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2016-2017 Annual ReportDENNIS K. WRIGHT MAYOR OFFICE OF THE MAYOR January 8, 2018 33000 CIVIC CENTER DRIVE LIVONIA, MICHIGAN 48154-3097 (734) 466-2201 TO: HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE CITY COUNCIL FROM: MAYOR DENNIS K. WRIGHT SUBJECT: 2016-17 Annual Report Dear Council Members: The Livonia City Charter requires the Office of the Mayor to compile and send an annual report to the Council on the activities of the City during the previous fiscal year. The attached annual report summarizes many of challenges and accomplishments of Livonia's Departments, Boards and Commissions from the 2016-17 fiscal year. Below are some of the highlights of the attached report and some additional thoughts - Planning & Economic Development Signs of a strong economy have continued in Livonia during the past fiscal year. Livonia's unemployment rate as of October 2017 was 2%, which is down from 3.3% in 2016. At the same time, the national average is 4.2%, the State of Michigan is 4.7%, and Wayne County is 4.8%. Meanwhile, Livonia's industrial market continued a trend of positive net absorption and leasing activity, with the industrial vacancy rate closing the year at an all-time low of 3%. Among the largest corporate investors this year were Amazon, RNDC, Masco, and the Ashley Capital -owned Livonia Corporate Center. Finance In 2017, the City refunded the Recreation MBA bond issue at a lower interest rate. The result will be debt service savings of $1,750,000 over the remaining life of the bonds. The Finance Department also initiated a conversion of all DTE mercury vapor streetlights to LED, which will result in a savings of $282,000 per year and a 1.4 -year payback on the conversion cost. To: Honorable Members of the Council January 8, 2018 Re: Annual Report, 2016-2017 Page 2 Communications and Marketing_ As the reporting entity, the Office of the Mayor doesn't have a section in the annual report. However, it is important to highlight that the addition of our Communications and Marketing Program Supervisor this year has allowed us to direct more attention to website updates and social media. During the fiscal year, our City Facebook page grew 48% and reached more than 6,700 page likes. Twitter has grown to 2,418 followers. Meanwhile, the City started Instagram and Nextdoor accounts this year, attracting 1,750 followers, and 9,000 followers, respectively. These new communication methods vastly improve the City's ability to serve our residents with unprecedented efficiency and timeliness. Police In 2017, the police department added 20 members to its staff; however, the police department also experienced 18 separations of service. The Department is committed to maintaining adequate staffing levels without sacrificing the high standard of qualifications of candidates. As of December 1, 2017, the Police Department remains 12 police officers short of our staffing goal. Among the police statistics for the year, there was positive news. Compared to the previous year, traffic crash report totals for the year showed a 12% reduction in property damage crashes and a 15% reduction in injury crashes. Library The Civic Center Library, which was renamed the Robert and Janet Bennett Civic Center Library this year, hosted its biggest program — the Solar Eclipse Viewing Party on Monday, August 21, 2017. About 750 pairs of NASA -approved viewing glasses were given to more than 3,000 participants. Families and strangers shared the glasses and watched live -streaming from NASA on the large screen to experience the phenomenon. Law The Law Department won a significant case, NL Ventures v. City of Livonia, that culminated in an oral argument before the Michigan Supreme Court to decide whether the Court would hear an appeal by the landlord plaintiff, who had lost in the Court of Appeals. The City was ably represented at the Supreme Court by Chief Assistant Attorney Michael E. Fisher. About a week later, the Court issued an order denying the landlord's application to hear the case, leaving the City's victory in place. City Clerk Vital statistics are kept for the City at the Clerk's Office. This year, they showed a 22% decrease in the number of births recorded from the previous year, with 736 babies born in the 2016-17 fiscal year. In addition, the number of deaths recorded increased by 15%, to 1,844 in 2016-17. To: Honorable Members of the Council Re: Annual Report, 2016-2017 January 8, 2018 Page 3 Summary Livonia had an outstanding year and is positioned for continued success on many fronts. Numerous economic factors that show the City remains exceptionally strong, from significantly low unemployment rates to impressively strong economic investment across the community. The City continues to benefit from outstanding police, fire and public services; low tax rate; quality schools; easy freeway access; a stable economic base; and unrivaled location. Evidence of this abounds in both commercial and residential construction. Among the many accolades for Livonia this year, perhaps one of the most impressive was being named the Second Hottest Real Estate Zip Code (48154) among Millennials by Realtor.com. This means home values are strong. This type of recognition also promises great things for our future. Of course, there are challenges. One is the long-term vision for land use and infrastructure in our community. The Comprehensive Master Plan effort initiated this past year will generate direction and expectations for our community's future. Livonia will continue to be among the top communities in the state by efficiently and effectively delivering high quality services to our residents and businesses. We will remain focused on our customers. Please know that I appreciate the cooperation and dedication of everyone who makes Livonia work so well, from our elected officials to our department heads, supervisors and dedicated City staff. Sincerely, Dennis K. Wright MAYOR Enclosure cc: Clerk, Council, Finance, Law emailed: Leadership Staff CITY OF LIVONIA ANNUAL REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2016-2017 CITY OF LIVONIA, MICHIGAN ANNUAL REPORT Fiscal Year 2016-2017 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. Assessing Department......................................................................... 1 Review, Board of....................................................................... 2 CityClerk.............................................................................................. 3 Civil Service Department...................................................................... 8 Trustees, Board of................................................................... 15 Community Resources Department and Cable .................................. 19 Arts Commission...................................................................... 23 Youth Commission................................................................... 24 Historic Preservation Commission ........................................... 25 Historical Commission..............................................................27 Aging Commission...................................................................31 Human Relations Commission ................................................. 32 DistrictCourt....................................................................................... 33 Finance Department........................................................................... 39 Information Systems.......................................................41 FireDepartment.................................................................................. 46 Housing Commission.......................................................................... 54 Inspection Department....................................................................... 58 Zoning Board of Appeals......................................................... 62 Building Code Board of Appeals .............................................. 62 LawDepartment................................................................................. 63 Library Department & Commission..................................................... 72 Parks and Recreation Department & Commission ............................. 77 Planning Department & Commission .................................................. 88 Police Department and Emergency Preparedness ......................... 97 Public Works Department................................................................. 107 Public Service Division........................................................... 108 Engineering Division............................................................... 126 Traffic Commission........................................................................... 130 Treasurer.......................................................................................... 132 ASSESSING DEPARTMENT The 2017 State Equalized Valuation of the City Real and Personal Property was $4,669,397,790 which relates to the following statistics: CLASS PARCEL COUNT VALUATION Residential 37,770 3,337,874,210 Commercial 1,710 799,101,470 Industrial 397 231,517,700 Personal 4,379 300,904,410 4,669,397,790 In addition, valuation under the Special Acts provided total valuation of $76,219,400 as follows: IFT Real 24,162,700 Turbo/Brownfield/CFT 15,625,600 IFT Personal 36,431,100 76,219,400 All property appeared on the assessment roll at 50% of true cash value as mandated by State Law. Annual sales studies are conducted in order to determine market growth by neighborhood. The results of these studies are utilized to adjust area values to the required 50% of True Cash Value. The appraisal and maintenance of all residential field data is the responsibility of this department. Records for 79 new homes were created. Revisions to approximately 1,195 existing property record cards were made. Commercial and Industrial new buildings, alterations and additions numbered 210 and were reviewed for value for the 2017 assessment roll. We continued our residential canvass this spring, starting in April. We canvassed approximately 7,040 homes in the north tier of the City. We are in the process of entering the data collected from each property. This project will continue for the next year in order to complete the entire City. This completed project will bring the Assessing Department into compliance with the State Tax Commission guidelines. For 2017, there were 3,101 transfer affidavits processed by the department. Homesteads, rescissions, conditional rescissions and denial forms totaling 3,924 were entered. These forms are processed on a daily basis. The veterans' exemption qualifies persons who are totally disabled for a full property tax exemption each year. The current exemption total is 129. Lot splits and combinations are processed by this department. This office reviews petitioner's applications and departmental correspondence for compliance with city 1 ordinances and procedures. If a split is non -conforming, Council action will be required. Approximately 24 splits and combinations were completed in 2017. Of these, one required Council action. Michigan Tax Tribunal appeals were review and finalized. A total of 41 appeals were completed. Of this number, there were 28 full tribunal appeals. There were 13 small claim appeals; nine were residential and four were commercial properties. Approximately 4,400 personal property statements were processed for the 2017 assessment roll. A small business taxpayer exemption, which went into effect in 2014, allows businesses with an assessed value under $40,000 to not pay taxes if an affidavit was filed with our department. About 1,806 Form 5076 Affidavits were processed and accepted for 2017. As part of this Act, an exemption for Eligible Manufacturing Equipment began its 10 -year "phase out" in 2017 with the State calculating an Essential Service Assessment. For 2017, we had 187 Industrial businesses that filed and qualified with the State's requirements and monies will be distributed to the local communities for lost revenue in February 2018. BOARD OF REVIEW The December Board of Review meeting was held on Tuesday, December 13, 2016, in accordance with Section 211.53b of the General Property Tax Law of Michigan, to correct all mutual mistakes of fact and clerical errors. The Livonia City Council, on January 30, 2017 (CR#27-17), set the place and dates for the 2017 March Board of Review meetings as scheduled by the Assessor and notice was given and published in the local newspapers. The Board of Review meetings convened Tuesday, March 7, 2017, for a seven- day session of public hearings, which included one evening session. Members William Tancill, Andrew Lendrum and Vahan Nazarian were in attendance. The Board heard 92 taxpayer appeals and acted on 168 mail -in petitions. Determination notices were mailed on April 3, 2017. State law requires a July Board of Review meeting to correct clerical errors and mutual mistakes of fact. This meeting was held on Tuesday, July 18, 2017. 2 CITY CLERK This office is administered by the City Clerk, elected for a four-year term at an odd - year election conducted by the City of Livonia. The powers and duties of the City Clerk are set forth in the City Charter and statutes of the State of Michigan. The Clerk is assisted by a Deputy Clerk and a staff of six who are trained specialists in delivering a variety of services to the citizens of Livonia and several departments of the City administration, i.e.: (a) "The Clerk shall be clerk of the Council and shall attend all meetings of the Council and keep a permanent record of its meetings ..." This responsibility involves receiving all correspondence and communications filed with the Clerk for transmission to the Council., preparing official agendas for both Council Regular and Study Meetings; taking and transcribing complex minutes of all Council proceedings for the official journal as well as for all Public Hearings conducted by the Council as required by law; notification and publication of Notices and Public Hearings and Council proceedings in the official newspaper as designated by the City Council; preparation and forwarding of true copies of Council actions to the parties affected; maintaining the official record of all Ordinances enacted by legislative actions. FUNCTION STATISTICS: LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT City Council 2016 2017 Study Meetings 24 24 Regular Meetings 24 24 Special Meetings 0 1 Council Resolutions Recorded 451 417 Ordinances Adopted 25 25 Public Hearings Conducted 22 16 (b) "The Clerk shall perform such other duties as are required of that office by State or Federal law, the City Charter, the Council or Ordinances of the City." DEPARTMENT OF VITAL STATISTICS Required by State Statute to record and file a record of all deaths and births occurring within the City for subsequent transmittal to the State and County Department of Health and make available for certification copies of such records, as can be legally released. 3 VITAL STATISTICS (DECEMBER 2015-2016) 2016 2017 Births Recorded 947 736 Deaths Recorded 1604 1844 $140,832 $139,037 FEES COLLECTED (c) "The City Clerk shall issue and sign all licenses granted and shall register same." LICENSING During the fiscal year, this office of the City Clerk accepted and processed, etc., under Title 4 of the Livonia Code of Ordinances, the following licenses: TYPE Gas Stations, Dry Cleaners, Amusement Places, Solicitors, Vending Machines, Restaurants, Caterers, etc. FEES COLLECTED Garage, Basement, Rummage Sales FEES COLLECTED Pet Licenses (1 -Year) Pet Licenses (3 -Year) FEES COLLECTED Bicycle Licenses FEES COLLECTED 2016 436 $37,518.50 1443 $9,855.00 1971 277 $25,238.50 17 $51 2017 1074 $79,241.50 1480 $9,370.00 2681 553 $37,308.50 9 $30 (d) "The City Clerk shall receive for filing: zoning petitions, subdivision plats, security bonds, etc. Comprehensive files covering all phases of development of new subdivisions: from the Public Hearings of the City Planning Commission in proposed plats, to the filing of all bonds and payment of financial assurances established in the City Council's Master Bond Resolutions, to the final signatures of the City Clerk after the final plat approval is given by the Council." 12 NUMBER AND TYPE OF PETITIONS FILED (e) Publication and Legal Notices The City Clerk is responsible for the publication of the City Council's proceedings in the official newspaper of the City and the insertion of Public Notices required by law of Public Hearings and all Ordinances duly adopted. In addition, Ordinances are printed, collated and distributed to all departments and interested parties. A complete file in excess of 2,991 separate Ordinances is maintained, and the Livonia Code of Ordinances is continually updated, as amended, and on file in the City Clerk's office. (f) Duplicating and Mailing Figures 2016 2017 Zoning 8 7 Vacating 1 1 Miscellaneous (Waivers) 23 19 New Plats Authorized (Preliminary) 0 0 Final Plats 0 0 Extensions 0 0 (e) Publication and Legal Notices The City Clerk is responsible for the publication of the City Council's proceedings in the official newspaper of the City and the insertion of Public Notices required by law of Public Hearings and all Ordinances duly adopted. In addition, Ordinances are printed, collated and distributed to all departments and interested parties. A complete file in excess of 2,991 separate Ordinances is maintained, and the Livonia Code of Ordinances is continually updated, as amended, and on file in the City Clerk's office. (f) Duplicating and Mailing Figures The City Clerk's office produces copies of the following materials for meetings of the City Council. 2016 2017 Council Regular Agendas 1716 1776 Council Study Agendas 2016 2016 Special Regular Agendas - 74 Special Regular Minutes - 84 Council Regular Minutes 144 144 Council Study Minutes 192 Attorney Notes for Council Regular Meetings Synopsis of Regular Council Minutes 96 96 Council Public Hearing Notices 484 352 Public Hearing Minutes 484 352 *Tables indicate number of sets required per year for distribution for each activity; number of pages varies by event and is not included in total. MAILING FUNCTION All City Departments' outgoing mail is handled through mailing equipment in the City Clerk's office and the required postage in 2017 totaled $99,104.50. All incoming mail is handled daily by the Clerk's office and is distributed to the various departments of the City. 5 (g) Election Commission of Livonia (Authority - State Statute) The City Clerk presides as Chairperson of the three-member Election Commission consisting of the Clerk, Mayor and City Attorney, charged with the responsibility of conducting all elections within the City. The compensation of election personnel shall be determined in advance by the Election Commission. In any case where Election procedure is in doubt, the Election Commission shall prescribe the procedure to be followed. STATISTICS RELATING TO THIS FUNCTION 2016 2017 Elections Held in City 1 Pres. Primary 1 City General 1 School Special 1 State Primary 1 State General 2016 2017 New Registrations 6,899 5,224 Total Registered Voters 76,722 75,348 Change of Name 734 422 Change of Address 848 537 Cancellations 4,746 5,099 Registrations by Mail 797 205 Number of Absentee Ballots Issued 29,709 9,725 AV Applications Issued 29,709 9,725 Notices of Election Inspectors 795 160 Notice of Cancellation of Registration 467 489 Sale of Voter Registrations Lists 0.00 $35.50 * Beginning July 1, 2015, new FOIA laws restrict what can be charged for voter or any information. (h) Other Duties and Responsibilities of the Clerk The Clerk shall have power to administer all oaths required by State Law, the Charter and Ordinances of the City. The Clerk shall be custodian of the City Seal and shall affix it to all documents and instruments requiring the Seal, and shall attest the same. 0 The Clerk shall be custodian of all papers, documents and records pertaining to the City of Livonia, the custody of which is not otherwise provided for by the Charter. As custodian of records, in 2015 the Clerk purchased document storage software. Currently all Birth records, Death records, Council Regular Minutes, Public Hearing Minutes and Election Commission Minutes have been scanned and are searchable by text. Other various board and commission minutes have been partially scanned and saved. In 2015 the Clerkjoined the Michigan Centralized Death Registration System and the Michigan Centralized Birth Registration System and can now receive filings of death records electronically and issue State Certified Birth Certificates to the public. The Clerk's office has offered notary services to the public since 2011. In 2017, 69 documents were witnessed and notarized by the department, with fees of $540 collected. The Clerk shall give the proper officials of the City ample notices of expiration or termination of any official bonds, franchises, contracts or agreements. The Clerk shall examine and audit all accounts and claims against the City. In 2017, the Clerk examined, pre -audited and signed approximately 13,170 vouchers issued by the Department of Finance for transmittal to the City Treasurer. The Clerk shall possess and exercise the powers of a Township Clerk so far as the same are required to be performed within the City. The Clerk shall certify by signature all Ordinances and Resolutions enacted or passed by the City Council. The Clerk, as custodian of the cemeteries under City jurisdiction, is in charge of all burial procedures and in 2016 there were no authorized opening or closings at the cemeteries and no placement of veteran headstones. 7 CIVIL SERVICE DEPARTMENT REGULAR BUSINESS The Civil Service Commission held 12 regular meetings during fiscal year 2016- 17. LABOR RELATIONS The City and the Livonia Lieutenant and Sergeants Association (LLSA), the Livonia Police Officers Association (POAM), AFSCME Union Local 1917, and AFSCME Union Local 192, successfully negotiated and implemented three-year contract agreements. In addition, the City and the Livonia Police Officers Association - Police Service Aide Unit have negotiated and, as of November 30, 2017, are very close to reaching a three-year contract agreement. Several Labor -Management Committee meetings were held to resolve employee and/or union grievances or concerns filed by the AFSCME Union Local 192, the Livonia Police Officers Association, and the Livonia Fire Fighters Union. These committees consist of representatives of the Union and the City. In the event a grievance cannot be resolved at the committee level, the grievance procedure permits appeal to the Civil Service Commission and, if not resolved, through mediation and/or formal arbitration. PERSONNEL REVIEW COMMITTEE The Personnel Review Committee, comprised of the Human Resources Director, the Director of Finance, and the Director of Administrative Services, met 20 times during the year and reviewed and made 76 recommendations to the Mayor pertaining to all new hires, replacement personnel, and promotions. EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PROGRAMS Hospitalization -Medical Insurance Plans Effective March 1, 2017, the City's cap for annual contributions to active employee health insurance consistent with Public Act 152 was: • Single coverage - $6,344.80 • Two -person coverage - $13,268.93 • Family - $17,304.02 Effective March 1, 2017, the monthly premium share amounts for employees were: General employees Single Two Person / Family Community Blue 3 $ 42 $258 Blue Choice $110 $401 Community Blue 12 $ 35 $ 66 9 LFFU employees Community Blue 3 Blue Choice Community Blue 12 LLSA & Police Command Community Blue 3 Blue Choice Community Blue 12 LPOA employees Community Blue 3 Blue Choice Community Blue 12 Single Two Person / Fami $ 42 $270 $110 $471 $ 35 $ 56 Single Two Person / Fami $ 42 $269 $110 $475 $ 35 $ 52 Single Two Person / Family $ 42 $270 $110 $461 $35 $61 The annual Employee Health and Wellness Fair was held on four separate afternoons during January 2017 at various City locations including; Police Headquarters Training Room, Department of Public Works Administrative Conference Room, City Hall Fifth -Floor Gallery, and 16th District Court. Employees and retirees, along with their immediate family members, were encouraged to attend. Representatives from Blue Cross/Blue Shield (BCBS) hospitalization/medical insurance plans, sponsored by the City, were present to permit employees to review and compare plan provisions and obtain assistance with health care questions or issues. As of October 31, 2017 (the last available report from Blue Cross Blue Shield), the employee and retiree hospitalization/medical insurance enrollments are- (BC/BS) Traditional Plan 2 Retiree subscribers (Regular Coverage) 127 Retirees on Medicare 1 Retiree Contracts with Regular Coverage & Medicare Coverage (BC/BS) Preferred Plan 17 Retiree subscribers (Regular Coverage) 140 Retirees on Medicare 34 Retiree Contracts with Regular Coverage & Medicare Coverage Blue Cross/Blue Shield 144 Employee subscribers Blue Choice PPO 89 Retiree subscribers (Regular Coverage) 101 Retirees on Medicare 33 Retiree Contracts with Regular Coverage & Medicare Coverage Community Blue 2 19 Retiree subscribers (Regular Coverage) 28 Retirees on Medicare 4 Retiree Contracts with Regular Coverage & Medicare Coverage 9 Community Blue 3 188 Insurance Employee subscribers Number 68 Employees Retiree subscribers (Regular Coverage) $34,835,685.44 6 17 Retirees on Medicare Retirees @ $3,500 11 $ 458,500.00 Retiree Contracts with Regular Coverage & 271 $ 1,355,000.00 Medicare Coverage Community Blue 12 137 Employee subscribers 2 Retiree subscribers (Regular Coverage) A total of 78 full-time employees participated in the Opt -Out program as of March 1, 2017. The program has been modified to allow for employees to opt -out at the time of employment with a monthly stipend to begin the first of the month following 30 days of employment. All employee groups will be on board with the last of the groups (LPOA — Police Service Aide Unit — Unit B) expected to be on board before the 2018 Open Enrollment period. The stipend is equivalent to $1,000 over a 12 - month period and is in lieu of hospitalization/medical coverage. Life Insurance & Accidental Death & Dismemberment Plan The City of Livonia currently contracts for group life insurance with the Reliance Standard Life Insurance Company at the rate of 0.182 cents per $1,000 per month volume. Accidental Death and Dismemberment (AD&D) group insurance coverage is also provided by Reliance at a rate of 0.015 cents per $1,000 volume per month. Current Insurance Volumes During the fiscal year, a total of $85,153.72 in life insurance and AD&D premiums were paid to Reliance Standard Life Insurance Company. There were seven retiree death claims totaling $27,500. There was one employee death claim totaling $52,856. Weekly Disability Income Plan The City of Livonia is self-insured for the weekly disability income coverage. Effective December 1, 2016 through November 30, 2018, the disability claims are administered by York Risk Services. This benefit provides $250/week to disabled general full-time employees and $125/week to disabled part-time employees for up to 45 weeks; $125/week for disabled Police Dispatcher full-time employees for 45 weeks; $42/week for the first 12 weeks and $100/week for the 40 -week balance of 52 weeks for disabled police and fire employees; and $200/week for up to 45 weeks for District Court employees. The total premium paid to York Risk Services to administer the disability program was $10,125. 10 Insurance Number Amount Employees 589 $34,835,685.44 Retirees @ $3,000 17 $ 51,000.00 Retirees @ $3,500 131 $ 458,500.00 Retirees @ $5,000 271 $ 1,355,000.00 During the fiscal year, a total of $85,153.72 in life insurance and AD&D premiums were paid to Reliance Standard Life Insurance Company. There were seven retiree death claims totaling $27,500. There was one employee death claim totaling $52,856. Weekly Disability Income Plan The City of Livonia is self-insured for the weekly disability income coverage. Effective December 1, 2016 through November 30, 2018, the disability claims are administered by York Risk Services. This benefit provides $250/week to disabled general full-time employees and $125/week to disabled part-time employees for up to 45 weeks; $125/week for disabled Police Dispatcher full-time employees for 45 weeks; $42/week for the first 12 weeks and $100/week for the 40 -week balance of 52 weeks for disabled police and fire employees; and $200/week for up to 45 weeks for District Court employees. The total premium paid to York Risk Services to administer the disability program was $10,125. 10 There were nine weekly disability income claims paid to employees during the year. A total benefit of $20,030.06 was paid by this self-insured program. Optical Program The City offers an optical benefit program with three providers: Co -Op Optical, Fortney Eyecare Associates, and RxOptical, who have multiple area locations. Employee usage and costs incurred during the fiscal year at these centers or through the direct employee reimbursement option were: Safety Glasses 4 $ 172.00 Direct Employee Reimbursement 80 17,383.53 Co -Op Optical 22 1,592.00 Fortney Eyecare Associates 10 1,400.00 RxOptical 78 8,386.40 Total 194 $28,933.93 Dental Program All employee groups have a dental reimbursement program which includes an option for the employee to elect a direct payment to the dentist. The City provides an annual benefit of $850 per employee for all full-time employees ($425 for part- time employees) except for LPOA which provide an annual benefit of $800 per LPOA full-time employee and $400 per LPOA part-time employee (to be increased to $850 and $425, respectively, effective 12/01/17). A summary of the employee reimbursements and hardship advances during the fiscal year to date is: Number of Total Average Transactions Amount Paid Payment Reimbursement/Direct Payment 954 $292,131.90 $306.22 Dental reimbursement may also include payment for Dental Insurance premiums. LFFU members participate in a dental insurance program. The program is administered by the Union. Orthodontic Services General employees, Court employees, LFFU, LLSA and Police Command are eligible for 50% of the fees for orthodontic services for a lifetime maximum of $1,500 per family for full-time employees and $750 for part-time employees. Coverage is limited to the employee, spouse, and dependent children until the end of the year the dependent reaches age 19. LPOA employees are eligible for 50% of the fees for a lifetime maximum of $1,000 per family for full-time employees and $500 per family for part-time employees. 11 A summary of the orthodontic service claims received during the fiscal year is: Number of Claims Total Amount Paid Police/Fire 3 $ 3,075.00 General 7 $ 2,422.63 Total 10 $ 5,497.63 Employee Voluntary Benefit Program In October 2017, the City implemented a voluntary benefit program for all regular employees. The program provides employees an opportunity to participate in a supplemental benefit program, which currently includes Aflac coverage for accident, critical illness, and hospital indemnity. In addition, the City offers employees legal and identity theft protection through LegalShield/IDShield. Employee participation in any of the supplemental benefits is voluntary and the costs related to each program are employee paid, through payroll deduction. Tuition Reimbursement The Civil Service Department staff administers the AFSCME Union Local 192 (General Employee union) and the AFSCME Union Local 1917 (Supervisory and Technical Chapter) tuition reimbursement programs. Eleven members of Local 192 expended $6,456.87 of the maximum allocation of $20,000.00 during the fiscal year in 34 separate reimbursements. One member of the AFSCME Union Local 1917 expended $330 of the maximum allocation of $3,475 during the fiscal year in nine separate reimbursements. Clothing Voucher Program As a result of the ratification of the AFSCME Union Local 192 and AFSCME Union Local 1917 contracts, the clothing voucher program for clerical employees began in June 2017. Employees in clerical positions are entitled to a $100 clothing voucher to purchase department -approved apparel and the Senior Clerk is entitled to a $200 voucher each fiscal year. Fifty-two redeemed their voucher for a total of $5,159.65. Worker's Compensation Program At the meeting of November 14, 2016, City Council (Resolution #433-16) approved the City's self-insurance program for Workers' Compensation for the contract period December 1, 2016 through November 30, 2018, with York Risk Services for claims administration services for a total estimated premium cost of $42,000 in year one and $43,260 in year two. Further, City Council authorized a contract for the period of December 1, 2016 through November 30, 2018, with Midwest Employers Casualty Company to provide the City with excess insurance coverage when losses from any one claim reaches $750,000, for a total estimated premium cost of $128,189, subject to conditions. 12 The total paid on all claims through York Risk Services from December 1, 2016 through November 30, 2017, is $160,124.67. There were fifty-nine (59) new claims submitted during this period. The total paid on all claims through CompOne Administrators, Inc. from December 1, 2016 through November 30, 2017, is $244,622. These payments are for claims that started prior to December 1, 2009. The total paid on all claims includes weekly wage loss indemnity benefits, medical services, related legal, vocational rehabilitation and other related professional expenses. Employees receive treatment for work-related injuries or illness at Providence Occupational Health Partners. Unemployment Compensation Program The City of Livonia participates in the self-insured Michigan Municipal League Unemployment Compensation Group Account. The firm of Equifax is the service agent for the group account. The Civil Service Department responded to approximately 15 claims for unemployment benefits filed with the Michigan Employment Security Administration (MESA). Approximate charges for 2017 are $12,056.14. City Physician and Medical Clinics Pre-employment, return -to -work, and examinations and treatment are providE John Providence Corporate Health Servl provided medical services for Police and only for general employees. occupational injury/illness medical J by the authorized City Physician, St. ;es. Also, St. Mary Mercy Hospital has Fire personnel and emergency services One hundred fifty-seven regular employee and temporary employee pre- employment (full-time and part-time) examinations and 41 physicals for return -to - work examinations were conducted. T City's Consulting Psychologists, Dr. Lyle Danuloff, Ph.D. and Dr. Linda Forsberg, Ph.D., Psybus, PC, completed 34 psychological evaluations for New Public Safety employees. In addition, there were medical consultations regarding employee health and occupational safety matters and worker's compensation claims, including continuation of pre- employment auditory, TB and pulmonary function examinations for firefighter and police officer new hires in compliance with MIOSHA requirements. Alcohol and drug testing are coordinated in compliance with federal regulations for employees assigned to drive specific types of Department of Public Works vehicles. SAFETY A representative from Providence Hospital conducted Bloodborne Pathogens Training for the Department of Public Works staff. Building Maintenance employees attended one of the three training sessions. 13 Dr. Kenneth Wolf, Ph.D., with the help of the Civil Service Department, presented the Active Shooter Survival Seminar at Livonia City Hall. Two sessions were required due to the large number of online and telephone registrations. Over 400 individuals attended, including City employees, Livonia Public Schools personnel, and local area business representatives. This was the third time Dr. Wolf has presented this timely and informative seminar for the City of Livonia. SERVICE RECOGNITION PROGRAM Service recognition awards were awarded to 101 employees in fiscal year 2016- 17 - Level of Service Five Years Ten Years Fifteen Years Twenty Years Twenty -Five Years Thirty Years Thirty -Five Years Forty Years Total Service Awards Presented 27 33 15 14 4 6 0 2 101 APPLICANT RECRUITMENT The Civil Service Department has continued an affirmative recruitment program through newspaper advertisements in the Observer/Eccentric, Detroit News/Detroit Free Press, and notices to various colleges, training schools, MESA, handicapper rehabilitation services, and minority community-based organizations. The total number of all-inclusive advertisements published during fiscal year 2016- 17 were: Detroit News — 10 and Livonia Observer — 10, as well as several professional association publications, the City of Livonia Spring and Fall News, and Cable Channel 8. EQUAL EMPLOYMENT/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION In accordance with the Affirmative Action policy adopted by the Civil Service Commission, Civil Service staff continued its efforts to monitor and revise position descriptions that are job related. Proposed qualifications for each new open - competitive examination were reviewed by the respective department staff and the Civil Service Commission in order to establish prerequisites that are appropriate to the positions being filled. EXAMINATION PROGRAM The Civil Service staff continued to prepare and administer open -competitive and promotional examinations as requested by City Department Heads. During fiscal year 2016-17, a total of 4,603 applications were received for regular full-time, regular part-time, temporary, and seasonal positions. 14 In response to the number of open positions in various departments, the Civil Service Department is currently running continuous examinations for the positions of Firefighter, Police Officer, Police Service Aide, and Custodian. TRAINING During the 2016-17, the Civil Service department sponsored several employee training activities and meeting opportunities. Throughout the year, the department coordinated one-on-one meetings each quarter with Empower Retirement for the 401(a) and the 457(b) plans. Mr. Moises Flores continues to be the City's representative from Empower Retirement. EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM During 2016-2017, eight employees and one family member received crisis intervention and individual counseling sessions. Each employee is provided up to five sessions, for a total of $400 per individual. In addition, EAP providers have been called upon to assist departments with group conflict resolution meetings, with services totaling $2,560. The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program has mirrored their behavioral health -counseling program to the City's EAP and uses many of the same referral network of providers. A total of $4,060 in CDBG funds has been expended during 2016-17. In addition, counseling services were provided for 11 low-income residents who received a total of 48 visits. BOARD OF TRUSTEES The following is a report on the activities and accomplishments of the Board of Trustees of the Livonia Employees Retirement System for the period December 1, 2016, through November 30, 2017- i M 114 017: iM114 akd;jWil ZI a) The Board of Trustees held twelve (12) regular meetings and two (2) special meetings during this period. b) As of November 30, 2017, the Defined Benefit Plan had 568 retirees or surviving spouses plus 16 Alternate Payees under Eligible Domestic Relations Orders (EDROs) for a total of 584 individuals receiving pension checks. Twenty-four (24) City retirees/surviving spouses passed away during fiscal year 2016-2017. The gross total pension payroll fiscal year to date is $17,490,930.76 through November 2017. 