped approximately 30 new and repaired vehicles with reflectorized striping material to identify them as City vehides and increase their visibility. • Removed and or changed 200+ signs throughout the city as requested by the Traffic Commission to bring our sign system into compliance with the newest MMUTCD manual. Sections changed are 3, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 25, 26, 31, 34 and section 35. • Assisted with setup for homecoming parade. • Handled approximately 244 work orders. • Changed speed limit signs on Schoolcrafl Rd. to reflect new 40 mph speed limit. • Created and modified election signs to reflect new precincts and numbers. • Restriped City parking lots, added double lines where needed to conform to code. Painted 40,400 feet of lines this year. • Striped 28 miscellaneous road locafions. • Created new parking areas, signed individual spots for community transit buses. • Manufactured 25 new temporary mailbox/post combinations. These have been designed to be faster to deliver and to set in place and safer in the event a vehicle hits them. • Posted and removed notificafion signs at subdivision entrances for the Leaf Pickup Program. • Maintained barricades and construction signs for all City departments. Animal Control Provided animal control services for residents and businesses which included requests for service as follows: 39 abuse to animal/cruelly complaints, 131 barking dog complaints, 7 bird problems, 13 cat bites, 33 coyote sightings/complaints, 61 dog biles, 120 injured animal reports, 1 kennel complaint, 28 vicious animal complaints, 67 pick up contained animal requests, 39 sick wildlife reports, 134 stray animal reports, 29 trapped animal complaints, 2 waste (feces) complaints, 82 wildlife complaints, 3 wildlife biles, 319 dog -at -large complaints, 16 requests to borrow trap, and 7 miscellaneous complaints Continued to track coyote sightings. Issued animal ordinance violations as required. Patrolled Bi -Centennial and Rotary Park trails in response to complaints of dogs off leash. Trapped and removed 55 feral cats at three locations. Trained and certified Michigan ACO's in Chemical Immobilization. 101 PARK AND ATHLETIC FIELD MAINTENANCE SECTION • Floated and lined all City baseball / softball diamonds, soccer and football fields on a routine schedule. • Mowed, lammed, edged, weeded, fertilized, applied herbicides and fungicides, lammed trees, and routine maintenance to Ford Field, Bicentennial Diamonds 1 — 3, Greenmead soccer fields, Civic Center, Sandburg and Sheldon libraries, Wilson Barn, Greenmead and all other Parks and fields. All other Parks and Fields did not receive the fertilizer or pesticide applications. • Installed banners at Civic Center and LCRC for Music Under the Stars, Spree, Arts and Crafts festival, Christmas, special events, and everyday, patriotic banners. • Rolled and aerifed baseball diamonds and soccer fields. • Performed safety inspections, repaired or removed damaged playground parts in all City parks and installed 1,500 yards of "So%all" under playground structures. Also continued adding woodchips under structures that currently have none. This is a result of changing regulations from the Playground Safety Institute. • Renovation work continued on soccer fields at Greenmead and Bicentennial, as well as Ford Field softball diamond #2. • Installed wooden fences between parking lots and play structures at Moelke, Broadmore, and Bien parks. • Added chain link fence to protect the players benches at Compton, Dooley, Nash, and Moelke park baseball diamonds. • Monitored trashcans on athletic fields that Waste Management couldn't get to. Also deaned dog stations and treshcans in City parks on weekends. • Performed weekend trash duties at all picnic pavilions as a result of rentals through Parks and Recreation. • Performed snow removal services for City buildings and Right -0f --Way sidewalks leading to Parks on an as -needed basis. This included shoveling, plowing and salting sidewalks. • Performed winter maintenance to equipment, which included miscellaneous repairs, painting, blade sharpening, preventive maintenance, and thorough cleanings. • Sprayed Roundup weed killer on Right of Way fences to control the growth of weeds. • Applied the Biological control VectoLex to control mosquito -breeding populations in recreational Parks. One application was accomplished this year. Also helped with the spring application to catch basins in Roads. 