15 c) From January through June 2017, Mr. David Sowerby of Loomis Sayles and Company advised the Board on investments for the Defined Benefit Plan. In June, Mr. Joseph Beauparlant of Loomis Sayles assumed the Investment Manager role and responsibilities to the Board and uses discretionary power regarding investments subject to confirmation by the Board. The Board approved investment transactions by Loomis Sayles and Company at regular meetings. The Defined Benefit portion of the fund managed by Loomis Sayles had a market value of $212,308,975 as of October 31, 2017. d) In March 2017, the Board reviewed the 64th annual Actuarial Valuation as of November 30, 2016, for the Livonia Employees Retirement System, prepared by the Board's Actuary, Rodwan Consulting Company. The Plan covered 569 retirees, 14 deferred participants, and 95 active employees, for a total of 678. The Actuary reported that the accrued actuarial condition of the Retirement System is "good." Continuation of this condition is dependent upon future investment experience and receipt of required contributions. e) The funded ratio of actuarial value of assets to actuarial accrued liability for the Retirement System Defined Benefit Plan was 103.2%. f) Mr. Gary Wyniemko, Sr. Consultant of NEPC, LLC, provided the consulting and performance evaluation services to the Board for the month of December 2016. The Board interviewed multiple Investment Consultant firms and chose to partner with Morgan Stanley Graystone for their Investment Consultant needs, beginning January 1, 2017. g) The Board has a $10,000,000 investment in a Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT) managed by Seminole Asset Strategies (SAS). Staff and Board members attend SAS investment update meetings quarterly. Total interest earnings on the SAS REIT from December 1, 2016, through October 31, 2017, were $500,000. h) The Board has a global real estate investment with Cohen & Steers Capital Management Inc., in a Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT), separately managed account. The account market value reported as of September 30, 2017, was $7,838,426. i) The Board voted to invest with Alidade Capital and ValStone Partners for $6,000,000 each. 16 Alidade Capital is a real estate private equity fund manager and Registered Investment Advisor that currently manages four (4) real estate value -add funds. With a commitment to asset management, Alidade Capital preserves and creates value through its value -add investments. ValStone Partners is a registered investment advisor with the SEC and is a private equity firm. ValStone Partners coordinates the investment and management activities of a series of private equity funds. j) Exercising due diligence, the Board heard presentations from Loomis Sayles and Ancora Partners regarding the Small Cap and SMID investments. The Board voted to invest with Ancora Partners, in their Small/Mid Cap Core Equity strategy, via the Retirement System's investment of $10,000,000. k) The total Defined Benefit fund value was $212,308,975 as of October 31, 2017. 1) Thirty-nine (39) requests for retirement estimates under the Defined Benefit Plan were processed by the Civil Service Department staff. m) Members of the Board and staff continued their required education as fiduciaries by attending the Michigan Association of Public Employees Retirement System (MAPERS) Conferences at Grand Traverse Resort, Acme, Michigan, from May 20-23, 2017; and at Shanty Creek Resort, Bellaire, Michigan, from September 16-19, 2017. 2. DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLAN a) The Board of Trustees held twelve (12) regular meetings during this period. b) The Defined Contribution Plan Administrator continues to be Empower Retirement Services, formerly known as Great West Retirement Services. c) The Defined Contribution fund had a total account ending balance of $69,653,659.94 as of November 30, 2017, with 613 active participants. d) As of November 30, 2017, a total of 192 employees have retired under the Defined Contribution Retirement Plan. e) The consultant for the Defined Contribution Plan is AndCo Consulting. 17 3. LIVONIA RETIREE HEALTH AND DISABILITY BENEFITS PLAN (VEBA) a) The Board of Trustees held twelve (12) regular meetings during this period. b) Mr. Sowerby advised the Board on investments for the VEBA until June 2017. In June, Mr. Beauparlant assumed the role of Investment Manager for the VEBA. The VEBA had a market value of $107,340,973 as of October 31, 2017. c) The Board voted to add an Investment Consultant to the VEBA plan. Mr. John Krakowiak, Morgan Stanley Graystone Consulting, was selected to be the Investment Consultant to the VEBA plan. d) Exercising due diligence, the Board heard presentations from Loomis Sayles and Ancora Partners regarding the Small Cap and SMID strategies. The Board voted to invest with Ancora Partners in their Small/Mid Cap Core Equity strategy, via the VEBA's investment of $5,000,000. Note: The VEBA was established at the recommendation of the former Actuary to the Board of Trustees, Gabriel, Roeder, Smith and Co., for purposes of placing in a tax-free trust, monies to pay for post -employment hospitalization -medical insurance benefits for members of the DB and the DC Plans, as well as to provide separate funding for DC Plan member disability retirement benefits. e) In March 2017, the Board reviewed the 19th annual Actuarial Valuation as of November 30, 2016, for the VEBA, as prepared by the Board's Actuary, Rodwan Consulting Company. The amortization periods adopted by the Board of Trustees for the funding purposes of this Plan are 30 years for disability benefits and for health insurance benefits. In previous years health insurance benefits had an amortization period of 40 years. The Governmental Accounting Standards Board Statements No. 43 and 45 relate to financial reporting for Postemployment Benefit Plans Other Than Pension Plans (OPEB). One of the items to be reported in the financial statements is the annual required contribution (ARC) of the employer. The maximum amortization period is 30 years. f) As of last Actuarial Valuation dated November 30, 2016, the fund had actuarial computed assets of $98,722,868 and the funded ratio of actuarial value of assets to actuarial accrued liability for the City of Livonia Retiree Health and Disability Benefits Plan and Trust (VEBA) in was 61.2% as of November 30, 2016. The unfunded liability is $62,503,402. g) The Board voted to invest with Alidade Capital and ValStone Partners for $3,000,000 each. Alidade Capital is a real estate private equity fund manager and Registered Investment Advisor that currently manages four (4) real estate value -add funds. With a commitment to asset management, Alidade Capital preserves and creates value through its value -add investments. ValStone Partners is a registered investment advisor with the SEC, and is a private equity firm. ValStone Partners coordinates the investment and management activities of a series of private equity funds. h) The City's post -65 prescription drug processor continued to be Retiree Rx Care. The City converted the over -65 retiree drug program to a Part D program. This eliminated the requirement to obtain an Actuarial Valuation that stated our prescription program was Part D compliant, saving this plan $5,000 per year. This also permitted the City to get immediate savings from Social Security Retiree Drug subsidy program and low-income programs. i) The City's prescription drug processor continues to be AMWINS Rx for all pre -65 retirees, spouses and dependents. DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY RESOURCES RESIDENT ASSISTANCE • Emergency Help — Emergency Service Program funds assist low-income households with food cards when the emergency is proven and funds/cards are available. We are also an active member with the Livonia Cares organization. • Temporary Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP): o Wayne County food was distributed monthly for a total of 3,353 households, equaling 4,557 residents. This amount of food distributed equates to $62,359, at no cost to the City. o 12 volunteers worked 648 hours. o The District Court Work Program also provided community service for 15 probationers a month, providing 1,170 work program hours. They helped unload the delivery trucks, sorted the food items, 19 o assisted our residents one-on-one with picking up their food, and loaded food into their cars. o We also partnered with the Forgotten Harvest Food Rescue organization, which provided our low-income residents with 89,341 pounds of fresh fruits, vegetables, dairy, bakery and meat items. • Non -Food Pantry Referrals — 960 referral forms were issued to TEFAP- qualified residents for boxes of assorted personal hygiene and household goods/supplies supplied by Holy Cross Lutheran Church and Newburgh Methodist Church. • Holiday Assistance — Over 159 TEFAP-qualified households were referred to local sponsors for holiday food assistance. The Community Resources Department also works closely with the Goodfellows organization to ensure that no child/family is without a Christmas. PUBLICATIONS City Newsletter — Three (3) issues published and mailed to approximately 43,000 residences and businesses. Dearborn Lithograph in Livonia will continue to publish for the next two years. COMMUNITY GARDENS • Cash collected for Garden Plots $5,810 • Plots available for planting 243 and 18 corn row plots • Plots purchased 200 • Plots purchased by residents 119 at $25 • Plots purchased by non-residents 81 at $35 In January of 2017, the gardeners from 2016 were contacted to pay for their plots if they wished to continue gardening in 2017. Open enrollment became available to everyone the first week of April. The gardens were staked by the 16th District Court Probation Department in May. The Department of Public Works delivered wood chips and compost. DPW plowed the garden in the spring and in the fall. This was a dry summer so wet gardens were not a problem. Richard, Garden Supervisor, was available three days a week during the time the gardens were open to assist gardeners with any issues. Six wheelbarrows and 30 hoses were purchased this year to replace worn out items. In September, we held the Annual Gardeners' Picnic, which was well attended. On October 14th, we closed the gardens. The District Court probationers cleaned up the gardens. LIVONIA YOUTH ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 2017 Referrals: 23 New Cases — (13 male and 10 female) Carry Over Cases from 2016: 40 Total Cases served in 2017: 63 2017 Cases originated from the following referral agencies: • Livonia Police Department — 19 • Surrounding Police Departments (Westland, Novi, Farmington) — 4 20 Youth Assistance also recorded: • 465 hours of volunteer work service by Youth Assistance clients. • 33 youth received instruction in the "Project Impact" (social living skills) group, equaling 396 hours of instruction. • 21 youth attended the County Jail tour. • 10 drug tests were administered. • 10 youth used the walk-in service for the Youth Employment Resource Center. The website was visited 14,471 times and 116,343 pages were viewed. • Wayne County grants from 1/10th Mill Fund — $52,195 through September 2019. LIVONIA COMMUNITY TRANSIT Community Resources has the administrative responsibility of providing transportation for Livonia senior citizens and disabled residents. This program is called Livonia Community Transit. Transportation is available, with a reservation, seven days a week on a first-come, first -serve basis. Livonia Community Transit also provides "To Work" service for people coming to Livonia using the SMART (Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transit) and D -DOT (Detroit Department of Transportation) bus systems. This service picks up riders from hubs located at Millennium Park and near Botsford Hospital and then takes these riders to pre- determined drop-off locations. "To Work" riders are picked up in the morning at 6 a.m., 7 a.m. and 8 a.m., and again in the afternoon for the return trip at 4 p.m., 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. Contracts for Municipal Credits funds, Specialized Service funds, as well as the FTA 5310 Call for Projects program, are all administered by SMART and prepared by the Community Resources staff. The Livonia Community Transit system has a fleet of 17 vehicles (a combination of small buses and vans). The vehicles are driven by 25 part-time bus drivers, all with Commercial Drivers Licenses. The Transit office is supervised by a Grant Manager and four (4) other part-time employees that help coordinate the drivers and the route schedules. The system provided approximately 55,300 rides. These rides totaled over 258,000 miles and approximately 20,600 service hours. Revenue from bus fares totaled approximately $70,000. Livonia Transit provides daily, door-to-door transportation for the students of Services to Enhance Potential (STEP) and the Personal Enrichment Program (PEP), which are programs are for disabled adults. Livonia Community Transit also transports qualifying veterans to the VA Hospital in Ann Arbor. Livonia Transit picks up Livonia veterans at their home and takes them to Meijer in Westland where they can board a shuttle. The VA shuttle departs Westland three times a day Monday through Friday at 9:05 a.m., 1:15 p.m. and 5:10 p.m. The cost is $2 each way. 21 Livonia Transit continues to use RouteMatch state-of-the-art technology and professional services to better serve the Livonia Transit passengers and streamline our ability to serve customers. Technology includes scheduling and routing software, on -board tablets for paperless manifests, and reporting features. LIVONIA CABLE TELEVISION COMMISSION In 2017, Livonia Television (LTV) provided viewers on Spectrum, AT&T U -verse, WOW and Comcast (business customers only) with high-quality programming, promoting the City's programs, services and quality of life. LTV staff consistently utilized cable television as a delivery format, as well as the internet for LIVE and on -demand streaming videos on the City's website, and regular updates to social media outlets such as Facebook and Twitter. Two new series programs debuted in 2017 — Small Business Spotlight and Livonia Construction Update. Both being short -format shows (five minutes and under), they have received positive feedback from numerous viewers online. More 150 new programs were produced in 2017. LTV also provided recording and editing services to the Livonia Public Library during their first hosting of a TEDx presentation event. As mentioned above, Comcast is now a service provider in Livonia for businesses. The City expects to receive its first Comcast Franchise Fee/PEG checks in early December 2017. Comcast chose to duplicate the Franchise Fee and PEG rates used by Spectrum and WOW in its Franchise Agreement with Livonia. An important upgrade for LTV was completed in 2017 — the complete overhaul of the control room in the City Hall auditorium. All equipment is now digital and HD. In 2017, LTV staff changes include Frank Molner replacing Paul Sutherland, and LTV intern Alex Westphal was hired as a part-time CO-OP, the first in LTV history. Frank and Alex consistently bring creativity and attention to detail to their work. Those positive traits are shared among the entire LTV staff. LTV grabbed three top honors in national competitions in 2017, in the NATOA Government Programming Competition and in the ACM Hometown Media Competition. As the WOW buildout in Livonia came to an end in September, the number of complaints logged from residents' emails and phone calls decreased. Most of them received earlier in the year dealt with WOW contractor issues. The LTV and Community Resources staff now receive very few "cable" complaints. In general, feedback from residents about Spectrum service is negative. The small amount of feedback received concerning WOW service is positive. Unfortunately, representatives from the service providers no longer attend the quarterly Cable Commission meetings to provide updates on new product offerings or resolutions to customer issues. 22 LIVONIA ARTS COMMISSION The Livonia Arts Commission held its meetings on the fourth Tuesday of each month in the Mayor's Conference Room at Livonia City Hall. The 2017 officers were Chairperson: Brian Duggan; Vice Chairperson: Dan Spurling; Secretary: Carrie Spurling. The Commission eliminated the office of Treasurer and relies on the financial reports submitted by liaison Chris Swish. Active members include; Virginia Bosak, Donna Eno, Grace Karczewski, Robert Khzouz, John Rogin, Helen Moore, Jerry Valentine, Pam Valentine, Karen Voran, and Lindsey Spence. Karen Voran resigned in 2017. Robert Khzouz and John Rogin were not reappointed. Budgeted Free -Admission Activities: The Commission appropriated $1,800 to co-sponsor the monthly Noontime Concerts held at the Civic Center Library. The Livonia Symphony Orchestra started the Music From the Heart concert series on June 15th this year performing at the Jack Kirksey Recreation Center. We continued the series with eight other performances on the steps of City Hall starting on July 13th and ending on August 31St. This year a bounce house, along with children's characters, were added during the concerts to promote the family - friendly nature of the event. Community Choice Credit Union donated $500 towards the printing of the MFTH postcards. They also provided hot dogs, chips and water to our citizens during one of our concerts. Commission Sponsored Community Activities: We provided a $500 grant to Visual Arts Association of Livonia. We also planned to give out two $1,000 scholarships; however, due to lack of participation, we had to cancel them. Commission Donations: Livonia Symphony Orchestra, $2,000; Greenmead's Garden Walk; $50; and Greenmead's Christmas Walk, $50. The Commission held its 20th Annual Fine Arts Exhibition in October. The juror, Eugene Clark, selected the artwork that was displayed in the Fine Arts Gallery at the Bennett Civic Center Library. Seventy-five (75) applicants submitted over 255 entries. The application fees netted $3,465 in revenue. Works from regional artists and art groups including the Livonia Public Schools and Clarenceville Public Schools were displayed monthly in the Robert and Janet Bennett Civic Center Library Gallery and in the City Hall Atrium. Commission Fundraiser: The commission came up with an idea to host an outdoor event, Red, White & BBQ. The commission partnered with the City and proceeds were shared with Greenmead. 23 Commission Sponsored Receptions: The Fine Arts Exhibition reception was held in October in the Bennett Civic Center Library Atrium. Individual artist receptions were held monthly in the Fine Arts Library Gallery. The Arts Commission also had a table at Livonia's Good Old -Fashioned Neighborhood Corn Roast 2017, providing brochures and small handouts. The Arts Commission maintains a group of pages on the city website, a Facebook site, and a youtube.com/artsinlivonia.com account and livoniaarts.org domain. The Arts Commission mission statement is: "To create, promote, develop, sponsor, sustain, facilitate, and further the Arts within the City of Livonia." The Arts Commission continues community access to art experiences, opportunities, and improving community awareness. LIVONIA COMMISSION ON CHILDREN AND YOUTH In 2017, the Livonia Commission on Children and Youth continued the administration of the Livonia Youth/Spree Scholarship Program sponsored by the Livonia Anniversary Committee. The Commission distributed brochures advertising the scholarships to the local high schools and libraries. The scholarship information was presented in the City Winter -Spring Newsletter, on Livonia Television, in the Livonia Observer, on the City's website and through the Department of Community Resources. This year we received 17 applications. We awarded one $2,000 scholarship. Commissioners Dan Spurling, Jessica Claypoole, and John Grzebik reviewed and selected the most deserving recipient. The Scholarship award was presented during the Livonia Spree Pancake breakfast in June. The 2017 Arbor Day Project in April was coordinated with the cooperation of both the Livonia Public Schools and the Clarenceville Public Schools. Arborvitae Tree seedlings were packaged and distributed to all fourth-grade classes in the two school systems. Global ReLeaf and the Youth Commission shared the cost of supplying more than 1,800 trees. Commissioner Ken Balcoff chaired the committee this year. The Youth Commission continues to monetarily support the "Senior All Night Parties" or a Senior Breakfast for the 2017 graduates. The Livonia High Schools, Clarenceville High School and Ladywood High School requested a $300 donation toward their parties, which were held on school grounds. In 2017, Honor Certificates were presented to all graduating seniors who had achieved a 3.0 grade point average or higher from Clarenceville, Ladywood, Churchill, Franklin and Stevenson High Schools. Commissioner Dan Spurling and John Grzebik spearheaded this project. 24 Acknowledging that back -to -school is a costly time of year for low-income parents, the Livonia Youth Commission held its annual school supply program for the sixth consecutive year. The Commission distributed more than 189 backpacks filled with school supplies to low-income families whose names were provided by the Livonia Goodfellows. Donations were received from the Livonia Anniversary Committee, Livonia Kids and Families, PEP Center, Walgreens, Sri Shirdi Saibaba Temple, Community Alliance Credit Union, Kohl's Care Program, City employee jeans days, and several Livonia families. The commission also purchased school supplies with their funds. Commissioner Dan Spurling was primarily responsible for this project and was assisted by other Commissioners, Chris Swish of Community Resources, City staff, Kohl's employees, Livonia Police Service Aides, and other volunteers. Emergency stickers, which are to be placed on the bedroom windows of children, senior citizens or handicapped individuals, continue to be available at City Hall as well as from the Livonia Fire Department. Information for obtaining these stickers is shown on Livonia Television. The Youth Commission reached out to the low-income youth by hosting a holiday party on two consecutive Saturdays, Nov. 11 and 18, for families who registered with the Livonia Goodfellows. While Goodfellows representatives interviewed the parents, the children were invited to enjoy snacks and crafts. They were given mittens/gloves, scarves and hats. The children were also given an opportunity to have their faces painted and to visit with and have their photograph taken with Santa at the Senior Center. Commissioners Dan Spurling and Jessica Claypoole headed this project and were aided by Commissioners, Livonia Police Reserves, Valentino's Pizzeria, Jimmy John's, Community Resources, Youth Assistance Program, the Spurling family and numerous volunteers. This seven -member commission meets quarterly on the first Tuesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. on the third -floor of Livonia City Hall. Commission members are: Ken Balcoff, Jessica Claypoole, Laura Duggan, George Gostias, John Grzebik, Nadia Ideh and Dan Spurling Commission Officers for 2017-2018: • Dan Spurling, Chairperson • Jessie Claypoole, Vice Chairperson • John Grzebik, Secretary LIVONIA HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMISSION HISTORIC DISTRICT RESOURCES: The Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) continued to meet the first Wednesday of the month at the Blue House at Greenmead in Livonia, Michigan. The Commission had four official meetings but elected to continue to meet for planning purposes every month except July. Due to the nature of Historic 25 Preservation Commission, official meetings may be added with the necessary approvals to accommodate owners of Historic Properties requiring approvals. This year again many requests for headstone information, historic house information and local family information were fielded by the Commissioners. GREENMEAD: HPC input recommendations, comments and support to the relocation of the Perrinville school house from Nankin Mills to Greenmead. Various other projects at Greenmead were discussed and approved as required to update the village, Hill House and farm buildings. HPC commissioners continue to volunteer at Greenmead events (Flea Markets, Highland Games, Sunday Tours, Teas and office work) to assist Historic Commission commissioners. This year, we also assisted at the Hill House open house. HISTORIC CEMETERIES: NEWBURG, LIVONIA CENTER (UNION SOCIETY), BRIGGS (UNION SOCIETY), CLARENCEVILLE Historic Preservation along with the Historical Commission, Michigan 17th Re - enactors and Livonia Historical Society planned and held a cemetery walk at Clarenceville Cemetery with profits of about $500 for cemetery repairs. We offered discounts to students, lowering the price and our profits and we had about 70 people attend the walk, slightly less than last year. Over 20 volunteers and re - enactors donated their time. Proceeds from the cemetery walk went towards the up -righting and repairing of stones at Livonia's historic cemeteries. The HPC allocated $2,000 of their budget of the Historic Preservation Budget was allocated to Headstone repair. Carter's Cemetery Preservation made all repairs. In addition, $1,600 of the cemetery repair fund was allocated to repair headstones. All the historic cemeteries in the city require much additional needed maintenance. There continues to be considerable maintenance required on the stones associated with the lawn cutting practices, age, weather and vandalism. The grass cutters are using large machines that cause damage to the headstones, including some recently repaired. The HPC plans to address these issues as funds are raised. Due to declining attendance, the Commission is suspending the tours indefinitely and is looking for alternate sources to fund cemetery repairs. In the future, the Commission would like the budget to support the needs of the historic cemeteries in Livonia including grass cutting and maintenance. Due to budget constraints, the commission tabled the discussion for another year. 26 KATOR / SHAY HOUSE This home is again for sale. The Commission is trying to determine if the potential structural and exterior envelope issues have been resolved. The commission has not made any progress pursuing the issues of this property with the owners. COMMISSIONERS This year, the commission welcomed a new commissioner, Cindy Immonen. All commissioners are active in the commission and meetings. OFFICER ELECTION Election of officers was held at the November voting meeting, results as follows: • Chairperson — Kathleen Johnson-Bartshe • Vice Chairperson — Kathleen Glynn • Secretary — Danielle Lewon • Treasurer — James Kline CERTIFIED LOCAL GOVERNMENT The commission continues to work towards becoming a Certified Local Government, which would allow the HPC to apply for matching funds for additional headstone repair. HISTORIC PROPERTY RESURVEY The commission continues to discuss where to start and what to survey in Livonia. We are working with the State to determine parameters. A laptop computer has been appropriated for this purpose. LIVONIA HISTORICAL COMMISSION The officers for 2017 were: • Barbara Mansfield — Chairman • Nancy Frye — Vice Chairman • Mary Cambridge — Treasurer • Stephanie Miner- Secretary They work along with Commissioners Deanna Brown, Mike Marihugh, Gary Pritchard, Sandi Pritchard, and Patty Trojan to oversee many activities at Greenmead Historical Park throughout the year. ACTIVITIES / EVENTS: During the 2017 year, the following special events were accomplished from January through December, with the events taking place in the Village, Clarenceville Cemetery, Alexander Blue House, Hill House, Meeting House and other buildings: • General meetings of the Livonia Historical Society —January, March. May Banquet, August Picnic, September and November. • A variety of Teas throughout the year, i.e., Highland Tea, Christmas Tea, etc. 27 • Happily Ever After — April. • Previously -Enjoyed Jewelry Sale — April. • 1950 Coffee Klatch - April . • Livonia Garden Club Plant Sharing — May. • Volunteer Orientation — April. • Flea Market - June and September. • The Motor City Irish Fest — June. • One Day Trunk Sale — July. • Fun Run and Pancake Toss — July. • The Red, White and BBQ (new event) — July • The St. Andrew's Society Highland Games — August • The AMC Car Show — August • The Livonia Cemetery Walk at the Clarenceville Cemetery — September • The Civil War: Guns'N' Gowns—A Living History Event—September • Celebration of the Hill House — October • Halloween Walk for children — October • Treasures from Grandma's Attic — November • Special Walks: Garden Walk in June and the Christmas Walk in December The Village has been open for tours on weekdays for special groups and for the public on 16 weekends throughout June, July, August, September, October and December. Many of the events were accomplished with volunteer members of Greenmead, the Friends of Greenmead, Questors, Livonia Historical Society, Livonia Preservation Commission, the 17th Michigan Civil War Members, Greenmead Gardeners, and Livonia Garden Club. ARTIFACTS: Accessioning and cataloging the artifact collection is an on-going process conducted by Kathie Glynn and Danielle Lewon. r,ARnFN.- The Hill House Gardens and Village Gardens were cared for by volunteer gardeners under the direction of Jan Whitcomb. The Greenhouse near the Hill House has been a joint project with the Friends of Greenmead and the Livonia Garden Club for restoration. This project is on-going through 2018. COMMUNITY USE OF GREENMEAD: There have been several events held by community members and friends for special occasions at Greenmead. Our Newburg Church continues to be a very W popular venue for weddings with several also renting the Alexander Blue House to host receptions. The Meeting House has been positively received as a rental facility for small group events and rehearsal dinners. The Alexander Blue House has been utilized by several groups from Livonia for business meetings, seminars, staff training, baby showers, bridal showers, anniversary and birthday celebrations, graduation celebrations, memorial recognition programs, and meetings of the Preservation Commission, Historical Commission and Historical Society. MAINTENANCE AND RESTORATION: During the year, many buildings in the village tour schedule received a thorough cleaning of rooms and windows inside and outside. All buildings have been reviewed for maintenance and future needs. The Bungalow and Hill House have had extensive staging. Throughout 2017, physical, mechanical, and labor work by many City of Livonia departments has proven valuable and is appreciated. Outside contractors have also assisted with building needs. On October 25, 2016, the Nankin Mills one -room school was moved to the Greenmead site and is still a work in progress. The foundation walls have been built up to the school and work continues to prepare for utility set-up. The next steps and plans for use will continue to be discussed by commissioners. The parking lot in front of the Church and Alexander Blue House was paved this year, with the gracious assistance of Mayor Wright and the Engineering Department. Annual Report submitted by — Barbara Mansfield, Chairman Livonia Historical Commission Members of the Livonia Historical Commission: Deanna Brown Barbara Mansfield Gary Pritchard Mary Cambridge Michael Marihugh Sandy Pritchard Nancy Frye Stephanie Miner Patricia Trojan GREENMEAD Historical Properties Community Resources has administrative responsibility for the Historical and Historic Preservation Commissions. The reports pertaining to these activities can be found under the Historical Commission and Historic Preservation Commission. 29 The Community Resources staff at Greenmead: • Conducted day-to-day operations of Greenmead. • Maintained Historical Commission records including minutes, volunteer hours, caretaker reports, contracts and budgets. • Coordinated weekday tours, Sunday tours, Gift Shop operations, Newburg School usage, as well as Newburg Church, Hill House Grounds, Alexander Blue House, and Meeting House rentals. Property usage included festivals, weddings, meetings, luncheons, memorials, classes, corporate events, filming, educational opportunities, private parties and photo backdrop for photographers and family groups. • Implemented Historical Commission resolutions. • Assisted with the development, planning and implementation of 27 special events, fundraisers and community projects sponsored by the Historical Commission, Preservation Commission, Friends of Greenmead, Livonia Historical Society, Motor City Irish Fest Committee, Ultimate Fun Productions, St. Andrew's Society of Detroit, Boy Scouts, 17th Michigan Civil War Re -enactors, A.M.C. Car Club and Garden Club. • Held a new Volunteer Orientation program this year at the Simmons Hill House; five potential new volunteers attended. • Worked with DPW to define and prioritize maintenance work in the Farm Complex, Historic Village and the Alexander Blue House. • Coordinated with outside contractors: o Meeting House — Gutters installed. o Alexander Blue's Office — replaced cedar shingle roof. o Newburg Church — repaired ceiling paint, cedar shingles on vestibule. o Newburg School — interior paint repairs, repaired roof leak and replaced cedar shingles. o Geer Store — removed existing chimney and rebuilt with proper brackets. o Farm Hand's House — new exterior door installed. o Screen doors installed at Geer Store, Shaw, and Kingsley. o Hand rails installed at Geer Store and Hill. o Nankin Mills Schoolhouse (Perrinville School) was moved to Greenmead on Oct. 25, 2016. The contractor dug the hole for the foundation, moved the school house over the hole onto wooden posts, and the foundation mason work was underway in December 2017. • Worked shorthanded for over half of the year. As of October 30, the staff is back to three full-time employees. • Accepted the Livonia Foundation Grant of $7,000, which will be used to rebuild the greenhouse near the pond. • Accepted cash donations totaling $6,583.83 from the Livonia Garden Club, memorials, Questers, and individuals. • Coordinated 134 private party rentals of the Church, Meeting House, and Alexander Blue House. New rentals this year at the Simmons/Hill House Museum. • Assisted and coordinated the Garden & Christmas Walk activity with the Friends for the Development of Greenmead. 30 • Conducted school field trips, funded partially by the bus expense reimbursement program of the Livonia Historical Society. • Coordinated Greenmead's volunteer program, published issues of the Volunteer Voice Newsletter, and scheduled volunteers for tours and special events. Volunteers this year donated nearly 3,000 hours of time and talent to Greenmead. • Supplied information for the City Newsletter magazine. • Maintained the Greenmead page on the city website. • Provided work site and supervision for community service probationers and community service projects. • Hosted several professional and volunteer gatherings such as a Volunteer Reception, Volunteer Season Opener, Historical Society Picnic, Meetings and Banquet, Police Reserves Picnic, City of Livonia Marketing meeting, Quester events and Community Garden Annual Picnic. • Provided a project site for the Master Gardener Program and support for the volunteer gardeners' program. • Utilized the Gov.delivery system to send digital newsletters to subscribers. • Provided a site for Madonna University film project and community service class. • Provided a site for the Boy Scouts summer camp. • Coordinated with Livonia Television for "In Season," by Nate Rockwell, promoting events and rentals at Greenmead. LIVONIA COMMISSION ON AGING The Commission continues to publish the "Heritage" as part of the City News. It is distributed to all homes in the City of Livonia. Commission funds are used. In April, the Commission helped organize the annual Senior Center Consumer Fair. In June, the Commission co-sponsored the annual Senior Citizens Picnic held at the Senior Center. The Commission paid for the Box Lunches and assisted with BINGO and the Share the Wealth drawing. In October, the Commission provided funds for the annual OktoberFest, and purchased supplies, centerpieces and pies for the Thanksgiving and Holiday/Christmas Parties. At its November 2017 meeting, pursuant to its by-laws, the Commission held its annual election. The following officers were elected to one-year terms (commencing December 1, 2017), by an approval vote of 5-0, with 2 absent. • Chairperson: Josephine Smith • Vice Chairperson: Dolores Smith • Treasurer: Florence Yeomans • Secretary: Marcia Heads 31 SENIOR CITIZEN PROGRAM CIVIC PARK SENIOR CENTER Participation in activities during 2017 totaled approximately 251,984 seniors. 13,402 congregate meals were served (including Special Lunches), 25,260 Home - Delivered Meals were sent out. Activities included: health screening, educational classes, support groups, fitness classes, cards and games, art & crafts, senior sports, Computer Lab, Medicare counseling, senior picnic, senior resource fair, craft show, holiday parties, Detroit Symphony Orchestra Trips, Farmer's Market Trips, etc. Volunteers logged 8,000 hours. Focus HOPE: 420 participants. SUPPORT SERVICES, GIFTS, GRANTS, AND TRANSPORTATION C.D.B.G. and Community Transit funds totaled $48,000 Donations in the amount of $23,925 were received. Federal and State grants and donations provided: • 11,508 one-way rides through the senior transportation program • 25,260 meals were delivered by volunteers to home bound seniors LIVONIA HUMAN RELATIONS COMMISSION The Livonia Human Relations Commission held its scheduled meetings for 2017 on Feb. 9, May 4, Sept. 14, and Nov. 9, in the Robert and Janet Bennett Civic Center Library meeting rooms. In addition, an unscheduled meeting was held on April 24, at a Panera's Restaurant in Livonia. The 2017 officers started as: • Elaine Livingway, Chairperson • Sandy Teeter, First Chairperson • Julie Kain, Secretary Other Commissioners were Dillon Breen, Harold Klee, James Roye, Caroline Grech, Kevin Aoun, and new Commissioner Richard Glover. The officers changed mid -year to: • Sandy Teeter, Chairperson • Elaine Livingway, First Chairperson • Caroline Grech, Secretary The Human Relations Commission was formed in 1966 as a direct response to a racial incident in a neighboring community. In 1980 the Commission created a subcommittee on Women and in 1988 added "handicappers" to its list of concerns. In other words, the HRC is continually evolving to meet the needs of the Community. In 2017, the list continues to expand and contract, as if giving birth to the ever- changing needs of society. Human Trafficking has been on the Commission's radar for several years, and in January, which is slated as "National Human 32 Trafficking Awareness" month, the Commission lent its support to an event hosted by Senator Judy Emmons at the Livonia City Hall. On January 16, the Commission attended the annual Martin Luther King, Jr., program hosted by Madonna University. The HRC has been a co-sponsor for years with the University and continually looks for new ways to reach our youth with his message of peace. The Commission continued to be proactive in the community by attending the State of the City address by Mayor Wright in March and the Livonia Community Prayer Breakfast in May. In April, the Commission received a joint grant of $1,750 with the Livonia Arts Commission from the Livonia Community Foundation. This grant was slated for the performance of "Common Chord," two musicians that deliver a powerful message of love, friendship, and tolerance, "Music that Matters." The performance was on May 24th and was a huge success. In May, the Commission welcomed Cynthia Spruill, a resident from a neighboring community who was discriminately treated at a store in Livonia by another patron. In September, the Commission welcomed Cheryl Kasparek, a Livonia citizen concerned with the racial climate in this country. More than a hundred copies of "A Color of His Own" by Leo Lionni, a book geared toward kindergarten through grade 2, was purchased by the Commission and will be handed out at the Youth Commission Holiday Party. The HRC continues to change to meet the needs of our society. We're excited with the plans we have for 2018. Stay tuned. 16th JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT NEW CASES FILED (Dec. 2016 — Nov. 2017) CRIMINAL 1. Felony 378 2. Ordinance Misdemeanor 2,566 3. Statute Misdemeanor 88 Total Criminal 3,032 33 TRAFFIC 4. Felony Drunk Driving 5. Felony Traffic 6. Ordinance Drunk Driving 7. Statute Drunk Driving 22 11 Total Felony Traffic 282 10 Total Drunk Driving 8. Ordinance Traffic Misdemeanors 2,119 9. Statute Traffic Misdemeanors 274 10. Statute Civil Infractions 11. Ordinance Civil Infractions MISCELLANEOUS Total Traffic Misd 2,231 25,436 Total Civil Infractions 12. Criminal/Traffic Juries Selected 5 13. Criminal/Traffic Cases Perfected to Appeal 0 Total Miscellaneous NON -TRAFFIC CIVIL INFRACTIONS & PARKING 14. Ordinance Parking 802 15. Ordinance Non -Traffic 79 16. Statute Parking 4 Total Parking 17. Statute Non -Traffic 22 Total Non -Traffic CIVIL DIVISION LAWSUITS 18. General Civil 1,634 19. General Civil Miscellaneous 4 20. Small Claims 295 21. Landlord Tenant 331 22. Land Contract Summary Proceedings 10 22a. Foreclosure 24 Total Civil Division 34 33 292 2,393 27,667 5 885 0 2,298 MISCELLANEOUS 23. Civil Division Juries Selected 1 24. Marriages 40 25. Motions 1,125 26. Discovery/Debtor Exams 98 27. Garnishments 4,080 28. Orders to Seize/Orders of Eviction 131 Total Miscellaneous PROBATION 5,475 1. Number or Placements on Probation 1,814 2. Pre -Sentence Investigation Reports 878 3. Violation of Probation Warrants Issued 1,085 4. Show Cause Summons Issued 2,344 5. Probation Cases Closed 1,938 6. Number of Open Probation Cases 1,495 7. Total Number of Days Worked on the Voluntary Work Program (in lieu of jail) 7,238 COURT-APPOINTED ATTORNEY FEES Paid out $59,051.90 The court has collected 78.6% Collected back $46,404.84 of the CA fees paid. 2012-2013 Projects/Updates 1. The 16th District Court continues to operate in a highly efficient manner with 98% clearance rates on all misdemeanors and a 99% clearance rate for all civil infractions, with the statewide court average being 97% and 98%. The court's clearance rate for all general civil cases is at 100%, with the statewide court average being 99%. Regarding felonies, the 16th District Court has a 92% clearance rate, as compared to the statewide average of 74%. This analysis was conducted by the State Court Administrative Office and published on June 1, 2017. These rates show that we are meeting or exceeding the Supreme Court's case processing guidelines. 2. In November of 2014, the 16th District Court launched a new collections effort by initiating State Income Tax Garnishments. Since the inception of the project, the court has collected $1,150,015.12. This year, the 16th District Court received authorization from the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office to process garnishments against all unpaid and delinquent fines, fees and costs for criminal proceedings and civil infractions arising from state statute and Wayne County ordinance violations. As a result, in November, the 16th District Court was able to issue a total of 7,808 garnishments combined, the highest number issued in the past four years. 35 3. The 16th District Court continues to seek reimbursement for inmate housing per the Inmate Reimbursement Act 88 of 2006, whereby the municipality can seek reimbursement from any person who is, or was, a convicted inmate and served jail, to pay for the expenses incurred by the municipality in relation to the incarceration of that person. Uncollected accounts are forwarded to the law department. 4. The Court has also been successful at collecting 78.6% of the court- appointed fees that are provided to the defendants that request a court appointed attorney. In collaboration with our funding unit and the Livonia Police Department, the Michigan Indigent Defense Compliance (MIDC) plan was submitted to the MIDC Commission. The compliance plan consists of the City's plan to comply with the first four approved minimum standards for indigent criminal defense. These standards include training and education of attorneys, initial interview between the attorney and client in local custody, independent investigation by experts and investigators, and counsel at first appearance and all critical stages of the case. 5. Since 2006, the 16th District Court has developed specialty courts for both Drug and Sobriety participants. The primary goal is to monitor and rehabilitate high-risk offenders with substance abuse problems while reducing crime and the cost of incarceration. Our Court focused on targeting substance abuse and addiction through intervention, treatment and offender accountability. Under strict supervision, eligible participants are placed on intensive supervision for up to 24 months and ordered to comply with their court-ordered requirements including substance abuse counseling and testing, as well as life skill development. This program is funded by the Michigan Drug Court Grant Program (MDCGP), which helps fund the operation of the program. We have also collaborated with other specialty courts such as Mental Health and Veterans Court for placement of eligible participants into their programs from our jurisdiction as well as accepting transfers into our program. This year, the 16th District Court complied with the new provisional requirements for Adult Sobriety Courts and our staff participated in the certification process training offered by the State Court Administrative office. Since the inception of the program in 2006, the 16th District Court Sobriety Court had 369 participants and 166 graduates. More than 81,000 drug and alcohol tests have been administered with 79,000 of them being negative for illicit drugs or alcohol. The State Court Administrative Office performance measures analysis show that recidivism rates for 2016 for Livonia's Sobriety Court was 8% 36 within two years of admission which compares favorably to the statewide recidivism rate of 10% for both alcohol or drug convictions. 6. The 16th District Court Work Program has continued to carry out various projects throughout the city. There were 7,238 days of work program service completed this year, which amounts to 57,904 community service hours supervised by the probation departments. This program has saved the taxpayers over $217,140 in jail housing costs, since most of the participants in the program are serving these days in lieu of jail. Some of the projects are completed on an ongoing basis and provide much-needed support. Some of the major projects are- a. Plymouth Road Authority — Maintenance along Plymouth Road from Inkster to Eckles Roads inclusive of edging sidewalks, sweeping brick pavers, trash removal, and seasonal maintenance, such as weeding perennial beds, trimming shrubs and snow removal. b. Annual Livonia Spree — Set-up, tear down and cleanup of the grounds before and after completion of the event. c. The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP) — Unloading commodity food for low-income families. d. Community Greenmead Garden Program — Preparation, planting and harvesting of produce, which is then donated to feed those in need. Final cleanup at the end of the harvest season. e. Wilson Barn — Grounds maintenance of the barn; assistance with the Annual Pumpkin Fest; and cleanup of other regular events. f. City Parks — Maintenance of all city parks, such as raking leaves, picking up litter and painting benches. g. Friends of the Library — Loading and unloading of books for the regular Book Sales. h. Livonia Housing Commission — Assistance with removal of abandoned belongings at city -owned family properties. i. Youth Commission — Assistance with moving inventory out of storage for annual events, such as Backpack programs. j. Churches — Assistance with seasonal grounds cleanup of numerous churches. k. Flower Basket Beautification Project — The court installed flower baskets on lamp brackets along 160 light posts on Five Mile Road and Farmington Road. The work program maintained and watered the beautiful baskets. This project has received positive feedback from many Livonia residents. I. Christmas Decorations Project — The work program placed holiday decorations along Five Mile Road and Farmington Road. 7. In a continuing effort to provide access to our services, the court continues to offer daytime and evening reporting for probationers Monday through 37 Thursday, using our 31 Volunteer Probation Officers. This program has been in existence since 1967 and continues to play an integral part in the operations of the probation department and the court, as we oversee 1,814 open cases this year. 8. In November of 2014, the 16th District Court began conducting substance abuse and assessment services at the probation department. The NEEDS assessment is a tool used to match a probationer with the appropriate substance abuse and mental health treatment services. The defendants are initially assessed on multiple problem areas (alcohol use, drug use, medical, psychological, family/social, legal, employment, etc.) so that the Court can refer them for the proper level of care with significantly improved client outcomes. The other advantages include speedier sentencing and immediate placement into proper level of care. The cost for the assessments is collected at the court and forwarded to our funding unit. This year, the court submitted $18,285 to the funding unit by conducting the assessments in house. 9. The court has also worked in improving efficiency and implementing new security enhancements and technological advancements. This year, the court applied for the Risk Avoidance Program (RAP)/Court Compliance Safety project with the Michigan Municipal Risk Management Authority (MMRMA). As a result, the membership committee authorized funding in the amount of $10,000 for security enhancements. Our funding unit, the City of Livonia, approved an in-kind match of funds, allowing for an upgrade of the existing cameras, installation of new monitors at the security station, and additional cameras throughout the building. The Court replaced the AS -400 server that was over 12 years old. A new enhancement that was offered by the State Court Administrative Office, the Electronic Docket Display URL feature, was also installed in the lobby of the courthouse as well as the 16th District Court's website. With this feature, the daily docket is now displayed live in the courthouse and available online on our website. The docket display lists the defendant's name, case number, and the courtroom where the hearing is scheduled. It does not disclose offense types or any other information. 10. The court also launched a Court Innovations program new on April 1, 2016. This online traffic review program allows citizens meeting certain criteria to dispute and resolve a citation online and receive amended charges that may carry less penalties. This program allows the magistrate and judges to resolve citations online. Since launching this new application, 2,846 citations have been resolved online. On the average, 133 traffic cases are resolved each month online. Additionally, 95% of online traffic cases were resolved and all fines and costs were paid in full within 30 days from the date the traffic offense was issued and with 2.6 days as the average time W from the online request to the decision and final disposition being made. It should be noted that 85% of the online citations were resolved online, with only 13% of offers being rejected and 2% of citations being in pending status. The goal of this feature is to allow access to the Court online while at the same time making sure that citizens get a fair opportunity to have their concerns addressed without spending time going to court. It is a great alternative for citizens and a time saver for the court as well. 11. Perhaps our most significant accomplishment over the years has been our unwavering commitment to the efficient use of public resources. Over the past year, the Judges and the staff of the 16th District Court have focused on maintaining a high standard of public service by increasing productivity through internal operational and procedural improvements. The staff at the 16th District Court has been active in cross training within the departments, allowing for flexibility in allocating personnel wherever needed due to unfilled positions, vacations, sick leave and other circumstances. Our annual public satisfaction surveys that are analyzed by SCAO indicated that 92% of our users agreed that they were treated with courtesy and respect by the court staff and 84% of court users agreed that the judge/magistrate treated everyone with courtesy and respect. The survey had 304 respondents. The court continues to seek ways to uphold the highest standards of public service and to increase the public's understanding of the administration of justice. As a result, we have trained volunteer greeters who are available daily to greet and direct the public during the morning docket and answer their questions and concerns. FINANCE DEPARTMENT The Department of Finance consists of Accounting, Management Information Systems, Water and Sewer Usage Billing, and the Division of Budget and Purchasing with a total staff of 22 people. The Director of Finance serves as administrative assistant to the Mayor in financial matters and is under the direct supervision of the Mayor. The function of the Department of Finance includes: • Supervision over the administration of the financial affairs of the City. • Keeping of accounts and financial records of the City and all departments, commissions and agencies of the City government. • Maintenance of payroll records for all City employees. • Preparation of checks for all financial obligations of the City. • Billing and collection of over 160,000 water and sewer bills. • Responsibility for all computerized reporting and budget analysis for City Departments. • Responsibility for evaluating and recommending computer hardware and software systems City-wide. 39 • Preparation of the annual budget for the Mayor. • Taking of bids for all major purchases made by the City. • Responding to City Council questions and providing additional reports and information as requested by Council. • The Finance Director serves on a three-person Personnel Review Committee, which is responsible for review and evaluation of the hiring, placement and replacement of all employees for the City. • Performs Treasurer function for the Plymouth Road Development Authority. • Membership on the Community Development Block Grant Committee. • Responsible for risk management of casualty and liability, worker's compensation and medical insurance for the City and is the City's representative to the Michigan Municipal Risk Management Authority (M M RMA). • Representation at over 50 meetings of the City Council. • Preparation of all debt issued by City. • Responsible for investment of City funds in interest earning accounts in accordance with State law. • Management of City -owned properties leased to third parties. BUDGET -PURCHASING The Budget -Purchasing office is under the supervision and direction of the Director of Finance. The Budget -Purchasing activity processed a total of 11,998 requisitions for the purchase of goods and services for the City of Livonia. A total of 484 supply orders and printing requests were also filled for City Departments. ACCOUNTING The volume of the Accounting Division activity is listed by comparative figures for the past two years: FISCAL YEAR ENDED NOVEMBER 30 2016 2017 General Fund & Other Fund Payables Checks 15,282 13,170 Payroll Items 30,682 30,826 Journal Entries 7,600 8,189 Retirement Checks (Payroll and Payables) 8,415 8,452 Accounts Receivable Invoices: False Alarms 814 Rescue Runs 6,468 Other 1,205 Water Bills Mailed 163,743 Water Bills Paid by EFT 18,387 W 748 6,297 1,172 164,821 18,558 Temporarily idle General Fund cash was invested in Certificates of Deposit and daily savings deposits, resulting in a total interest earned of $128,320 or 0.0023% of City General Fund Revenue. SPECIAL PROJECTS 1. The Finance Department played a key role in meeting the state requirements under the City, Village and Township Revenue Sharing (CVTRS) program, enabling the City to qualify for $880,000 in revenue sharing funds. 2. The Finance Department continued to work with City Council and the Mayor's Office to maintain the City's excellent bond ratings, which currently are rated AA3 at Moody's and AA at Standard and Poor's. Because of these excellent bond ratings, more people will invest in City of Livonia bonds, resulting in more competitive bidding from brokerage houses. Savings will continue into the future for the City due to these ratings. 3. In 2017, the City refunded the Recreation MBA bond issue at a lower interest rate. The result will be debt service savings of $1,750,000 over the remaining life of the bonds. 4. The Finance Department initiated a conversion of all DTE mercury vapor streetlights to LED, which will result in a savings of $282,000 per year and a 1.4 year payback on the conversion cost. 5. The City of Livonia audit was completed and, once again, the City's auditors found no significant audit adjustments. 6. The Finance Department participated in several cooperative bids with surrounding communities that resulted in more competitive bids and reduced costs to the City. INFORMATION SYSTEMS DEPARTMENT The Information Systems Department is responsible for the computer hardware and software used by the City. The IS Department assists other City Departments in evaluating, selecting and implementing computer systems. It also sets the standards for City computer systems. The Information Systems Director is appointed by the Mayor and reports directly to the Finance Director. The staff of the Information Systems Department consists of five (5) employees. The staff is made up by the Director, one System Analyst II, two Computer Administrator II, and one part-time Computer Administrator I. The Information Systems Department has four primary areas of responsibility. These are Computer and Network Support, Application Software Support and End User Support, Website and Internet and Geographic Information Systems. 41 COMPUTER AND NETWORK SUPPORT The IS Department maintains the following hardware: y&*1NMy&*1[my&*1Vl Windows 2008/2012/2016 Servers 28 25 30 Physical Servers 13 13 10 Virtual Servers 22 17 26 Personal Computers 340 340 403 Tablets & Smartphones 24 62 89 We also support 48 network switches (34 logical switches), 9 firewalls and 3 network routers. We also replaced 94 computers this year to keep our computer fleet current and reliable. We did a major data center infrastructure upgrade. We replaced the 5 -year-old host servers for our server virtualization with new current servers. With modern servers, we reduced our host servers from 3 to 2. At the same time, we replaced our two aging Storage Area Network (SAN) devices that provided 21 TB of capacity with a new Dell/EMC Unity SAN. The new SAN utilizes solid state disk drives making it approximately 10 times faster than our old unit and increased our capacity to 30 TB. These upgrades brought some needed performance improvements and allowed us to virtualize our largest servers. This new equipment is more energy efficient and reduces the heat output in our data center. We also replaced our data backup solution with a newer product. As part of this solution, we are now placing an encrypted copy of our backup data into the cloud for offsite recovery in case of a disaster. Previously, we were storing the offsite data in another building on the City campus. A major project for us this year was incorporating the Library Staff Network of 50 computers, one server and their users into the city network. This included the Civic Center Library and both branch libraries. This allows the City Information Systems Department to provide the maintenance and support on these computers and increases the security on them. We did a significant network upgrade at Greenmead Historic Village this year. We installed network cabling in conduit between the Blue House, the Meeting House, and Hinbern. We also replaced the Firewall and added additional Wi-Fi capabilities at these three buildings. We worked with the 16th District Court to connect their security cameras to the City Avigilon system. Their old video recorders had become unreliable and was also difficult to access. The new system can be accessed by Livonia Police, if required. :, We also installed a new router provided by the State of Michigan Courts to provide secure connections between the 16th District Court and the State of Michigan Courts. This new connection increased the speeds significantly and decreased the costs incurred by the Michigan Courts. The IS Department provided support on work order requests: FYI 2015 FYI 2016 FYI 2017 Opened 1,899 1,570 1,392 Closed 1,902 1,571 1,393 APPLICATION SOFTWARE SUPPORT Working with the Livonia Police Department and Emergency Preparedness, we acquired, installed and implemented the Lynx Employee Notification System. This system allows authorized personnel to broadcast a message to the City computers warning of things like weather alerts to potentially things like an active shooter. This system allows us to quickly distribute information to every computer by either department, building or across the city. Currently the system is operational, but we hope to do more customization for some of the departments to support their operations. To better defend the City computer networks and data, we began an aggressive campaign on Cyber Security Awareness. All city employees (other than Public Safety) who have access to computers were offered short courses in Cyber Security. Response from the employees has been very good and we have heard multiple reports that the training has helped them avoid problems. We also conducted some test phishing campaigns to measure our readiness. The initial testing came back with a 23.5% click rate, after the training was offered we saw that rate drop to range of 3.9% to 5.5%, which is a significant reduction in our risk. This year we installed two digital signs in the lobby of City Hall. These signs work with a cloud -based solution and allow the Marketing and Communications Manager and the Mayor's office to promote the city and its activities to City Hall visitors. WEBSITE AND INTERNET The Information Systems Department also manages the City Website (http-//www.ci.livonia.mi.us/http://www.cityoflivonia.net)), which continues to find new uses and grow in usage. We updated the City website with the following items: • We developed two new blogs on our website to improve communications. They were LTown Business Insider (Economic Development) and Around Livonia (Marketing/Communications). • We developed and implemented a new approval process for calendar items and announcements on the website. These items are now reviewed prior to publication to make sure that we are providing quality products. 43 • We now allow pictures to be submitted for requests to add events to our community calendar. • The Information Systems, Parks and Recreation and Arts Commission web pages were redesigned. Much of this redesign was done to reduce the number of pages by combining like things, thus making the pages easier to use. • We did some redesign on the home page of the City website to make it easier for mobile device use. • We added five additional simple website (URL) addresses to provide easy access to information. The new sites are www.greenmead.us, www.livoniaparks.org, www.livoniaarts.org, www.livonia4vets.us, and www.livoniawater.org. • Our staff developed an online process to support registrations for the Life Remodeled project. Other web activities: • Our City Facebook page grew from 4,511 likes to 6,707. Our City Twitter account has grown to 2,418 followers, in just six months since it was launched. Website statistics include: GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS The Information Systems Department also manages, operates and maintains a Geographic Information System (GIS) to help manage its maps, apps and spatially referenced data. 2017 GIS Accomplishments Online Map Services —We have maintained and updated the maps and apps for General City Map, Park Finder, Transit System Pickup Locations, Trash Pickup Day, Zoning Map and Voter Polling Place Map. These maps are compatible with mobile devices (smartphone and tablets). We also created the Leaf Pickup 2017 Map application to inform and help the residents during the leaf pickup program. FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 Number of Page Views 2,527,699 2,136,751 1,827,075 Computer vs Mobile Usage of FY 2015 FYI 2016 FYI 2017 website Desktop Computer Access 53.53% 48.50% 44.33% Mobile Access 46.47% 51.50% 55.67% Smartphone Access 36.79% 43.25% 47.69% Tablet Access 9.68% 8.25% 7.98% The Department also provides e-mail and Internet access to City Employees. FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 Number of E-mail accounts 261 295 296 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS The Information Systems Department also manages, operates and maintains a Geographic Information System (GIS) to help manage its maps, apps and spatially referenced data. 2017 GIS Accomplishments Online Map Services —We have maintained and updated the maps and apps for General City Map, Park Finder, Transit System Pickup Locations, Trash Pickup Day, Zoning Map and Voter Polling Place Map. These maps are compatible with mobile devices (smartphone and tablets). We also created the Leaf Pickup 2017 Map application to inform and help the residents during the leaf pickup program. The map allowed DPW to mark quarter section segments as not completed, pending cycle 1, completed cycle 1, pending cycle 2 and completed cycle 2. The previous map was viewed 2,703 times during the leaf pickup season 2016. For the winter season, the Snow Emergency App is ready for use by our residents and DPW. The Snow Emergency App will allow DPW to mark quarter section segments as Not Completed/No Parking in Roadway or Completed/Parking Restrictions Lifted. Also, we have created a completely new app for internal use, Livonia Damage Survey GeoForm App, which will help Livonia Police Department capture the damage estimated and to report to State and FEMA. A new WebApp was developed for Livonia Public Schools, to help the residents easily search and find the schools in their area based on their location. Database Maintenance — We have continued our weekly maintenance schedule with the GIS during 2017. Our GIS database is under SDE configuration control. Editing of our various data layers is done by GIS users within the City. The established procedure calls for all editing to be done to a "personal" version of the GIS database. These edits are then pushed up to a DRAFT version of the database where they are inspected and verified. Once the DRAFT version has been verified edits are then pushed up to the DEFAULT version of the database for general use. This procedure has worked very well and insures that the GIS is continuously updated in a systematic fashion. Starting with 2017, the Cityworks maps will be updated on a weekly basis. This will help DPW and the field workers to have the latest information available on their mobile devices. This year, we rolled out tablets and smart phones to DPW workers to use in the field. Mapping Support — During 2017, the GIS has continued to support mapping activities for numerous City departments, including the Assessing department (generating 144 tax assessing maps plus various other maps), measured the parcel "frontage" for all commercial parcels in the City, generated numerous maps for the Housing Department depicting City -owned homes along with Silver Village, Mac Towers, and Newburgh Village, Parks and Recreation, Police and Fire Department. In addition, we continually maintain our set of quarter section tax maps (144), address maps (144), zoning maps (144), land use maps (144) and various City maps (city street maps, subdivisions, voter precincts, etc.). A completely new set of maps has been produced for Livonia Fire Department. User Support — In the spring of 2017 we upgraded our GIS system to the most recent version - ArcGIS 10.5 (Basic, Standard and Advance) licenses. This includes the desktop and server's licenses. Also, this year we replaced our GeoConnector software (no longer supported at ArcGIS 10.5 or above) with FME (Feature Manipulation Engine) software. FME is 45 a platform that makes simple the connections of hundreds of systems, transform data in unlimited ways, and automate workflows. Awards — This year, we were nominated and earned the IMAGIN's GIS for Everyone Award 2017, which is presented to an organization that seeks to make GIS data or analysis accessible to other organizations and/or to the public and/or to GIS organizations that strive to disseminate and share data making spatial data available to everyone. LIVONIA FIRE & RESCUE During the fiscal year 2017, Livonia Fire & Rescue responded to 10,062 incidents, with 86% involving emergency medical services, and fire -related responses accounting for 14%. The following statistical breakdowns reflect the departmental activity for the current fiscal year (11/1/16-11/1/17). Incidents Emergency Medical 8,936 Fire 366 Fire (other) 1,211 Total 10,513 For the Fire Incidents (other) category, carbon monoxide alarms accounted for 104 of the responses, 540 were false fire alarm calls and 319 were downed -wire incidents. In comparison to last year, Emergency Medical runs are up 3% and Fire Runs are up 20%, while Fire (other) was same. Overall runs are up 5%. FIRE PREVENTION Throughout the year, in addition to the related activities listed below, this Division is responsible for updating technical knowledge, maintaining electronic and paper records, maintaining job efficiency and state certification for the department's Fire Inspectors. This is accomplished by attending numerous seminars, job-related schools and other continuing education programs. These schools would include, but are not limited to, Schoolcraft College, the National Fire Academy, Michigan State Police Arson School, Michigan Fire Inspectors Conferences, Metro Detroit Fire Inspectors Society, Michigan Arson Prevention Committee, Oakland Macomb Fire Inspectors, and the various International Association of Arson Investigators (I.A.A.I.) schools and seminars. These classes and seminars provide continuing educations credits that are vital in maintaining our Fire Inspector Certification. EN Inspections Although not all-encompassing, the following categories reflect the majority of inspections conducted by the Fire Prevention Division: Advice 140 History File 17 Alarm 58 Life Safety 9 Carnival/Spree 6 Liquor License 13 City License 77 Re -Inspections 623 Complaints 52 (Alarms-94,Cnst-318, Other -32, Suppression -147) Construction 798 Re -Occupancy 15 False Alarms 42 Site Plan/Preliminary Plan 37 Fire Inspection 18 System Report Deficiency 146 Fireworks 4 Temporary Structures 6 IMi��iL'1(i Plan Reviews Alarm 64 Site Plan 37 Construction 165 Fire Suppression 75 Total 341 The above plan review totals reflect the number of projects received/assigned in the Fire Prevention Office and do not include the actual number of inspections made. Multiple site visits are required when inspecting various fire alarm, suppression or structural systems to ensure compliance with the adopted codes and standards installation practices. A conservative estimate of site visits needed to complete a project would be four inspections. More complex jobs would require additional inspections, in some instances 10-20 site visits. Several large projects were completed or are near completion at this time. Completed projects include: Amazon, Masco Headquarters, Marycrest Nursing Home, Resident Dormitory Madonna Collage, Consumers Energy Office, Ford Transmission, renovation of the GM Engine Facility, Livonia Storage, Ashley Capitol projects, Hampton Inn, Holiday Inn Express, Zeal C.U., Roush, EQS Logistics and many others. McLaren Performance, Bill Brown Ford, Embassy Suites, Key Plastics, Laurel Park renovation and Schoolcraft College Soccer Dome Facility. Many more smaller projects are not listed. In Progress projects include: Ashley Capitol projects, two buildings totaling over 1.5 million sq. feet, Clover Self Storage, Holiday Inn, Madonna Residential Housing, Zeal C.U., Roush, Autumnwood Nursing Home, Ford ANTPC Building, 47 Livonia Corporate Tower, BJ's Restaurant, Republic National Distribution, Welcome Center Madonna Collage, QCI Logistics and many others. The Fire Marshal and Fire Inspectors regularly go to the fire stations and review false alarms with the station officers. This allows the Fire Prevention Division to address those locations that are having multiple false alarms. Dialogue with the suppression personnel gives the inspection division a second avenue for finding and correcting building deficiencies. We are also members of Wayne County Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) and Michigan Critical Management System (MI -CIMS). This Division has started the residential Knox Box program along with other community risk -reduction programs; we also attend community events and open houses. This division also provides fire investigations for determination of origin and cause. Whenever a question arises from a fire officer that a fire may not have started accidentally, we are requested to respond. Also, any large loss or fatal fires are also examined and documented. The Fire Prevention Office responded to approximately 21 fires in 2017. Nearly 30% of these fires required extensive documentation and follow-up varying from simple photography to exhaustive research and interviews. Youth Fire Setter Project: After identifying deficiencies in the current program, a new program was developed. The new approach utilizes a structured interview plan, "risk identification" scoring techniques, referral partnership with University of Michigan Straight Talk program and participation in the Yfires.com national reporting system. The first utilization of the program involved a 12 year old who was involved in fire play at his school. Subsequent interviews, utilizing the new scoring system, identified a risk pattern of behavior requiring intervention. Currently the student is enrolled in the U -M Straight Talk program and is actively being counseled. All feedback from U -M with regard to the new program approach has been positive. MAINTENANCE DIVISION The Livonia Fire & Rescue Maintenance Division is comprised of one Fire Apparatus Supervisor, one Fire Equipment Mechanic and one Mechanic Trainee who are responsible for specification writing, ordering, care, maintenance and repair of all mechanized and related fire, rescue and paramedic equipment. The division provides firefighters, Livonia citizens and visitors to Livonia with safe and reliable ambulance, rescue and firefighting vehicles and related equipment. EN This year the responsibilities of the Maintenance Division included the following: • Completed 589 work order requests. • Inspected pumpers, rescue vehicles, aerial tower, administrative cars, USAR trailer, WWC Hazmat trailer, Hazmat trucks as well as all equipment on each vehicle on a semi-annual and annual basis. • Annual Pump Tests on all Fire Pumps. • Annual Ground ladder test of all ladders. • Annual testing of all air packs and masks. • Continue to work with neighboring cities to come up with universal specifications for replacement Squads in an attempt to keep costs down. • Received new Engines #1 and #4 from Halt Fire. Mounted equipment and prepared Engines to be placed in service. • In coordination with the Training Division, instructed Firefighter and E.M.T.D.'s on the operational requirements of vehicles and aided in training exercises, when necessary. • Responded to major fires to assist the department in set-up of equipment, filling of SCBA bottles, repair and refueling of vehicles. • Provided assistance, as needed, to neighboring fire departments and members of Western Wayne Mutual Aid Association. • Built new ladder test stands. • Assisted the following Project Managers: • SCBA Officer— ordering parts, repairing SCBA air packs, as well as placing new air packs in service and removing obsolete air packs out of service. Yearly testing of air packs and masks. • Hose Officer — specification writing; ordering and mounting of nozzles, adapters, and hose; and hose testing. • Building Maintenance Officer — repair of vehicle electrical and air line drops. • Apparatus Officer — Two new pumpers Eng 1- 4. Mounted loose equipment, Radio's, headsets and new Knox box's and make ready for service. Ordering mounts for new equipment/hand tools. Ordering new tools and repairing other ones. Preparing 3 old Engines for disposal. Remove decals and all other mounted equipment. Making sure they are ready to go to auction. • EMT Officer — installation of ALS equipment. • Communications Officer — mounting hand held prep radio vehicle chargers and installation of new radio and complete computer systems for ALS and relocation of some radios in pumpers, and repair of same. • Public Relations Committee — equipment. • Work with Project Manager, Building Maintenance for addition of apparatus work area for Station 6. Additional work in moving emergency generator and storage building and equipment to allow for building expansion. Help with contractors for building addition of Apparatus repair bays by moving equipment and answering questions. Build pallet racks and storage area in new addition. Start making a parts inventory. New Employee hired from DPW as Fire Mechanic Trainee Position. Train mechanic as to how the city works and what his job entails. Inspect his work and make sure he is working up to the city's expectations. This Division provides maintenance on all of the following items- Vehicles- 1 tems:Vehicles:1 — 2016GMC Crew Cab Pickup 1 — 2012 Pierce Arrow XT Heavy Rescue 1 — 2000 Freightliner/Medic Master Fire Investigation Unit 1 — 1996 GMC 3/4 -Ton Pick -Up 1 — 2006 Freightliner M-2 Swat Alpha Unit 1 — 2005 International/Marque Water Rescue/Technical Unit 1 — 2009 Ford Explorer 1 — 2008 Ford Taurus 1 — 2016 Freightliner/ PL Customs Alpha Unit SQ -4 1 — 2012 Freightliner/ AEV Alpha Unit SQ -5 1 — 2006 Freightliner/Medic Master Alpha Unit RS -2 2 — 2009 Freightliner/Medtec Alpha Units SQ -1 and RS -1 1 — 2011 Freightliner/Medtec Alpha Unit SQ -6 1 — 2014 Freightliner PL Customs SQ -3 2 — 2014 Pierce Arrow XT PUC 1500GPM pumpers E-5 and E-6 1 - 2016 Pierce Arrow XT PUC 1500GPM pumper E-3 2 - 2017 Pierce Arrow XT PUC 1500GPM pumpers E-1 and E-4 1 — 2017 Pierce Enforcer 1500GPM 75FT. PUC Aerial 107 L-1 1 — 2006 American LaFrance 2000GPM 100FT. Mid -Mount Aerial Platform 1 — 2003 American LaFrance Eagle 1250 GPM Pumper TR -1 1 — 2009 American LaFrance Eagle 1250 GPM Pumper RE -1 1 — 2003 Ford 450 Maintenance Truck 1 — 2003 Mercury Marine Inflatable Rescue Boat, Motor and Trailer 1 — 2011 Chevrolet Tahoe 3 - 2015 Chevrolet Equinox 1 — 2017 GMC Terrain 1 — 2008 Chevy Impala 1 — 2007 Chevrolet Trailblazer 1 — 2007 Chevrolet 2500 Pick-up 1 — 2009 GMC 2500 Yukon XL 1 - Toyoda used fork lift 1 — 2003 Club Car Ambulance and Hauling LS Enclosed Trailer 1 — 2006 Haulmark Trailer (C.B.R.N.E.) 1 — 2006 Spartan Spencer RRTN HAZMAT Truck 1 — 28ft USAR Trailer 1 — 2007 Fire Safety Unit 50 Equipment on Vehicles: Thousands of feet of fire hose Fire hose nozzles Axes and adapters Foam equipment, hand and vehicle mounted Deluge equipment 110 V electrical lighting Tools (hand and firefighting) 9 — Auxiliary generators 48 — ISI Viking Air Pack 250— Air Bottles 94 — ISI Viking Masks Bauer Air Compressor Cascade System 1 — 6000psi 4 Air Bottle Cascade System 1 — K-950 Saw 2 — K-12 Saw 7 — Chain saws 2 — Amkus Power Tools 6 — TNT Power Tools 7 — Life Jack PPV fans Mounting of Medical equipment on Alpha Vehicles Various hazardous material and confined space rescue equipment. 4 — Walk behind mowers Lawn blowers, weed whips, edgers 2 — Self-propelled snow blower Garage Equipment: 2 — Hose test Pump 2 — In -ground garage hoist hydro -testing 1 — Garage tool replacements 1 — Pumper pump test tool as needed to comply with NFPA 1911. 