102 • Added topsoil and grass seed to goal mouths on all soccer fields. Greenmead, LCRC, and Clement Circle fields were closed for a short time forsodding in those areas. • Using contracted services, herbicides to control annual weeds were sprayed at Civic Center, LCRC, boulevard islands, libraries, fire stations, and Wilson Barn. • Set out and brought in the picnic tables and trash barrels for the picnic season. • Repaired picnic tables as needed. • Ordered and replaced rusted and broken trash cans. • Pruned trees and shrubs in Parks, City buildings and Athletic Fields where needed. • Installed 2,000 assorted flower bulbs for the spring bulb display. • Assisted wth all Spree related activities including set-up, takedown and daily garbage detail. Also repaired damage to diamonds 3 — 7 as a result of parked vehicles on the diamonds. • Completed 103 "Requests for Service" that related to special activities for other City Departments (entailed delivering, setting up, taking down canopies, tents, picnic tables and garbage cans), delivering and setting up the Showmobile, delivering TEFAP commodities for Community Resources, Wilson Barn, Greenmead activities, and other City activities. • Repaired and maintained irrigation systems at Civic Center, LCRC, Ford Field, Bicentennial Park and Greenmead. • Due to the retirement of a Parks Maintenance Worker III in 2003, the irrigation systems at Noble Library, Sandburg Library, Wilson Barn, and fire station #4 and #5 were turned on and operated by contracted services this year. • Using contracted services, we continued replacing the antiquated irrigation systems on the Five Mile and Farmington Rd. boulevard islands. The new system is automated and will use less water. • Maintained the LCRC, including soccer field renovations, and landscape work. • Cleared deadfall trees and branches off of Nature Preserve walkways. • Contracted services will remove 140 trees from 30 parks and two cemeteries later this fall. • Continued testing vacuum breakers as part of Wayne County's DEQ requirements regarding irrigation systems. • Four employees attended the playground safety institute, which re- certified them as playground inspectors. • Set up and monitoredthe ice on the City's three outdoor ice rinks. • Plowed the Community Garden two times. • Continued replacing Christmas decorations to change some of the lawn ornaments for the City hall display. • Oversaw contracted services for mowing maintenance that maintained 24 undeveloped Parks and three City cemeteries. 103 Achieved Tree City USA status for the tenth year and received our fifth year "growth award". Continued the young tree -training program for newly planted trees with both City staff and contracted services. Young tree training helps trees with proper form and strong structure as they mature. Young tree training also helps reduce the amount of pruning later in the trees mature life. Work was done on trees planted in 2003 - 2006. Forestry personnel removed 50 small trees and slumps. Supervised the removal of 250 trees and slumps by one contractor, Branch Tree Service. A few ash trees were part of the removal list but almost all ofthe ash trees we had in the Right -0f -Ways are gone. Supervised and administrated the planting of 450 trees associated with the 2008 planting lists. Also supervised the warranty replacement of 70 trees from the 2007 program. Planted three trees in connection with the Arbor Day Program. The three trees were a sweet gum, musclewood, and ruby red horsecheslnul. The trees were planted in the Beverly Park associated with Coolidge Elementary School. Also, 450 seedling Spruce trees were handed out as part of the program to the children al the school. Removed approximately 500 yards of woodchips as part of the DPS brush pickup program. Treated 45 wasps nest, mainly in August and September with insecticide to kill the wasps. Completed 165 storm related tree trimmings. Received and investigated 1,448 requests for service through Oct. 10th, 2008. Of those, 1,100 have been closed as either serviced or answered. 580 of the requests were for tree trims. Performed miscellaneous repairs and blade sharpening on the Sections saws and trimming equipment. Assisted other departments (Water, Engineering, Ordinance, etc.) with emergency tree removals, site inspections and tree inspections. Performed snow removal operations to City buildings and Right of Way sidewalks. Service included plowing, shoveling and salting. Assisted in the Rouge River deanup day. This years' event was held at Moelke Park in association with Take Pride in Livonia day. Supervised one contractor who trimmed approximately 5,000 trees in six City sections. These trees were trimmed to current International Society of Arboriculture Standards for street tree elevations. Supervised the same contractor doing resident call -out trim requests. Of the 580 tree trim requests through Oct. 10r", 2007, 480 had been trimmed. Tracked gypsy moth populations in Sections 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, and 22 as part of the gypsy moth egg mass survey. No spraying was needed in 2008 but the population is continuing to build in these areas. 