2 - Ladder test stands. TRAINING DIVISION The focus of the training office for fiscal year 2017 was to continue to assure compliance for the Continuing Education Units (CEU) requirements for both EMT and Paramedics within the department. The number of overall CEU's for Paramedics is higher than that of an EMT and thus requires a more diligent training program in order to ensure that the department's personnel are always compliant with licensing requirements. State of Michigan standards require the obtaining of both lecture and practical credits. Livonia Fire & Rescue is a Continuing Education Program Sponsor, which allows us more flexibility in the scheduling and delivery of classes for EMS education. The training office continues to improve its record management system related to training activities, which in turn ensures compliance with OSHA, ISO and nationally accepted standards on training and 51 documentation. The training division continues to provide training commensurate with the mission of our department. Although EMS training takes up large amounts of resources and time, this office still facilitates training in fire suppression, specialized rescue, hazardous materials, utility emergencies and risk reduction. In order to sustain quality, long-term education practices, the Department added seven additional Emergency Medical Service Instructor Coordinators to its staff by hosting and sponsoring an in-house instructor course. Fire Officer training commensurate with the Collective Bargaining Agreement continues to be a high priority and is currently up to date. In addition, the Department has finished training the remainder of Fire Suppression Personnel in "Blue Card Incident Command." This training tool will enhance the knowledge base as well as improve the practical application ability of the Department's Fire Officers as well as future Officers. It places the Livonia Fire Department at the forefront of trained Departments. In addition, all Fire Officers have been trained to the NIMS 300/400 level bringing the department, well ahead of schedule in incident command training per NFPA. Yet another group of upcoming Officers are getting set to begin additional NIMS training this winter to further strengthen the Incident Command Structure within the Department. The safety of our Firefighters remains the paramount focus of training activities and, as such, the Department continues to train all of its members in the Fire Ground Survival Program endorsed by the International Association of Fire Fighters. Increased training on Fire Ground Survival tactics was designed to increase individual competencies. Significant training evolutions in Firefighter "Mayday" events were accomplished as well. Fire ground survival, accountability, and communications will continue to be focal points of training in 2018. This office continues to look at ways to improve our overall service and maintain the highest level of pre -hospital care to the citizens of Livonia. The Department's EMS Quality Assurance (QA) program continues to strive to comply with stringent county and state requirements regarding QI/QA. The training office continues to administrate and facilitate the Medical Priority Dispatch system that is used in dispatching EMS calls city-wide. The system has proven to be extremely effective in risk -reduction for responders, as well as the public, by assigning a priority to the medical call. Because of the increasing EMS run call volume each year, the MPD system allows the prioritizing of all EMS -related calls to ensure that the most life- threatening emergencies receive assistance above those of a lesser degree. This office was also responsible for tracking and fulfilling the MPD Quality Assurance requirements as outlined in county Medical Control protocols. Since the MPD program came on line in May 2001, the training office meets and discusses QI- related issues quarterly to ensure compliance within county and state guidelines. We continue to have residents from St. Mary Mercy Hospital ride along with our crews as part of their medical educational requirements. Many of the residents 52 have also put on EMS Continuing Education classes for our members. This year, the Department began adding nurses from St. Mary to this ride -along program to further enhance the relationship between the LFD and St. Mary Hospital. In the spring, we spent significant time training on vehicle extrication techniques. With ever-changing automotive technologies and a large volume of vehicle traffic in the city, it is imperative to be proficient with these skills. In addition to the implementation of a new Heavy Rescue extrication vehicle, we dedicated six weeks of hands-on practical training to improving our extrication skills. In the fall, the Department hosted a Mental Health First Aid program, as well as a Suicide Prevention program, to address important needs in the community. PUBLIC EDUCATION The 2017 fiscal year was an exciting year for our Public Education division. The division is tasked with educating our citizens on all fire and life safety topics at different places and times that will have the highest impact. Each year, Livonia Fire & Rescue responds to numerous requests from the public for Fire Safety Education programs. These requests are forwarded to either the on -duty Battalion Chief or to the Fire Safety Education Committee, based on the needs of the requesting person or group. If the caller is requesting to visit a fire station or have a fire apparatus visit them as part of the educational effort, the on - duty Battalion Chief handles the request. If the group requests an individual to speak at a pre -arranged time and location that does not require firefighting apparatus, the Fire Safety Education Committee is contacted. Currently, most requests are handled by on -duty crews at the fire stations, while remaining in- service to respond to emergency calls in our area. Livonia firefighters participated in a May event held at the Civic Center Area called "Passport to Safety." This project was a huge success — crowds were estimated in the thousands. After being involved in the nine-year annual event, more effort is being directed into this area. The large number of children that attend the outdoor event is encouraging. In October 2017, Livonia Fire & Rescue held its annual "Fire Prevention Week Open House." The Open House has proven to be a highly anticipated event by our community reaching a crowd estimated at 2,000. While in attendance, visitors receive information on fire and life safety and are given an opportunity to practice life safety skills. There is also an area where kids can practice their fire safety behaviors. 53 We also distribute our fire and life safety messages to the citizens of Livonia through: • Livonia Public Schools • Livonia Television • Livonia Observer • City of Livonia website LIVONIA HOUSING COMMISSION The Livonia Housing Commission submits the following information on its activities and accomplishments for Silver Village, Newburgh Village, Community Development Block Grant Program, McNamara Towers and Housing Choice Voucher Rent Subsidy Program. Silver Village Housing Community Silver Village occupancy was always 100%. The waiting list consists of 110 Livonia residents and 26 "Parents of Livonia residents." Activities and Accomplishments 1. Silver Village had a turnover of eight units in 2017. 2. All apartments were inspected for safety and maintenance purposes. 3. The bathroom remodel project was completed. All apartments were updated with new commodes, new vanities, and new flooring. 4. Four residents received new carpeting and six residents received new vertical blinds. 5. Speakers presented information to the residents on Medicare Changes and Enrollment, Cyber Safety tips, and Adaptive Changes that can be implemented with Age. 6. Residents continued to regularly recycle bottles and cans, newspapers and junk mail. Return of bottles support resident activities. Sustainable coffee cups and paper products have been purchased for use at Silver Village functions. Further efforts will be taken to reduce and recycle on the Silver Village campus. Newburgh Village Housing Community Newburgh Village occupancy was at 100% at all times. The waiting list consists of 88 Livonia residents and 65 relatives of Livonia residents. Activities and Accomplishments 1. Newburgh Village had a turnover of 13 units in 2017. 2. All property lighting was updated to LED. 3. Trees throughout the property and along Capitol Court were completely trimmed so as not to affect lighting and improve overall safety. 54 4. Professional NAHRO housing training classes were hosted in the community building. 5. All 120 apartments have been inspected for safety and maintenance purposes. Community Development Division The Community Development Office administered the following programs during the 2016-2017 program year, which began on 7/1/16 and ended 6/30/17. Total expenditures through the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program for the year were $653,800. The table highlights the number of households/persons served by the Block Grant Program: Activity Accomplishments Major Home Rehabilitation Loan Program 2 Households Served Emergency Home Rehabilitation Loan Program 0 Households Served Minor Home Repair Program 17 Households Served Scattered -Site Rental Homes (Managed & Maintained) 14 Households Served Emergency Utility Shut -Off Assistance 10 Households Served Senior Van Transportation (9,439 one-way rides were provided for seniors) 897 Persons Served Mental Health Counseling Program (20 sessions were provided) 11 Persons Served First Step 205 Persons Served Public Facilities Improvements to McNamara Towers 132 Persons Served TOTAL SERVED 1,288 Households/Persons During the 2016-2017 program year the CDBG program's priority goals were: to improve the condition of existing housing, increase the supply of affordable housing, improve access to and stability of affordable housing, reduce cost burden for renter households, reduce blight, provide needed public service programming and community development, enhance infrastructure and public facilities, economic development, and to improve planning and administration capacity. These objectives were met through various programs/projects that were proposed and executed during the 2016-2017 year. Most programs met or exceeded planned accomplishments as summarized below: Rehabilitation Program • MAJOR HOME REHABILITATION AND ADMINSTRATION —two qualifying units were brought to full code and lead -paint compliance, with two additional units brought to full code compliance using HOME funds. Expended $130,589. • EMERGENCY HOME REPAIR — No applicants. Expended $0. • MINOR HOME REPAIR AND ADMINISTRATION —17 households received grants not exceeding $5,000 for minor home repairs to correct substandard housing conditions. Expended $63,756. • REHABILITATION INSPECTIONS — Inspections for lead-based paint and code compliance provided for rehab projects. Expended $3,425. 55 Acquisition, Rehabilitation, Clearance & Demolition Programs • ACQUISITION AND REHABILITATION — One home and lot purchased through First Right of Refusal tax -foreclosed properties offered by the Wayne County Treasurer. One home rehabilitated by the Livonia Public Schools Building Trades program with intent to sell to low -moderate income family. Expended $38,757. • CLEARANCE & DEMOLITION — Two homes purchased through First Right of Refusal tax -foreclosed properties offered by the Wayne County Treasurer with the intent to demolish for blight removal. Expended $44,412. Maintenance and Management of City -owned Rental Homes • MAINTENANCE — 14 City owned scattered site low-income rental homes were maintained by the CDBG staff and contractors. Expended $48,279. • MANAGEMENT — 14 City -owned rental homes managed by CDBG staff. Expended $49,939. Neighborhood Revitalization • Improvements to local parks to include the addition of volleyball courts to Clements Circle Park and a picnic shelter and playground equipment to Compton Park. Expended $50,079. Public Facilities Improvements • Public housing modernization to McNamara Towers senior housing including replacement of building and apartment entry systems, new toilets for all apartments, ceiling the replacement in the lobby and corridors along with light fixtures, exit signs, cameras and air diffusers. Expended $78,828. Public Services • SENIOR VAN TRANSPORTATION — 897 rides provided to seniors, with 11,508 one-way rides, 259 wheelchair riders and 1,521 riders picked up at subsidized housing. Expended $48,000. • FIRST STEP — 205 victims of domestic violence and/or sexual assault received assistance. Expended $20,000. • MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING — 11 clients received 48 sessions of mental health counseling services. Expended $4,060. • EMERGENCY UTILITY ASSISTANCE —10 households avoided utility shut- offs. Expended $4,049. Planning & Administration and Accounting Services • PLANNING & ADMINISTRATION — Costs associated with the administration of the CDBG Program. Expended $56,724. • ACCOUNTING SERVICES — Costs associated with the financial management accounting and auditing services. Expended $12,908. 56 Fair Housing Services • Fair housing counseling, complaint reception, and investigation and resolution services to citizens or potential citizens of Livonia along with staff training and resource development all provided by Fair Housing of Metropolitan Detroit. Expended by LHC $6,000. McNamara Towers #1 & #2 & Scattered Site Homes Activities and Accomplishments: 1. McNamara Towers #1 & #2 & Scattered Site Homes had a turnover of 25 units from 12/01/16 to 11/30/17. 2. Upgraded the security entry door FOB systems in McNamara Towers #1 and #2. 3. Installed new ceiling tiles on 1St floor lobby areas of McNamara Towers #1 & #2. 4. Installed new toilets in all apartments in McNamara Towers #1 and #2, including public restrooms in #1. 5. Replaced existing privacy fencing at McNamara Towers #1 with new vinyl fencing. 6. Removed damaged wallpaper at first -floor entry area of McNamara Towers #2, repaired damaged walls, and painted. 7. Replaced existing parking lot lighting with LED lighting. 8. All public housing apartments at the McNamara Towers and scattered site single family homes were inspected to conform to HUD physical condition standards. 9. The Housing Commission was designated as a standard performer for the fiscal year ending Dec. 31, 2016. The annual independent audit of Housing Commission financial activities and compliance with HUD regulations resulted in no findings. Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Rent Subsidy Program The Livonia Housing Commission administers a HVC Rent Subsidy Program consisting of 909 low income family/elderly and disabled clients. 1. The fiscal year 2017 HUD Management Assessment scored the Commission as a Standard Performer. An independent audit was conducted on the Voucher program and no findings were identified. 2. The Livonia Housing Commission, HCV opened the waiting list on June 5, 2017. The Administrative Plan stipulates that the Housing Commission conduct a lottery and 2,500 applicants were randomly selected. All applicants who work or live in Livonia were given a preference point and have been already called off the list to participate in the program. 3. The landlord training that was held in October of 2016 was highly attended. The topics that were discussed were Housing Quality Standards, the Housing Commission relationship with the HCV program landlords, how rent is calculated for the tenant, fraud issues and lease provisions. Department of Community Resources staffer Chris Nielsen videotaped the 57 class and it is available on our City website under "Housing" for landlords who were unable to attend or new landlords. The Housing Commission expended all HUD -allocated funds for housing assistance payments, totaling $5.6 million. INSPECTION DEPARTMENT INSPECTION DEPARTMENT is responsible for all construction operations on private property. Included in its jurisdiction are building inspection, plan review, sanitation and ordinance enforcement. Areas of involvement include Zoning Board of Appeals, Building Code Board of Appeals, Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG), Cost Recovery Appeal Hearings, and various civic groups. In addition, we are involved with Greenmead with regards to construction projects and/or repairs. Coordination with State government agencies involving building construction is handled by this department. Moreover, in certain instances, we interact with other municipalities, serving as a Hearing Officer or sitting on employee interview panels. We have also provided limited fill-in services for Plymouth Township and City of Plymouth. Plan Review for new buildings, alterations and additions, pools, demolitions, zoning compliance and signs is an integral part of the department's function, as well as the issuance of permits, sanitation and enforcing the City's Code of Ordinances designated as Inspection's responsibility. Inspections were made and permits issued for the rehabilitation of homes for the CDBG. Additionally, the Inspection Department reviews lot splits for the Department of Assessment and reviews site plans and waiver use petitions for the Planning Department and provides support to all other departments as needed. Furthermore we provided clerical services and administrative support in regards to the Zoning Board of Appeals. Although the Board is under Council jurisdiction we are tasked with the clerical functions and subsequent administrative support in addition to the intake work we are doing. We also work with the Economic Development Director/Planning Director and others in promoting existing sites in Livonia. BUILDING INSPECTION issued approximately 3,992 permits in 2016-17 for buildings, signs and mechanical installations, including new construction, additions, renovations and alterations. Of those, 23 permits were issued for new single-family residential homes and 47 single-family condominium units were constructed or are currently under construction. In other activity, 24 permits were issued for new commercial/industrial buildings. No permits for apartment buildings were issued this year. Mechanical permits (plumbing, electrical, heating and refrigeration) numbered approximately 4,948 for the year. Residential additions/alterations, garages, decks/patios, fire repairs, pools, signs, zoning compliance and commercial/industrial additions comprised the remainder of permits issued. There were 36 demolition permits issued during the year, 12 of W which were residential structures. Permits for Christmas tree sales lots, pennant and banner displays, awnings, and various special inspections were issued as required. Certificates of Occupancy are issued for all new residences and commercial and industrial buildings upon completion. Zoning compliance permits are issued for subsequent re -occupancy of non-residential properties and occupancy certificates are issued for all residential properties involved in the vacant and/or abandoned building program after completion of all requirements. State building, mechanical, plumbing, electrical, and sign contractor licenses are registered in this office. Additionally, official records are retained on fence contractors, excavators and demolition contractors. The systematic annual inspection of existing commercial buildings for compliance with the Livonia Property Maintenance Code (based upon the International Property Maintenance Code 2012) continued through 2016-2017. In connection with this program, 10 inspections were made, violations issued when necessary and compliance obtained. Due to staff availability, this program was very limited this year. This program is designed to maintain health and safety standards in the city. In mid -2011, due to staff reductions, we ceased inspecting existing industrial factory buildings on a biennial basis after we were able to complete one cycle. We still inspect those buildings for zoning compliance and when permits are issued. If personnel become available, industrial biennials may be resumed. Additionally, the number of annual inspections completed was reduced due to staffing issues and other priorities. In addition to the annual inspection program, the Inspection Department performs all functions mandated by city ordinance that requires all private (one- and two- family) and multiple -family rental dwelling units are licensed and inspected on an annual basis. This year the Department inspected the following rental units: A. 1,703 units, consisting of one- and two-family dwellings and group homes. B. 27 apartments/complexes consisting of 2,145 units. The inspection covers all dwelling units, common areas and exterior structures and grounds. In mid-January 2010, the Department began enforcement of the Vacant and/or Abandoned Building Ordinance #2844 (VAABO) that took effect October 29, 2009, and was instituted in January 2010. The program is designed to provide for maintenance and inspection of problem properties, residential and non-residential, but pertains to any vacant and/or abandoned structures. Moreover, during the enforcement of the program, additional permits and inspections may be needed due to the work required. Following is a breakdown of the activities generated by this program: 59 Type of Fee Total Permits Total Registration Fee — Residential 90 $ 3,237 Registration Fee — Non -Residential 25 $ 900 Monthly Maintenance Fee — Residential 2,028 $ 88,614 Monthly Maintenance Fee — Non -Residential 371 $ 20,140 Inspection Fee — Residential 360 $ 36,180 Inspection Fee — Non -Residential 81 $ 16,800 Permit Fee — Residential/Zoning 265 $ 23,871 Permit Fee — Non -Residential 71 $ 10,004 Total 3,291 $199,746 Additionally, 237 formal complaints were received and responded to throughout the year as they related to property, zoning and ordinance code violations. Numerous requests for information from many various sources (Council, Commissions, Citizens, Contractors, other municipalities, other Departments and Guests) are routinely handled every day and on an annual basis would exceed 30,000 individual communications. There were approximately 924 rental inspection violations, 12 annual/biennial inspection violations and 7 VAABO program violations that were issued for various code infractions during 2016-17. (Violations and/or formal complaints are legal notices issued as a start of prosecution and are different from the everyday correction notices that we utilize; correction notices issued are numerous and would exceed 20,000.) This office also provides the enforcement of special conditions of approval by the Zoning Board of Appeals, Building Code Board of Appeals, Planning Commission and City Council relative to site plans, variances, waiver uses and grants. The Inspection Department continually reviews our current fee structures. We also worked with the Planning Department and the Law Department to update and/or change sections of Zoning Ordinance 543. We are routinely involved in such endeavors over the course of the year. Furthermore, we were involved with administering and maintaining contracts for the City Weed Mowing Program. The current weed contract extends, at our option, through December 2017. We are currently seeking an extension of the current contract through the Administration and Council. We previously raised weed/grass administration fees in an effort to cover our cost and decrease the number of people who utilize the City as their lawn service. The weed/grass administration fees alone this yearwere $26,023.10. We also are continuing to upgrade our computer system and hardware and engaging in the training involved. The computer, system upgrades, and training will carry over into the next fiscal year. The valuation of new building activities for 2016-17 is $153,025,131. The revenue collected from all building and inspection activities was approximately $3,391,161. .E SANITATION AND ORDINANCE ENFORCEMENT has responsibility for compliance with the City Zoning Ordinance #543 and also the Code of Ordinances #1688 as it pertains to the majority of all nuisance and non -criminal violations. These responsibilities include those things that affect the health, safety, welfare, and quality of life of the residents, business owners and their employees and guests (visitors) of the City, such as pollution, hazardous waste, trash and debris, vacant buildings, weed cutting (which includes direct supervision of the city weed contractor), basic property maintenance and supervision of the collection of municipal refuse. The enforcement of special conditions of approval made by the Zoning Board of Appeals, City Council and the Planning Commission relative to site plans, variances, and waiver uses may also be delegated to Ordinance Enforcement as needed. STATISTICS 2016-17 Total General Inspections Made 18,387 Building Maintenance and Repair 571 Parking Lot Repairs 23 Animals/Rats 418 Trash and Debris 1,368 Junk Vehicles 521 Noxious Weeds* 2,155 Noise/Air/Odor 55 Nuisances 296 Illegal Signs on Commercial Property 271 Illegal Signs Removed from Public Property 1,416 Illegally Parked Recreational Vehicles 283 Illegally Parked Commercial Vehicles 197 Illegal Sales, Use and Occupancy 99 Misc. Illegally Parked Vehicles 174 Right of Way encroachments 198 Vacant Buildings (Re-inspected/Posted) 61 Snow on Sidewalks 98 License Violations 874 Vehicle Parking Snow Emergency 24 Site Inspections 4,052 Zoning Grants 75 Sanitation activities also included 1,879 citizen complaints regarding the collection of municipal refuse and the delivery of 2,723 recycling bins. * Enforcement of the Noxious Weed Ordinance included the investigation of citizen complaints and the abatement of violations through the mowing of weeds and 61 removal of debris from 420 properties and 136 tree removals by the City Weed Mowing Contractor. ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS The Zoning Board of Appeals is a seven (7) member Board created by State statute and City of Livonia Zoning Ordinance No. 543 as amended. The Board hears appeals from residential and business property owners when they are unable to comply with ordinance requirements and are rejected permits by the Inspection Department. The Board meets on selected Tuesday evenings at 7 p.m. The Inspection Department was tasked with all clerical and administrative responsibility for the Zoning Board of Appeals in addition to the intake support and meeting responsibility we previously had. This includes the supervision of the outside contractor hired to record and provide the meeting records. The following is a breakdown of the Appeal Cases prepared and heard by the Zoning Board of Appeals in the fiscal year, Dec. 1, 2016, through Nov. 30, 2017. * Includes cases which were Granted in Part/Denied in Part ** Meeting material was prepared more than once, but for various reasons (Petitioner did not appear, asked to be rescheduled, etc.) these cases were not heard at the first scheduled meeting. *** Meeting material was prepared and Board heard case at meeting and made a decision to table for revised plans, etc. All meeting notices, agendas, etc. were redone when new meeting date was scheduled. **** Case was heard, but Board took no further action. Number of Regular Meetings: 12 Number of Special Meetings: 11 BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS The Building Code Board of Appeals (BCBA) provides any person the right to appeal a decision of the code official refusing to grant a modification of the building code covering the manner of construction or materials to be used in the erection, alteration or repair of a building or structure or in certain instances to appeal other administrative actions such as a bond forfeiture. An application for appeal shall be W Granted with Tabled or Granted Denied Modifications* Postponed*** Total New Cases 46 6 8 27 87 Re -hearings 0 0 0 0 0 Actual Cases Heard 87 Prepared and Scheduled** 9 No Further Action**** 0 Total Cases Heard and Prepared 96 * Includes cases which were Granted in Part/Denied in Part ** Meeting material was prepared more than once, but for various reasons (Petitioner did not appear, asked to be rescheduled, etc.) these cases were not heard at the first scheduled meeting. *** Meeting material was prepared and Board heard case at meeting and made a decision to table for revised plans, etc. All meeting notices, agendas, etc. were redone when new meeting date was scheduled. **** Case was heard, but Board took no further action. Number of Regular Meetings: 12 Number of Special Meetings: 11 BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS The Building Code Board of Appeals (BCBA) provides any person the right to appeal a decision of the code official refusing to grant a modification of the building code covering the manner of construction or materials to be used in the erection, alteration or repair of a building or structure or in certain instances to appeal other administrative actions such as a bond forfeiture. An application for appeal shall be W based on a claim that the true intent of the code or the rules legally adopted thereunder have been incorrectly interpreted, the provisions of this code do not fully apply, or an equivalent form of construction can be used. In the case of a bond forfeiture, the appeal must show the action of the Building Official was arbitrary and capricious. In addition, the BCBA may be utilized to provide guidance to the Building Official or affirm an issue not covered by the Building code. No appeals were filed with the Building Code Board of Appeals for the fiscal year 2016-17. DEPARTMENT OF LAW The following information is a brief analysis of the activities of the Law Department during the 2016-17 fiscal year, with a comparison of the previous two years. The report reveals that the Law Department has maintained a heavy workload. The following table and narrative illustrate this point - 63 2014 -15 2015-16 2016-17 Increase/Decrease 2015-16 to 2016-17 Cases pending in 11 8 5 -3 Wayne County Circuit Court Wayne County Circuit 13 15 14 -1 Court cases resolved. Cases pending in 1 1 0 -1 Ingham County Circuit Court Cases resolved in 0 1 1 0 Ingham County Circuit Court Civil cases pending in 3 3 7 +4 16th District Court Civil cases resolved 9 13 22 +9 in 16th District Court Civil cases resolved 4 5 12 +7 in 16th District Court with judgement monies still owing Criminal appeals 0 0 1 +1 pending from the 16th District Court Criminal appeals 3 1 2 +1 resolved from the 16th District Court 63 Cases pending in 4 4 4 0 Michigan Court of Appeals Cases resolved in 2 9 3 -6 the Michigan Court of Appeals Cases pending in 1 4 0 -4 Michigan Supreme Court Cases resolved in 0 3 4 +1 the Michigan Supreme Court Cases pending in the 0 0 0 0 U.S. Court of Appeals 6t" Circuit Case resolved in the 0 1 0 -1 U.S. Court of Appeals 6t" Circuit Cases pending in 6 5 5 0 U.S. District Court Cases resolved in 3 3 1 -2 U.S. District Court Title VI Cases 0 0 0 0 pending Title VI Cases 0 1 0 -1 resolved EEOC Civil Rights 0 2 0 -2 cases pen din EEOC Civil Rights 1 1 3 +2 cases resolved Cases pending in 49 37 31 -6 Michigan Tax Tribunal Michigan Tax 54 21 26 +5 Tribunal cases resolved. Amendments to the 9 13 12 -1 Zoning Ma Amendments to the 5 5 3 -2 Zoning Ordinance Amendments to the 13 14 19 +5 Code of Ordinances Real estate 1 3 5 +2 transactions Preparation and 466 505 597 +92 review of contracts MI between the City and others, including approving as to form other legal documents. Review and 138 231 278 +47 fulfillment of Freedom of Information Act requests Review and respond 7 7 6 -1 to Freedom of Information Act appeals on behalf of the Mayor Assist walk-in 29 52 67 +15 residents with complaints regarding legal City matters. Review, typing, and 1600 1297 1247 -50 remitting District Court warrant requests Drunk driving 297 332 314 -18 Traffic 3100 2335 2393 +58 misdemeanors Non -Traffic 2776 3074 2654 -420 misdemeanors Jury Trials 28 18 5 -13 In 2009, the Law Department began to handle sidewalk litigation in-house rather than refer those cases to firms such as Cummings McClorey Davis & Acho, PLC for an estimated yearly savings of approximately $30,000 in attorney fees subject to the number of sidewalk cases. Since that time the Law Department has undertaken virtually all of the civil litigation filed against the City. As a result, the attorney fees saved each year are now much more substantial, estimated to exceed $100,000. This report is intended to provide you with examples of the nature, complexity and extent of the work handled by this department over the past year, as well as some information about the status of the referenced matters. Nolan, Holloway & Perttunen v. City of Livonia On September 22, 2016, Judge Murphy granted the City's Motion for Summary Disposition and dismissed John Nolan's causes of action against the City. He also 65 granted the City's Motion for Summary Disposition with respect to the City's breach of contract counterclaim against Mr. Nolan and ordered Mr. Nolan to pay the City $28,392.78.1 The check for the full amount of those damages was received on November 2, 2016. Thereafter, the Law Department filed a Motion for Sanctions against Plaintiff's attorney, Gregory J. Rohl, because of the frivolous complaint that he filed on behalf of his client, John Nolan. On October 21, 2016, Wayne County Circuit Judge John A. Murphy denied that motion. In November of 2016, Judge Murphy's decision to deny the award of sanctions was appealed to the Michigan Court of Appeals. The Michigan Court of Appeals did not schedule oral argument to give the attorneys an opportunity to address the Court, but rather, on March 31, 2017, it issued an order reversing Judge Murphy's decision and remanded the case to Judge Murphy for a determination of the appropriate sanction. Thereafter, Mr. Rohl filed a motion for reconsideration of the Court of Appeals order regarding sanctions. His motion for reconsideration was denied. The Law Department is in the final stages of calculating the hours, costs, and fees spent defending John Nolan's frivolous case against the City and will be seeking payment in short order. Wheeler v. City of Livonia In July of 2015, Frederick and Marilyn Wheeler ("Wheelers" or "Plaintiffs") filed a one -count complaint against the City of Livonia ("City") and alleged that they suffered damages as a result of a sewage disposal event. Because of the Law Department's workload at that time and the particularized nature of sewer back up litigation, attorney Edward Salah was retained as outside to lead the defense of this case. The Law Department has served as co -counsel with Mr. Salah. In an effort to amicably resolve the dispute with the Wheelers and minimize the costs of litigation for both parties, a joint motion for stay of proceedings was filed with Wayne County Circuit Court Judge Annette J. Berry. Judge Berry granted the motion and the parties engaged in settlement discussions for a period of ninety days. In fact, over the course of the litigation, the parties engaged in facilitation with former Judge Daniel P. Ryan. Unfortunately, these efforts were unsuccessful seemingly because of the Wheelers' excessive demands for compensation for damages which included items, such as attorney fees and costs, which would not be recoverable even if they were successful at a trial. Because all efforts to amicably resolve the matter were unsuccessful, the parties engaged in discovery. On February 15, 2017, Plaintiff filed a partial motion for summary disposition against the City of Livonia and asked the Court to determine liability against the City such that damages would be the only issue to be resolved at a trial. On March 31, 2017, a motion for summary disposition was filed on behalf of The City filed a counterclaim against Mr. Nolan for breach of contract to force him to repay $28,392.78 in tuition and fees paid to Mr. Nolan as he pursued his Master of Business Administration degree from Madonna University. The collective bargaining agreement between the LPOA and the City provides if an officer leaves the City within five years that the advanced degree was received, the officer is responsible to repay the City. the City. The City's motion for summary disposition was based upon the following two key arguments: (1) the Wheelers' lawsuit was barred by governmental immunity and (2) the Wheelers' back up was not a sewage disposal event as defined by state law. On June 5, 2017, Judge Berry issued an opinion and order which held that (1) the City was not entitled to governmental immunity and (2) there was a question of fact regarding whether the Wheelers' back up constituted a sewage disposal event. Judge Berry also denied the Wheelers' motion for partial summary disposition. Because the denial of governmental immunity provides the City with an automatic right to appeal that decision, the Law Department appealed the denial of governmental immunity to the Michigan Court of Appeals. The Michigan Court of Appeals process will likely be complete in approximately 18 months. Until then, all litigation is stayed. International Outdoor, Inc. v. City of Livonia In 2013, International Outdoor, Inc., sought a permit to erect a 672 -square -foot digital billboard 80 -feet high along the I-96 corridor through Livonia. With the permit denied by both the Inspection Department and the Zoning Board of Appeals, International Outdoor filed suit in the Wayne County Circuit Court alleging that the City had violated the rule against exclusionary zoning, given that the City has no billboards and has long banned them. Rejecting International Outdoors' theory that Livonia "needs" billboards, the Circuit Court dismissed the case on December 10, 2014. International Outdoor then appealed to the Michigan Court of Appeals. The Court of Appeals upheld the Circuit Court's dismissal, so International Outdoor requested leave to appeal to the Michigan Supreme Court. On April 4, 2017, the Supreme Court denied International Outdoors' request, thereby leaving Livonia's billboard ban intact and preventing the erection of the proposed digital billboard. In celebration of this outcome, Scenic Michigan — an organization which provided valuable assistance during the course of this litigation — awarded the City its Scenic Michigan Hero Award. NL Ventures Farmington VI LCC v. City of Livonia During the process of collecting unpaid water/sewer bills from the now defunct Awrey Bakeries, LLC, the property owner/landlord challenged the validity of the statutory water/sewer liens on the property. The landlord prevailed in the Wayne County Circuit Court, so the City appealed to the Court of Appeals. The Court of Appeals reversed the Circuit Court judgment, and awarded the City just over $1,000 in costs, in addition to reinstating the liens. The landlord responded by seeking leave to appeal to the Michigan Supreme Court. To the surprise of the Law Department, the Supreme Court issued a February 1, 2017, order for oral argument and additional briefing on whether the Court should grant leave to appeal. So, the parties filed supplemental briefs and 67 waited for oral arguments to be scheduled. Finally, on October 12, 2017, the Court heard what it calls a "Mini Oral Argument on the Application." Just over a week later, the Court issued an order denying the landlord's application, leaving the City's triumph at the Court of Appeals undisturbed. Rogers v. City of Livonia On May 17, 2017, Roger Rogers filed suit against the City contending that his house was flooded due to the City's failure to properly maintain its rainwater and sewage disposal system back on July 7, 2016. After undertaking an investigation with the full cooperation of the Engineering Office, the City filed a comprehensive motion for summary disposition detailing facts and a thorough presentation of the applicable specialized laws regarding these claims. Ultimately, Mr. Rogers' attorney elected to stipulate to the dismissal of the case rather than prepare a response, as there was no response that could defeat the City's argument in light of the facts presented by Engineering. The order of dismissal with prejudice was entered on September 21, 2017. Sznyr & Horning v City of Livonia These two former police officers filed suit in Wayne County Circuit Court against the City contending they were the victims of gender discrimination and were retaliated against for refusing to violate citizens' rights, among other claims. The suit was filed on September 13, 2016. Upon internal investigation, the Law Department concluded that these were phantom claims intended to leverage an economic defense in response to two small district court lawsuits the City had filed against them in 2016. Both officers had voluntarily resigned the Livonia Police Department to work as police officers elsewhere. However, they had both agreed to