104 • Attended these seminars to increase job knowledge: Michigan Nursery and Landscape Association annual meeting; Michigan Turfgrass Foundation annual Meeting, Arborist Society of Michigan annual meeting, Metro Detroit Landscape Association annual meeting, Society of Municipal Arborists, various seminars on chain saw safely; tree climbing, hazard assessment and aerial rescue training; roping and rigging training and equipment repair training. BUILDING MAINTENANCE Miscellaneous Repairs and Improvements • Completed 1510 work orders through 11-14-2008 • Opened, closed, and winterized City out buildings, pool buildings and pumps • Start-up, service and shutdown pump systems as needed • Maintained City owned outside lighting fixtures at various locations • Perform preventative maintenance on equipment • Semi-annually replace all flags, maintain flag poles • Strip and finish floors in buildings as needed and able • Spot and clean carpeting in buildings as needed and able • Clean inside and outside first floor windows on all buildings as needed and able • Clean exterior windows at City Hall, Library and Community Center • Monitor building automation and climate control systems • Monitor and expand electronic access and systems • Answer environmental complaints • Perforin yearly shut -down maintenance and custodial assignments at Community Center • Continue to enhance the custodial job assignment checklists and service delivery program for all buildings • Test and treated all process water systems • Assist with all other departmental projects as requested • Serviced overhead and pedestrian doors as needed • Cleaned carpeting in Sr. Center, Noble Library, and City Hall • Hung dedication plaque in City Hall vestibule • Replaced over -head door in prisoner drop off garage at Police station • Re -carpeted ECO hallway in basement of Police station Roof Replacement Maintenance and Repair • Repair leaking roof at Police station and Noble Library • Performed roof restoration on Senior Center roof 105 Painting • Paint hallway between City Hall and Annex • Paint Treasurers office • Paint Fire #5 lounge area • Painted Fire #6 lounge area • Painted restroom partitions in Annex and City Hall • Painted newly installed doors in DPW yard building and Police station Health and Safety • Continued with Lock Out / Tag Out program • Tested fire alarms, sprinklers and suppression systems in City buildings • Maintain compliance with Wayne County Backflow Certification program as requested • Maintained compliance with Stale of Michigan Boiler and Elevator inspections and certifications • Maintained employee Slate required licensing, certifications and training • Exterminated or remove pests in City buildings as needed • Conducted safety inspections of City facilities with insurance control specialists as requested • PM and load -bank tested generators • Reset all clocks, lighting and equipment for time changes • Clean debris and growth from building rooftops, sumps and gutters • Tested and repaired panic buttons in DPW administrative office • Perform required CSD -1 test on all boilers • Install additional defib boxes at City Hall and in Water and DPW Administrative buildings • Audit FOB and access system • Assemble and deliver hazmat "red boxes" to facilities serviced by custodial staff • Perform load lest on City Hall elevator • Assisted with Police ECO project • Building Mechanic IVs certified to perform boiler CSD testing Greenmead • Assisted with all events held on grounds (Highland Games, Flea Markets, Car Shows, Fall Harvest, Holiday Walks) • Install and remove decorations for Holiday and special events • Move and set-up and install furniture, furnishings and equipment as requested • Continue maintenance, set-up and custodial services • Assistwith 2n°fioor remodeling project • Re -roofed Hill house museum kitchen 106 • Wet plastered Hill house museum kitchen and pantry ceilings • Installed outside roadway lighting in Blue house west parking lot area • Replaced furnace in Fannhand's house • Moved Greenmead offices from Hinbum house to Blue house Renovation and New Construction • Replaced carpeting in City Hall elevators • Replaced ceiling tiles and base molding between City Hall and Annex • Worked on City Hall HVAC replacement project • Worked on new Court house project • Worked on Fire # 1,3,4,5 and 6 remodeling projects • Worked on C.C. Library audiovisual and electrical project • Installed partition in Director of Administrative Services desk area • Constructed unisex ADA accessible restroom in Noble Library • Constructed new quiet room in Noble Library • Install properly sized packaged heating / cooling and ventilation RTU for George Murphy's restaurant • Fabncate and install load centers for Rotary Park • Replaced mechanical room double doors and lintel at Sheldon Pool • Install vents for new equipment at Botsford and Sheldon pools • Replaced fogged windows at Noble library • Provided female restroom facilities at Fire # 5 and 6 • Replace deteriorated soffit areas and trim on exlenor of Sr. Center • Replaced rooftop HVAC units and ductwork in Senior Center • Replace water heaters in LCRC, Police gun range and Fleet Maintenance buildings • Replaced IR heater in Fleet Maintenance building • Replaced unit heaters with IR heater in Building Maintenance, Park Maintenance and Sign shops • Installed heater in Police UPS building • Replaced heat exchanger in Whispering Willows rooftop unit Special Projects and Interdepartmental Assistance • Assisted with various City Hall functions as requested • Provide set up and tear downs for meetings and events as requested • Maintained facilities leased from the City • Moved furniture, computers, work stations and materials and equipment as requested • Respond to and perform daily maintenance requests on equipment and facilities as requested • Assist with Senior Citizen shows and events as requested • Regularly cleaned out grease trap in Senior Center kitchen 107 • Jelled and maintained base mentdrains at Fire #1, 5 and 6 • Assist with snow removal and cycles as requested • TA personnel to leaf pick-up as needed • Assislwilh special facility projects at LCRC • Provide service for golf course buildings as requested • Administered Honeywell Service contract for Community Center • Completed custodial supply annual RFQ • Work on annual elevator Maintenance RFQ • Performed inspections on approximately 966 City -owned equipment and completed just over 2,623 work orders in the CarteGraph system. • Maintained and provided service for 12 SMART buses for Livonia Community Transit. • Wrote specifications for and ordered new equipment for various departments: Four Ford Escapes for the Inspection department ➢ Two (2) cargo vans for the Building Maintenance Section ➢ Two (2) single -axle dump trucks for the Roads Section ➢ One (1) backhoe for the Water and Sewer Section ➢ Two(2)small dump trucks for the Water and Sewer Section ➢ Two (2) leaf vacuums for the Leaf Pickup Program ➢ Two (2) stake trucks for the construction crews ➢ One (1) slake truck for the Forestry Section ➢ Five (5) pickup trucks for the Roads Section ➢ One (1) camera truck for Water and Sewer Section ➢ One (1) small dump for Parks Section ➢ One (1) easement cleaner machine for Water and Sewer ➢ Three (3) pickup trucks for Parks Section ➢ One (1) chipper for Parks Section ➢ One (1) trencher for Parks Section ➢ Four (4) tractors for Parks Section ➢ Two (2) vans for Parks Section ➢ Four (4) mowers for Parks Section ➢ Five (5) gators for Parks Section ➢ One (1) backhoe for Roads Section ➢ One (1) stake truck for Roads Section ➢ One (1) vactron for Roads Section ➢ Two (2) leaf collectors for Roads Section • Some of the responsibilities of the Equipment Maintenance Section are, but not limited to, the following: ➢ Maintain all City -owned vehicles and equipment ➢ Maintain City Transit and Senior Center busses ➢ Prepare seasonal equipment prior to the season of use ➢ Organize training for new equipment and technology 108 Maintain and operate City-wide computerized fueling systems at DPW, Civic Center, and Golf Courses Work with Wayne County and LPD during power outages by placing and maintaining generators at required intersections throughout the City to insure safe traffic flow and conditions Oversee two-way radios for all non-uniform radios Set up and monitor annual safely inspections for all man lift and equipment hoists at both DPW and the Recreation Center Assist LPD, LFD and other various departments throughout the City with a number of fabrications and modifications during the year Assist LPD in vehicle inspections on cars and trucks involved in fatal crashes Maintain and keep operating all vehicles and equipment for leaf and snow seasons Water Systems Inspected, exercised 2,003 water gale valves, the condition of the structure and updated inspection forms. Repaired 102 water gale valves and replaced old gland packing with o - ring type about 5.1 % in need of repair after exercising gate valves. Flowed, inspected and maintained 850 fire hydrants within the, city 36 sections. Repaired 103 fire hydrants in the field in these sections above; about 12.1 % need repair after exercising fire hydrant and inspection. Repaired 111 water main breaks or leaks, which is down 44% from last fiscal year. Repaired or replaced 116 water curb slop boxes. Slaked over 4,971 locations for Miss Dig system. Made 39 service line repairs for various reasons. Retired 9 water service lines. Rebuilt 9 fire hydrants in shop. Installed 4 new gale valves and 11 new fire hydrants. Meters • Replaced 16 antiquated large commercial water meters. • Repaired 42 large commercial meters. • Replaced 356 water meters (meter only) for various reasons. • Replaced (updated) 431 residential water meters and outside readers for various reasons. • Made 32,689 water related service calls; up 2,168 from last fiscal year. • Completed 3,617 service slips. 