reimburse the tuition costs incurred by the City to send them to the police academy if they resigned within four years of becoming officers. The District Court lawsuits sought the balance of those tuition dollars that remained unrecovered. After the discrimination suit was filed, the former officers' attorney had the district court cases transferred to the circuit, supporting the Law Department's conclusion of phantom claims. After numerous motions and multiple hearings regarding both the irregular procedures and the substance of the case, the Circuit Court concluded first that the District Court cases did not belong in Circuit Court, ordering them returned to the District Court. Subsequently, after additional motion practice and hearings, the Circuit Court Judge concluded that none of the claims filed by the Plaintiffs in Circuit Court had any merit, dismissing them on October 18, 2017. We still await return of the district court cases in district court so that we may continue pursuit of the remaining tuition dollars. Hard Rock HDD, Inc. v. City of Livonia, et. al. On April 21, 2017, Hard Rock HDD, Inc., which was a subcontractor to City of Livonia ("City") contractor Rohl Networks, L.P. ("Rohl"), filed a lawsuit against the City as well as Rohl, Rohl Group International, Inc., Jason Rohl, Brad Rohl, Travelers Casualty and Surety Company of America ("Travelers" or "Bond Company"), and David Marinelli, a former Rohl employee. Hard Rock's complaint alleged the following causes of action against the City: (1) breach of contract, (2) breach of a third -party beneficiary contract, (3) violation of the Michigan Safe Drinking Water Act, and (4) breach of the duty of good faith and fair dealing. In lieu of answering the Complaint, the Law Department filed a motion for summary disposition in an effort to have the case dismissed. Thereafter, Hard Rock filed a First Amended Complaint in an attempt to overcome the City's Motion for Summary Disposition. The Law Department filed a supplemental brief in response to Hard Rock's First Amended Complaint. Hard Rock also filed a motion requesting leave to amend its complaint to add City employees Todd Zilincik and Tom Wilson as defendants. Ultimately, on October 31, 2017, Wayne County Circuit Court Judge Martha Snow granted the City's Motion for Summary Disposition. Additionally, at that hearing, counsel for Hard Rock agreed that they would not seek to amend their complaint to add Mr. Zilincik or Mr. Wilson as defendants. Quiet Title Actions Toward the end of 2015, the Law Department became aware of claims of interest in real property purchased by the City through the Wayne County Treasurer tax foreclosure process. The claims of interest were made by land speculators who are strangers to title with no legal interest in any of the subject parcels. The Law Department aggressively challenged the claims of those speculations, eliminating all but one by the end of 2016. The Law Department also favorably resolved the last claim via lawsuit involving 15505 Auburndale which was purchased by the City from the Wayne County Treasurer through the tax foreclosure process. After the City purchased 15505 Auburndale, Matthew Peterson claimed that he and his wife, purchased the Property from Tangible Acquisitions, LLC ("Tangible"). As evidence, Mr. Peterson produced unrecorded quitclaim deeds for the Properties from Tangible. However, a title search relative to the Properties revealed that Tangible never had any interest in either parcel. Mr. Peterson offered to purchase the Property for the amount of back taxes that the City paid to purchase it through the foreclosure process. It was very apparent that Tangible and Mr. Peterson were working together to create a cloud on title in an effort to purchase the Properties from the City for a fraction of their market value. If the Properties had been part of a Sheriff's sale, Mr. Peterson would have had to bid against other interested parties to purchase the Properties. The Properties likely would have sold for an amount that far exceeded the amount of the past due taxes. The City obtained clear title to 15505 Auburndale on January 12, 2017. Prosecutorial Duties Like last year, the Law Department's law enforcement role continues to be a significant focus of our time and efforts. For the year 2016-17, the Law Department reviewed 1,247 warrant requests, which is a reduction of 3.48% from 1,297 from the year 2015-16. The reduction is largely because of a change in policy. In 2016, Livonia Police Department ("LPD") and Law Department agreed that the LPD would issue citations for "routine" retail fraud and possession of narcotics cases rather than have the Law Department make the decision regarding whether or not to charge in those cases. The LPD reports that it issued 280 retail fraud citations as well as 136 citations involving marijuana possession. While complaints and warrants were not reviewed by the Law Department in those 416 cases, the Law Department was required to resolve them in 16th District Court at a pretrial conference or trial. There were five jury trials in 16th District Court in the 2016-17 fiscal year, which is a reduction of 13 fewer jury trials over the previous year. While it is difficult to know all of the reasons for this reduction, we believe that thorough police work at arrest and investigative stages, the exercise of sound discretion in review of complaints and warrants, tough negotiations at pretrial conferences, and waivers by defendants of their right to a jury trial are some of the key factors. There were also a substantial number of non jury trials; however, we do not maintain records of the number of non -jury trials. All of these cases are prosecuted in 16th District Court by attorneys in the Law Department. Additionally, traffic misdemeanors, which often involve a person charged with driving on a suspended license, increased from 2,335 to 2,393 (2.48%) this year. However, non -traffic misdemeanors, such as possession of marijuana, possession of narcotic paraphernalia, disturbing the peace, domestic assault and battery, etc., decreased from 3,074 to 2,654, which is a decrease of 13.66%. Moreover, there were 18 fewer drunk driving cases charged this year, which is a decrease of 13.66%. Additionally, the Law Department has attempted to find ways to increase revenue to the General Fund. As a part of that effort, in 2010, the Law Department and the Livonia Police Department ("LPD") Traffic Bureau are now handling vehicle forfeitures in cases in which an individual is charged with Operating While Intoxicated ("OWI") 2nd or subsequent offenses. In such a case, the defendant's vehicle is subject to forfeiture and he or she must pay $900 to recover his or her vehicle. Of the $900 collected, $250 is intended to cover attorney fees, $450 is for police services, and the remaining $250 is sent to the Crime Victims' Rights fund. Michigan Tax Tribunal Petitions While petitions before the Michigan Tax Tribunal ("MTT") continue to decline, the Law Department remains actively involved in settlement discussions of MTT cases. Of course, when reasonable terms cannot be negotiated, or the taxpayer's 70 petition is not voluntarily withdrawn, a trial is necessary. The City tried Dearborn Heights Montessori Center v City of Livonia on September 11, 2017, and we await the decision. Currently, there are 31 pending appeals before the MTT that are being handled by the Law Department. In the past year, the Law Department resolved 26 MTT cases. Personal Property Tax Collections In 2016-2017 the Law Department, at the request of the Treasurer's office, sent 195 letters demanding payment of past due personal property taxes and filed 20 lawsuits against delinquent taxpayers. These efforts generated $148,934.87 in payments as well as 11 judgments totaling $91,690.25. Freedom of Information Act Requests The Law Department's attention to Freedom of Information Act ("FOIA") requests increased in this fiscal year, going from 231 in 2015-16 to 278 in 2016-17. Presumably this was because of recent changes in the law which make it much cheaper to obtain information from government. Legislative Advocacy While it is not reflected in the table above, it should be noted that the Law Department has also been involved in legislative advocacy. In addition to our longstanding involvement with the League affiliated right-of-way themed PROTEC, we hold memberships in MML's Economic Development and Land Use Committee and the Michigan Association of Municipal Attorneys' Legislative Committee (which Livonia co-chairs). Late last year, at the request of the previous Administration, State Representative Laura Cox introduced House Bill ("HB") 5113 to extend the statute of limitations on unpaid water bills from three years to five years. The Livonia Water and Sewer Board ("Board") wanted to be able to enter into longer installment payment plans with financially stressed residents who, because of unfortunate circumstances, are struggling to pay past due water and sewer charges. Because the Municipal Water Liens Act (Public Act 178 of 1939) provides that municipal water and sewer liens are not enforceable after three years, the Board would not enter into a payment plan that is more than three years. On May 4, 2016, and September 6, 2016, the Law Department appeared before the House Local Government Committee and the Senate Committee on Local Government, respectively, to encourage passage. The legislation was approved by the Michigan Senate on December 14, 2016, and signed into law by Governor Snyder on January 3, 2017. The Law Department is currently working with Mayor Dennis K. Wright and PROTEC to address serious concerns that we have with Senate Bill ("SB") 637, which was introduced October 19, 2017, and referred to the Senate Committee on Energy and Technology. The legislation was written to create the "Small Wireless 71 Communications Facilities Development Act" ("Act"). The purpose of the Act, among others, is to allow providers of wireless services with access to public rights-of-way and the ability to attach to poles and structures in those rights-of- way. In our view, SB 637 does not (1) address the complaints our citizens may have about damage to their property by companies working in easements and rights-of-way beside their homes; (2) require companies to pay for their use of public property; or (3) to make their poles meet reasonable standards, even though we know ugly poles can affect property values. Instead, virtually all the rules in this legislation, as drafted, limit what municipalities can do. Presently, SB 637 has not been reported out of committee. We will continue to monitor this and other legislation and advocate on behalf of the City. LIBRARY COMMISSION DIRECT SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC The Civic Center library underwent a big change this year with the library being renamed The Robert & Janet Bennett Civic Center Library, in honor of the Mayor and his wife who had such a big impact on the Livonia community. They were instrumental in the library's successful millage campaign and worked tirelessly with the Friends to raise money for the library. We are proud that the library now bears their names. We had another great year for electronic book, audio and video circulation. Statistics for these platforms are up once again. Data relating to the use of technology and virtually all other electronic services continue to rise. The popularity of the online database we added last year, Universal Class, encouraged us to try another. Transparent Language offers the most comprehensive language learning solution for libraries with over 100 languages and is constantly growing. Pensiamo the sia grandioso! (We think that's great!) The overall circulation of books and other traditional materials decreased slightly in 2016 compared to last year, but much of that is still due to the reduced hours of service at the Noble and Sandburg branches, along with the various closures we experienced at all three libraries. The newly designed e -newsletter is now bi-monthly and under the editorship of the PR Committee, had 122 new subscribers, now totaling 1,839. We have 1,627 Facebook followers, with likes up 1,179 this year; and our Twitter feed is up 147 with 917 followers. The popularity of our 2016 Summer Reading Program Video continues and it received another award this year, the National Association of Telecommunications Officers and Advisors Government Programming Award. This award recognizes excellence in broadcast, cable multimedia and electronic programming produced 72 by local government agencies. Our 2017 Summer Reading Program video had 1,761 views on YouTube and again featured the Mayor, along with our Police and Fire Chief who made their movie debuts. Our TEDx program had 26,466 YouTube views as of October. Civic Center Adult Services: We had two hugely successful and notable programs this year. It was a great honor to host our first TEDx program. Designed to help communities, organizations and individuals spark conversation and connections through local TED -like experiences, our theme was Act Local, Think Global, and the videos are on YouTube (search: tedxlivoniaCClibrary.) We were very lucky to host Tom Daldin and Jim Edelman from Under the Radar Michigan, the PBS television program that features the people, places and things that make Michigan a great. Over 300 people attended the program, and everyone thought it was outstanding. A diverse assortment of new programs was offered to the adult patrons this year from topics covering a Live Murder Mystery, Gifts from your Kitchen and Whatever happened to Idlewild? Various fun adult craft programs drew many patrons. One new program, Bad Movie Night, appears to be a hit, despite its off-putting title. Our continuing series include Film Movement, Classic Movies, Genealogy with Carl, Noontime Concerts, History Lives at the Library, Civic Center Book Club, Science Spectacles, one-on-one computer training and the Adult Summer Reading Program. Civic Center Children and Teen Services: The Children's Department continues to provide quality programming for families. In addition to regular storytimes held throughout the year, children enjoyed holiday events, craft programs, Money Smart Week programs, learned about "Funny Books," and how to make "Fun and Simple Jewelry." In an effort to create stronger community partnerships, the children's librarians attended school open houses, Kindergarten Round Up, provided storytimes to preschools (both in the library and on location), were Guest Readers during March is Reading Month and hosted a Family Fun Night for Grant Elementary. With the help of circulation staff, we were able to provide library cards to patrons outside of the library. The library also collaborated with the Parks and Recreation Department. We were able to attend some of the Park It! Programs and the Fall Open House at the Recreation Center. Parks and Recreation allowed the library to use their big games and the Clements Circle Splash Park for the library's Summer Reading Programs. We were also able to register children for the Summer Reading Program at the Recreation Center. Karen Smith, community Outreach Manager from Seedlings Braille Books, gave the library $1,625 to purchase braille books through The Eagles for Children Grant 73 from Western Golf and Country Club. With this gift, we purchased board books, blocks, Newbery Award winners, and replaced worn out titles. Many libraries in The Library Network (TLN) often borrow books from this collection to loan. Our biggest program, the Solar Eclipse Viewing Party, was held Monday, August 21, 2017. We provided approximately 750 pairs of NASA -approved viewing glasses to over 3,000 participants. Families and strangers alike shared the glasses and watched live -streaming from NASA on the large screen to experience the phenomenon. Harry Potter Club continues to be the most popular and successful teen program. Not only do they meet weekly during the school year with an average of 40 kids each week, they also enjoyed the Yule Ball, Parkour training, and won the 2nd Annual Michigan Muggle Quidditch Tournament, which was held at the Alfred Noble Library. Teen volunteers received training and helped with numerous projects throughout the year. Our Red Cross -certified Teen Librarian provided Babysitting Workshops and hosted a Teen Job Fair. Livonia Teens enjoyed Dungeons and Dragons, Teen Trivia Night and a Drop-in Maker Space. The teens planted and maintained a Victory Garden, with the veggies donated to a local food pantry as part of the "Build a Better World" Summer Reading Program, and continue to look for ways to make a difference in the community. Civic Center Automation and Circulation: The Library began working with the City's IT Department for server hosting and additional computer security. This move also enabled the staff to partake in Security Awareness Training, training staff to recognize threats of Cybercrime. While it has not been a problem -free transition, in the end it will help guarantee our safety. Our public library co-operative, The Library Network, which serves 75 libraries in southeast Michigan and provides acquisitions, cataloging and administration of the library catalog, went out to bid for a new ILS (computer catalog system). Two representatives from the Bennett Library were on the RFP committee that chose the new ILS for all 55 shared system libraries, which will go live in May of 2013. It is a more user-friendly system that will also cost less than the current one. Because of this upcoming change, TLN has been clearing out the library database to make the transition easier. They removed items listed as lost or long overdue from the system, as well as patron records that have not been active. This purge accounted for the large drop in the number of items in the collection and number of registered borrowers. The popularity of our Wi-Fi and the use of cell phones for surfing the internet are probably to blame for the decrease in our internet computer usage. Noble and Sandburg Branches: It was a challenging but successful year at the branch library buildings. The most significant event was the carpeting project at both locations. Due to some complications with the carpet install, Sandburg branch ended up closed for 74 approximately five weeks, with Noble branch completing installation within the planned two-week schedule. Despite the longer -than -expected installation, the buildings look great! We have been weeding our collections, consolidating and replacing shelving to open up floor space, especially at Sandburg Branch. We are also proud of the fact that branch program attendance, despite the weeks of closure, will exceed last year's total. Staff has undergone some turnover; a new circulation staff member was hired, and a new page; and we will be replacing our circulation supervisor as she retires in the upcoming year. Next year, we hope to explore some new ideas for the development of new, alternative collections and further community outreach to the area surrounding our branch buildings, as well as going even bigger and better with our major summer programs. Noble continues to host a number of popular long-standing programs, including the children's storytimes, and teen Pokemon and anime groups. Summer programming included Splash Days with a giant inflatable waterslide the kids loved; an end -of -summer picnic with a petting zoo; Japan -a -Rama and dart tag events for teens; and a solar eclipse viewing party where 200+ people showed up for eclipse glasses, many of them staying to picnic on our lawn and watch the event. We also teamed up with Parks and Recreation to host kid campers for an hour on IMonday afternoons. Both branches hosted Harry Potter Quidditch matches, as well. In December, Sandburg hosted two successful holiday programs; one, a Christmas centerpiece workshop conducted by the Livonia Garden Club, and a holiday party where we had electric trains for the kids to run, storytimes, and a live reindeer outside for pictures taking opportunities. This event attracted over 200 people. We reached out to a local music school to bring some music programs to the branches for our summer reading program, which were filled to capacity and well received. Other summer programming at Sandburg included Splash Day with a giant inflatable waterslide, art camps for teens, and art -on -the -lawn with a mid-July "snowball fight." Summer reading registration went well at both branches and adult program registration was much higher with the inclusion of a "tin can raffle" and prizes. FACILITIES The Bennett Library went through some notable physical changes this year as well. We were delighted to have the installation of a new roof completed in November of 2016. In February, we were thrilled to see the removal of 30 -year-old carpet on the third floor and in both elevators. There had been no reorganization on the first - and second -floor adult and teen collections and in the juvenile department since the library opened 30 years ago. Because of all the new formats added over the years, rearrangement was desperately needed. We closed for three days in October, and the staff managed to move thousands of materials to new locations making the collections more streamlined and efficient. The public appears to be pleased with the changes. Urgently needed new chairs for the first and second 75 floor, the juvenile department and the conference room, are on order and should arrive any day. Meeting rooms provided at Civic Center, Noble and Sandburg branches continue to be in high demand. Numerous small citizen groups, clubs, and associations, as well as other City departments, look to this resource as a vital and valuable public service. The Art Gallery at the Bennett Library hosted a number of beautiful shows arranged by the Livonia Arts Commission. MANAGEMENT AND STAFF After 25 years of service, Librarian II, Merrill Wassell, retired. We replaced another outgoing part-time librarian, three part-time clerks and one library aide I. The reappointment of Library commissioners Donna Anagnostou, Diane Policelli and Dawn Borregard for another term took place in October. FUNDING State Aid to libraries and Penal Fines both increased this year. The influx of the Local Community Stabilization Share Appropriation was an appreciated bonus. Exam Proctoring continues at a brisk pace; we have collected over $2,235 thus far. Unique Management Service continues to function as our collection agency, recovering funds that allow the Library to replace lost and stolen items. The Livonia Arts Commission approved another generous grant to help underwrite the costs of the Noontime Concert Series. Local businesses continue to donate incentives to the library for its Summer Reading Program to help encourage young readers. Local businesses donated $2,100 in support of our TEDx program, as well as in-kind donations. The Library extends its heartfelt thanks to the many citizens who donated money to the Library in honor or in memory of their loved ones over the past year. The Friends of the Livonia Public Library awarded one $1,000 scholarship to Nathan Shaw who is pursuing a Master's degree in Library and Information Science. The Friends continue their hours of hard work organizing their Book Sale events and their used bookstore is more popular than ever. We are very grateful for all their financial help for the collection and for the Children and Teen Summer Reading Programs, as well as for the History Lives program. STATISTICAL REVIEW Library Program Attendance Meeting Room Attendance Registered Borrowers Items in the Collection Circulation Library Website Usage Internet Workstations Usage Wi-Fi Usage e -Items Circulation October 2016 October 2017 21,699 26,805 71,145 70,540 43,683 28,839 267,823 246,401 572,206 486,328 630,543 2,093,574 38,497 33,430 55,540 59,715 48,343 56,991 76 PARKS AND RECREATION Come out and Playa An integral part of Livonia's quality of life is our solid commitment to Parks and Recreation services. We provide facilities, programs, classes and opportunities for leisure time to help develop healthy habits, improve fitness, develop skills and create memories. With 12 full-time staff and more than 300 dedicated and enthusiastic part-time staff, and the support of the Department of Public Services Building Maintenance and Park Maintenance, in the fiscal year 2016-17 we recorded: • A daily average of 2,800 individual visits to the LCRC • 107,505 rounds of golf played at our three courses • Over 10,000 participants in Special Events • 16,671 visits to the outdoor pools • 26,058 people attending organized picnics at a park pavilion • Over 5,100 athletic participants playing over 2,600 games We received $2,100, as well as in-kind donations from businesses/organizations for parks, programming and special events. Parks and Recreation works cooperatively with and delivers services to other City Departments, civic organizations, community businesses and the Livonia and Clarenceville Public Schools. As part of this cooperation we have partnered with three civic organizations to manage athletic facilities (Rotary and Jaycee Parks and soccer fields at Greenmead and Wilson Barn) and with one community business, Mercy Elite — St. Mary Mercy of Livonia. Our Department recognizes the dynamic and unique role we play in fostering a healthy community through our six divisions: ■ Aquatics ■ Athletics ■ Community Center ■ Golf ■ Special Events ■ Parks AQUATICS DIVISION The Aquatics Division is comprised of two indoor pools, spa and Splash Pad at the Jack E. Kirksey Recreation Center and three (Botsford, Clements Circle and Shelden) outdoor facilities. We provide safe, educational and enjoyable aquatic services to the community through a wide array of swim lessons, water fitness 77 classes, open swim, lap swim, diving lessons, pool rentals, synchronized swimming, special events and swim teams. Kirksey Recreation Center Pools Over the last year, the classes and programs we offered had more than 3,367 participants, not including the swim teams. We hosted swim practices for five swim teams, and serve as the home pool for three of those teams. We are also the home of the Catholic High School League Swimming and Diving championships for both men and women. Other large meets that we hosted include the Snowball Splash and the Polar Plunge United States Swimming meets. The listed meets had between 300 and 1,200 participants each. In addition, we hosted one dual meet for Ladywood High School and three dual meets for Catholic Central High School. Among the special events at Community Center pools this year were the Polar Swim Event, 14th Annual Cardboard Boat Races and the 11th Annual Arctic Chill Indoor Triathlon, Dive -In Movie Nights and a Spooky Swim with pumpkins in the pool! Outdoor Pools We recorded 16,671 daily pass visits at the pools this year (3,368 at Botsford and 2,009 at Shelden and 11,294 at Clements Circle). This was an increase from last year's total of 15,459. There were 635 season passes issued this year. Residents who lived in Section 36 did not receive free passes this year as Clements Circle was open for a full season. Clements Circle and Botsford opened late due to delays in construction on the bathhouses affecting daily pass visits and there was a pump failure at Shelden, closing the pool for three weeks. Shelden's season was extended through August 28 to accommodate for the closure. Our swim lesson program recorded 118 students. We held lessons at Botsford (24 participants) and Clements Circle Pools (94 participants). We also introduced a free swim lesson week at the start of summer session to familiarize Livonia residents with the program; 90 residents attended. ATHLETIC DIVISION Athletic Division provides a wide variety of athletic programs for adults and youth of all ages. Programs include league play men's/women's softball, men's basketball, youth basketball, t -ball, coach pitch, softball, baseball, soccer, archery and tennis. League Play We had more than 5,100 participants play over 2,600 games. We offered the following team sports for participants ranging in age from 4 to 65+. We had over 109,000* contact hours in our athletic programs. W Programs Ages # of Teams # of # of Average Contact Games Players Game Time Hours* Winter Men's Men's 18 & older 22 169 264 1 hour 4,056 Basketball Basketball UAL 18 & under 78 426 977 1.25 hours 12,780 Basketball 958 1195 2 hours 45,984 Spring/ Summer Men's 18 & under 16 118 192 1 hour 2,832 Basketball UAL 18 & under 127 958 1195 2 hours 45,984 Baseball & Softball Collegiate 22 & under 6 90 126 2.5 hours 9,450 Baseball Men's 18 & over 39 267 702 1.25 hours 12,015 Softball Women's 18 & over 7 42 126 1.25 hours 1,890 Softball Co -Ed 18 & over 16 112 288 1.25 hours 5,040 Softball T -Ball ages 5-6 26 96 312 1.25 hours 2,880 Coach Pitch ages 7-8 18 64 216 1.25 hours 1,920 Fall Men's/Coed 18 & over 23 163 414 1.25 hours 7,335 Softball Men's 18 & over 15 104 180 1 hour 2,496 Basketball T -Ball ages 5-6 4 16 48 1.25 hours 480 Coach Pitch ages 7-8 6 24 72 1.25 hours 720 *Contact Hours: 1. Baseball equals number of games x 42 (2 teams @ 21/team) x length of game 2. Softball equals number of games x 36 (2 teams @ 18/team) x length of game 3. Basketball equals number of games x 24 (2 teams @ 12/team) x length of game 4. Youth Programs equals number of games x 24 (2 teams @ 12/team) x length of game 79 5. Co-sponsored equals number of games x 24 (2 teams @ 12/team) x length of game 6. Does not include practice time or number of spectators at games Archery Range The outdoor Archery Range opened this year on April 1. The range has seven targets at various distances and a broad -head range. Several area Boy Scout and Girl Scout groups used the range for badge certifications. The range is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays, from April through October; 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. Sundays, from May through October; and at 4 p.m. to dusk Tuesdays and Thursdays from September through October. Over 610 people used the range through daily admission ($1,118) and season passes ($1,390). Range revenue was $2,508. Ice Skating The City owns two ice arenas, Eddie Edgar (2 sheets) and Devon -Aire (1 sheet). The Livonia Civic Arena manages both rinks and offers leagues, clinics, tournaments ice skating lessons and open skating. COMMUNITY CENTER DIVISION The Community Center, in its 14th year of operation, continues to meet its mission by offering annual memberships and daily admissions for fitness, athletics, class participation, league play, community group partnerships and rentals. Through all the ways we serve the community, the recreation center alone averages over 2,800 visitors per day. Since the center is closed only seven days per year, almost 1 million people come through the door each year. We believe steady membership numbers reflect the desire of people getting in shape and looking for a great place to have fun. The variety of programs and facilities at the Community Center continue to outperform those at any facility in the region. Families continue to be our largest group of members. The skate park continues to be a free park for skateboarders and bikers. Total Annual Membership 13,024 Summer membership 808 Total Day Passes 33,571 Group Day Passes 1787 Many classes and leagues reach the maximum enrollment each session. Swim lessons have continued to be a hallmark of our programs, with over 400 youth honing their skills each session. Drop-in water exercise and group fitness classes continue to meet the needs of people with a varied schedule. :E Total Enrollment 21,718 Aerobics 6,555 Camps 404 Camp Swoosh 1,044 Climbing Wall 747 Fitness Center 807 Leisure Classes 2,033 Personal Training 2,665 Special Events 2,185 Swim Lessons 2,255 Water Exercise 1,219 Special projects completed in 2017 were - 1 . ere:1. Over 700 hours gym time to Livonia Junior Athletic League 2. Purchased 22 new cardio equipment pieces 3. Installed water bottle fill station, potentially saving over 2,500 bottles from the landfill each month 4. New filtration sand for leisure pool and spa 5. Air duct cleaning Fitness and Wellness Fitness and Wellness programming continues to offer great variety: fitness hub workouts, fitness assessments, climbing wall classes, personal training, group personal training, nutritional counseling, massage therapy, group exercise (aerobics) and Livonia's 100 Days to Health wellness program. The fitness hub has remained a very busy area. Equipment orientations are offered free of charge by the personal training staff. We also offer Polar Body Age assessments. The Body Age assessment provides an individual with a baseline measurement of their overall fitness level. The assessment takes into account a number of health and fitness markers including strength, flexibility, percent body fat, nutrition and cardiovascular fitness to calculate the fitness of your body. For youth, we offer two types of orientations: Teens in Training Part I and Teens in Training Part II. The fitness hub has 99 cardio machines, 17 selectorized weight - training machines, 3 cabled functional trainers, 2 sets of 5 lbs. to 100 lbs. dumbbells and 1 set of 20 lbs. to 110 lbs. fixed curl bars. Cardio equipment is also available on the bridge leading to the track, upstairs hallway and in one of the track corners. Also available is an assortment of plate -loaded machines such as a smith machine, squat rack, leg press, calf raise and chest press benches. Another feature is the Cardio Theater function found on most of our cardio equipment. This unit enables the member to tune into a television program while getting their cardio workout. With a staff of 12 certified personal trainers, personal training continues to be utilized on a consistent basis. Members can utilize personal training as an individual, a couple or in a group setting. Members meet with a personal trainer, with frequency dependent on the individual goal. Personal trainers help members become successful with their fitness goals. Nutritional counseling is an additional service, with a registered dietitian on staff. Members meet with the registered dietitian on an individual basis. This service is by appointment only. Members also have an opportunity to meet with our m registered dietitian through some of the nutrition seminars/workshops that are offered periodically. Massage therapy is a service offered to members and non-members. We currently have one certified massage therapist on staff. This service is by appointment only. Massage therapy is currently offered on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays & Saturdays. Group exercise classes (land aerobics) continue to be a popular offering. We currently offer 75 classes, seven days a week. We offer 32 classes in the evenings and 43 classes in the mornings. Most group exercise classes are 50 minutes long. We also offer 30 -minute classes. Zumba, women on weights, boot camp, yoga, cycle, Fit after Fifty, Fit after Sixty, TRX, challenge fitness and Pilates are a few of our most popular classes. We have a total of 36 certified group exercise instructors on staff. Livonia's 100 Days to Health has become a successful, community -wide initiative to build partnerships with area businesses and increase community involvement through programming. The goal of the program is to provide participants with simple, factual and educational information on nutrition, exercise, health and wellness for the entire family. Participants involved in the 100 Days have access to exercise classes, nutrition seminars, wellness seminars, grocery store tours, rock climbing and free workouts and swimming on Fridays at the Kirksey Recreation Center. The program runs from January to April. The 2017 event attracted 738 participants. The 100 -Day Weight Loss Fitness Challenge had 173 participants, losing a combined 578 pounds. The winner for the Weight Loss Challenge lost a total of 67 pounds. Corporate sponsors included the St. Mary's Hospital, Dick's Sporting Goods, Time Too Savor, Perkins Family Wellness, Jimmy John's, and Gazelle Sports. Youth and Adult Leisure In 2017, we continued to offer a variety of leisure classes, expanding all ages and all interests. We strive to offer quality programs at affordable prices for all our customers. Between the two winter sessions, one spring session, one summer session and two fall sessions, we offered close to over 310 (up from 290 in 2016) classes/clinics and multiple day camp experiences for youth. Leisure classes include pre-school developmental classes such as 2's on the Move, Fun 2B Fit, and LOCO! -Motion, Sports and Games. We also expanded our offerings for dance classes and camps for youth! More than 20 different martial arts classes from Tae Kwon Do to Kung Fu and Karate are available. We also offer enrichment art and music classes for youth. New for 2017, S.T.E.A.M programs were added to the lineup as well, including computer programing/coding and engineering classes. This year, we continued to hold monthly Pewabic ceramic workshops for both youth and adults, as well Print Making classes. W Indoor and outdoor sport programs include baseball, volleyball, basketball, soccer, and tennis. They are run in a variety of formats including seven -week class sessions, two- or three-day clinics, week-long camps and instructional leagues. We expanded in our volleyball and tennis offerings also. Two Open House events in 2017 brought in a combined total of 687 non-member guests and resulted in $4,275 "day of membership sales. While Open House goals are to show off the amenities of our facility and the benefits of a membership, they have also served the dual purpose of becoming a community showcase for non -profits and businesses to interact and provide an enriching service (indoor "Easter candy hunt" and "trick or treating") to our participants. Kid Quarters Our short-term child care operation continues to serve the needs of our members, residents and non-residents, allowing parents to stay active and work out while their children are in a safe, friendly and fun environment. There was a total of 4,509 visits to Kid Quarters, which generated just over $14,400 and averaged 376 visits per month. Rentals The opportunity for family, friends and neighbors to use the center for special gatherings is a great way for people to take advantage of the Community Center services. The following events took place in 2017: After Hour Rentals 2 Parties/Gatherings 492 Meetings 9 School Groups 14 Total events 522 There were 485 hours of gym rental as well as 700 hours used by Livonia Junior Athletic League as part of the City sponsorship. Many teams rent gym time during off-season training to keep athletes in shape. After -hour outings are an opportunity to have a more private event. GOLF DIVISION The Golf Division had another successful season in 2017. Depending on how November finishes out, the fiscal year should come close to equaling 2016, and finish above the five-year average in revenue. A lease agreement with Jacobsen, signed early in 2017, highlighted the course news by bringing in 23 pieces of brand new equipment for the maintenance crew! The superintendents at all three courses couldn't have been more pleased, increasing efficiency and spending less time focused on repairs to old equipment. m Rounds Played Whispering Willows 37,387 Idyl Wyld 29,537 Fox Creek 40,661 Total 107,585 Whispering Willows: Whispering Willows had a fantastic 2017. Regardless of how November plays out, the course will finish up over last year, and well above the five-year average. The course was tasked with replacing the superintendent heading into the season and it appears to have worked out very well. Jim Priebe was hired away from Mt Pleasant Country Club where he not only served as Course Superintendent but also General Manager. Mr. Priebe worked on the grounds crew at Whispering Willows in his younger years, and it is great to have him back leading the crew! Fox Creek: Heading into November 2017 was right on par with the record 2016!!! Unfortunately, last November was one of the best Novembers on record, so it will be tough to match. The course will, however, finish up over the five-year average. Outside of the new lease equipment, it was a pretty quiet year for any changes or repairs to the golf course. Idyl Wyld: Idyl Wyld also had to replace the Course Superintendent in early 2017 and long-time assistant Ryan Maxwell was tabbed to step in to the head role, providing a near seamless transition. The majority of course improvements for 2017 were at Idyl Wyld. The most significant project was the construction of two new tee boxes on holes No. 3 & No. 4. Other projects completed include a slight reshaping of hole No. 10 through tree work and widening of the fairway to open up the left side of the hole to help golfers aim more away from Five Mile; repairs made to the bridge on No. 18; and additional cart path repairs made around the course. SPECIAL EVENT DIVISION The Department places great emphasis on special events and programs that bring together families and friends and shape memories. It is our intent to play an integral role in developing community involvement by working with local businesses and civic organizations. A sense of family and individual pride and community spirit is developed through events such as the Daddy/Daughter dance, holiday lunches, Memorial Day Ceremony, summer playground program, Tree Lighting Ceremony, Cardboard As Boat Races, Elk's Hoop Shoot, Indoor and Youth Triathlon, and the Family New Year's Eve Party. In 2017 we continued with our second year of Parks, Performances and Play!, a youth summer concert series, and Harvest Hike & Hunt at Rotary Park. For our playground program, we have continued with our successful blend of park - based programs and local field trips, offering access to over 280 children in the summer of 2017. The Playground Program is a four-hour drop off program that gives children the opportunity to socialize with their peers and connect with positive adult mentors in a safe, creative and activity -based environment. Camp Swoosh continues to provide so much more than just a place for kids to go in the summer. Each week, Camp Swoosh offered kids the opportunity to make friends, build leadership and social skills, use their creative side through art and themed projects, stay physically active and involved, and instill a sense of pride. Over the course of summer 2017, Camp Swoosh staff mentored a total of 87 (more return campers per week vs. previous years) children ages 6-11, while averaging 47 total campers per week (capacity raised to 50 campers in 2017). In addition, our extender care had an average of 16.9 children in the morning session and 19.7 children in the afternoon. Over 10,000 individuals have benefited from participating in our special events, totaling an estimated 71,280 hours of direct contact. Event Ages # of Time # of Contact Co -Sponsored W Days People Hours By Kids Night Out 5-12 12 4 29.67 1,424 Winter Santa's Workshop Gr K-3 2 3 110 75 Livonia Kiwanis Calling Santa Mailbox 7 & 1 0.5 100 50 Livonia Kiwanis under Essay Contest 5-12 1 1 63 63 Friends of the Barn Tree Lighting All 1 3 1,000+ 3,000+ Rotary Club, Ceremony (2016) Libraries, Civic Chorus Lunch with Santa 12 & 1 2 150 300 under W Event Ages # of Time # of Contact Co -Sponsored Days People Hours By Elk's Hoop Shoot 8-13 1 2.5 125 312.5 Livonia Contest/Pancake Elks/LJAL Daddy Daughter 4-16 1 2 435 870 Livonia Elks Dance Lodge Civic Chorus All 1 1 150 150 Civic Chorus Indoor Triathlon 18+ 1 2 56 112 Wolverine S&C Cardboard Boat All 1 4 93 372 Wolverine S&C Races New Year's Eve All 1 3 355 1,065 Wolverine S&C Party Spring Take Pride in All 1 3 146 438 Rotary Club, Livonia Day Scouts, and School Groups Passport to Safety 14 & 1 5 1000+ 5,000 Various under Sponsors Memorial Day All 1 4 200+ 800+ Veteran's Ceremony Alliance Hunter Safety 10 & 1 12 35 420 DNR Course up Dive in Movie 1 ALL 1 4 41 164 Dive in Movie 2 ALL 1 4 36 144 Civic Chorus 18 & up 2 2 200 800 Livonia Civic Concert Chorus Easter Bunny 12 & 1 2 103 200 Optimist club Lunch under Egg Hunt 12 & 1 3 2,000 6,000 Rotary Under Pitch, Hit & Run 7-14 1 3 182 546 LJAL/Wolverine S&C Event Ages # of Time # of Contact Co -Sponsored under Days People Hours By Summer 32 1528 Friends of the under Music From the All 8 1.5 200+ 2,400+ Arts Heart 1,599 Goodfellows, Commission Playground 5-12 35 4 283 39,620 Sponsors Program All 1 3 52 156 Park it movie All 2 6 500 4,000 Multiple night Sponsors Parks 8 & 3 6 400 1,200 Livonia Arts Performances and Under Commission Play Fall Harvest Hike & 12 & 1 2 25 50 Busch's Hunt under Haunted Stroll 12 & 6 32 1528 Friends of the under Barn Turkey Trot All 1 3 430 1,599 Goodfellows, And Corporate Sponsors Spooky Swim All 1 3 52 156 Climbing Wall With a staff of eight attendants/instructors and a coordinator, the climbing wall continues to be a unique feature of the recreation center. The wall has 13 routes, ranging in degree of difficulty to challenge climbers. The wall remains open for use seven days a week. We offer a range of youth and adult climbing classes throughout the weekends. A specialty activity at the climbing wall is the rock wall climbing social every Friday night. Through the climbing social, the center provides the belayer for a fee. PARKS DIVISION Our parks are a great place for families and groups to gather for picnics, outdoor activities or just to visit, walk or hike. We have many amenities, including pavilions, grills, play structures, ball fields, soccer fields, tennis courts, nature trails, walking paths, fitness clusters, in-line courts, playgrounds, sand volleyball courts or Wilson Barn. It is impossible to estimate the number of individuals visiting our parks. Park Maintenance staff keeps up all parks, handles inspections and works with us in providing safe, clean and quality parks that our residents have come to expect. Approximately 359 pavilion permits were issued with an estimated 26,058 attendees for Rotary, John Stymelski, Veteran's, Bicentennial, Clements Circle, Mies and Shelden Parks. Our revenue for the pavilion rentals totaled $38,262.50. The parks also hosted numerous special events and activities. AN MARKETING The Marketing Department strives to promote the assets of the department and influence the lives of those we serve, as well as, develop and cultivate partnerships, collaborations and volunteerism. As a department, we are devoted to offering quality programs and facilities, while providing the highest standards of customer service possible. The L Magazine continues to be our primary source of communicating with our patrons. The L is distributed three times a year to the 39,000 plus households in Livonia, as well as, to non-resident members. The L Magazine is also available on our website. In addition, programs are promoted through the website, Chamber Business Member e -blasts and the Chamber Directory, the City Newsletter, Facebook, promotional videos, member giveaway promotions, visiting local businesses, email blasts, news releases, program and event flyers, and Livonia TV. PLANNING & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT, PLYMOUTH ROAD DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY AND PLANNING COMMISSION Activities and projects handled by the Planning Commission and the Planning Department for the year 2017 included the following: SUBDIVISION PLATS CONSIDERED Preliminary Plats 0 Final Plats 0 PETITIONS PROCESSED Rezoning 7 Waiver of Use 14 Site Plans 11 Cluster Condominiums 2 Sign Permits 0 Greenbelt & Landscape 0 Satellite Dish 0 Lot Splits 13 Extensions 0 Plan Revisions MEETINGS HELD Public Hearings (29 items) 14 Regular Meetings (6 items) 2 Study Meetings (35 items) 16 Special Regular Meetings 1 AMENDMENTS Master Plan Amendments 0 Language Amendments (Ord. 543) 0 Vacating 1 2017 NOTEWORTHY PROJECTS Throughout the past year, the Planning Department was involved in processing approximately 33 petitions involving a variety of projects and activities. Below is a summary of the more noteworthy projects, some of which are still pending approval: 1) Approval to develop a Planned Residential Development under the Single -Family Clustering option (Mystic Creek Condominiums) at 18000, 18040 & 18080 Wayne Road, located on the east side of Wayne Road between Six Mile Road and Curtis Road; 2) Approval to construct and operate a contractor's yard (Dynamic Lawn Service) for the outdoor storage of landscaping equipment and materials at 34434 Rosati Drive, located on the north side of Rosati Drive between Stark Road and Belden Court; 3) Approval to redevelop the site at 19470 Haggerty Road, by demolishing the existing building (former Champps Americana Restaurant) and constructing a new full-service restaurant (BJ's Restaurant & Brewhouse), including expansion of the Class C Liquor License and an outdoor dining patio increasing the overall seating count from 249 to 295, located on the east side of Haggerty Road between Seven Mile and Eight Mile Roads; 4) Approval to operate an animal day care facility (4 -Legged Friends Daycare) at 33501 Eight Mile Road, located on the south side of Eight Mile Road between Farmington and Gill Roads; 5) Approval to construct a gas station at 27430 Seven Mile Road, located on the northwest corner of Seven Mile and Inkster Roads; 6) Approval to operate a full-service restaurant with drive -up window facilities and outdoor seating on the site of the commercial development known as Livonia Market II at 29659 Seven Mile Road, located on the south side of Seven Mile Road between Middlebelt Road and Melvin Avenue; 7) Approval to operate a martial arts and yoga studio (10th Planet Michigan) at 12924 Farmington Road within the Livonia Trade Center, located on the east side of Farmington Road between the CSX railroad right-of-way and Schoolcraft Road; 8) Approval to develop and operate an outdoor storage yard (Moore Outside Storage) for recreational equipment and special trade contractors at 12350 Merriman Road, located on the east side of Merriman Road between Plymouth Road and the CSX Railroad right- of-way; 9) Approval to use the building at 27565 Grand River Avenue for office space, storage and e-commerce in association with the business operations of a pawn shop (Great Lakes Pawn), located on the south side of Grand River Avenue between Inkster and Eight Mile Roads; 10) Approval to remodel the exterior of the existing restaurant (Wendy's) at 27526 Grand River Avenue, located on the north side of Grand River Avenue between Inkster Road and Eight Mile Road; 11) Approval to remodel the exterior of the commercial strip center (Middlebelt Plaza) at 18730-18790 Middlebelt Road, located on the east side of Middlebelt Road between Pickford Avenue and Seven Mile Road; 12) Approval to develop a site condominium (Adams Court) consisting of two (2) single-family homes at 38801 Plymouth Road, located on the south side of Plymouth Road between Alois Avenue and Eckles Road; 13) Approval to develop a Planned Residential Development under the Single -Family Clustering option (Bishop Estates) at 28200 Lyndon Avenue, located on the north side of Lyndon Avenue between Inkster Road and Harrison Avenue; 14) Approval to construct a chapel addition to the hospital (St. Mary Mercy Hospital) located at 36475 Five Mile Road, located on the southwest corner of Five Mile and Levan Roads; 15) Approval to construct an addition and remodel the interior of Livonia Fire Station No. 1 at 14910 Farmington Road, located on the east side of Farmington Road between Lyndon Avenue and Five Mile Road; 16) Approval to construct a retail addition to the previously approved restaurant (BJ's Restaurant & Brewhouse) located at 19470 Haggerty Road, located on the east side of Haggerty Road between Seven Mile and Eight Mile Roads; 17) Approval to develop a site condominium (Baci Estates) consisting of four (4) detached single-family homes at 10014 Levan Road, located on the east side of Levan Road between Ann Arbor Trail and Plymouth Road; 18) Approval to expand and renovate the interior and exterior of the building at 13335 Farmington Road for use as the City of Livonia the Department of Public Works administrative offices and garage, located on the west side of Farmington Road between the CSX Railroad right- of-way and Schoolcraft Road; 19) Approval to modify the exterior appearance of the existing KFC restaurant at 29060 Plymouth Road, located on the north side of Plymouth Road between Camden Avenue and Middlebelt Road; 2017 STUDIES, SURVEYS AND REPORTS PREPARED Lot Splits Reports — 13 Language Amendments — 0 Vacating Reports — 1 Disposal of City -Owned Property Reports — Fully Digitized In-house Petition Books • 1953 thru 1964 • 1965 thru 1976 • 1977 thru 1999 a • 2000 thru Present • City-wide overall map Update Future Land Use Map Prepared Zoning Ordinance Amendments All Minutes Have Been Archived Using Laserfiche PLYMOUTH ROAD DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY The Planning and Economic Development Department continues to provide support to the Plymouth Road Development Authority (PRDA). This past year, the PRDA has focused primarily on working with DTE on a plan to replace the street lighting system. The system contains over 450 decorative light posts and teardrop luminaires equipped with high -efficiency LED lights. Three (3) replacement options are currently being evaluated. City Council will make the final decision as the funds needed to complete the project will come from sources other than the PRDA's annual budget. Other major work along the corridor this past year included paving Plymouth Road from Farmington Road east to Inkster Road. LIVONIA BROWNFIELD REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY The Livonia Brownfield Redevelopment Authority (LBRA) was established in 2008 to help facilitate the implementation of brownfield redevelopment plans and promote the revitalization, redevelopment, and reuse of blighted, functionally obsolete and environmentally contaminated properties. Currently, the LBRA is overseeing two (2) active brownfield projects: Livonia Marketplace and Livonia Commons. Both have reimbursement agreements that rely on tax increment financing to repay the developer for brownfield eligible costs, such as building demolition, lead and asbestos abatement, and contaminated soil remediation. Throughout the course of the year, the LBRA met three (3) times. The Authority meets regularly twice per year to authorize the disbursement of captured tax dollars for the two (2) active projects in accordance with each of the respective reimbursement agreements. The third meeting, held in September, was to review a new brownfield plan and reimbursement agreement relating to the redevelopment of the former Farmer Jack property located on Seven Mile Road, just west of Middlebelt Road. On December 4, 2017, City Council granted approval to the project, allowing for a maximum repayment of approximately $1.5M in eligible costs over a 11 -year period. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT The Planning Department oversees and coordinates the activities and functions of the Economic Development Department, whose primary mission is to lend assistance to commercial and industrial businesses by administering a variety of economic incentive programs and initiatives that help attract new business into the community, as well as provide assistance to existing businesses to help them thrive and grow. Integrating economic development with the activities of the Planning Department provides a high level of governmental efficiency that helps reduce costs and expedites the local review and approval process. It enables 91 concurrent review of projects with both planning and economic considerations. More often than not, the ability to provide timely decisions is critical to the success of a project. Multiple development projects took place throughout the year including office, retail, industrial, hospitality and residential. Such investments include the Amazon fulfillment center (DET1), 39000 Amrhein, a million -square -foot building housing approximately 1,500 employees, with the potential to increase to over 1,700 employees during the holidays. Republic National Distributing Company (RNDC), the second-largest beverage alcohol distributor of premium wine and spirits in the U.S., purchased 32 acres of land on the property adjacent to Amazon. Construction began on RNDC's new 550,000 -square -foot warehouse, which will bring 400-450 jobs to the area. Adding to the industrial footprint in Livonia are two new warehouse facilities on the campus of the Livonia Corporate Center, located at 28101-28401 Schoolcraft Road. This $25 million investment includes Building 1 is 172,646 square feet and Building 2 is 741,984 square feet. Expected completion for both buildings was late fall 2017. Tenants have yet to be announced. Other development projects that continued to reshape the 1-96 corridor are the newly constructed Holiday Inn Express at 27451 Schoolcraft Road, the Hampton Inn at 28101 Schoolcraft Road and the Livonia Safety Mini -Storage being developed on the site of the old Cloverlanes Bowling Alley property. Business growth continued to be a trend in 2017 in the Livonia Chamber. There were over 40 business grand openings and/or ribbon cutting events throughout the year including Burke Architectural & Millwork, Athletika Sports and Fitness, Dunkin' Donuts, Goodyear, Grand Tavern, Joe's Plaza, St. Joe's Healthy Urgent Care, Masco, The Confucius Institute, and VACO. The City of Livonia's unemployment rate as of October 2017 was 2.0% which is down from 3.3% in 2016 and 3.0% in 2015. The National average is 4.2%, the State of Michigan is 4.7%, and Wayne County is 4.8%. Livonia's industrial market continues on a trend of positive net absorption and leasing activity. The City has over 30 million square feet of classified industrial space. The industrial vacancy rate closed the year with an all-time low of 3%. According to CoStar, a commercial real estate tracking and information service, there were over 100 industrial leases and/or sales transactions over the past 12 months. The largest single sales transaction involved the sale of two office properties at 17870-17876 Farmington Road and 17880-17940 Farmington Road. The property sold for $4.45 million, or $80.18/square foot. The seller was Hamama Investments and the new owner is Marion CRE Inc. The largest lease transaction involved Amazon, which signed a long-term lease to occupy 1 million square feet in the Livonia West Corporate Center located at 39000 Amrhein on the site of the former GM Spring and Bumper Plant. Looking at other sectors of Livonia's economy, retail occupancy remains steady at 92.3% consistent with last year's rate. Occupancy in the office market has remained relatively stable at 89.6%, which is slightly up from last year at 88%. The Economic Development Department also assists individuals and business owners wishing to further expand and or grow their operation in Livonia. In 2017, the Economic Development Department provided over 22 property search inquires through the use of CoStar in various sectors ranging from office, retail and industrial. In 2017, the Economic Development Office provided assistance to many businesses. Listed below are a few of the companies and a project summary: MASCO CORPORATION Masco is a global leader in the design, manufacturing and distribution of branded home improvement and building products. Masco invested over $22 million to move their 91,000+ square foot World Headquarters operations to the campus of Schoolcraft College. Additionally, this strategic move brings approximately 250 employees to the community. An official Grand Opening event was celebrated on July 31, 2017. Masco was awarded a 12 -year tax abatement. AMAZON Amazon first approached the Planning and Economic Development Department late last summer under the code name "Project Hamilton." A team of representatives from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, Wayne County, DTE Energy and the City worked with Amazon to create an incentive package, leading to Amazon signing a lease with Ashley Capital. Amazon qualified for a 12 -year tax abatement by means of an Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificate (I FEC). For the 2016 tax year, the property was treated as vacant, and just under $14,000 was collected in City tax revenue. Once the project is complete, the estimated revenue to the City, with the tax abatement, will exceed $234,000 per year. Upon expiration of the tax abatement in 12 years, the full City millage rate will apply, and the amount of tax revenue to the City will effectively double from the preceding year. FORD MOTOR COMPANY Ford Motor Company announced in May that it will invest $350 million to support the production of a new transmission for front -wheel drive vehicles, creating or retaining 800 hourly jobs. According to Ford officials, the new jobs will be added later in 2017, with the majority added next year and in 2019. GIL-MAR Gil -Mar Manufacturing Company is a fabricating, machining, welding and light assembly manufacturer for the automotive and military markets. To accommodate its growing needs, Gil -Mar looked to the City to further expand the operation. In September, Gil -Mar purchased the 85,000 -square -foot industrial building at 12841 93 Stark Road and plans to renovate the building into its headquarters. The Planning and Economic Development Office provided assistance in the early planning and site selection stages prior to acquiring the building to assure expansion needs could be met. Gil -Mar expects to take occupancy in early 2018. REPUBLIC NATIONAL DISTRIBUTING COMPANY (RNDC) RNDC, the second largest beverage alcohol distributor of premium wine and spirits in the U.S., purchased approximately 32 acres of land on the property adjacent to Amazon in March 2017. RNDC is constructing its 550,000 -square foot warehouse at 13000 Eckles Road. The $63 million investment will bring 400-450 jobs when it opens, which is expected to be early 2019. INFINEON TECHNOLOGIES The Michigan Economic Development Corporation reached out to the Planning and Economic Development Department in early fall on behalf of Infineon's search for incentives to support growth and expansion needs in Livonia. MISCELLANEOUS RETENTION AND ATTRACTION PROJECTS The Livonia Economic Development Department conducts regular business retention visits as part of the ongoing Business Visitation Program, in order to learn about the local business climate, address concerns and provide information on local and or state incentive programs. In 2017, the Department visited over 100 businesses, in addition to supporting grand opening events and spearheading the new business Welcome Wagon Program in partnership with over 50 businesses. On eight different retention visits, a representative from the Wayne County Economic Development Office and the MEDC joined the City representative to provide business owners with a broader scope of information and resources to address their needs. Below are some of the companies and organizations the Economic Development Department worked with over the past year: 2017 STORCH Gil -Mar Ford Ashley Capital Amazon RNDC Hercules Drawn Steel EXCEL Infineon Technologies Schostak Brothers Livonia Marketplace Soave Homes SCIAKY PSI L'Es irit End Grain Woodworking Furs -A -FI in United Road M iWorks/S E M CA Legal Shield Vibe Credit Union Nestle Waters NYX, Inc. Feldman Chevrolet BJ's Restaurant and Brewhouse Haggerty Marketplace MARKETING & PROMOTION In an effort to promote Livonia as the ideal place to live, work and play, the Economic Development Department initiated a number of marketing and promotional strategies, such as: 1) Establishing a business and community development blog. Articles are emailed to subscribers, then pushed out on other City social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. 2) Establishing a Livonia New Resident Welcome Page and Packet in conjunction with our Marketing Team. 3) Initiating the New Business Welcome Wagon program by partnering with local business. The Masco Welcome Program included 28 local businesses and the Amazon Welcome Program had 37 local businesses. It should be noted that as of October 2017, Realtor.com® ranked Livonia's zip code 48154 as the second hottest zip code in real estate sales nationwide among millennials. MAPS The Planning Department has prepared many new maps for City use and has revised others. These maps are used at the various public hearings conducted by the Planning Commission and City Council. The maps are also made available to other City departments and groups. COMPREHENSIVE MASTER PLAN After nearly a yearlong effort by the Planning Department to develop a detailed RFP, form a steering committee, solicit proposals, and evaluate and interview consultants, a comprehensive master plan project began in earnest when the Livonia City Council on November 1, 2017, approved a professional service agreement with McKenna Associates, serving as the lead consultant, and OHM Advisors, as the subconsultant. This long-awaited project, which is expected to take approximately a year, has a broad scope. It includes a wide variety of community planning related issues, and has been specifically developed to ensure that the following expectations are met: 95 1. The Comprehensive Master Plan reflects the community's desired direction for the future. 2. The Comprehensive Master Plan identifies strategies for priority redevelopment areas. 3. The Comprehensive Master Plan addresses land use and infrastructure, including complete streets and connected and automated vehicles. 4. The Comprehensive Master Plan includes a zoning plan. 5. The Comprehensive Master Plan incorporates recommendations for implementation including goals, actions, timelines, resources, priorities and responsible parties. 6. The Comprehensive Master Plan will continue to be reported on annually to the governing body. 7. The Comprehensive Master Plan will be accessible online. GIS The Planning Department continues to work closely with the Information Systems Department and other City Departments involved in the development and maintenance of the City's desktop Geographic Information System (GIS). The City's GIS is a powerful collection of computer hardware and software designed to visualize, explore, query and analyze data geographically. The Planning Department utilizes the GIS on a daily basis for a variety of planning related tasks including: mapping, obtaining land use statistics and information, generating mailing labels for public notification purposes, and much more. As part of its responsibility of providing accurate and current land use information, the Planning Department maintains the following spatial GIS layers and accompanying attribute information: Zoning Liquor Licenses Existing Land Use Cell Towers Future Land Use Truck Routes Building Footprints Act 198 Industrial Districts Control Zones PLANNING DATABASE The Planning Department continues to expand the use of its computer database, which was designed and developed for the purpose of tracking and storing information on the various petitions that the Department is responsible for overseeing. The new database was created with several benefits in mind, including faster and more efficient delivery of information to residents, other City Departments and developers, better record keeping, and expandability and compatibility with other computer software programs including the GIS. The Planning database was developed using Microsoft Access and includes detailed information on each petition including the type of project, the review procedure, the applicant, critical deadlines (i.e., public notification), past history, zoning, etc. Select information can be linked directly with the GIS and viewed in a spatial context. For example, maps can be generated showing the locations of all properties involved in certain types of land use proposals (i.e., restaurants), over a given period of time. As of December 5, 2017, the Planning database contains detailed information on approximately 3,272 petitions. ASSISTANCE TO OTHERS Each year, hundreds of hours are spent assisting other City departments, Livonia Public Schools and neighboring cities. LIVONIA DIVISION OF POLICE The Livonia Police Department is the seventh largest police department in the State of Michigan. The Police Administration consists of the Chief of Police, one Deputy Chief of Police, and three Captains who are Division Commanders. Two civilians provide administrative support, including payroll and benefit administration, employee records, and financial tracking. In 2017, the police department added 20 members to its staff; however, the police department also experienced 18 separations of service. We are committed to maintaining adequate staffing levels without sacrificing the high standard of qualifications of candidates. As of December 1, 2017, the Police Department remains 12 police officers short of our goal. SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION The Support Services Division is responsible for the efficient day-to-day operation of the Department. Important functions include preparing and maintaining the budget, purchasing, training, personnel, labor relations, contacts with citizens groups, as well as providing reports to the Mayor's Office, City Council, City Clerk, and various City Commissions. Training During fiscal year 2017, the Training Division coordinated the attendance of our officers at more than 160 off-site, in-service training courses and administered the state training resources, as well as the federal Bullet Proof Vest Grant. The Training Division also ensured that all officers completed the MCOLES Firearms Proficiency Standards, including our Reserve Officers, and conducted 22 firearms training sessions throughout the year. All of the Dispatchers attended the required number of courses to comply with State Law, and the reporting of the 9-1-1 funds was conducted in accordance with the grant. Our annual Police Officer Refresher Training (PORTS) covered: Subject Control; Emergency Vehicle Operations/P.I.T.; Reality -Based Scenarios Utilizing Force -on - Force Simulations; Active Shooter/Rapid Deployment Tactics; Legal Update; and Cultural Diversity. This training was in addition to mandatory training sessions 97 which covered: Intermediate Weapons Recertification; CPR; Emotional Disturbed Person Response Tactics; De-escalation and Verbal Techniques; Body Camera Training; and Perimeter Tactics. The Training Division coordinated with the Civil Service Department on hiring 15 new Police Service Aides, three Police Officers, and two Dispatchers. Five Police Service Aides were promoted to the rank of Police Officer during this period. Communications — Dispatcher Responsibilities The Dispatch Center equipment includes the computer-aided dispatch terminals, 9-1-1 premise equipment, early warning sirens, cable override capabilities, Law Enforcement Information Network (LEIN) teletype equipment, etc. In 2017, there were a total of 48,857 calls to 9-1-1; 38,202 of which were wireless calls. There are currently 11 dispatchers assigned. Communications is also responsible for the building's Uninterruptible Power Supply system and its battery bank, as well as the proper testing and operation of our emergency generator. Computer Services Computer Services is responsible for research and development, maintenance, implementation, training, support, and purchasing for the Police and Fire Departments' 300 -plus computer devices, software and specialty equipment. This includes: desktops, mobile scout car computers, printers, servers, fingerprint identification equipment, video and audio devices, surveillance equipment, as well as wireless and Bluetooth devices. Computer Services also supports multiple networks including all fire stations, the CLEMIS consortium, and mobile scout car wireless communications. Additionally, Computer Services is responsible for the 9-1-1 Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) Director's duties. In all, over 3,500 projects, support calls, and service requests have been completed for 2017. In 2017, Computer Services upgraded or replaced over 40 computers and supported the deployment of new, faster modems for scout cars, as well as printers. Livonia Police Department's jail management system was upgraded and deployed in the first quarter of 2017. The new CLEMIS CAD system was configured and went live at the Police Department during the second quarter of 2017. Additionally, the department's recording system was upgraded; 9-1-1 data lines were upgraded to improve deliverability; assistance was provided for the updated Emergency Operations Center; a temporary network connection was provided for the Fire Department's Construction Project; and the Police Department's network was expanded to accept the Body Camera implementation. Central Records Central Records is staffed with six full-time civilians. This bureau reviews and files all arrest and history information and verifies/updates information on Incident Reports, as required by the State of Michigan. In addition, they fulfill Freedom of Information requests, subpoenas and discovery orders, electronically fingerprint citizens for record checks, and are responsible for the issuance of pistol purchase permits. Central Records personnel also update criminal records information as necessary. Property and Licensing The Property and Licensing Unit is staffed by one Police Officer and a full-time civilian. The main function of the Property and Licensing Unit is to receive, document and store evidential and non -evidential property coming into the possession of the Livonia Police Department. Other work activities include the control and tracking of impounded and abandoned vehicles; oversight of vehicle auctions conducted by towing agencies; categorizing and submitting confiscated firearms and other miscellaneous weapons to the Michigan State Police for destruction; and licensing investigations authorized under Title 5 of the Livonia Code of Ordinances. INVESTIGATIVE DIVISION The Investigative Division is comprised of several units including the Detective Bureau; Crime Scene Unit; Crime Prevention; Special Victims Unit/Polygraph; Court Services/Liquor Control Enforcement; Internet Crimes Against Children; School Resource; and Crime Analysis. The Investigative Division Lieutenant is in charge of six Sergeants, 12 Police Officers, one Clerk Typist and two civilian analysts. Detective Bureau The Detective Bureau is currently staffed with three Sergeants and four Police Officers. Their responsibilities include the investigation of most of the reported crimes. These include assaults, robberies, burglaries, larcenies and frauds. Detroit Commercial Auto Theft (DCAT) Unit One Police Officer is assigned to the Detroit Commercial Auto Theft (DCAT) Unit, which investigates individuals, as well as organized groups, involved in auto theft, carjackings, and larceny from autos in the metropolitan Detroit area, including Livonia. Crime Scene Unit One Sergeant, one Police Officer, and one civilian analyst make up the Crime Scene Unit. This unit is responsible for processing crime scenes, which includes the collection and analysis of evidence. Crime Prevention A Police Sergeant is assigned to Crime Prevention. His duties include: supervision of the School Resource Officers and interaction with the Livonia Public Schools Administration; conducting tours of the police station, as well as teaching crime prevention techniques to civic groups and businesses. In coordination with the Chief of Police, the Crime Prevention Officer conducted approximately 75 community service events including Detroit Police Department's Field Day; ALPACT; Run to Save Our Youth; Passport to Safety; Citizens Police Academy; and public appearances at neighborhood block parties. The Crime Prevention Officer also helps increase community outreach efforts via social media. The Crime Prevention Officer is responsible for research, compilation, analysis, mapping of crime trends/patterns, and the distribution of such findings throughout the department. The information assists patrol, investigative and administrative staff in planning the deployment of resources for the prevention, intervention, and suppression of criminal activities within the city. Special Victims Unit/Polygraph The Special Victims Unit is comprised of one Sergeant and one Police Officer. This unit investigates domestic violence and sexual assault cases. The Polygraph Operator retired this year and has yet to be replaced (Sergeant). Court Services/Liquor Control Enforcement One Police Officer and one civilian analyst, under the supervision of a Detective Bureau Sergeant, are assigned to Court Services/LCC Enforcement. They handle the daily court activity and process all warrants. They also investigate Michigan Liquor Control Commission license applicants and enforce the MLCC laws. Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) One Sergeant is assigned to the Michigan State Police Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Unit. The ICAC Unit investigates individuals who, via the Internet, attempt to lure minors for illicit acts. This Sergeant also conducts investigations with the F.B.I. Southeast Michigan Trafficking and Exploitation Crimes (SEMTEC) Task Force and the U.S. Secret Service. School Resource Unit The School Resource Unit is comprised of three Police Officers who are assigned to the middle and high schools. They provide a liaison between the police and schools and investigate any crimes that occur at the schools. The Clerk Typist serves as an Office Manager responsible for daily logs, employee time records, Sex Offender Registry, canceling warrant recalls, and handling writs issued by various courts UNIFORM DIVISION Patrol Bureau The Patrol Bureau is comprised of one Captain, four Lieutenants, 12 Sergeants, 60 Police Officers, 15 Police Service Aides, 11 Dispatchers, and one Vehicle Maintenance Coordinator. The Patrol Bureau provides around-the-clock assistance, protection, and law enforcement to the City of Livonia. 100 Traffic Bureau The Traffic Bureau consists of one Sergeant, three road officers, one Motor Carrier (commercial vehicle) Enforcement officer, and one desk officer. All Traffic Bureau personnel have been trained in basic traffic crash investigation, which is the primary focus of this bureau. Four officers in this bureau are also trained in accident reconstruction. This bureau investigates all fatal and serious injury crashes, which are surveyed and photographed with an extensive technical follow- up investigation. Secondary responsibilities include: investigation and prosecution of traffic -related crimes; civil forfeiture of vehicles for drunk and drugged driving; selective traffic enforcement activities; traffic crash pattern analysis; engineering enhancement recommendations for improved traffic flow and increased safety; breath test instrument calibrations; hiring and supervision of school crossing guards; training and monitoring of all speed enforcement equipment; and Planning Board/Zoning Board research and recommendations. The Traffic Bureau Sergeant is an ad-hoc member of the Livonia Traffic Commission and attends all meetings. Additional Traffic Bureau responsibilities include: completion of numerous injury and property damage crash investigations; hit and run crash investigations; reckless driving complaints; fleeing and eluding investigations; reviewing all crash reports; and tracking and reviewing all drunk driving arrests and related vehicle forfeitures. The Strategic Traffic Accident Reduction (S.T.A.R.) program and the Safe Communities grant program (Click -It or Ticket and Over the Limit, Under Arrest) are both managed by the Traffic Bureau. Community Service Bureau The Community Service Bureau is managed by one Police Officer who reports to the Patrol Operations Lieutenant. This officer also serves on the Board of the Livonia Anniversary Committee and is responsible for planning and implementing all public safety aspects of the annual Spree Festival. The Community Service Bureau is responsible for the administration of the Police Reserve Program, which currently consists of 39 Reserve Officers. Reserve Officers provide police presence at special community events, such as the Livonia Spree, school functions, and miscellaneous civic events. Reserve Officers also respond to snow emergencies, downed power lines, and situations where crowd control is required. In addition, Reserve Officers function as support personnel at the 16th District Court, and serve as vehicle maintenance officers for the Livonia Police Department. During 2017, uniformed personnel in this bureau worked 12,425 hours. The total cost of services for the year is estimated at $179,546, with fractional reimbursement, which is determined by City Council Resolution, at $81,507 and discounted unsubsidized services in the amount of $98,038. This Bureau also oversees the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT). The Livonia CERT unit consists of 62 members who are trained in disaster response skills, such as medical operations, light search and rescue, and fire safety. In 2017, CERT members worked 17 activations throughout Southeastern Michigan. 