109 • Placed 840 note cards placed at residential homes requesting to gain access to home for internal meter repairs. • Installed 96 (ORD) outside touch read device systems. • Installed 119 (MXU) radio read device systems. • Installed 95 water meters for new accounts. • Established 59 new commercial accounts. • Established 36 newresidential accounts. • Established 1 new seasonal irrigation account. • Installed and removed 305 seasonal irrigation meters. • Tested 158 commercial meters. Storm Sewers • Answered 76 storm sewer complaints. • Jelled 52 restricted storm sewer lines generated from homeowner complaints. • Retrieved and replaced 69 catch basin covers. • Started storm sewer catch basin cleaning, cleaned 5,025-storm sewer catch basins worked 96 days cleaning for SWEPPI program started on April 22"d in section 12; working in descending order November now in section 34. • Mosquito program -- we placed 5,450 briquettes into 4,395-storm sewer catch basins and 245 inlets for citywide West Nile Virus elimination program. Sanitary Sewers • Cleaned 260.03 miles in 20 city sections of sanitary sewer lines by hydrant flushing, power flushing, buckeling, and chemical and power root cutting. • Cleared 3 main sewer backups. • Investigated 115 sanitary sewer complaints. • Televised 5,480'ofsanitary sewer. • Inspected 17 city sections for sanitary lines and structures. • Completed 8,198' of sanitary sewer foaming for root control at various locations. Special Projects • Worked with cross training the office staff at front desk and cross training the water and sewer foremen for handling emergency situations. • Finished updating 36 section water main maps to send master out for duplicating to engineering. • Updated computer programs relating to lawn, concrete and asphalt repairs along with new tap list and Carte Graph associate work orders to other sections for request to repair. 110 • Updated computer programs relating to Sensus water meter reading system and hardware for Logos.net web based system that is operational. • Coordinated hydrant repair requests for the Livonia Fire Department. • Assisted Roads with asphalt, concrete, lawn, catch basin and pavement restorations. • Assisted the Engineering with water main and fire hydrant replacement and completed projects for 2008 and planned 2009 water main and sanitary sewer replacement programs. • Working on updating the water slop box location, seasonal meter slop box location and contact information in MS Access database. • Inspected 20 water taps made by water section contractor (20 -new construction). • Completed the inspection of 147 O.S.D.S. (septic systems), 1 new O.S.D.S. (septic systems), was installed at Idyl Wyld G.C. we now have a total of 148 O.S.D.S. (sepficsyslems). • Helped with flow tests for water model, SCADA system and flow lest with Livonia Fire Department and water main replacement program that was installed in 2008 and proposed for 2009. • Updated the Six Mile and I-275 sanitary sewer high water monitors to digital compliance per the F.C.C. mandated regulation February 2009. • All section office staff with desktop computers and computer training. • Worked on inventory updating pricing database for future software changes to take place with Carle Graph 7.0 a upgrade. • Assisted engineering with sidewalk, driveway approaches and major road replacement projects. • Worked with various contractors for road, water and sewer main installations and repairs. • Rebuilt the PRV # 10-12" and # 10a-16" completed on Tuesday March W 2008, complete rebuilding the pressure regulating valve that is located at Stark and Schoolcraft Roads in DWSD LV -14 meter pit. • Rebuilt the PRV # 11-20" completed on Friday March 28" 2008, complete rebuilding the pressure regulating valve that is located at Stark and Schoolcraft Roads in DWSD LV -14 meter pit. • Checked road structures before road improvements and cleaned catch basins after completion. • I.D.E.P. Illicit Discharge Elimination Program inspections of storm sewer ouffall sampling. • Assisted with water activities for the Livonia spree, Race for the Cure and other activities. • Continue the replacement program for antiquated large commercial compound Badger and Rockwell water meters. • Continue with the replacement program for antiquated large commercial piston type Badger and Rockwell water meters. • Responded to 6 illicit discharge complaints and 2 emergency spill hazards in private parking lots of businesses. 111 Finished updafing 36 section water main maps to send master out for duplicating to engineering. Installed (1) one new sanitary sewer high water monitors at Seven Mile and 4275 for the section 6 businesses West of 1275 and North of 7 Mile Roads, now have a total of @) six phone dialers for sanitary sewer flood control all now have the same hardware and software, so the acknowledgements to respond back to dialers are all same codes. Completed the US EPA mandated water sampling on the second week in August 2008 and US EPA mandated report due January 1, 2009 for the Disinfection By -Products Program. Completed the M.D.E.O. mandated Lead and Copper water sampling program this year sampled 18 homes; no sampling sites above the action level. Next monitoring period Junel, 2011 to September 30,2011. The Traffic