101 Special Operations Unit The Special Operations Unit (SOU) consists of one Sergeant and six Police Officers; two of these officers are K-9 officers. The unit is under the guidance and control of the Patrol Operations Lieutenant. This unit works in uniform or plain clothes, depending on the assignment. The primary function of the SOU is to identify crime trends or patterns and saturate these problem areas with the goal of making arrests. The SOU became operational in May 2017. Since then, SOU officers have made 72 arrests, 39 of which were for felony crimes. The SOU works closely with the Intelligence Bureau and the Detective Bureau in order to isolate particular areas to focus upon. The SOU is also tasked with looking for and apprehending subjects on outstanding warrants. INTELLIGENCE BUREAU The Intelligence Bureau is staffed by one Lieutenant, five Sergeants, nine Police Officers and one Clerk Typist. Their responsibilities are as follows: • As the Officer -In -Charge, the Lieutenant supervises all members of the bureau and is responsible for the management and administration of the bureau. The Lieutenant reports directly to the Chief of Police. • Two Sergeants directly supervise a crew of six Police Officers who are responsible for all narcotics enforcement and criminal surveillance affecting the City of Livonia. • One Sergeant handles all of the narcotics evidence for the department and narcotics case preparation, to include court presentation and civil forfeiture actions. Western Wayne Narcotics One Sergeant is assigned to the Michigan State Police — Western Wayne Narcotics unit. This unit consists of our officer and officers from the Michigan State Police, Plymouth Township, Canton Township, Northville Township, Northville City, Detroit, and Van Buren Township. This unit is responsible for developing and prosecuting narcotics cases in the Western Wayne County communities. Combined Hotel Interdiction Enforcement Team (CHIEF) - FBI One Police Officer is assigned to the Combined Hotel Interdiction Enforcement (C.H.I.E.F.) Task Force. This unit consists of our officer, along with officers from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI); Federal Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA); United States Border Patrol; Department of Homeland Security; Michigan State Police; Allen Park; Brownstown Township; Romulus; Royal Oak; Woodhaven and the Wayne County Airport Authority Police Department. This unit is responsible for disrupting illegal drug trafficking in the Detroit Metropolitan area by detecting and targeting violators and trafficking organizations that are primarily utilizing hotels to facilitate drug trafficking. 102 Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team (DFAT) - USMS One Police Officer is assigned to a United States Marshal Service Fugitive Apprehension Team. This unit is responsible for the arrest of felony fugitives who have fled prosecution in local, state and federal criminal cases. Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) - FBI One Sergeant is assigned to the Federal Bureau of Investigation Joint Terrorism Task Force. Our Sergeant is assigned to a squad that includes agents from the FBI, along with agents and officers from multiple other federal and local law enforcement agencies. This unit, comprised of four squads, is responsible for the investigation and apprehension of individuals and groups that are involved in domestic terrorism activities in the Southeastern Michigan region. Violent Crimes Task Force (VCTF) - FBI One Police Officer is assigned to the Federal Bureau of Investigation Violent Crimes Task Force. This unit consists of our officer and agents from the FBI; Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF); Michigan State Police; Detroit Police Department; Wayne County Sheriff Department; and Michigan Department of Corrections (MDOC). This unit is responsible for identifying and targeting for prosecution individuals and criminal enterprise groups responsible for committing violent crimes such as homicide, carjacking, robbery, kidnapping, and firearms violations. The Clerk Typist serves as an Office Manager responsible for daily supplies, records management, and employee time records. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS The City of Livonia is recognized as an independent/stand-alone Emergency Management Program by the State of Michigan under Public Act 390 and is consistent with the National Incident Management System (NIMS). The purpose of Livonia's Emergency Management Program is to facilitate the means necessary to prevent, prepare, mitigate, respond to and recover from emergencies, natural disasters and acts of terrorism as required under the National Response Framework (NRF). Primary responsibilities include planning, training, equipment procurement, exercise and the management and administration of Livonia personnel and resources charged with responding to major incidents. Along with these primary responsibilities, Livonia's Emergency Management Program focuses on being an emergency preparedness resource for the citizens and business community for any type of emergency. The City's Director of Emergency Preparedness is responsible for the overall organization and management of Livonia's Emergency Management Program, ensuring compliance with all applicable state and federal requirements. The Director of Emergency Preparedness is an appointed position and works closely with local, county, regional, state, federal, private and volunteer partners involved in emergency management and homeland security. 103 During 2017, the Emergency Preparedness Department initiated the daunting task of completing a full update/revision of the Livonia Emergency Operations Plan, which is required every four years. The Plan was submitted for review and was subsequently approved for another four-year period by the State of Michigan's Emergency Management and Homeland Security Division. Other emergency preparedness activities included procuring and managing Justice Assistance Grants (JAGs), which provide equipment to enhance the City's emergency response capabilities. Livonia's Emergency Management Department applied for, and was authorized to submit, a grant for Federal Hazardous Mitigation funding for four additional emergency warning sirens, based upon the 2014 flooding that resulted in a Presidential Disaster Declaration for Southeast Michigan. In the fall of 2016, the Emergency Preparedness Department was informed that the grant was approved by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) with the final siren installation and grant close-out occurring in the spring of 2017. The purchase and installation of these additional emergency warning sirens will significantly enhance Livonia's ability to provide timely outdoor warnings to the public of a pending emergency. The Department was responsible for procuring and managing Detroit Southeast Michigan Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) grants which provide for the training and purchase of equipment that increase the interoperability of the City, as well as the Western Wayne County Mobile Field Force (MFF) and Western Wayne County Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) law enforcement specialty teams. Additional funding was obtained to purchase tactical surveillance and tactical medic equipment for first responders, which consisted of both police and fire personnel. The replacement of worn, outdated helmets and other equipment for the Western Wayne Special Operations Team (SOT) was also secured. Additional funding was obtained through UASI grants that provided new equipment for the MFF that will allow them to better handle potential civil unrest situations where protestors may secure themselves to immovable objects. Additional activities in 2017 include participating in a full-scale Detroit Metro Airport terrorist based exercise that involved numerous local rescue, fire and law enforcement agencies, individuals from state and federal law enforcement, as well as multiple private and public agencies. The Emergency Preparedness Department conducted ongoing training for City emergency response personnel, as well as general employees and outside partners as required by the Department of Homeland Security, in accordance with the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the National Response Framework (NRF). The Emergency Preparedness Department represents the City and engages with multiple local, county, regional and state homeland security and emergency management organizations, as well as sitting on several state work groups, policy groups, and regional boards for emergency management and homeland security. 104 The Emergency Preparedness Department is part of the State of Michigan's Emergency Alert Policy Development group and represents Wayne County on the non-profit grant administration group. The Department continues to provide mass notification abilities for Livonia Public Schools, Clarenceville Public Schools, and parochial schools, as well as conducting communications drills. The Emergency Management Department facilitated the development of Mutual Aid Agreements with various private businesses in the City, enhancing interoperability among public and private partners. Livonia's Emergency Management Program is an all -hazard based program that partners with the community, both public and private. This partnership with the citizens and businesses of Livonia was accomplished through outreach campaigns and through conducting emergency planning presentations/exercises with public and private partners including, but not limited to, Schoolcraft College; University of Michigan Surgical Centers; UAW Local 182; the Civil Air Patrol; Livonia Rotary Clubs; and the Livonia Amateur Radio Club. The Emergency Preparedness Department, along with Livonia's Civil Service Department, hosted training to provide informational seminars to city employees, as well as public and private partners, on Active Shooting incidents. Additional community-based activities included partnering with the National Weather Service to bring "Skywarn" training to the citizens of Livonia; providing assistance to Livonia's health care and long-term care facilities with new federal and state emergency preparedness mandates; hosting the Livonia Amateur Radio Club's (LARC) annual "QSO" communications drill; completing the upgrade of the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) for better functionality and ease of use for personnel that may fill a position during its activation; partnering with the Department of Homeland Security in the "See Something, Say Something" campaign to provide Public Service Announcements to the public; continuing with FEMA's emergency preparedness campaigns, as well as the City's "Eyes and Ears" program. The Emergency Management program continues to maintain oversight of the citizen based Community Emergency Response Team (CERT). The Livonia CERT continues to be a model program, with members volunteering in both Livonia and regional activities/emergencies. This year, the Livonia CERT assisted on a regional basis, taking part in the Canton Cup; Canton Liberty Fest; Dearborn Memorial Day Parade; Lincoln Park Parade; and the Melvindale Summer Fest, just to name a few. Livonia events consisted of the Livonia Spree; Highland Games; Red, White and BBQ Festival; Passport to Safety; and Livonia Fire Department's Open House. Livonia CERT has just over 4,300 volunteer hours to date, between call -outs, local events and training. 105 ACTIVITIES CENTRAL RECORDS Activity 2016 Amount Est. 2017 Amount Accident Reports 914 $12,432 939 $23,718 Incident Reports 283 $1,350 261 $1,305 Fingerprints — City 719 $10,805 860 $12,900 Fingerprints — State 304 $16,098 414 $21,776 Fingerprints — N/C 106 -16% 68 215 LCC 11 $17,550 17 $24,042 Purchase Permits 480 $2,400 490 $2,450 Purchase Permits — N/C 3,896 3690 Record Clearance/Checks 160 $960 170 $1,020 Record Clearance/Checks - N/C 1,330 1,796 Public Vehicle License — Renew 2 $24 0 0 FOIA / Discovery 914 $7,809 411 $8,915 FOIA / Discover — NC 696 Miscellaneous (Jail Phone, Vehicle Forfeiture, etc.) 130 $30,626 137 $42,279 Warrant Processing Fee 1486 1$4,804 1477 1$4,770 TOTAL REVENUE $104,858 $143,175 PROPERTY & LICENSING Activity 2016 Est. 2017 % Change Public Vehicle Permit Applications/Renewals 2 0 -200% Taxi Cab Inspections 2 0 -200% Business License Applications 204 1296 1 +45% Impounded/Abandoned Vehicles Processed 1,650 1 1,768 1 +7% Property Items Received/Processed 4,489 15,318 1 +18% INVESTIGATIVE DIVISION Activity 2016 Est. 2017 % Change Total Cases Investigated 5089 5100 +.2% Felony Warrant Requests 326 386 +18% Misdemeanor Warrants Requested 1271 1300 +2% Crime Scenes Processed 96 90 -6% Vehicles Processed 64 72 +12% Pieces of Evidence Processed 2289 1900 -16% Latent Prints Identified 215 225 +4% Reports by Crime Scene Unit 290 230 -20% 106 AFIS Cases 1028 1068 +3% Polygraphs Administered 7 4 -42% Referrals to Youth Assistance 17 18 +5% MLCC Reports 19 20 +5% MLCC Inspections on site & deco 68 80 +17% MLCC Violation Reports 9 10 +11% MLCC Applications Investigated 34 49 +44% PATROL BUREAU Activity 2016 Est. 2017 % Change Calls for Service — Police 32,753 32,747 0% Calls for Service — Fire 9,989 9,938 -1% Reports Taken 7,789 7,112 -9% Adult Arrests 6,360 5,106 -18% Juvenile Arrests 120 69 -42% Use of Force Incidents 46 48 +4% Vehicle Pursuits 35 33 -6% TRAFFIC BUREAU Activity 2016 Est. 2017 % Change Drunk Driving Prosecutions 279 270 -3% OWI Vehicle Forfeitures 33 33 0% Traffic Crash Data 203 135 -33 % Property Damage 2591 2270 -12% Injury 734 621 -15% Fatal 2 3 +33% Traffic Crash Totals 3327 2894 -13% Uniform Law Violations 31054 33157 +6% INTELLIGENCE BUREAU (Livonia Team) Activity 2016 Est. 2017 % Change Assigned Cases 1,300 1,150 -11 % Search Warrants 83 70 -15 % Forfeiture Actions 203 135 -33 % DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS The Department of Public Works includes the Public Service Division and the Engineering Division, which operates under the direction of the Director of Public Works. The responsibilities of the two Divisions are as follows: 107 Public Service Division — This Division is responsible for the performance of a wide variety of maintenance functions. These functions range from in-house activities such as building maintenance of all city buildings and vehicle maintenance to the more visible maintenance of public utilities, park sites and roadways. The Public Service Division is comprised of seven sections: Administrative, Equipment Maintenance, Parks & Forestry, Animal Control, Building Maintenance, Roads and Water & Sewer. Engineering Division — The Engineering Division is under the direction of the City Engineer and is responsible for all construction operations within public rights-of- way and/or public easements. The division has provided engineering services as directed by the Mayor, the City Council, other City departments and various Boards and Commissions, as well as for the general public. During the past fiscal year, the work was handled by 10 full-time employees. The department consists of three sections: Administrative, Design and Field. Highlights of the 2017 year's accomplishments include: PUBLIC SERVICE DIVISION Administrative Section • Provided administrative services for the City telecommunications system. • Prepared annual budget submittal for Public Service Division. • Conducted employment interviews. • Administered safety programs within the Department. • Maintained an alcohol and controlled substance testing program per requirements of Federal law. • Prepared monthly payment submittals for solid waste contract. • Administered Recycling Center, City Office Paper Recycling Program, Curbside Recycling Program and Separated Yard Waste Collection Program. • Conducted a Household Hazardous Waste/Electronic Waste Drop -Off Day at Ford Field on Friday, April 28, 2017, and Saturday, April 29, 2017, and publicized the Wayne County events and the Northville event which were held throughout 2017. • Maintained City Type III landfill in compliance with all Federal, State and County requirements. • Prepared and submitted all solid waste reports required by State of Michigan and Wayne County. • Continued community solid waste and recycling educational programs through use of City media. • Prepared and distributed to all Livonia households a Bulk Leaf Pick -Up Program brochure. • Conducted a secure document shredding waste and tire recycling event for Livonia residents at the Livonia DPW yard on September 16, 2017. m • Oversight of Water & Sewer Board, Greenleaf Commission, Tree Committee. • Assisted the Water & Sewer Board in their monthly meetings. For the year October 2016 -October 2017, the W&S Board has received 207 requests for assistance and granted 161 penalty -free extensions. Of the 97 extensions expiring between October 2016 and October 2017, 75% successfully paid off the balance of their water accounts during their extension term, 11 % requested more time, and 11 % failed to pay off their account. ROAD MAINTENANCE SECTION Snow and Ice Control • Maintained roads on primary salt routes 24/7 throughout the 2016-2017 snow season. We used approximately 1,100 tons of salt. • Continued purchasing road salt at the multi -agency consortium pricing of $57.07 per ton. This is considerably less than private contractors were paying. • Performed two citywide major snow event (cycles) last season using DPW forces and contractors. Plowed 370 miles of road each time, and kept 69 miles of primary, industrial and collector roads salted. • Spread slag on gravel roads and parking lots when icy and needed for traction. • Installed snow fence at the most drift -prone locations to prevent roadway drifting, reducing salt use and plowing call -ins. • Provided plowing and ice control services, in conjunction with the Parks section, at municipal buildings, parks and in City -owned public parking lots. • Filled and maintained citizen -access salt barrels at specific locations throughout the city. • Spot salted water break, problem areas and house fire locations, as well as specific locations requested by LPD. • Used dump trucks with live bottoms equipped with brine and a computer - controlled salt applicator. This offers a significant boost to the reliability of the snow removal fleet, as well as reducing even further the amount of salt that needs to be applied for a given snow and ice situation. • Made approximately 36,000 gallons of salt brine. Brine is primarily used to pre -wet road salt so it sticks to the roadway better and activates faster, giving better performance at lower salt application rates. Sweeping, Drainage and Grading • Swept residential roads four times. Industrial and major roads were done twice. • Swept City parking lots twice for events. • Graded all parks, alleys and gravel roads three times using in-house equipment and personnel; did additional spot grading and added gravel as needed. Did not need to hire a contracted road grader to reshape the roads this year. 109 • Reworked drainage ditches, culverts and gravel road surfaces to improve road surface longevity and improve drainage. Re -dug 300+ feet of ditch and replaced two roadway cross tubes where needed. • Applied brine solution to gravel roads citywide three times as needed to solidify the gravel and minimize dust. • Cleaned the inlet grates on the major storm drains throughout the city this year to prevent flooding and erosion damage to the surrounding area. • Removed overgrown vegetation from the major drains, maintained and cut back access roads and trails. • Performed inspections for illicit discharges on 101 storm water outfalls citywide to keep us in compliance with state storm water regulations. Landfill, Transfer Station and Recycling Center • Maintained licensed City landfill, including clay closure cap, underground leachate pumping system, the "active face" dumping area, all exposed slopes, access roads, drainage pipes and ditches in compliance with State of Michigan and Wayne County regulations and inspections. • Sprayed saplings and phragmites (perennial grasses). • Performed a controlled burn with the Livonia Fire Department for additional phragmites regulation. • Composted 66,592 cubic yards of leaves collected from last year's Leaf Pickup Program. This year's program is in progress during the compilation of this report. • Maintained the berm and contact water conveyance system along the limits of the Glendale licensed landfill area to contain and dispose of leachate. • Regraded and re -ditched approximately 150 feet at the City landfill to maintain the separation of storm water and leachate. • Maintained the cardboard, paper, glass, oil, battery and antifreeze recycling facility per County and State regulations, as well as loading yard waste for composting off site. • Maintained the citizen solid waste drop-off/transfer area to County and State specs. • Pumped approximately 3.5 million gallons of leachate contact water from the landfill to be processed at the Detroit sewage treatment plant. • Monitored the contractor bulk brush and woodchip disposal operation in conjunction with the transfer site operation. • Removed the 500 -gallon drum from the oil recycle area and added six tote for more accessibility. Brush Pickup • Conducted a spring cleanup brush sweep of all streets in the city. • Began by -call brush service for the season; responded to requests citywide. There were 2,630 requests for brush pickup this year, with 10,000 -plus stops. 110 • Removed logs from large tree removals and storm cleanups; disposed of chips resulting from stump grinding using various Roads section heavy equipment and dump trucks. • Assisted Forestry with down limbs. Leaf Pickup • Deployed approximately 38 regular and seasonal DPW employees from the Roads, Signs, Parks, Building Maintenance, Forestry, Equipment Maintenance, Water and Sewer sections for a period of six weeks to provide residents with two scheduled leaf pickups. We collected 66,592 cubic yards of bulk leaves last season; this year's program is in progress. • Provided street sweeping to clean paved streets and clear storm drain grates after the final leaf pickup was completed. • Cleaned leaf pickup vehicles, removed and stored truck tailgates, boxes. Construction, Road Maintenance and Miscellaneous • Responded to 3,919 service requests from residents. • Repaired or adjusted 92 manholes, storm drains, catch basins and water gate wells. • Provided and delivered storm and sanitary manhole frames and covers, water gate castings, etc., to contactors doing road replacements in Livonia. These are installed by the contractor while the pavement is out in order to repair or upgrade castings on underground structures that are normally the City's maintenance responsibility. • Repaired or replaced 10 sanitary and storm sewer lines. • Completed 10 asphalt repairs or replacements due to water main breaks, damaged streets and park/golf course pathways. • Patched potholes on 370 miles of City -maintained roads, parking lots and some sites excavated by the Water and Sewer section. Repaired potholes reported on the Pothole Hotline within two business days of the report. • Ramped vertical separations on sidewalks as reported to us by the Law Department, Engineering, Forestry and field staff to maintain safe walkways until the slabs are replaced. • Assembled a selective slab replacement contract to address high priority structure and pavement repairs citywide. This year's list consisted of 33 locations. • Provided major road construction zone signing and barricading when needed. • Used heavy equipment to clear storm -washed trees and logs from primary drains, creeks and rivers. • Maintained access ways to major drains to minimize flood control response time and maintain access for regular maintenance activities. • Picked up and cleaned oil spills, large debris or lost loads from trucks on City streets. • Closed roads, rerouted traffic as needed due to downed power lines, traffic accidents, water main breaks, fallen trees and storm damage. 111 • Provided truck training for approximately ten current and new employees so they could get commercial driver's licenses and be available for snow removal and storm damage cleanup in dump trucks. • Changed truck and tractor attachments (buckets, blades, boxes, tailgates, leaf claws, salt spreaders) from construction season/summer mode to leaf pickup mode, then to winter plowing/salting configuration. • Cleaned debris from outfalls and inlets of major City storm drains to prevent flooding and storm drain backups. • Repaired or replaced four damaged guardrails. • Cut and cleared brush from city -owned alleyways. • Made lawn and/or sprinkler repairs resulting from Water Department and Roads Maintenance activities and occasional snow plow damage at 300 -plus locations. • Repaired or replaced mailboxes after they were damaged or removed during various maintenance and snow removal operations. • Worked with the Forestry section picking up logs and stump chips from various locations throughout the City as well as assisting with the cleanup from the March 2017 windstorm. SIGN MAINTENANCE SECTION • Traffic and Street Name Signs: Replaced or Removed: 600 -plus • Traffic Posts: Replaced or Removed: 200 -plus • Engraved 42 signs for various City departments. • Created outdoor and indoor signage for golf courses, volleyball courts, baseball diamonds, soccer fields, parking lots, City roads, entranceways and buildings. • Assisted with the delivery, setups, signing, snow fencing, barricading and traffic control devices as needed for SPREE, Household Hazardous Waste Day, Passport to Safety, the Save Our Youth run, the electronic waste and tire disposal event, Fire Dept. Open House, Easter Egg Hunt, Rouge Rescue, Music from the Heart, several Wilson Barn shows, the flea market, the Highland Games and additional events at Greenmead, as well as the Memorial Day Ceremony and the Holiday Tree Lighting event. • Maintained traffic control signs (stop, yield, one way, etc.) throughout the city in compliance with the Michigan Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices standards. • Continued upgrading street name signs to conform to new retro -reflectivity standard. • Maintained Cityworks by adding road sign information and updated data to reflect ongoing changes made again this year from Traffic Control Orders to remove stop signs, change speed limits, etc., as well as sign upgrades. • Applied or removed reflective striping, vehicle numbers and City seals to new, repaired or scheduled -for -auction vehicles. • Applied Eyes & Ears stickers to all marked City vehicles. • Handled 213 service requests for making or replacing signs. 112 • Posted grant signs for Parks. • Created and posted all signing for dog park. • Installed posts in various parks to prevent blow -over or intentional tipping of porta johns. • Provided signs and materials for the advance notification signs at subdivision entrances for the Leaf Pickup Program. • Investigated and acted on most non -leaf pickup service requests sent to Roads and Signs sections during the leaf pickup program, including debris in road, damaged guardrail, pothole, equipment damaged mailbox, barricading and flooded road service requests. • Maintained barricades and construction signs for all City departments. • Restriped numerous City parking lots. • Maintained and provided barricades for Council -approved citizen block parties. • Completed emergency road closures and created detours for Livonia P.D., Water Department and contractors working for Engineering. • Removed graffiti from walls and/or pavement. • Assisted with moving and signing LFD over to the old court building while Firehouse #1 is being renovated. ANIMAL CONTROL SECTION The City's Animal Control section provides public services for Livonia residents, businesses and law enforcement agencies. Responsibilities and duties include: • Maintain community standards for Livonia by monitoring animal treatment and wellbeing throughout the community and by reducing animal related nuisances, concerns and dangers. • Maintain public safety as it relates to animal issues. • Provide timely response and assistance to request from residents, businesses, and law enforcement as needed. • Provide 24/7 response to LPD requests for Animal Control related emergencies. • Maintain awareness of changes in state laws related to animals and enforce current standards. Consult with legal department as needed. • Monitor and address quality of animal conditions in Livonia pet stores and kennels. • Educate and advise the public on animal -related issues, including animal welfare and handling, neighborhood pet and wildlife nuisances. • Handle animal bites and enforce rabies quarantines as it pertains to state law. • Provide yearly inspections and monitoring of residences that are found to have vicious or potentially vicious animals, as dictated in Livonia ordinances. Performed the following services for the community in Livonia in 2017: • Patrolled all city neighborhoods, with focus on known problem areas. 113 • Patrolled all city parks to prevent or address patron complaints of dogs off - leash. Continued increased patrols of Rotary Park to reduce the numbers of dogs routinely off -leash. • Patrolled schools and playgrounds. • Coordinated with Ordinance Enforcement on animal -related ordinance issues. • Responded to 879 requests for service. The breakdown of these requests is: 1. 448 dog complaints (67 bites) 2. 207 cat complaints (7 bites) 3. 198 wild life complaints (4 bites) 4. 14 inspections of pet stores (8) and boarding kennels (6) • A total of 407 animals were impounded as a result of these calls. In addition, 160 violations were found and cited. • Completed the National Animal Cruelty Investigations School, professional, advanced and expert levels. Both officers are now "Certified Humane Animal Investigators." Also completed two independent study courses for animals in disaster through FEMA. • Attended the National Animal Care and Control Conference providing training and networking opportunities nationwide. • Provided educational lessons on animal safety to Livonia Little Tots Daycare and Preschool children. • Provided training and ride -a -longs for new animal control officers in the City of Dearborn Heights, City of Dearborn and City of Wayne. FORESTRY SECTION • Achieved Tree City USA status for the 20th year and received our 15th year "growth award." • Continued the young tree -training program for newly planted trees with both City staff and contracted services. • Removed 25 small trees and stumps. • Supervised the removal of 380 street trees and stumps. • Removed approximately 60 mature trees on streets associated with the concrete road replacement program and water main replacement projects. • Supervised the planting of 560 trees associated with the 2017 planting program. Also supervised the warranty replacement of 80 trees from the 2016 program. • Planted three trees relating to the Arbor Day Program at Hoover Elementary. One white pine, one tuliptree, and one sweetgum were planted in Fairway Park. Also, 400 seedling Douglas fir trees were handed out to the children at the school. • Treated approximately 75 wasps' nests with insecticide to kill the wasps, mainly in August and September. • Completed over 400 storm/emergency-related tree requests. The severe wind storm on March 8 generated one-third of the calls. 114 • Received and investigated 1,500 requests for service, of which 1,000 requests were for tree trims. • Performed miscellaneous repairs and blade sharpening on the section's saws and trimming equipment. • Assisted other departments (Water, Engineering, Ordinance, etc.) with emergency tree removals, site inspections and tree inspections. • Performed snow removal operations to City buildings and right-of-way sidewalks. Service included plowing, shoveling and salting. • Coordinated the City's annual Rouge Rescue Day. This year's event was held at Beverly Park. Native plantings, stream bank stabilization, trash removal, and invasive species removal were the focus. Thirty volunteers helped in this cause. • Supervised one contractor who trimmed approximately 3,000 trees in four City sections. These trees were trimmed to current International Society of Arboriculture Standards for street tree elevations. Those standards call for elevations of 16-18 feet over the street and 8-10 feet over the sidewalk. • Residential complaint trimming was severely curtailed for almost a year due to budgetary issues at the end of 2016 and contractual issues through July of 2017. • Tracked gypsy moth populations in Sections 11, 22, and 35 as part of the gypsy moth egg mass survey. No spraying was needed in 2017. Trees at Ford Field are again showing signs of infestation. • Attended these seminars to increase job knowledge: Michigan Nursery and Landscape Association annual meeting; Michigan Green Industry annual meeting; Arborist Society of Michigan annual meeting; Metro Detroit Landscape Association annual meeting; Society of Municipal Arborists; various seminars on chain saw safety; pruning, insect and disease identification, tree climbing, hazard assessment and aerial rescue training; roping and rigging training and equipment repair training. • Responded to 150 tree -planting requests. • Issued 40 planting/removal permits. • Continuously updated the TreeKeeper tree inventory program to accurately reflect our right-of-way tree inventory. • Supervised four contractors in the section. The contractors are the removal contractor, trim contractor, planting contractor, and park tree removal contractor. • Gathered inspection reports, and prepared the 2018 tree removal list. There are 400 trees to be removed and the program will be bid out in November 2017. • Built the 2018 tree planting contract. There are 400 addresses on the planting list. The program will replace trees that were removed in 2017 and the 2017 road construction program. The goal of this program is to replace trees removed in earlier removal programs and to continue to diversify our urban forest. This program was to be bid in November 2017. 115 PARK MAINTENANCE SECTION Athletic Field and Park Maintenance Section • Floated and lined all City baseball/softball diamonds. Also painted soccer field lines on a regular schedule. • Performed all landscape maintenance activities on a regular schedule to all City Parks and buildings. Applied fertilizers/pesticides around all City buildings, Mile road boulevard islands under our care, and prime athletic fields on an as -needed basis. • Aerified prime ball fields and soccer fields to reduce compaction issues. • Performed safety inspections, repairs, and installed 1,200 yards of "Softfall" under playground structures. • Oversaw four contractors doing work for Parks Maintenance. One mowed 27 parks and three cemeteries covering 150 acres. Most of these parks were non -recreational open space. The second contractor maintained irrigation systems and applied fertilizers and pesticides at Wilson Barn, Fire Stations 4, 5 and 6, Sandburg and Noble libraries, and the Six Mile boulevard islands. The third contractor performed maintenance, and repairs on the Plymouth Road irrigation system. Lastly, a tree removal contractor removed 80 trees in several City parks. • Monitored trashcans on athletic fields that GFL couldn't get to. • Continued a cost -savings measure instituted in 2009; weekend trash detail was not performed, saving over 250 hours of overtime expense. • Performed snow removal services for City buildings and Right -of -Way sidewalks leading to Parks on an as -needed basis. This included shoveling, plowing, and salting sidewalks, as well as plowing numerous City -owned parking lots. • Continued renovation of planting beds at the Senior Center, Robert and Janet Bennett Civic Center Library, old Chamber of Commerce building, and Veterans Memorial Park. New material replaced old, overgrown material to ease maintenance requirements. The process began in 2012. • Added sand to all sand volleyball courts in the parks. • Ensured that employees attended safety -training seminars for chain saw operations, athletic field maintenance and playground safety. • Set out and brought in the picnic tables and trash barrels for the picnic season. Repaired tables as needed and ordered new trash cans to replace old cans. • Pruned trees and shrubs in Parks, City buildings, and Athletic Fields where needed. • Assisted with Spree -related activities including set-up, takedown, and trash clean-up. Also repaired damage to Diamonds 3-7 as a result of parked vehicles during Spree. • Completed the installation of two new sand volleyball courts at Clements Circle Park as part of a Housing Department grant. • Completed 120 "Requests for Service" that related to special activities for other City Departments (including delivering, setting up and taking down 116 canopies, tents, picnic tables and garbage cans), delivering and setting up the Showmobile, assisted with Wilson Barn and Greenmead activities, and delivering TEFAP commodities for Community Resources, among other City activities. • Repaired and maintained irrigation systems at Civic Center, Jack E. Kirksey Recreation Center, Ford Field, Bicentennial Park, and Greenmead. • Maintained the fountain at City Hall. • Maintained the Jack E. Kirksey Recreation Center, including soccer field renovations and landscape work. • Cleared deadfall trees and branches off Nature Preserve walkways. Major work was accomplished on the nature trails at Bicentennial Park. • Continued testing vacuum breakers as part of Wayne County's DEQ requirements regarding irrigation systems. • Attempted to maintain ice on the three outdoor ice rinks through the winter of 2017. However, winter conditions did not support ice activities. • Rototilled the community garden twice in 2017 for the gardeners. • Coordinated the maintenance of the PRDA with the 16th District Court work program. • Coordinated the annual port -a -john ordering and unit placement with a contractor. • Worked with the Mayor's office in dealing with unhappy residents and trying to satisfactorily resolve their issues. • Wrote specifications for new equipment that was bid on MITN. Gathered information on surplus equipment auctioned on MITN. • Ordered the annual sidewalk ice melt shipment, fertilizers, garbage bags, dog station waste bags, and chemicals used in the section. • Removed tree forts/hideouts in parks as we became aware of them. • Inspected graffiti issues and asked the 16th District Court for help in dealing with the issues. BUILDING MAINTENANCE SECTION Miscellaneous Repairs and Improvements • Completed 792 work orders through 11/15/2017. • Opened, closed, and winterized City pool buildings and pumps. • Start-up, service and shut -down Landfill, Leachate, lift stations, brine and other pump systems as needed. • Maintained and re-lamped City -owned outside lighting fixtures at various parking lots and buildings; ice rinks, restaurants, golf courses, etc. • Performed preventative maintenance on equipment and appliances. • Semi-annually replaced all flags, unless otherwise requested; maintained flag poles. • Stripped and finished floors in buildings as requested. • Spot and cleaned carpeting in buildings as requested. • Cleaned inside and outside first floor windows on all buildings as needed. 