Commission is responsible for the planning, coordination, and determination of proposed traffic control devices to improve traffic flow and to provide maximum safely for all drivers, pedestrians, and property. As provided by the City Charter, the Commission consists of seven cdizens who are appointed by the Mayor. The Commission meets once a month to discuss and implement traffic control measures which have been brought to their attention by citizens, as well as other City departments. The Commissioners work in conjunction with the Traffic Bureau oflhe Police Department. SIGNIFICANT ISSUES IN 2008 As with previous years, the main issue facing the Traffic Commission in 2008 related to the updating of traffic control devices along existing city streets in order to comply with the Michigan Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MMUTCD). This project began three years ago under Chairman Ian Wilshaw, continued under Chairman Kevin Priddy and then under the current Chairmanship of Joe Steele. Over the course of the last year, in coordination with the Livonia Police Traffic Bureau, the Commission accomplished some impressive goals: • Researched and reviewed intersections in 19 sections of the city • Approved 131 Traffic Control Orders (TCOs), and • Those TCOs involved 1,056 signs. In 2008, the Traffic Commission also completed its three-year project to update each intersection to meet current MMUTCD standards. Both the Commissioners 112 and Livonia Sgt. Dave Studt deserve a tremendous amount of credit for the amount of time and work they have put in during this three-year project. As in previous years, some of the intersection changes we implemented caused some concern among local residents, although most changes have gone smoothly and most importantly traffic accidents throughout the city have continued to drop. While that drop cannot be credited entirely to the work of the Traffic Commission, the process of removing unwarranted or misplaced signs has improved traffic flow and safety around the city. We have continued to implement the plan, as directed by the City Council and the previous administration, to make residents aware of pending traffic control device changes in their immediate area. This plan was originally developed in response to some citizen complaints about lack of notification when changes were being made to signage in their neighborhoods. Throughout the year citizen concerns and Police Department will bring issues from placement of informational signs (Handicapped Child in Area for example), review of existing signage and requests for placement/removal of existing signs. We continue to monitor areas, including the Wonderland Village and College Park areas, as new developments will lead to traffic pattern changes. Coming up in 2009, we will monitor the changes being planned and redevelopments made at the Livonia Mall properly. The Commission continues to work with TIA to obtain expert opinion and guidance on traffic concerns in the community. Several individual agenda items were referred to TIA by the Commission during 2008 and TIA was requested to provide crash data for specific intersections related to agenda items. TIA have proven to be an invaluable resource to the Commission, especially when reviewing and researching some of the more controversial and troublesome intersections in the city. Furthermore, TIA provided the Commission with traffic count data for all major streets in Livonia along with a report summarizing crash information for major City intersections. CONCLUSION We believe the recent work done, jointly with TIA and Sgt. Dave Studt of the Livonia Police Traffic Bureau, has been beneficial to the city and its residents. The Traffic Commission will continue to monitor the changes it has made over the past three years and adjust, if needed, accordingly. 113 The Commission will also continue to monitor traffic and parking conditions within the City and will be particularly concerned with monitoring areas of re- development and construction. The Commission will also continue to meet with citizens and business owners to jointly address traffic and parking concerns and to act to alleviate dangerous conditions. Ongoing monitoring of traffic concerns by this Commission will ensure that Livonia's streets and highways will continue to be safe and well maintained. This Commission is a group the city should be proud of and we will continue to do everything we can to keep Livonia's streets and residents safe. TREASURER The Treasurer's Department is responsible for collection, disbursement and custody of all revenues belonging to and held in trust by the City. All funds collected by City agencies are transmitted to the Treasurer, vented and recorded through cash receipting, deposited and reported daily to the Finance Department. In addition, the Treasurer's Office, on instruction from the Finance Director, transmits instructions for the daily investment of City funds among City banks to maximize the interest on its holdings. ADMINISTRATION This year the Treasurer's Office opened on Saturday, September 13, to enhance our customer service capabilities. The extended hours were announced on City Channel 8 and in the Livonia Observer. The Treasurer's Office anticipates future Saturday hours as due dates for property taxes necessitate. The Treasurers Office once again sent letters to real and personal property taxpayers whose taxes for the 2007 tax year had not been paid by February 15, 2008. A total of 3,897 letters were mailed to real and personal property taxpayers. 3,160 letters were also mailed to real & personal property taxpayers after the due dale for the summer 2008 season. In 2002, the Treasurer's Office initialed the practice of mailing letters to notify Livonia property owners that their property was listed in the Wayne County Treasurer's Office court petition to foreclose on their property for delinquent real property taxes. In 2008 the City of Livonia Treasurer sent out 97 such notices, as compared to 54 notices in 2007, 33 notices in 2006, 45 notices in 2005, 89 114 notices in 2004, and 113 notices in 2003. As a result of this effort, the Wayne County Treasurer sold no Livonia parcels at tax auction in 2007, 2006, 2005, or 2004. The Treasurer's Office is responsible for monitoring and maintaining the files on bankruptcy cases. Proof of Claims for personal property taxes are fled with the courts by the City Treasurer. In 2008, 6 businesses with locations in Livonia filed for bankruptcy protection as compared to 11 businesses in 2007, 8 businesses in 2006, and 8 businesses in 2005. The Treasurer's Office fled 52 personal property jeopardy tax bills with the Wayne County Register of Deeds for 2008. In 2007, we issued 8 personal property tax bills and 11 in 2006. Applications for electronic fund debit for tax payments were included in the 2008 summer real property tax bills to property owners who are directly responsible for payment of their taxes. Again this year we have seen an increase in the number of taxpayers utilizing electronic funds transfer for payment of lax bills. During the summer 2008 season 2,360 taxpayers participated in this convenient and no-cost service as compared to 2,317 during the summer of 2007, 2,281 during the summer of 2006, 2,223 during the summer of 2005, 1,903 during the summer of 2004, 1,819 during the summer of 2003, 1, 417 during the summer of 2002, and 664 taxpayers during the summer 2001 lax season. Tax bills can be paid with a credit card through Official Payments Corporation. There is a convenience fee collected and retained by Official Payments Corporation for this service. There is no cost to the City of Livonia for this service to be offered to the residents. During 2008, 452 taxpayers utilized this option, as compared to 431 taxpayers in 2007, 399 taxpayers during 2006, 340 taxpayers during 2005 and 216 taxpayers during 2004. This year the Treasurer's Office continued printing the summer and winter lax bills in-house, which results in a significant printing cost savings of $4,600 per tax season. Printing the tax bills in-house also allowed for greater control and efficiency of mailing and distributing the lax bills in a timely fashion. The Treasurers Office has strict procedures in place regarding the handling of City funds. All departments issue numbered receipts and timely deliver collected funds to the Treasurers Office for processing. Large checks are deposited immediately to yield a higher rate of interest. 115 TAX COLLECTIONS There are 44,842 taxpayers in the City: 2005 2006 2007 2008 Real Property 39,447 39,684 39,863 39,791 Personal Property 4,369 4,443 4,337 4,979 IFF 78 76 78 72 43,894 44,203 44,278 44,842 Sixty six percent of residents are responsible for paying their own property tax bills. Mortgage companies pay 34% of the real property lax bills. The tax levy breakdown is as follows (includes Real, Personal, & IFF for 2007 Winter and 2008 Summer): The total number of original lax bills mailed for Summer and Winter was 89,376 116 REAL PERSONAL IFT TOTAL City of Livonia 51,688,818 6,604,264 828,703 59,121,785 Livonia Public Schools Operating 23,466,743 6,168,411 792,690 30,427,844 Debt 10,819,206 1,400,872 112,737 12,332,815 Supplemental Tax 1,350,686 100,589 0 1,451,275 Wayne Cty Intermediate School District 14,662,743 1,839,774 55,809 16,558,326 Clarenceville Schools Operating 1,420,443 81,088 0 1,501,531 Debt 1,091,054 44,009 0 1,135,063 Supplemental Tax 96,445 4,657 0 101,102 Oakland Intermediate School District 816,826 32,947 0 849,773 Slate Education Tax 26,850,229 1,770,735 106,347 28,727,311 SchoolcmR Comm Coll 8,040,102 971,728 113,511 9,125,341 Wayne County 29,718,609 3,622,486 428,066 33,769,161 Wayne County Jail 4,210,820 538,020 67,519 4,816,359 Wayne County Parks 1,103,619 141,010 17,703 1,262,332 Huron Clinton Metro Aulh. 963,116 123,060 15,443 1,101,619 Special Assessments 2,256,500 2,256,500 