117 • Cleaned exterior windows at City Hall, Libraries, Court and Community Center • Monitored building automation and environmental control systems. • Monitored and maintained electronic and mechanical access systems. • Answered occupant environmental complaints as received. • Performed yearly shut -down services in addition to daily maintenance and custodial assignments at Community Center. • Continued to adjust the custodial job assignments, checklists and service delivery program based on current resources for all buildings. • Tested and treated process water systems. • Assisted with all other departmental projects as requested. • Serviced overhead and pedestrian doors as needed. • Located and installed original bronze City Hall dedication plaque in new City Hall lobby. • Raised 2 overhead door heights on Building #13 to accommodate new vans. Roof Replacement, Maintenance and Repair • Replaced roofing on Police station. • Reroofed Sam's Restaurant. • Replaced section of failed roofing on Senior Center, repaired various other leaking areas. • Recoated north fiberglass roof dome over Courthouse lunchroom. • Repaired leaking roof at Fire Station # 6. • Repaired roof and soffit/facia on north side of Building # 12. Painting • Painted wall area around elevator on fifth floor • Painted area around counters in City Clerk's office • Painted areas in Noble and Sandburg Libraries after new carpet was installed • Painted 5t" floor Gallery • Repainted LPD gas line on roof and exterior of building • Painted concrete walks and curbs in City Hall garage Health, Safety and Energy Conservation • Addressed water back up in buildings as needed. • Serviced Glendale Landfill and Leachate pumps and controllers. • Inspected and cleaned commercial hood and duct systems in Fire Stations. • Tested fire alarms, sprinklers and suppression systems in City buildings. • Maintained compliance with State of Michigan Boiler and Elevator inspections, testing and certifications. • Maintained employee State -required licensing, certifications and training. • Arranged for annual Blood-borne pathogen training for staff. • Exterminated or remove pests and rodents as needed. • Maintained and load -bank tested generators. 118 • Reset all clocks, lighting and equipment and automation systems for time changes. • Cleaned debris and growth from building rooftops, sumps and gutters. • Performed monthly inspections on all boilers. • Cleaned and maintained sump discharge lines at various buildings. Replaced sump pumps at LPD, George Murphy's, 7 Mile & Newburgh lift station. • Cleaned and maintained City lift stations and pumps. • Tested seasonal and fire protection backflow devices; maintained database to track same. • Maintained lighting on Newburgh bridge underpass. • Tested emergency lighting in City buildings. • Continued replacement of burnt out florescent bulbs and inoperable fixtures with LEDs. Continued upgrading lighting in buildings to LEDs; completed City Hall & Annex. • Replaced two furnace and cooling units in Fire Station # 3. • Replaced furnace and cooling unit in building #13. • Two new Building Mechanics obtained CDL licenses. • Replaced swamp cooler for George Murphy's kitchen cooling. • Installed new additional 5 -ton split cooling unit and 600cfm dishwasher exhaust for George Murphy's kitchen; balanced all related systems. • Installed new heating/cooling roof top unit (RTU) for Senior Activity room; removed old boiler. • Replaced two compressors for LPD chiller circuit #1 servicing old section. • Worked on replacement of City Hall Air Handlers 1 & 2. • Worked on replacing existing three energy management systems (Novar, Honeywell and Tridium) and consolidating them to a web -based, non- proprietary open system. • Worked on insulating all City Hall tower office and adjoining walls. • Worked on installing grease traps for LFD kitchens. • Installed new CSI rooftop exhaust system at LPD. • Began replacement of packaged RTU for Fire Station # 4. • Began replacement of heat exchanger for LPD boiler. • Began installation of mini -split cooling system for LPD Radio room. • Began replacement of Bennett Library chiller barrel heads. • Began replacing sump pump controller at old Courthouse. Greenmead • Assisted with all events held on grounds (Highland Games, Flea Markets, Car Shows, Fall Harvest, Red, White & BBQ, Holiday & Halloween Walks etc.). • Installed and removed signage and decorations for Holiday and special events. • Moved, set-up and installed furniture, furnishings and equipment as requested. • Continued maintenance, set-up and custodial services for rentals. • Assisted with construction and maintenance projects as requested. 119 • Inspected and cleaned commercial hood and duct system in Blue house. • Began replacing furnace in Bungalow. Renovation and New Construction • Oversaw and tracked day-to-day activities of City Contractors. • Assisted with Clerk's office remodel and decorating, and re -carpeted new office. • Worked on Clements Circle and Botsford pool house remodels. • Assisted with re -carpeting of Senior Center and Libraries. • Assisted LPD and LFD with remodeling and building projects. Special Projects and Interdepartmental Assistance • Assisted with various City Hall functions as requested. • Provided set up and tear downs for meetings, testing and events as requested. • Maintained facilities leased from the City as per agreements. • Handled citizen complaints as received. • Moved furniture, computers, work stations, and materials and equipment as requested. • Assembled, hung, switched, took apart, repaired and disposed of items in buildings as asked. • Responded to and performed daily maintenance requests on equipment and physical facilities as requested. • Assisted with Senior Citizen shows and events as requested. • Cleaned out grease trap in Senior Center and Blue house kitchens. • Jetted and maintained inside basement drains at Fire Stations and other buildings as needed. • Assisted with snow removal and cycles as requested. • Temporary Assignment personnel to leaf pick-up as needed. • Assisted with special facility projects and repairs at LCRC, pools and parks. • Provided service for golf course buildings as requested. • Administered service contracts for skilled trades contractors. • Seasonally started, shut down, and regularly maintained City HVAC equipment. • Continued ordering, stocking and distributing Personal Protective Equipment and supplies through first quarter of year. • Continued custodial and safety supply procurement and distribution. • Assisted Community Resources with food commodities. • Worked with utilities during events and as needed. • Assisted Parks with maintaining City Hall fountain and various sprinkler system pumps. • Supported employee and departmental activities or concerns as requested. • Replaced grease trap in Senior Center kitchen. • Installed new water fountain/cooler/bottle filler at Rotary Park. 120 Maintained and serviced City's brine producing and chloride systems. Assisted with work related to new DPW Operations building. EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE SECTION Responsibilities of the Equipment Maintenance Section include, but are not limited to, the following: • Maintained existing fleet of all City -owned vehicles and equipment, other than Police and Fire, which is approximately 700 pieces. • Prepared and maintained all seasonal equipment and vehicles, including mowers, leaf and snow removal equipment. • Wrote specifications, ordered, and put into service new equipment as requested by various departments. • Disposed of 63 pieces of unreliable older vehicles and equipment while maintaining fleet size. • Maintained Livonia Senior Center buses. • Maintained and operated City-wide computerized fueling systems at DPW, LPD, Civic Center and Golf Courses. • Placed generators during power outages at required intersections in coordination with Wayne County Signal and LPD. • Set up and monitored annual safety inspections for the man lift, bucket trucks and equipment hoists at both DPW and the Recreation Center. Highlights of 2017: Completed specifications on: • Two single -axle dump trucks for snow removal. • Two tandem -axle dump trucks to be used by the Water department. • Several pickup trucks with upfitting as needed for various departments. • Two Ford F-550 Swap loader to be shared by Water and Roads department with attachments. • Assisted with completing the specifications for Water Department service trucks. • Reviewed specifications for Inspection Department Escapes. • Reviewed specifications for Transit Department buses. Purchased and put into service the following new equipment in 2017. • Two single -axle dump trucks for Roads Department. • Thirteen pickup trucks for use in different sections within the DPW. • Four vans — two to be used by the Water Department and two by Building Maintenance. • Four leaf vacuums. • Two brush chippers. • Excavator and Trailer for use by the Water Department. • Several mowers and gators for Parks department. 121 • Two arrow boards. • Two Transit 350 HD Vans to be used by the Transit Department. • Ford F-150 for the Inspection Department. We have a new equipment mechanic trainee again this year and the first three have advanced to full Mechanic far ahead of schedule. This is a great program! Our propane site has been up running for several years. We are refueling our buses, pickup trucks and mowing equipment regularly. Fabricated two leaf boxes for our new dump trucks. Reassigned some equipment to better serve the department needs and save on purchasing additional equipment that can be shared. Started on the restoration of our 1971 Diamond Reo Wrecker. We are making one useable truck out of two unusable ones. In addition, the staff has been: • Continuing our agreement with Livonia Public Schools, which services our Transit buses and makes necessary repairs to save costs. • Rotating our technicians to attend seminars and fleet motor pool association meetings. This gives them the opportunity to learn firsthand about snow and ice control and reducing costs, using current best practices and equipment. • Meeting with vendors and other communities to learn about new equipment and the current technology. One example is the Swap loader truck that can be shared across many sections all year. • Assisted LPD and other various departments throughout the city with several fabrication and modification projects during the year. • We have completed over 2,200 equipment repair work orders as recorded in the Cityworks system. Performed preventative maintenance work (full vehicle inspection with repairs as needed of oil change, air filters, coolants, tires) on approximately 30-35 vehicles each month, along with other work as requested. WATER AND SEWER OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Sanitary Sewer System • Cleaned 76.31 miles of sanitary sewer lines in 12 city sections by hydrant flushing, water jetting and power cutting roots. • Cleared two sanitary sewer main backups for claims, in accordance with Public Act 222 of 2001. • Responded to and investigated 84 sanitary sewer complaints. • Video inspected approximately six miles of sanitary sewer. • Assisted with cured -in-place pipe (CIPP) lining projects for sanitary sewers. 122 • Cleaned and inspected a total of 121 monthly sanitary specials at 40 locations. • Cleaned and inspected a total of 214 tri -monthly sanitary specials at 73 locations. Storm Sewer System • Responded to 125 storm sewer drainage complaints including perimeter drains, sump pumps, missing structure covers, flooded yards, and flooded streets. • Jet cleaned 16 restricted storm sewer lines, generated from homeowner complaints. • Cleaned 974 storm sewer manholes and catch basins in Sections 34, 35, and 36. • Cleaned 12 Wayne County storm sewer manholes and catch basins on Five Mile Road between Henry Ruff and Melvin. Water Distribution System • Inspected and exercised 730 water gate valves. • Repaired 52 water gate valves and replaced old gland packing with O-ring type. • Low -flow tested, inspected and maintained 22 fire hydrants and exercised the auxiliary valve. • Repaired 22 fire hydrants in the field; painted 877 fire hydrants. • Repaired 190 water main breaks or leaks. • Repaired or replaced 27 water curb stop boxes. • Located and marked over 18,000 locations for Miss Dig system for water and sewer utilities. • Made 28 service line repairs for various reasons. • Disconnected and retired 18 water service lines. • Rebuilt three fire hydrants in shop. • Installed two new water gate valves and one new fire hydrant. • Replaced one Pressure Reducing Valve (PRV) located on Newburgh Road just south of Seven Mile Road. • Rebuilt and repaired one PRV located on Middlebelt Road just south of Eight Mile Road. Water Meter System • Replaced 23 antiquated large commercial water meters. • Repaired 19 large commercial meters. • Replaced 76 water meters (meter only) for various reasons. • Replaced (updated) 1,203 residential water meters and outside readers for various reasons. • Made 3,864 water -related service requests. • Completed 4,395 service slips. 123 • Placed 293 note cards at residential homes requesting to gain access to home for internal meter repairs. • Installed 378 outside touch read device (ORD) systems. • Installed 3,069 (M-2) Flex Net 2 -way radio read device systems. • Established 28 new commercial accounts. • Established 32 new residential accounts. • Installed and removed 285 seasonal irrigation water meters. Special Projects • Replaced the water main along Five Mile Road from Arcola Avenue to Inkster Road. • Assisted with completing the DWRF Project 7356-01 Phase 2 water main replacement project in Section 36. • Assisted with completing the Five Mile Road water main replacement project from just west of Middlebelt to Arcola Avenue in Section 13. • Assisted and supplied new style sanitary, storm, and water casting for the various contractor and consultants for the road repair program. • Coordinated hydrant repair requests for the Livonia Fire Department. • Administered and inspected 60 new water service taps. • Installed second meter reading tower at McNamara senior towers. • Administered cross training with the office staff at front desk due to staff shortages and cross training the water and sewer foremen for handling emergency situations to improve response time. In addition, the operation and maintenance field staff are participating in this job enrichment again this year. • Updated computer programs relating to GIS Arc Map, Water and Sewer, Sensus water meter reading system software and hardware for Logos.net web -based system that is operational for future enhancements. • Assisted Roads with asphalt, concrete, lawn, catch basin and pavement restorations. • Assisted the Engineering Division with water main and fire hydrant replacement. • Eliminated 112 homeowner self -read cards and scheduling water meter appointments to eliminate remaining homeowners' reads and streamlining the water meter reading, thus lowering water -billing complaints. • Continued working on updating the water stop box location, seasonal meter stop box location, and contact information in GIS. • Performed hydrant flow tests for hydraulic water model and ISO rating review process. • Administered the Footing Drain Disconnection program to disconnect up to 50 footing drain connections from the sanitary sewer and install new sump pumps to divert clean ground water into the storm sewer system. • Worked on inventory updating of pricing database for software changes that take place with City Works. • Assisted the Engineering Division with sidewalk, driveway approaches, and 124 major road replacement projects. • Worked with various contractors for road, water, and sewer main installations and repairs. • Checked utility structures before road improvements and then inspected and cleaned catch basins after completion throughout the city. • Assisted with water supply needs for the Livonia Spree and other community events and activities. • Continued the replacement program for antiquated large commercial compound Badger, Hershey FM, and Rockwell water meters prepping for wireless meter reading system. • Continued updating the GIS system for all 36 sections of water main coordinated with the Engineering Division on new project as -built information. • Continued with the US EPA mandated water -sampling report for the Stage 2 Disinfection By -Products (DBP) Program for 2017. Lab results finalized by GLWA in September 2017 for mandatory water sampling and follow up letters with results were sent via USPS to properties that participated in the program. • Completed the 2017 tap water sampling program for lead and copper and submitted the required report to the MDEQ. • Completed the 2017 consumer confidence report for community water supply and distributed report copies to the public as required by the MDEQ. • Received approval for the MDEQ 2016 mandated Sanitary Sewer Operation and Maintenance Program this year. The 2017 report due before January 15, 2018. • City buildings and Golf Courses Storm and Sanitary Sewer Improvements for MDEQ and Wayne County Illicit Discharge Elimination Program (IDEP). • Delivered letters for non-compliance through the backflow and cross connection program with testing and inspections performed monthly city wide by Hydro Corp. • Reviewed design plans for new site development and capital improvement projects for underground utilities. In addition to the operation and maintenance of the public water distribution and sewer collection systems, these sections are also responsible for responding to complaints through field inspection and investigation services of: • Assisting Animal Control, Building Maintenance, Building Inspection, Engineering, Roads, and Water Billing Departments • 2017 Pavement and Sidewalk Repair — Water Main Breaks • 2017 City Wide Sidewalk Program • Continue investigations and documentation regarding claims as needed for MMRMA and the Water and Sewer Board for the hardship cases • Lawsuit and Claims Investigations • Storm Drainage and Catch Basin Complaints • Soil Erosion and Grade Complaints 125 ENGINEERING DIVISION Administrative Section This section prepares reports for the City Council, subdivision bond establishments and releases, and various other reports; reviews the design of public improvements connected to the development of residential subdivisions, commercial and industrial site plans; prepares legal descriptions as required by other departments; and provides technical assistance and advice to administrative and legislative groups within the City as well as State and County governmental units. The Engineering Division is also responsible for the issuance of permits for work in the public rights-of-way and/or easements; along with fielding residential complaints on drainage, sidewalk and road issues; also assisting with other City projects, including the Bicentennial Dog Park and the Greenmead Parking Lot Paving Project. Attendance at Council meetings, various Commissions and citizen meetings for infrastructure improvements is also a function of this section. The Engineering Division was involved with the following matters during 2017, in addition to attending meetings with State and County officials and investigating citizen complaints: • Amrhein Road/Newburgh Road Intersection and Traffic Signal Improvements • Amrhein Road Reconstruction (Eckles to 2,900 feet East of Eckles) • Bike/Walk Improvements on Hubbard (Buchanan Elementary to Rotary Park) Survey and Preliminary Design • Dedication of Sanitary, Storm and Water Main Easements • DTE Streetlight Outage Reporting • DWRF Project 7356-01 Phase II, Sections 34 and 36 Water Main Improvements • Mystic Creek Site Condominium Streetlighting Special Assessment District (SAD) • Perrinville School Relocation Project • Saville Row Site Condominium Streetlighting SAD • SAW Grant Project #1441-01 • Storm Water Management Agreements • SESC Permits and Inspections ■ Five Residential ■ 22 Commercial ■ 5 Utility ■ One City Project • Vacation of Sanitary and Storm Easements • Washington Park Site Condominium Streetlighting SAD • Numerous Pavement Reconstruction and Rehabilitation Projects in conjunction with the Annual Paving Program • Numerous Metro Act Permits for Various Telecommunication Upgrades and Installations 126 • Numerous Utility Permits for Consumers Energy Projects under Annual Permit • 362 Submission Reviews for the Installation of Fiber Optic Cable throughout the City, plus an additional 30 Submission Reviews for Consumers Energy Project • Closed out several MDOT and Wayne County Projects • Updated the City website in regard to the Citywide Pavement Management Program with the renewal millage for the 2017/2018 Road Programs • Annual Permits for Utility Companies performing work in the right-of-way and upgrades before paving contracts Seven site condominium projects and numerous commercial and industrial projects were also reviewed and/or inspected by the Division. • Adams Court Site Condominium (S.W. '/4 of Section 30) • Aletha Apartments (NE '/4 0f Section 21) • Allied Commerce Center — Phase III (31800 Enterprise Drive) • Allied Commerce Center 2013-2015 Site Pavement Utility Improvements, Phase 1 (31800 Enterprise Drive) • Allied Commerce Center — Building No. 6 Addition (31778 Enterprise Drive) • Allied Commerce Center 2014 Site Pavement/Utility Improvements (31800 Enterprise Drive) • Alrig Multi -Tenant Outlot A (29601 Seven Mile Road) • Amrhein Road and Grantland Ave. Monitoring Wells/Soil Gas Probes • Arbor Trail Estates Condominium (SE'/4 of Section 32) • Bishop Estates Site Condominiums (NE '/4 of Section 24) • BJ's Restaurant Brewhouse (19470 Haggerty Road) • Cade Meadows Site Condominiums (SW'/4 of Section 32) • C.N.G. Re -Fueling Station (11801 Farmington Road) • Costco Wholesale Development (20000 Haggerty Road) • Country Fresh Water Main Connection (31770 Enterprise Drive) • Credit Union (20595 Farmington Road) • D-618 Kroger Retail Fuel Center (31338 Five Mile Road) • DPW Complex Building Project • Ford Livonia ATDL (35500 Plymouth Road) • GLR Advanced Recycling, Inc. (12600 Stark Road) • Goodyear (12661 Middlebelt Road) • Hampton Inn — Livonia (28151 Schoolcraft Road) • Holiday Inn Express (27451 Schoolcraft Road) • Holiday Inn — Livonia (17123 N. Laurel Park Drive) • Holy Transfiguration Orthodox Church (36075 Seven Mile Road) • Home Acres Building Addition & Renovations (35766 Industrial Road) • Jimmy John's (33299 Plymouth Road) • Les Tres Amigos Restaurant (29441/29567 Five Mile Road) • Livonia Corporate Center 1& 2 (28101 & 28201 Schoolcraft Road) 127 • Livonia Distribution Center (12200 Middlebelt Road) • Livonia Fire Station No. 1 (Building Addition and Renovation) • Livonia Fire Station No. 6 (Garage Addition) • Livonia Outdoor Storage (33720 Plymouth Road) • Livonia Storage Units (28153 Eight Mile Road) • Lormax Stern Development Livonia (29601, 29659, 29701 Seven Mile Road) • Lube Cube Oil Change (28085 Plymouth Road) • Madonna University Student Housing (14351 & 14363 Levan Road) • Marycrest Heights Senior Village — Phase II (15475 Middlebelt Road) • Masco World Headquarters (17450 College Parkway) • Medora Building Company (13245 Newburgh Road) • Menards (12701 Middlebelt Road) — Detention Pond and Removal of Stockpile • MN Express — Medora Building Company (13520 Merriman Road) • Multi -tenant Retail Building (17108 Farmington Road) • Mystic Creek Site Condominiums (SE'/4 of Section 9) • NYX, Corporation — Proposed Parking Lot Addition (30111 Schoolcraft Road) • NYX, Inc. (38900 Plymouth Road) • NYX, Inc. — Building Expansion Project (38800 Plymouth Road) • Panera Bread (37800 Six Mile Road) • RDNC — Office /Distribution Facility (13000 Eckles Road) • R & D Enterprise — New Driveway Plan (35255 Glendale Ave.) • Retail Development — Menards Outlot Parcel A (12691 Middle Belt Road) • Rosedale Gardens Sub. 04 (9835, 9839, 9843 & 9855 Cranston) • RTI Laboratories — Proposed Building Addition (33080 Industrial Road) • St. Mary Mercy Chapel (36475 Five Mile Road) • Sarah Estates Lane Extension (34618, 34619 and 34622 Sarah Beth Lane) • Schoolcraft College — Ring Road Extension, Parking Lot Improvements and Traffic Signal Improvements (18600 Haggerty Road) • Sheldon Park Village Development (33111 Plymouth Road) • Simply Self Storage (11960 Farmington Road) • Sonic America's Drive -In (29622 Seven Mile Road) • Stevenson High School Renovations & Addition (33500 Six Mile Road) • Trinity Health Victor Parkway — Proposed Pedestrian and Sidewalk Improvements • Washington Park Site Condominium (S.W. '/4 of Section 31) • William Finishing (13170 Merriman Road) • Zeal Credit Union (15950 Middlebelt Road) • Zeal Credit Union (17250 Newburgh Road) 128 Design Section This section, in conjunction with the Administrative Section, prepares plans, specifications and bidding documents for the City's public improvement projects. It also prepares legal descriptions as needed. In addition, this section provides utility information to the public, assigns addresses and reviews residential site plans. The following major projects were designed and/or built in 2017: • 2017 Pavement Joint and Crack Sealing Program • 2017 Lane Line Marking Program • 2017 Pavement and Sidewalk Repair — Water Main Breaks • 2017 Selective Slab Replacement Program • 2017 Sidewalk Program Field Section This section, in conjunction with the Administrative Section and the Design Section, prepares, administrates and provides all field inspection and survey services in connection with contract plans and specifications for projects constructed under the jurisdiction of the Engineering Division, as well as all subdivision and commercial developments involving the installation of public improvements. Inspection and surveying services provided for projects valued at approximately $1,129,047 were handled by the division during the past year. These are summarized as follows: • 2017 Pavement Joint and Crack Sealing Program = $185,000 • 2017 Lane Line Marking Program = $120,000 • 2017 Pavement and Sidewalk Repair — Water Main Breaks = $145,618 • 2017 Selective Slab Replacement Program = $130,000 • 2017 Sidewalk Program = $548,429 • 2017 Sidewalk Program = $5,000 (Precision Concrete Cutting) In addition to the public improvement contracts, this section was also responsible for the field inspection and survey services of: • All inspection of work under permits numbers 17-001 through 17-529 • Lawsuit Investigations • Drainage Complaints • Catch Basin Complaints • Soil Erosion Permits • Grade Inspections • Landfill permit renewal and application 129 • Ditching and Ditch Cleanouts as Requested by the Department of Public Works • Commercial Site Sedimentation Basin Inspections, including the related letters and follow up of the clean outs • Residential Plot Plan Review and Grade Certificates • Installation of Public Utilities • Inspection of various paving projects LIVONIA TRAFFIC COMMISSION The Traffic Commission is responsible for the planning, coordination, and determination of proposed traffic control devices to improve traffic flow and to provide maximum safety for all drivers, pedestrians and property. As provided by the City Charter, the Commission consists of seven citizens who are appointed by the Mayor. The Commission meets once a month to discuss and implement traffic control measures that are brought to its attention by citizens as well as by other City departments. The Commissioners work in conjunction with the Traffic Bureau of the Police Department. SIGNIFICANT ISSUES IN 2017 Again this year, the Traffic Commission faced many concerns and issues from residents and neighborhood groups. In general, the commission focused on timely responses to these concerns and requests. In total, the Commission approved approximately 10 Traffic Control Orders in 2017. Commissioner Debra Murphy resigned early in the year and Joel Turbiak accepted the open position. Joel has contributed to the mission of the commission and we look forward to developing his skills. The biggest focus of the commission this year was on advisory signs, such as "No Parking" and Speed Limit signs. The Commission placed several Speed Limit signs at subdivision entry points off the major mile roads in the city and Handicap Informational signs. Several studies were conducted by the Police Department for proper speed limit signs. Some of these locations included: • Hillcrest Street handicap signs study, section 35 • Yale Street, Plymouth to West Chicago Roads, section 32 • Speed and "Yield" signs on Norwich and Rayburn Streets, section 16 130 The Commission is presently working with the neighborhood residents on Yale to Plymouth Roads to address their concerns with traffic speeds and proper signage in the area, section 32. The Commission also approved several "No Outlet" and "No Parking" signs at appropriate locations making sure motorists are aware that those particular streets do not go through and easing concerns of the residents seeing cars frequently turning around in their driveways. During the year, a resident from section 17, Levan Road north of Five Mile at Hoover Elementary School, expressed concern with vehicle safety and speeding and her concerns were addressed. Also, in section 6. Livonia Hills Estate, Eight Mile and Newburgh Roads, requests from residents were received for the realignment of the roadway and placement of additional traffic signals on Eight Mile Road. This concern was directed to the City's Engineering Department and County and State representatives for their considerations. Earlier this year, the Traffic Commission exchanged organization, management structure and approval process with the City Manager from Morristown, West Virginia. This discussion and sharing of ideas were a follow up to an electronic mail request from Morristown for assistance and support. The Commission, along with the Livonia Police Traffic Bureau, continues to respond to all citizen inquiries, comments or questions coming into their respective offices. Throughout the year, numerous telephone calls, e-mails and other forms of communication are received by city officials. These communications from residents include concerns and recommendations such as requests for deer crossing signs, traffic light bulbs requiring replacement, and speeding in the area. This involvement from the community is very helpful to correct and protect the safety of the community. This year, a portable speed sign device was purchased by the Police Department and has provided very useful data. CONCLUSION The work done by the Commission, in conjunction with the Livonia Police Traffic Bureau, continues to benefit the city and its residents. The Traffic Commission will continue to monitor the changes it has made over the past several years and adjust accordingly as needed. The Commission will also continue to monitor traffic and parking conditions within the City and will be particularly concerned with monitoring areas of redevelopment and construction, helping to ensure that Livonia's streets and highways will continue to be safe and well maintained. 131 The continued support from both the Engineering Department and the Police Traffic Bureau aided significantly to the success of the Traffic Commission in meeting the needs of citizens throughout the city. The biggest area of challenge during 2017 was managing the on-going traffic flows and road closures throughout the city. Throughout the year, numerous construction projects were completed safely, including Plymouth and Farmington Roads. The Police and Engineering Departments, working along with the Wayne County Traffic Bureau, retimed and engineered several traffic devices, including signals, throughout Livonia for better traffic flow. Our thanks for all their efforts and their communications with the Traffic Commission. The closure of the M-5 connector contributed to significant traffic congestion for many of the major north -south roadways such as Newburgh, Levan, and Farmington Roads. This created a demand on all local resources from the police and engineering department; they all worked well together and we thank them. We believe the Police and Engineering Departments should continue to evaluate new traffic technology as it becomes available and determine if it can benefit or improve traffic studies and lead to safety improvements. The Traffic Commission will continue to review and evaluate all traffic control devices throughout the city. TREASURER The Treasurer's Department is responsible for collection, disbursement and custody of all revenues belonging to and held in trust by the City. All funds collected by City agencies are transmitted to the Treasurer, then verified, recorded, deposited and reported daily to the Finance Department. In addition, the Treasurer's Office, on instruction from the Finance Director, transmits instructions for the daily investment of City funds among City banks to maximize the interest on its holdings. The Treasurer's Office has strict procedures in place regarding the handling of City funds. All departments issue numbered receipts and deliver collected funds to the Treasurer's Office for daily processing. ADMINISTRATION The Treasurer's Department continues to utilize the BS&A Tax Software for printing our tax bills allowing better control of individualized information. This allows the department to print additional information right on the bill rather than include an additional insert with the tax bill. The department used a local printing/mailing company with capabilities to reduce the mailing costs and increase the efficiency of mailing. By using the same procedure in 2017, we continue to save over $2,000 for the fiscal year in printing and paper expense. The tax software also allows us to print a postal bar code to reduce the amount of first class 132 postage charged for mailing by $.07 per piece resulting in a postage savings of over $5,600 per year. The Treasurer's Office sent letters to real and personal property taxpayers whose taxes for the 2016 tax year had not been paid by February 14, 2017, as has been our past practice. A total of 3,867 reminder letters were mailed. Letters were also mailed to 1,969 real & personal property taxpayers who had not paid their taxes by the due date for the summer 2017 season. The Treasurer's Office is responsible for monitoring and maintaining the files on bankruptcy cases. Proof of Claims for personal property taxes are filed with the courts by the City Treasurer. In 2017, nine businesses with locations in Livonia filed for bankruptcy protection as compared to two in 2016, three in 2015, six in 2014, five in 2013, and 17 businesses in 2012. Applications to pay property taxes electronically are available on the City's website and by request. Again, we have seen a slight decrease in the number of taxpayers utilizing electronic funds transfer for payment of tax bills. During the summer 2017 season, 1,760 taxpayers participated in this convenient and no -cost service as compared to 1,818 during the summer of 2016, 1,853 during the summer of 2015, 1,939 during the summer of 2014, and 2,017 during the summer of 2013. The winter tax bill EFT payments are similar in count per tax year. We continue to offer credit/debit card transactions at the counter for tax payments only. Chase Bank retains the fees, which are currently 2.5% for credit transactions, and a flat $3.95 fee for debit card transactions; there is no transaction fee charged by the City. Payment options are printed on the back of the tax bills and on the City's website. Tax bills can still be paid by phone or online with a credit card through ACI Worldwide/Official Payments Corporation. This information is detailed on the City's website and is on the back of the tax bill. There is a convenience fee of approximately 3% collected and retained by ACI Worldwide/Official Payments Corporation for this service. TAX COLLECTIONS There are approximately 44,300 taxable parcels in the City. The breakdown follows: 2014 2015 2016 2017 Real Property 39,742 39,730 39,763 39,893 Personal 5,537 4,271 4,270 4,377 Property IFT 152 133 120 47 TOTALS 45,431 44,134 44,153 44,317 133 Fifty-nine percent of residents are responsible for paying their own property tax bills. Mortgage companies pay 41 % of the real property tax bills. The total number of original tax bills mailed for Summer and Winter was 84,523. The tax levy breakdown for Ad Valorem and Special Act parcels is as follows, and is accurate for Winter 2016 as of March 1, 2017, and accurate for Summer 2017 as of November 30, 2017: 134 REAL PERSONAL TOTAL City of Livonia $49,254,579 $4,879,890 $54,134,469 Livonia Public Schools Operating 18,110,217 2,051,752 20,161,969 Debt 15,473,284 1,444,285 16,917,569 Sinking Fund 3,810,105 355,665 4,165,770 RESA Spec Ed 11,644,257 1,002,584 12,646,841 RESA Operating 333,475 28,716 362,191 Clarenceville Schools Operating 1,271,973 85,769 1,357,742 Debt 0 0 0 Sinking Fund 808,963 45,234 854,197 OISD Spec Ed 559,310 31,461 590,771 OISD Operating 35,328 1,987 37,315 State Education Tax 21,845,548 1,396,286 23,241,834 Schoolcraft College 6,461,935 546,849 7,008,784 Wayne County 24,042,015 2,085,101 26,127,116 Wayne County Jail 3,314,999 328,432 3,643,431 Wayne County Parks 868,799 86,079 954,878 HCMA 758,189 75,124 833,313 Zoo Authority 353,218 35,005 388,223 Art Institute 706,520 70,015 776,535 PRDA 487,121 179,950 667,071 WC Resa Enhancement 6,913,888 595,381 7,509,269 Special Assessments 3,045,565 0 3,045,565 TOTAL $170,099,288 $15,325,565 $185,424,853 134 DELINQUENT TAX COLLECTIONS City Treasurer, Lynda Scheel, and her staff collect delinquent personal property taxes by making regular visits to the businesses, follow-up phone calls and written communication. The personal property collections breakdown is: Tax Year Prior 2012 Years # of Parcels Due as of 11/30/17 Collected FY 16-17 373 2013 2014 2015 2016 371 340 251 199 568,535 578,239 506,283 322,050 117,819 $106,975 $55,862 $72,325 $74,267 $153,509 $234,083 Delinquent personal property collections in Fiscal year 2016-17 totaled $697,021 OTHER COLLECTIONS The Treasurer's Office is responsible for invoicing properties that are in violation of the Noxious Weed Ordinance and for any special assessments authorized by Council during the year. The Treasurer's Office also processes the payments for these special assessments. In 2017, the Treasurer's office issued 301 weed invoices as compared to 393 for 2016, 535 for 2015, 734 for 2014, 868 for 2013, and 821 for 2012. Special Assessment breakdown as follows: Special # of Parcels $ Amount # of Parcels $ Amount Assessment Billed on Billed on Billed on Billed on Districts 2016 Tax 2016 Tax 2017 Tax 2017 Tax Sidewalk 85 35,320 65 27,617 Paving 18 10,180 10 6,218 Lighting 14,055 1,242,895 14,076 1,279,619 Weeds 134 36,634 115 26,607 Blight 10 2,954 3 2,520 Drains 2,591 33,432 2,591 7,291 Sanitary Sewer 3 40,924 2 26,528 Stream Bank Stabilization 6 9,996 5 8,170 Delinquent Water 1,664 1,661,506 1,673 1,773,179 TOTALS 18,566 $3,073,841 18,540 $3,157,749 135 TELLER COLLECTIONS The Treasurer's three tellers processed $249,328,157 in cash, checks, and credit cards for the following items during the course of conducting City business: property taxes, water bills, the greens fees for the City's three municipal golf courses, Livonia Community Recreation Center memberships and fees, park permits, fees for swimming and skating, registration fees for Parks and Recreation league sports, inspection and engineering permit and bond fees, licenses, the fees for the City's three libraries, Police Department adjudicated, non -adjudicated drug, fees for City sponsored special events such as the Highland Games and the Arts & Craft fair, false alarm charges, accounts receivable items, SMART bus ticket sales, City garage sale, fees for using the City Dump, Police auction, rent payments for Silver Village, Newburgh Village, McNamara Towers and city -owned homes, record duplication fees, etc. Of the amounts collected, $56,173,261 was for the general deposit items and $193,154,896 was for property taxes. The tellers also receive walk-in water payments from residents. During this fiscal year, 11,714 water customers were assisted at the Treasurer's Office counter. The busiest day was September 11, 2017, with 346 water bills being processed. The average number of water bills processed was 48 per day. Due to the changes in receipting water bill payments over the last year, the total dollars collected were processed along with the Water Department's deposits. DISBURSEMENTS All payable checks are released through the Treasurer's Office on approval of the Finance Director and the City Clerk (internal auditor). Payroll is a direct deposit. The number of checks processed is as follows: 2014 Vendor Checks -City & Court 14,444 136 2015 2016 2017 13,849 14,774 14,348