TOTAL 178,555,959 23,443,650 2,538,528 204,538,137 The total number of original lax bills mailed for Summer and Winter was 89,376 116 Delinauent Tax Collections Our personal delinquent property taxes, penalty and interest collected from 12-1- 07 through 11-30-08 were $1,264,898. The collections breakdown is as follows: Personal Property Tax Year Tax Year Tax Year Tax Year Amount Due as 2004 2005 2006 2007(3/1/2008) Of 12/01/2007 1,616,480 1,300,341 991,517 1,378,002 Idr�II0 i1tonIESdMe This Year $65,007 $235,867 $452,973 $418,368 OTHER COLLECTIONS Invoices for Council authorized weed cuttings are mailed to taxpayers as well as any special assessments approved during the year. The Treasurers Office records payment on these assessments and any unpaid amounts are added to tax bills at year-end. In 2008, the Treasurer's office issued 1,195 invoices for weed bills, as compared to 1,084 for 2007, 631 for 2006, 557 for 2005 and 512 for 2004. TELLER COLLECTIONS The Treasurer's two tellers processed $435,426,273 in cash, checks, and credit cards for the following items during the course of conducting City business: properly taxes, water bills, the greens fees for the City's three municipal golf courses, Livonia Community Recreation Center memberships and fees, park permits, fees for swimming and skating, amusement park ticket sales, registration fees for Parks and Recreation league sports, inspection and engineering permit and bond fees, licenses, the fees for the City's three libraries. 117 # of Parcels $ Amount # of Parcels $Amount Billed on Billed On Billed On Billed On 2007 Taxes 2007 Taxes 2008 Taxes 2008 Taxes Special Assessment Districts Sidewalk 37 $ 7,595 134 $ 66,117 Paving 360 $ 91,135 298 $ 80,361 Lighting 13,800 $ 919,795 13,770 $ 889,006 Weeds 150 $ 26,117 366 $ 39,804 Dlgt Water 1 545 $1,107,732 1 742 $1,227.99 15,892 $2,152,374 16,310 $2,303,285 TELLER COLLECTIONS The Treasurer's two tellers processed $435,426,273 in cash, checks, and credit cards for the following items during the course of conducting City business: properly taxes, water bills, the greens fees for the City's three municipal golf courses, Livonia Community Recreation Center memberships and fees, park permits, fees for swimming and skating, amusement park ticket sales, registration fees for Parks and Recreation league sports, inspection and engineering permit and bond fees, licenses, the fees for the City's three libraries. 117 Police Department adjudicated, non -adjudicated drug and D.A.R.E. funds, fees for City sponsored special events such as the Highland Games and the Arts & Craft fair, false alarm charges, accounts receivable items, SMART bus ficket sales, City garage sale, fees for using the City Dump, Police auction, rent payments for Silver Village, Newburgh Village, MacNamara Towers and city - owned homes, record duplication fees, etc. Of the amounts collected, $50,577,870 was for the general deposit items and $384,848,403 was for property taxes. The tellers also receive walk-in water payments from residents. During this fiscal year, 9,709 water payments were processed by the Treasurers Office. The busiest day as December 18, 2007 with 224 water bills being processed. The average amount of water bills processed was 41 per day. Due to the changes in receipfing water bill payments over the last year, the total dollars collected were processed along with the Water Department's deposits. All payroll and payable checks are released through the Treasurers Office on approval of the Finance Director and the City Clerk (internal auditor). 2007 2008 Payroll Checks 27,952 35,007 Vendor Checks -City 15,279 15,446 Vendor Checks -Court 1,808 1,842 ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS The Zoning Board of Appeals is a seven (7) member Board created by State statute and Zoning Ordinance No. 543, as amended, City of Livonia. The Board hears appeals from residential and business property owners when they are unable to comply with ordinance requirements and are rejected perils by the Inspection Department. The Board meets on Tuesday evenings at 7:00 p.m. The following is a breakdown of the Appeal Cases prepared and heard by the Zoning Board of Appeals during the fiscal year December 1, 2007 through November 30, 2008. 118 Granted with Tabled or Granted Denied Modifications Postponed"` Total New Cases 53 2 7 12 74 Rehearings 0 0 0 1 1 118 Actual Cases Heard Prepared and Scheduled" 75 Total Cases Heard and Prepared 79 Includes Cases which were Granted in Part/Denied in Part " Meeting material was prepared more than once, but for various reasons (Petitioner did not appear, asked to be rescheduled, etc.) these cases were not heard at the first scheduled meeting. Meeting material was prepared and Board heard case at meeting and made a decision to table for revised plans, etc. All meeting notices, agendas, etc. were redone when new meeting date was scheduled. Number of Regular Meetings: 11 Number of Special Meetings: 19 119